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Keyword: thorheyerdahl

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  • Thor Heyerdahl. The raft was named Kon-Tiki

    04/26/2016 8:47:34 PM PDT · by Rabin · 21 replies
    linkedin ^ | Apr 26, 2016 | gary bubb
    Solar Impulse is a Swiss long-range experimental solar-powered aircraft project, The privately financed project is led by Swiss engineer and businessman André Borschberg and Swiss psychiatrist and aeronaut Bertrand Piccard, who co-piloted Breitling Orbiter 3, the first balloon to circle the world non-stop. The Solar Impulse will to achieve the first circumnavigation of the Earth by a piloted fixed-wing aircraft using captured energy rather than recovered fuel. In March 2015, Piccard and Borschberg began to circumnavigate the globe with Solar Impulse 2, departing from Abu Dhabi. By June 2015, SI2 had traversed Asia, and notably, by July 2015, it completed...
  • Voyage To Prove Pharaohs Traded Cocaine

    05/29/2007 6:47:52 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 1,641+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-30-2007 | Tom Leonard
    Voyage to prove pharaohs traded cocaine By Tom Leonard in New York Last Updated: 2:21am BST 30/05/2007 An adventurer who believes that ancient man regularly crossed the Atlantic Ocean 14,000 years ago plans to recreate such a voyage in a 41ft raft made of reeds and eucalyptus tree branches. Basing his theory on the thinnest of historical evidence, Dominique Gorlitz believes that the discovery of traces of tobacco and cocaine in the tomb of the pharaoh Rameses II proves that there was trade between the Old and New Worlds. He also claims that 14,000-year-old cave paintings in Spain show that,...
  • Ancient Navigators Could Have Measured Longitude -- in Egypt in 232 B.C. !

    01/12/2003 11:19:24 AM PST · by ex-Texan · 102 replies · 4,753+ views
    Ancient Navigators Could Have Measured Longitude -- in Egypt in 232 B.C. !by Rick Sanders Around the year 232 B.C., Captain Rata and Navigator Maui set out with a flotilla of ships from Egypt in an attempt to circumnavigate the Earth. On the night of August 6-7, 2001, between the hours of 11 PM and 3 AM, this writer, and fellow amateur astronomer Bert Cooper, proved in principle that Captain Rata and Navigator Maui could have known and charted their location, by longitude, most of the time during that voyage. The Maui expedition was under the guidance of Eratosthenes, the...
  • Polynesian mtDNA in extinct Amerindians from Brazil

    04/04/2013 11:01:14 AM PDT · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Dienekes' Anthropology blog ^ | 03 April 2013 | Dienekes' Anthropology blog
    From the paper: In 1808 the Portuguese Crown declared “Just War” (Bellumiustum) against all Indian tribes that did not accept European laws (23). The fierce Botocudo were targeted in such wars and, in consequence, became virtually extinct by the end of the 19th century (24). Their importance for the history of the peopling of the Americas was revealed by studies reporting that the Botocudo had cranial features that consistently were described as intermediate between the polar Paleoamerican and Mongoloid morphologies (25, 26). Multivariate analyses of the cranial measures of different Amerindian and Paleoamerican groups from Brazil indeed concluded that the...
  • Did Early Humans Ride the Waves to Australia?

    02/05/2012 5:09:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Mind & Matter 'blog (WSJ) ^ | Saturday, February 4, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    For a long time, scientists had assumed a gradual expansion of African people through Sinai into both Europe and Asia. Then, bizarrely, it became clear from both genetics and archaeology that Europe was peopled later (after 40,000 years ago) than Australia (before 50,000 years ago). Meanwhile, the geneticists were beginning to insist that many Africans and all non-Africans shared closely related DNA sequences that originated only after about 70,000-60,000 years ago in Africa. So a new idea was born, sometimes called the "beachcomber express," in which the first ex-Africans were seashore dwellers who spread rapidly around the coast of the...
  • Australian Aborigines Were Once Indians - Study

    07/22/2009 5:57:18 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies · 691+ views
    Scientific Blogging ^ | July 21st 2009 | News Staff
    New genetic research in BMC Evolutionary Biology found telltale mutations in modern-day Indian populations that are exclusively shared by Aborigines. The new study indicates that Australian Aborigines initially arrived via south Asia. Dr Raghavendra Rao worked with a team of researchers from the Anthropological Survey of India to sequence 966 complete mitochondrial DNA genomes from Indian 'relic populations'. He said, "Mitochondrial DNA is inherited only from the mother and so allows us to accurately trace ancestry. We found certain mutations in the DNA sequences of the Indian tribes we sampled that are specific to Australian Aborigines. This shared ancestry suggests...
  • Chicken bones show Polynesians went to Chile (Told ya so!)

    06/05/2007 5:31:36 AM PDT · by DieHard the Hunter · 47 replies · 1,115+ views
    Reuters ^ | 5 June 2007 | Maggie Fox
    Chicken bones show Polynesians went to Chile By MAGGIE FOX - Reuters | Tuesday, 5 June 2007 A chicken bone found in Chile provides solid evidence to settle a debate over whether Polynesians travelling on rafts visited South America thousands of years ago – or vice versa, New Zealand researchers have said. The DNA in the bone carries a rare mutation that links it to chickens in Tonga and Samoa, and radiocarbon dating shows it is around 600 years old – meaning it predates the arrival of Spanish conquerors in South America. "These chickens are related to hens from Polynesia,"...
  • Polynesians Beat Columbus To The Americas

    06/04/2007 5:58:20 PM PDT · by blam · 84 replies · 2,081+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 6-4-2007 | Emma Young
    Polynesians beat Columbus to the Americas 22:00 04 June 2007 NewScientist.com news service Emma Young Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Prehistoric Polynesians beat Europeans to the Americas, according to a new analysis of chicken bones. The work provides the first firm evidence that ancient Polynesians voyaged as far as South America, and also strongly suggests that they were responsible for the introduction of chickens to the continent - a question that has been hotly debated for more than 30 years. Chilean archaeologists working at the site of El Arenal-1, on the Arauco Peninsula in south-central Chile, discovered what...
  • Kon-Tiki Replica To Sail, Study Pacific In 2005

    09/06/2004 4:20:33 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 1,087+ views
    ABC Science News ^ | 9-6-2004 | Alister Doyle
    Kon-Tiki Replica to Sail, Study Pacific in 2005 Sept. 6, 2004 — By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - A replica of the Kon-Tiki balsa raft will sail the Pacific in 2005 to study mounting environmental threats to the oceans since Thor Heyerdahl made his daredevil 1947 voyage, organizers said on Monday. One of Heyerdahl's grandsons will be among the six-strong crew for the trip from Peru aiming to reach Tahiti, about 310 miles west of the Raroia atoll where the Kon-Tiki ran aground after traveling 4,970 miles in 101 days. Heyerdahl's original voyage defied many experts' predictions that...
  • Explorer Thor Heyerdahl, 87, Dies

    04/19/2002 3:19:18 AM PDT · by Vigilant1 · 36 replies · 896+ views
    AP, via Newsday.com ^ | 19 April 2002 | DOUG MELLGREN
    By DOUG MELLGREN, Associated Press Writer April 19, 2002, 4:42 AM EDT OSLO, Norway -- Thor Heyerdahl, the Norwegian explorer who crossed the Pacific on a balsa log raft to prove his theories of human migration, has died at 87. Heyerdahl, whose book "Kon-Tiki" on the daring 101-day voyage sold millions of copies, stopped taking food, water or medication in early April after being diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor. He died Thursday night in his sleep at home in Colla Michari, Italy, said his son, Thor Heyerdahl Jr. Heyerdahl had been hospitalized near there in late March when he...
  • Norwegian Adventurer Heyerdahl Dies

    04/18/2002 4:59:39 PM PDT · by kattracks · 67 replies · 353+ views
    AP | DOUG MELLGREN
    OSLO, Norway, Apr 18, 2002 (AP Online via COMTEX) -- Thor Heyerdahl, the Norwegian adventurer who crossed the Pacific on a balsa log raft and detailed his harrowing 101-day voyage in the book "Kon-Tiki," died Thursday night. He was 87. Heyerdahl stopped taking food, water or medication in early April after being diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor. "Norway has lost an original and spectacular researcher, explorer and adventurer," Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik said. Experts scoffed at Heyerdahl when he set off to cross the Pacific aboard a balsa raft in 1947, saying it would get water logged...
  • Kon-Tiki tour draws to a close (Thor Heyerdahl just about dead)

    04/17/2002 9:32:14 AM PDT · by dead · 23 replies · 555+ views
    Sydney Morning Herald ^ | April 18 2002
    One of the greatest adventure stories of all time is about to end with the death of a controversial Norwegian explorer. Thor Heyerdahl, skipper of the famous raft Kon-Tiki. Thor Heyerdahl, 87, who won worldwide acclaim in 1947 for his daring Kon-Tiki expedition, is greeting his demise with all the eccentricity with which he lived his life. Heyerdahl lapsed into a coma on Tuesday, a week after he started refusing food, water and medical treatment. The scientist and adventurer had been taken to the Santa Conora hospital on the Italian Riviera over Easter after becoming ill during a family gathering...
  • One man's mission to become the first person to swim across the Atlantic Ocean

    10/17/2015 11:47:33 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 38 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Harry Wallop
    Some time in December, Ben Hooper will step on to a beach in Dakar, Senegal, and plunge into the warm blue waters of the Atlantic. He will not stop swimming until he hits Natal in Brazil. The distance is 1,763 miles. But that’s only if he goes in a straight line. And swimming across the Atlantic in a straight line is a bad idea: “The currents in the centre are so strong, I’d never get there. It’s an absolute car wreck in the centre. Great for rowers, great for sailors, horrible for swimmers,” he says. Instead he will go in...
  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    12/19/2014 11:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Tuesday, 16 December 2014 | Ms Monica Tromp
    Known to its Polynesian inhabitants as Rapa Nui, Easter Island is thought to have been colonised around the 13th Century and is famed for its mysterious large stone statues or moai. Otago Anatomy PhD student Monica Tromp and Idaho State University’s Dr John Dudgeon have just published new research clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been a staple plant food for Rapa Nui’s population over several centuries. However, no other line of archaeological or ethnohistoric evidence supports palm having a dietary role on Easter Island; in fact evidence points to the palm becoming extinct soon...
  • Mysterious Easter Island Heads Have Bodies Too

    Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of visitors to the island have been astonished to see that, indeed, Easter Island statues have bodies
  • July 11 Total Eclipse Among the Mysterious Moai

    07/10/2010 3:57:06 PM PDT · by combat_boots · 12 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 9 July 2010 | Written by Nancy Atkinson
    A group of astronomers are now on the mysterious Easter Island, one of the few solid places to stand on Earth where a total solar eclipse will be visible on July 11, 2010. The majority of the eclipse's path is over the ocean, so this will be one of the least observed eclipses ever. "This is one of the most interesting things that is possible for anyone on Earth to see in one of the most interesting places on the Earth that people can go," said Jay Pasachoff from Williams College, who is the Chair of the International Astronomical Union's...
  • Easter Island's Ancient Inhabitants Weren't So Lonely After All

    10/23/2014 2:15:04 PM PDT · by blam · 21 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 10-23-2014 | Will Dunham, Reuters
    Will Dunham October 23, 2014 They lived on a remote dot of land in the middle of the Pacific, 2,300 miles (3,700 km) west of South America and 1,100 miles (1,770 km) from the closest island, erecting huge stone figures that still stare enigmatically from the hillsides. But the ancient Polynesian people who populated Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, were not as isolated as long believed. Scientists who conducted a genetic study, published on Thursday in the journal Current Biology, found these ancient people had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years before the first Westerners reached the...
  • Ancient Vessel Traces Voyages Of The Past

    06/13/2002 2:31:03 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 2,402+ views
    Cyprus Mail ^ | 6-13-2002
    Ancient vessel retraces voyages of the past By Stefanos Evripidou IT LOOKS like a tree house stuck on a bamboo banana. In reality it's the incarnation of a pre-Pharaonic reed boat, designed and built to unravel the mysteries of prehistoric navigation. The Abora II drifted in to Larnaca marina yesterday. Weighing in at six- tonnes, the vessel is a totra-reed boat. It is 11.5 metres long, 3.5 metres wide and 1.5 metres deep. The man responsible for building the huge boat is Dominique Goerlitz, a biology teacher at a school in Germany. As a student, Goerlitz was fascinated by the...
  • (Prince) Madoc In America

    07/10/2003 5:56:52 PM PDT · by blam · 76 replies · 7,275+ views
    Madoc In AmericaNative American Histories in the USA Is truth stranger than fiction? Of course it is; it always has been One subject that has been debated for the last four hundred years was whether or not a Khumric-Welsh Prince called Madoc discovered America. Queen Elizabeth I was persuaded by her advisors that this was so and the Khumric-Welsh discovery was put forward as somehow giving England a prior claim in the political wrangles over first rights in the New World of the Americas. No one ever thought to investigate the British records. Caradoc of Llancarfan wrote about it circa...
  • New study challenges theories on Easter Island collapse

    12/12/2013 11:08:52 AM PST · by Theoria · 52 replies
    KITV ^ | 10 Dec 2013 | KITV
    Bishop Museum's Dr. Mulrooney conducted 6-year study on Rapa Nui Bishop Museum's assistant anthropologist, Dr. Mara Mulrooney, conducted a six-year study on Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, about the island's theoretical civilization collapse. Results from her groundbreaking doctoral dissertation entitled "Continuity or Collapse? Diachronic Settlement and Land Use in Hanga Ho'onu, Rapa Nui (Easter Island)" are outlined in an article published in the December issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. This new evidence debunks previous theories that the islanders "self-destructed" before Europeans first visited in 1722. As popularized in Jared Diamond's 2005 book Collapse, Rapa Nui is...