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Keyword: uruk

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  • Scientific Team Finds On Of World's Oldest Cities

    02/22/2007 10:52:14 AM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 855+ views
    Expatica ^ | 2-22-2007
    Scientific team finds one of world's oldest cities 22 February 2007 MADRID - A Spanish scientific team found one of the world's oldest cities, thought to be about 5,500 years old, in Syria. The discovery, based on pottery fragments and other ceramics found at the site, was announced in Madrid by two of the scientists in charge of the investigation, Ignacio Marquez of Spain's CSIC scientific research council and Juan Luis Moreno of the Universidad de La Coruña. According to reports, the find is of "the highest level" of scientific importance because of its ramifications for the understanding of history...
  • Uruk – 5000 Years of the Megacity

    01/09/2013 4:13:48 AM PST · by Renfield · 19 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 1-8-2013
    Exactly one hundred years ago, finds from an excavation in the south of present-day Iraq sent shockwaves around the academic world as archaeologists working at the site of the Mesopotamian city of Uruk, (modern day Warka in Iraq), brought to light the first known urban culture.Uruk the first city of Sumer For thousands of years, southern Mesopotamia was home to hunters, fishers and farmers exploiting the fertile soil and abundant wildlife, but by 3200 B.C., the largest settlement in southern Mesopotamia, if not the world, was Uruk: a true city dominated by monumental buildings of mudbrick decorated with painted clay...
  • Did Uruk soldiers kill their own people? 5,500 year old fratricide at Hamoukar Syria

    09/24/2010 3:17:03 PM PDT · by Little Bill · 42 replies
    heritage-key.com ^ | 09/23/2010 | owenjarus
    Five years ago an archaeological team broke news of a major find that forever changed our views about the history of the Middle East. Researchers from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, and the Department of Antiquities in Syria, announced in a press release that they had found the “earliest evidence for large scale organized warfare in the Mesopotamian world.” They had discovered that a city in Syria, named Hamoukar, had been destroyed in a battle that took place ca. 3500 BC by a hostile force. Using slings and clay bullets these troops took over the city, burning...
  • IRAQ: Gilgamesh tomb believed found

    04/29/2003 6:13:45 AM PDT · by Constitution Day · 59 replies · 1,728+ views
    BBC News Online ^ | Tuesday, 29 April, 2003 | BBC staff
    Gilgamesh tomb believed found Archaeologists in Iraq believe they may have found the lost tomb of King Gilgamesh - the subject of the oldest book in history. The Epic Of Gilgamesh - written by a Middle Eastern scholar 2,500 years before the birth of Christ - commemorated the life of the ruler of the city of Uruk, from which Iraq gets its name. Now a German-led expedition has discovered what is thought to be the entire city of Uruk - including, where the Euphrates once flowed, the last resting place of its famous King. "I don't want to say...
  • Can Technology Discover the Ancient City of Gilgamesh?

    01/11/2003 2:09:33 PM PST · by vannrox · 14 replies · 559+ views
    Biblical Archaelogical Review ^ | FR Post 1-10-3 | Editorial Staff
    Surveying the Walls of Uruk Can Technology Discover the Ancient City of Gilgamesh? German archaeologists working at the ancient site of Uruk (modern Warka, just east of the Euphrates River in southern Iraq) have begun mapping the canals, walls and building foundations of the sprawling, buried city—without even lifting a spade. Over the past two winters, a team headed by Margarete van Ess of Berlin’s German Archaeology Institute has laid out a grid system over the site and begun to map the buried ruins with a magnetometer an instrument that measures differences in the strength of the earth’s magnetic field...