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Hunger Games: An eerie reflection of our “new American society”
Tea Party Nation ^ | April 1, 2012 | Dr. Rich Swier

Posted on 04/01/2012 3:14:31 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

My wife and I went to watch the blockbuster movie “The Hunger Games”. Before going to the movie I already understood that the ruling class, so expertly portrayed in Hunger Games, does in fact exist here in America.

Hunger Games is not science fiction; rather it is an eerie reflection of our “new American society”.

In Hunger Games the citizens of twelve fictional colonies do not govern themselves but rather are kept in a perpetual state of hunger by a “new upper class” that has arisen from the ashes of a nuclear war. In the book there are rumors of a thirteenth colony, sound familiar? The rational for their totalitarian policies is to prevent another war (rebellion). Citizens of each colony are allowed to produce a unique product (e.g. food, fuel, and clothing), which is then redistributed to the other colonies under the strict control of the new upper class. Annually children are selected from each colony for sacrifice upon the alter of the central government called the Hunger Game.

I read two books recently that describe a new American society not unlike that portrayed in The Hunger Game: Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 by Charles Murray and The Ruling Class: How they Corrupted America and what we can do about it... by Professor Angelo M. Codevilla.

Charles Murray describes two fictional neighborhoods called Belmont and Fishtown to describe the “new upper class” from the “new lower class”. He uses these fictional neighborhoods, which are based in reality, to track key indicators in white America, from 1960 to 2010. He calls these indicators “the founding virtues” of America: industriousness, honesty, marriage and religiosity.

This new upper class is well educated, wealthy and powerful. Murray writes, “[W]hile there is no such thing as an ordinary American, it is not the case that most Americans are balkanized into enclaves where they know little of what life is like for most other Americans. ‘The American mainstream’ may be hard to specify in detail, but it exists."

"Many members of the new upper class are balkanized,” states Murray. They live in large and modern cities much like Belmont described in Murray’s book. Murray identifies the new upper class as “overwhelmingly white and urban”. This mirrors the capital city in Hunger Games.

Murray analyzed where the “new upper class” lives in the United States by zip code. He found they are clustered primarily in four key centers or capitols: Washington, D.C., New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. In these four communities, and smaller ones across the nation, the new upper class controls the money, high level jobs, political power and policies in their areas. You can easily identify them in your own community. You may also identify those at the opposite end of the spectrum known as the “new lower class”. Here in Sarasota County, Florida we have the communities of Longboat Key and Newtown which parallel Belmont and Fishtown respectively in Murray’s book.

Professor Codevilla in his book describes the “ruling class” as, “formed by an educational system that exposed them to the same ideas and gave them remarkably uniform guidance, as well as tastes and habits.” According to Professor Codevilla, “What really distinguishes these privileged people demographically is that, whether in government power directly or as officers in companies, their careers and fortunes depend on government.” Both Charles Murray and Professor Codevilla are describing the scenario in Hunger Games. As professor Codevilla writes, and as we see in Hunger Games, “For our Ruling Class, identity always trumps truth.”

In Hunger Games "the truth" is the upper class is killing children for entertainment. Killing children becomes an annual event with sponsors, pageantry and rewards to the lone survivor. It is the Roman gladiatorial arena taken to a new level of high technology.

Frances Grund, the seventh son of a German Baron educated in Vienna, who immigrated to Philadelphia in 1825 wrote, “No government could be established on the same principle as that of the United States with a different set of morals. The American Constitution is remarkable for its simplicity; but it can only suffice a people correct in their actions. Change the domestic habits of the Americans, their religious devotion, and their highest respect for morality and it will not be necessary to change a single letter of the Constitution in order to vary the whole form of their government.” [My emphasis]

As Patrick Henry wrote, “Bad men cannot make good citizens.” Self-governing requires individual citizens govern their own behavior first and foremost.

The Hunger Games are coming to a community near you!


TOPICS: Conspiracy; Government; Politics; Society
KEYWORDS: elites; hungergames; obama
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1 posted on 04/01/2012 3:14:36 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Altar.


2 posted on 04/01/2012 3:24:22 PM PDT by OKSooner (Never take a known wise-@$$ shooting with you.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

“Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 by Charles Murray”

A must read.


3 posted on 04/01/2012 3:26:30 PM PDT by Stormdog (A rifle transforms one from subject to Citizen)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The main thing I took away from The Hunger Games, is that in the future, everybody is going to look like Lady Gaga.


4 posted on 04/01/2012 3:29:13 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Reading both The Hunger Games and Coming Apart at the moment.

Both are excellent.


5 posted on 04/01/2012 3:29:44 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Oh yea when i read the books i took them for a parable of where our society is headed.


6 posted on 04/01/2012 3:31:03 PM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: wiggen
Oh yea when i read the books i took them for a parable of where our society is headed.

I think "Idiocracy" is more accurate.

7 posted on 04/01/2012 3:31:48 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

With the millions of kids aborted in the U.S., we already have a version of the Reaping. How far away are we from having them in an arena hacking each other up for show?


8 posted on 04/01/2012 3:37:42 PM PDT by VanDeKoik (If case you are wondering, I'm supporting Newt.)
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To: dfwgator
As is Being There.
9 posted on 04/01/2012 3:39:01 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Ich habe keinen Konig aber Gott)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Of course I did like the movie better, back when it was called, “The Running Man.”


10 posted on 04/01/2012 3:40:08 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: dfwgator

Rats, I was hoping for a future based on Ziggy Stardust. Bowie was 40 years ahead of the curve.


11 posted on 04/01/2012 3:42:57 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: VanDeKoik

Not far....UFC.


12 posted on 04/01/2012 3:44:44 PM PDT by Terry Mross ( a)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

From the previews, it looks like the Hunger Games is very similar to “The Lottery.” If anyone has seen it, was that the case?


13 posted on 04/01/2012 3:49:47 PM PDT by Raider Sam (They're on our left, right, front, and back. They aint gettin away this time!)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The Hunger Games were, BY FAR, the worst dystopian society novels I have ever read. The plot holes were so big I could drive a darn planet through em.

Atlas Shrugged is a much better and mature comparison to our society today and the Hunger Games should be viewed in the light in which it was written: As a little girl’s romantic heroine fantasy.

IMO, the Hunger Games is so popular because the majority of today’s Society cannot comprehend Ayn Rand’s masterpiece and this trilogy presents a dystopian tale on a 4th grade level. It truly is an insult to anyone with a modicum of intelligence.


14 posted on 04/01/2012 3:50:02 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: dfwgator

Theres Washington a few large liberal states forever in their corner and the rest. The book mirrors that.


15 posted on 04/01/2012 3:51:34 PM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

President Snowbama dreams of a place like the one depicted the Hunger Games.


16 posted on 04/01/2012 3:54:39 PM PDT by ConservaTexan (February 6, 1911)
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To: Black_Shark

In fairness the Hunger Games novels were of the “young adult” genre.

I’ve read Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, and although prescient, they’re tough sledding.


17 posted on 04/01/2012 3:58:31 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Thanks for posting.

I have not read the "hunger games" books on which the movie was based, nor seen the movie. YET. Nor have I read the books cited in this article. Nonetheless, I think the movie is probably a good one to spark discussion about the future of our nation among young people. (Dear reader, hopefully you realize that I am thinking something like "...compared to Iron Man, or anything by Michael Moore or Al Gore, or Freddie Looks in the 13th Nightmare Basement or whatever...").

Anyway, I hope to go see it soon, or when it is released to DVD / Netflix.

I do NOT think that young people are taught to "think in a straight line" (my shorthand for using logic, good judgement, analyzing, and drawing conclusions). In fact, I don't think they think much at all. Just my opinion. I was no exception to that rule. Growing up, having a family, being in the military, etc is just as good as getting mugged for turning a liberal into a conservative.

As far as I know, third world tyrrany / tribal-centered-control and safe efficient distribution continue to be the main problem in solving "world hunger". We have the capacity to feed the world!

Seems to me that the fascism / communism we have witnessed throughout history are always ready to make the "hard decisions". Like Stalin(?) said: "One death is a tragedy; a thousand deaths is a statstic." So, although for many, the shocking view of the future portrayed in the movie would be relatively far-fetched. However, for the academia and other liberal intelligentzia in the audience, I bet the reality-show-lottery by the elite ruling class would seem to be a kinder, gentler form of eugenics.

I find it very interesting that controlling the lives of the masses and "killing children for entertainment" are main elements in this movie (at least from what I have heard and read).

Flyover thought in summary: "Bread and Circuses" leading up to the fall of Rome.

18 posted on 04/01/2012 3:58:55 PM PDT by txnuke (Drip Drip Drip goes the eligibility questions. Vet the candidates.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Interesting, almost a mirror of today’s society. IMHO, Corporations control the rank and file workers through various means like layoffs, forced relocation like you either move or get laid off, the stress of work you are assigned like political games, petty rules (incl. unwritten) and depending your status, how you are dealt with when you break them. The “penalty” can vary from nothing happens to outright fired or put on probation like a “performance improvement plan (PIP). The PIP can be designed where failure is a guarantee.

My impression, companies have gotten mean and they make sure you know it since the job market is pretty bad.


19 posted on 04/01/2012 4:02:02 PM PDT by CORedneck
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To: Black_Shark
Black_Shark: "The Hunger Games were, BY FAR, the worst dystopian society novels I have ever read. The plot holes were so big I could drive a darn planet through em. Atlas Shrugged is a much better and mature comparison to our society today ..."

I've read Atlas Shrugged and loved it. I've seen the Terminator TV series. And of course, some of the other books and movies in that typology. As a fan of the genre, I would love to hear your opinion on what is worth reading / watching. I can add it to my "to be read list" or whatever. Note: I am speaking of fiction; although I am not ~allergic~ to non-fiction....

By the way, I purchased Travis McGee's 99 cent Kindle book he had on special a couple of weeks ago, but have not read it yet.

20 posted on 04/01/2012 4:05:10 PM PDT by txnuke (Drip Drip Drip goes the eligibility questions. Vet the candidates.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

“What really distinguishes these privileged people demographically is that, whether in government power directly or as officers in companies, their careers and fortunes depend on government.”


I can see some truth in that.


21 posted on 04/01/2012 4:05:48 PM PDT by chasio649 (Stop looking for heroes.)
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To: Black_Shark

http://www.scholastic.com/home The ‘Hunger Game’series was published by this company and it was written by a childrens’ author.


22 posted on 04/01/2012 4:07:17 PM PDT by tumblindice (our new, happy lives)
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To: ConservaTexan
ConservaTexan: "President Snowbama dreams of a place like the one depicted the Hunger Games."

I think this is where I was headed with my wordy post (below).

I would add "...Snowbama and his cabal...."

23 posted on 04/01/2012 4:07:29 PM PDT by txnuke (Drip Drip Drip goes the eligibility questions. Vet the candidates.)
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To: grey_whiskers
I would be interested in your thoughts on this topic.

Thanks in advance.

24 posted on 04/01/2012 4:15:28 PM PDT by txnuke (Drip Drip Drip goes the eligibility questions. Vet the candidates.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Whether “The Hunger Games” or “Lord Of The Flies”, when people cease to regulate themselves, “horrid mischief” ensues - a phrase that the Founders took seriously.

So should we.

‘Specially as Horrid and Mischief dwell in the White House as I type.


25 posted on 04/01/2012 4:18:56 PM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles."...the public interest)
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To: tumblindice

Which is my point. I am very tired of the media trotting this out as an example of an “excellent” book. It is twilight with a poorly thought out dystopian society instead of vampires/werewolves.

The media should be presenting it for what it is and any decent critic would be tearing the books apart. It’s a children’s trilogy. Not a Novel nor anywhere close to a masterpiece which is, IMO, how the media is presenting it.


26 posted on 04/01/2012 4:50:56 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I don’t go to the movies. I’ve got The Hunger Games saved in my DVD Netflix queue.


27 posted on 04/01/2012 4:54:24 PM PDT by upchuck (Need is not an acceptable lifestyle choice; dependent is not a career. ~ Dr. Tim Nerenz)
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To: upchuck

1984 was all I needed to read to know what is in store for us.


28 posted on 04/01/2012 5:01:51 PM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (Solyent Pink is Sheeple!!!!)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Ever read ‘The Lottery’? That was written in 1948. It’s a story. Stories come and go.


29 posted on 04/01/2012 5:03:15 PM PDT by ReneeLynn (Socialism is SO yesterday. Fascism, it's the new black. Mmm mmm mmm...)
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To: Black_Shark; 2ndDivisionVet

Blackie,

Consider “The Hunger Games” as Ayn Rand “trainer wheel version.” We’ve got to start the youngin’s with something, and this series is a good way to grap their attention. And from some of the younger kids where I go to church, the good ideas in it have sunk in.


30 posted on 04/01/2012 5:37:55 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: VanDeKoik
How far away are we from having them in an arena hacking each other up for show?

They're called urban public schools.

31 posted on 04/01/2012 5:38:50 PM PDT by Repeat Offender (While the wicked stand confounded, call me with Thy Saints surrounded)
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To: txnuke

As far as I know, third world tyrrany / tribal-centered-control and safe efficient distribution continue to be the main problem in solving “world hunger”. We have the capacity to feed the world!


The late ruler of North Korea was a fat little bastard. The population could have been prosperous. Communist Kim reduced them to eating tree bark.

Rhodesia was a net exporter of food until Communist Jimmy Carter installed Communist Robert Mugabe. Now Zimbabwe is one of the poorest, hungriest nations on Earth.

Under Batista, Cuba thrived. Now, people will ride anything that can float to escape Communist Castro’s “Socialist Paradise.”

Anybody notice a trend? What’s the common denominator?


32 posted on 04/01/2012 5:40:11 PM PDT by Rides_A_Red_Horse
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To: ReneeLynn
We did that play in 7th grade when I was in "mentally gifted minors" (how I slipped in, I still don't know ... LOL) and it is similar to Hunger Games.
33 posted on 04/01/2012 5:47:56 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Ich habe keinen Konig aber Gott)
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To: GreyFriar

I disagree. This series is an excellent series for young girls who adore “Twilight” but it fails miserably outside of describing teenage romance/clothes/make-up.


34 posted on 04/01/2012 5:53:18 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: Black_Shark

Gotta disagree with you. Twilight was a terribly written masturbatory fantasy with a bland Mary Sue lead character based on a the physical description of the author being lusted over by nearly everyone, with a little smidgen of a plot tossed in as an afterthought.
In the hunger games, it’s a plot with a bit of romance tossed in. I didn’t care for the style in which it was written, but that’s just me.


35 posted on 04/01/2012 5:54:22 PM PDT by chae (I was anti-Obama before it was cool)
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To: Black_Shark

‘This series is an excellent series for young girls who adore “Twilight” but it fails miserably outside of describing teenage romance/clothes/make-up.”

If that is all you got out of it, then you missed the point of the trilogy, which is seeking individual freedom that is denied by a tyrannical dictatorship that requires human sacrifice every year as a reminder to the oppressed districts that they lost the war of rebellion 74 years earlier.


36 posted on 04/01/2012 6:01:14 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: Black_Shark

I also recommend that you read the following article from “The American Thinker:”

http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/03/the_unseen_message_of_the_hunger_games.html

One line from it is: “the book series’ pro-individualism, anti-socialist/communist/totalitarianism message has thus far eluded them — but the legions of children reading the books are getting the message.” And that is not the best line in the article.

Read more: http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/03/the_unseen_message_of_the_hunger_games.html#ixzz1qqBhZ4mf


37 posted on 04/01/2012 6:09:03 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: txnuke; upchuck; 2ndDivisionVet

I saw the movie yesterday. It is very faithful to the 1st book. There were only a few minor changes and additions, but these make several things understandable to those who have not read the book/trilogy. The Hollywood leftists did NOT get their hands on the script to give it their usual makeover. I hope the next 2 movies also remain true to the story line.


38 posted on 04/01/2012 6:17:17 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: txnuke; upchuck; 2ndDivisionVet

I forgot to mention that the name of the country is Panem, which my daughter reminded me is the Latin word for “Bread” and thus the “hunger games” can be seen as the “circuses.”


39 posted on 04/01/2012 6:20:08 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: GreyFriar

I got the point however where was the depth? She never expanded on the political or economic underpinnings nor was the action particularly believable.

In short, it was a terrible trilogy. Just my opinion.


40 posted on 04/01/2012 6:31:24 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: Rides_A_Red_Horse
Rides_A_Red_Horse: "The late ruler of North Korea was a fat little bastard. The population could have been prosperous. Communist Kim reduced them to eating tree bark.... Rhodesia was a net exporter of food until Communist Jimmy Carter installed Communist Robert Mugabe. Now Zimbabwe is one of the poorest, hungriest nations on Earth.... Under Batista, Cuba thrived. Now, people will ride anything that can float to escape Communist Castro’s 'Socialist Paradise'...."

THANK you for the excellent examples. I realize we are a wealthy (and blessed) country. We throw away SO MUCH FOOD!

if I could bring up the standard of living of the rest of the world by 10 percent or 20 percent and see my own lowered by the same amount, I might be willing to be a progressive. It does not work like that (as proven by the "Big Black Book of Communism" -- more people have died in the attempt to bring about communist utopias than in ALL THE WARS IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD!!!). We are headed for trouble, big trouble. And those (on the conservative side or the more liberal) who think that revolution can be achieved peacefully are just fooling themselves.

41 posted on 04/01/2012 6:33:53 PM PDT by txnuke (Drip Drip Drip goes the eligibility questions. Vet the candidates.)
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To: GreyFriar
Hunger Games: An eerie reflection of our “new American society”

Who is it who is busy trying to pit various sectors of society against each other to keep his regime afloat while starving the nation for:

electrical energy (EPA shut-down of coal-fired electrical generation, more than 40% of U.S. electricity comes from that, coal mines),

petroleum (one of the biggest ever restrictions on exploration and drilling in the history of the U.S. while subsidizing Brazil to drill for oil in the Gulf of Mexico, EPA shut-down of refineries, plans to impose Cap and Trade, rejected by legislation, by regulation through the EPA that will add many hundreds of billions in costs to every sector of the economy),

health care (supposedly to get insurance to about 15 million uninsured, who account for 1/2 of 1% of all health care costs annually, Obamacare has already resulted in skyrocketing premiums and will soon, if not stopped, force about 30 million to lose their insurance they get through their employment),

jobs (the total number of people employed has shrunk by millions over the past 3 years, those missing who are no longer looking for a job or are unemployment compensation are no longer counted in unemployment statistics, making what looks not so good a lot better than it would if it accurately reflected reality),

money (refusing to continue the current tax rates and then increasing taxes greatly to fund Obamacare will increase the amount of money going to Washington, leaving even less with people to spend, invest, start businesses),

fiscal sanity (has piled on a greater amount of debt in a shorter amount of time than anyone in U.S. history and has blown nearly all of it on bailouts for foreign banks, for contributors’ “green energy” companies, for unions, for taking over companies like GM and then giving them to his contributors, for vastly expanding public sector employment at both state and federal levels, for plans for fricking trains, for absolute morons like Stephen “we could have everyone paint his roof white” Chu, who, though he may have a Nobel in physics, doesn’t have a clue about energy production)
42 posted on 04/01/2012 6:37:53 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
He found they are clustered primarily in four key centers or capitols: Washington, D.C., New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Ouch.
43 posted on 04/01/2012 6:43:43 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: aruanan

Dear Aruanan,

The answer is quite obvious: GEORGE W. BUSH

;-)


44 posted on 04/01/2012 6:44:19 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: txnuke
I haven't read the book, nor have I seen the movie: so I can only comment on the article at the top of the thread.

The closest thing I can see is that Obama (and the globalists / Communists / whatevers behind him) are trying the classical techniques for undermining / subverting a society -- see also Antonia Gramsci and/or the famous 1963 Congressional Record article on the Communist Goals for America; or Paul Harvey's speech on what he'd do to destroy America if he were the devil.

I think there are a number of reasons for this.

1) The United States is steeped in freedom and individuality -- everything from the Declaration to the Constitution to the Bill of Rights to "Go West Young Man" has created a cultural memory with its own inertia, which is proving harder than expected to eradicate. More on this later. Whereas Europe's cultural history is full of feudalism, overlords, monarchies, dictatorships: the people have a cultural memory of being servile, and without social mobility.

2) Related to this, the United States has long been a Christian country: we fought a war to eliminate slavery. And Christianity focuses on the individual: Christ died for sinners, to *make* them worthy, not *because* of anyone's or any group's inherent superiority.

3) Putting these factors together, the left has been trying to eliminate the cultural memory of the U.S. ("Hey hey! Ho Ho! Western Culture's got to go!") and to dumb down the people (public schools were developed in Germany to make compliant serfs for the masters, and fit in well with the "Organization Man" meme of the post-World War II bureaucracies). And hand in hand with this has been the effort first to remove religion from the public square, then to make religion bad ("homophobia" or "anti-science" anyone?), and then to destroy the last bastion of resistance to tyranny, the family (birth control / abortion / welfare / hookup culture).

The thing is, it isn't working: or rather, it isn't working like clockwork as it has in other countries.

And so the Gramsci-ites and others are working on other time-tested techniques: Cloward-Piven (put enough financial strain on the system that it will collapse), dependency, class warfare. The idea is twofold: one, if the great middle class is in the way, get rid of them by pressure from without (outsourcing / taxes / regulation to stop entrepreneurs) and by subversion: encourage unhealthy personal and societal habits in order to foster near-universal dependence on government.

So instead of dividing the underclasses *geographically* as in the movie (although to some extent this happens with the Rust Belt and/or the South being full of "bitter clingers"), people are divided along class lines.

And as in Animal Farm where the puppies were raised to be attack dogs, so the underclasses are being groomed via Race Hatred and the Occupy Movement to attack the Middle Class, the elites hope to pit the non-elites among one another, fighting for the scraps.

But two things are happening, that the conspirators haven't counted on. One, is that all their toxic results are hitting the lower classes; two, the more educated youth, having been inculcated with a sense of entitlement, are nonetheless left with a sense of *superiority* such that they will not deign to accept handouts: oh, no, they want a job commensurate with their perceived status.

And they remember that four short years ago, everyone HAD jobs. But now? They have awful debt, and NO job.

So who are they going to blame? Not themselves. The man at the top: the one who *PROMISED* change...not telling them it was change for the worse.

And the second, is that one has to time things VERY carefully. The Cloward-Piven is working so well, that not only are the underclasses running out of money; the lower echelons of the elites (the government functionaries, the apparatchiks, are threatened with losing their livelihoods as well.

And if both the lower classes and the middle classes become dispossessed at the same time -- someone just *might* get the idea that "Let's get the dirty bastards at the top!" will bring more *positive* change than fighting each other. It wasn't the Rust Belt Union Boys who came up with the idea of sending all the factories to China: it was MBA hot-shots doing the bidding of the top dogs. It wasn't the middle-aged white male programmers who came up with the H1B visa and having to train in their own replacements: it was the elites. And it wasn't the working-class blacks who came up with the idea of de facto amnesty for illegal aliens in order to lower costs by paying manual labor their wages under the table, and socializing the health care and other disruptions. Yup, it was the elites again.

And I fear that it was a grave mistake to try to keep power by resorting to the politics of personal destruction to keep Palin and Cain out of power: it simply acted to plug up a pressure cooker of political frustration...

Cheers!

45 posted on 04/01/2012 6:49:07 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The “smart” people. Socialists created them and now embraced them as supeior rulers. It figues given their politically correct (re)education which ensures compliance of thought and behavior amongst their national and international equals.

The added element of delusional superiorty over the politically incorrect riff raff, is a given. They are too arragant and stupid to be ashamed of themselves. They might end up losing their pretty heads.


46 posted on 04/01/2012 7:02:26 PM PDT by SaraJohnson
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To: GreyFriar

I haven’t read the books, but my husband and I saw the film last night. I didn’t go with terribly high expectations, but I thought it was an arresting film with some very nice artistic touches, particularly during the flashback scenes. I just felt it started lagging in the last 30 minutes, with the repetitive romantic scenes. One of two would have sufficed, but that’s a minor point-—it still kept my attention until the credits.


47 posted on 04/01/2012 8:28:04 PM PDT by Calliecat
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To: grey_whiskers
I think there are a number of reasons for this.

Wow, freeking fantastic analysis! Well done!

You've pissed me off plenty of times, but I sincerely doff me hat to you for this one, good sir.

I'm saving your missive for future reference.

48 posted on 04/01/2012 9:45:03 PM PDT by Talisker (He who commands, must obey.)
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To: Calliecat

The romantic scenes actually have a point to them. The contestants must get sponsors who will buy items that they need to survive and possibly win the games. Haymitch, the mentor for Katniss and Peeta, knows this and tells them to play up the “romantic angle.” Katniss has no real interest in doing so, perhaps this is more evident in the books; however she comes to realize the need to “market” herself and Peeta. The ointment and soup both came from sponsors who took a liking to the 2 contestants from District 12.

Remember what Cinna said: “You have to sell yourselves.” or words to that affect, perhaps it was “Make the crowd like you.” Read at least the first book in the trilogy.


49 posted on 04/02/2012 5:46:09 AM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: Calliecat

The romantic scenes actually have a point to them. The contestants must get sponsors who will buy items that they need to survive and possibly win the games. Haymitch, the mentor for Katniss and Peeta, knows this and tells them to play up the “romantic angle.” Katniss has no real interest in doing so, perhaps this is more evident in the books; however she comes to realize the need to “market” herself and Peeta. The ointment and soup both came from sponsors who took a liking to the 2 contestants from District 12.

Remember what Cinna said: “You have to sell yourselves.” or words to that affect, perhaps it was “Make the crowd like you.” Read at least the first book in the trilogy.


50 posted on 04/02/2012 5:46:18 AM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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