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1 in 5 kids get little vitamin D, study says
Associated Press ^ | Oct 26, 2009 | LINDSEY TANNER

Posted on 10/26/2009 4:21:40 AM PDT by decimon

CHICAGO – At least one in five U.S. children aged 1 to 11 don't get enough vitamin D and could be at risk for a variety of health problems including weak bones, the most recent national analysis suggests.

By a looser measure, almost 90 percent of black children that age and 80 percent of Hispanic kids could be vitamin D deficient — "astounding numbers" that should serve as a call to action, said Dr. Jonathan Mansbach, lead author of the new analysis and a researcher at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital in Boston.

>

The body also makes vitamin D when sunlight hits the skin, but many children don't spend enough time outdoors. That's one reason why lower vitamin D levels are found in children living in colder climates and those with darker skin, which absorbs less sunlight.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: health; vitamind
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1 posted on 10/26/2009 4:21:40 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

W&MHH.


2 posted on 10/26/2009 4:22:39 AM PDT by SIDENET ("If that's your best, your best won't do." -Dee Snider)
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To: decimon
Sounds like we need a new Federal vitamin D program. It must be a national emergency where we can contract for vitamin D and give part of it to the rest of the world... sarc/
3 posted on 10/26/2009 4:24:56 AM PDT by Truth29
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To: Truth29
Sounds like we need a new Federal vitamin D program.

Sad to say, I had the same thoughts. This is necessary information but it's disheartening to think where it may go.

4 posted on 10/26/2009 4:31:21 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

I hate to be the guy who ALWAYS says get away from the TV and step outside. Run, jump, chase the other little rug rats around, enjoy the sunshine.

Man - its amazing this dumb stuff

I’ve often said there’s nothing better for the inside of a man than the outside of a horse. - Ronald Reagan


5 posted on 10/26/2009 4:33:22 AM PDT by Patrsup (To stubborn to change now)
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To: decimon

Here is some food for thought:

* In 2006, Dr. John Cannell (Staff Psychiatrist at Atascadero State Hospital, California) and colleagues published a paper showing evidence that lower vitamin D blood levels during the winter can account for the increased transmissibility of the influenza virus among children and adults. Studies have proven that Vitamin D stimulates the immune system and disease-fighting cells, called macrophages and T cells. The cells create proteins that have antiviral and antimicrobial properties. Further, we know that macrophages and T cells have vitamin D receptors (VDRs) on them, enhancing their functions.

Dr. Cannell noted that patients in his psychiatric ward who took 2,000 IU of Vitamin D did not get the flu, while the patients in other wards (who did not take Vitamin D) did. The patients intermingled with each other so cross exposure was certain. The study demonstrated that Vitamin D supplementation could prevent one from developing the flu.


6 posted on 10/26/2009 4:35:07 AM PDT by mkjessup (0bama = The Ultimate Asswipe)
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To: decimon

A generation of “go-too-far” parents who have kept kids out of the sunshine because of menanoma fears. (Well, that and video games that are more fun than actually playing outside. Virtual dodgeball, anyone?)


7 posted on 10/26/2009 4:36:32 AM PDT by 50sDad (The Left cannot understand life is not in a test tube. Raise taxes, & jobs go away.)
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To: mkjessup

Dr. Cannell has been pushing 5,000 IU as a ‘threshold’ amount for adults. It should be mentioned that Cannell has a financial interest in selling vitamin D through Purity Products. Nothing wrong with that but it should be mentioned.


8 posted on 10/26/2009 4:46:36 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

But...but...but....I thought MSM (Main Stream Medicine) said that vitamin supplements were a waste of money. I’m confused.

But I’ve been taking 6000 IU D3/day for years now. And, yes, in my opinion, all disorders associated with vitamin D deficiency — and there are MANY — should be considered iatrogenic in nature. Between MSM’s terrifying people about the “risks” of taking more than 400IU as supplements, and their terrifying people about the risks of sun exposure, all Vitamin D associated disease can be laid at the feet of the FDA, AMA, and MSM.


9 posted on 10/26/2009 4:56:48 AM PDT by Liberty Ship ("Lord, make me fast and accurate.")
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To: decimon

darker skin absorbs less sunlight???


10 posted on 10/26/2009 4:57:54 AM PDT by sickoflibs ( "It's not the taxes, the redistribution is the government spending you demand stupid")
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To: decimon

20 minutes in the sun will give a person the 5000 IU’s of vitamin D that’s required.

Now all that needs to be done is develop a television that can be seen outside in direct sunlight and put the playstation, XBox, or nintendo in the backyard. LOL


11 posted on 10/26/2009 5:02:01 AM PDT by diverteach (http://www.slapobama.com/)
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To: mkjessup
The study demonstrated that Vitamin D supplementation could prevent one from developing the flu.

I was flipping channels a couple of weeks ago and caught a lecture done by a Phd from UCLA on their "Universityhouse" channel on Dish Network. This prof delved into and discussed six Vitamin D deficiency studies that showed links to not only immune system function, but several types of cancer, Type 1 diabetes and MS. The case was very well presented. The gist of the discussion was that humans need to get their Vitamin D blood serum levels up to 40-60 ug/ml, which is way above the current recommended daily amount.

As a redhead who has already spent way too much time in the sun I tend to avoid direct exposure if at all possible. I don't drink a lot of milk, so I started taking 2000 IU's of Vitamin D the next day. I'm going to have a blood test done in six weeks or so and see how my Vitamin D levels are looking.

12 posted on 10/26/2009 5:02:33 AM PDT by Thermalseeker (Stop the insanity - Flush Congress!)
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To: Liberty Ship

In my medical career, I have had the opportunity to care for several patients who were intoxicated with fat-soluble vitamins, two with Vitamin A and two with Vitamin D. In only one was the intoxication not iatrogenic and she died.

The two patients with hypervitaminosis D both survived, however they were very ill for weeks.

I’d really rather not go there again, thank you.


13 posted on 10/26/2009 5:04:55 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("I want to see you make decisions without your televisions.")
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To: sickoflibs
darker skin absorbs less sunlight???

From all I've read, yes.

14 posted on 10/26/2009 5:07:34 AM PDT by decimon
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To: sickoflibs

And older skin. The story is that skin becomes less efficient at producing vitamin D from the sun as it becomes older. Skin covering a body, that is.


15 posted on 10/26/2009 5:09:40 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon; sickoflibs
darker skin absorbs less sunlight???

From all I've read, yes.


True. The darker skin protects against UV. If you've got darker skin and live at a latitude where insolation is less, you're that much less likely to get enough sunlight to produce adequate vitamin D. However, you need something like 10 to 20 minutes on your arms to get enough vitamin D synthesized. How many people, except in the summer, get this now?
16 posted on 10/26/2009 5:14:42 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: diverteach
20 minutes in the sun will give a person the 5000 IU’s of vitamin D that’s required.

The summer sun, with enough skin exposed. I think it's NIH.gov with the info that, on the east coast, from Boston and up, for at least four months, Nov. through Feb., sunlight will produce no vitamin D in humans.

Did that need more commas?

17 posted on 10/26/2009 5:15:04 AM PDT by decimon
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To: CholeraJoe
In my medical career, I have had the opportunity to care for several patients who were intoxicated with fat-soluble vitamins, two with Vitamin A and two with Vitamin D.

Say it ain't so, Joe.

A little more info, por favor. What was the source of the vitamin D? If the source was through supplement then why do sunbathers not suffer the same?

18 posted on 10/26/2009 5:18:58 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

I get skin cancer. My doc advised me to stay out of the sun for the rest of my life. He said that vitamin D was important and I need to force it, and I told him I take multivitamins he said “Wah, you need way, way more than that”.


19 posted on 10/26/2009 5:20:57 AM PDT by I Buried My Guns (As always, I apologize if I've offended.)
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To: CholeraJoe

CholeraJoe,

Could you share with us what the symptoms of vitamin D overdose are? Also, what was the level of supplementation your patients were taking, and for how long? Was it viatmin D3? And where did the 25-hydroxy test when the toxicity was diagnosed? Thanks,


20 posted on 10/26/2009 5:21:51 AM PDT by Liberty Ship ("Lord, make me fast and accurate.")
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To: 50sDad

Not to mention feeding kids soy milk because “that cow stuff is bad for you”...


21 posted on 10/26/2009 5:30:04 AM PDT by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible.)
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To: diverteach

“20 minutes in the sun will give a person the 5000 IU’s of vitamin D that’s required.”

But 20 minutes in the sun on the southside of Chicago could cost you your life.


22 posted on 10/26/2009 5:34:40 AM PDT by Bluebeard16
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To: decimon

Oh nothing wrong with acting in your own best interest and I agree, disclosure is important.


23 posted on 10/26/2009 5:48:08 AM PDT by mkjessup (0bama = The Ultimate Asswipe)
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To: I Buried My Guns
I get skin cancer.

This may be premature, but... Since I've upped my vitamin D intake to 5,000 - 6,000 IU a day, Ive seen my age spots fading. I'm 64 years old.

24 posted on 10/26/2009 5:52:30 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon; Liberty Ship

The two hypervitaminosis D patients had been intoxicated as a result of supplementation by their physicians. Both had undergone surgery on their necks for cancer and as can happen in such surgery the parathyroid glands were damaged. This resulted in a low serum calcium causing irritability, and possibly uncontrollable muscle spasm. At the time, (late 1970’s) the only available treatment was supplemental oral calcium and large doses of Vitamin D.

What the treating physicians did not realize, was that the parathyroid gland damage is often transient and may recover in several days. Both of these patients received three weeks of high dose calcium gluconate orally, and Vitamin D. (ergocalciferol or D2) Probably 2-3 grams daily. Activation of Vitamin D to 25 hydroxy form is not rate limited in the liver and is totally dependent on how much precursor is available. So both of these patients must have had massively elevated serum levels, but that test was not available at the time.

Both developed coma, renal failure and marked elevation of their serum calcium levels. They were successfully treated with IV fluids, diuretics and steroids, but it took several weeks for them to wake up and recover kidney function. One of them suffered from kidney stones for years thereafter.

You asked why sun worshipers don’t suffer the same problem. It’s probably because conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to D3 in the skin is rate limited by the amount of UV exposure and as the skin tans, progressively less and less UV light penetrates deeply enough to convert the 7-dhc to D3.

I’m not a Vitamin D expert by any stretch. I haven’t treated either deficiency or intoxication in years.


25 posted on 10/26/2009 6:04:15 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("I want to see you make decisions without your televisions.")
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To: Truth29

Vitamin D is cheap, buy a bottle and give the kids 2000 I.U. a day. I have been taking it for the past two months. From what I hear vitamin D is better than C.


26 posted on 10/26/2009 6:08:31 AM PDT by alice_in_bubbaland (Markets and Marxists Don't Mix! Audit the FED NOW!)
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To: Liberty Ship

6000? I thought the safe level was 4000 IU?


27 posted on 10/26/2009 6:10:05 AM PDT by alice_in_bubbaland (Markets and Marxists Don't Mix! Audit the FED NOW!)
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To: PugetSoundSoldier

Except soy milk has phytoestrogens, giving boys girl characteristics and vice versa.


28 posted on 10/26/2009 6:11:43 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: decimon

Is there a natural med or homeopathy ping list?


29 posted on 10/26/2009 6:12:19 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: alice_in_bubbaland
6000? I thought the safe level was 4000 IU?

The gist of the lecture I saw last week stated that "safe" D3 intake amounts vary widely from individual to individual. What you are really looking for is the blood serum level of Vitamin D. The only real way of knowing if you are taking enough is to have your blood tested. They also said not to have your blood tested until 6 weeks after you begin taking D3.

30 posted on 10/26/2009 6:23:33 AM PDT by Thermalseeker (Stop the insanity - Flush Congress!)
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To: alice_in_bubbaland

After being diagnosed with the following: MS, ALS, Chemical immunodeficiency, arthritis,, I had a doc run a simple Vit-D test. My Vitamin D level was almost non-existent. For the next 3 months I took a 20,000 IU tablet once a week, and took 4000 IU Vit-d3 tabs daily. Within three months, all my symptoms had almost vanished.

So, in my case, 4000IU’s was the daily dose. I still take 2000IU daily. It’s amazing what this particular chemical controls in the body.


31 posted on 10/26/2009 6:45:11 AM PDT by Explodo (Pessimism is simply pattern recognition)
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To: Explodo

Yes, it is amazing! Thank goodness for you that your Doctor was up on the wonders of vitamin D!

I’m hearing more and more good things about vit. D! I will never stop taking it!


32 posted on 10/26/2009 6:57:50 AM PDT by alice_in_bubbaland (Markets and Marxists Don't Mix! Audit the FED NOW!)
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To: CholeraJoe
Both of these patients received three weeks of high dose calcium gluconate orally, and Vitamin D. (ergocalciferol or D2) Probably 2-3 grams daily.

2 - 3 grams? Yowser! The conversion of grams to IU varies with the vitamin type but I'm reading that 2.5 micrograms equals 100 IU for vitamin D. If that's so, and my math is correct, they were getting some 100 million IU daily.

33 posted on 10/26/2009 7:04:20 AM PDT by decimon
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To: CholeraJoe
I personally know two people who have chronic fatigue. Both were diagnosed with extreme deficiencies of Vitamin D. After supplementation, they've have see dramatic improvement.

The two patients with hypervitaminosis D both survived, however they were very ill for weeks. I’d really rather not go there again, thank you.

How many ulcers have you seen caused by ibuprofen?

34 posted on 10/26/2009 7:11:07 AM PDT by aimhigh
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To: Explodo

That’s interesting that you have been diagonosed with such autoimmune diseases, as my mom has MS and I have psoriasis and both of our doctors have recommended boosting out Via D intake.

I love being outside and enjoy the sunlight, but my mom has very fair skin and tries to avoid direct sunlight. In the winter months, I go to a tanning bed 1-2 times a week, which keeps my P symptoms in check. I’m not sure how good of a source of Via D it is, but it has significantly helped. She has been taking Via D for about 2 months now, watched her diet and lost about 23 pounds and I believe a combination of that has really helped her.

I’m glad to hear that somone else with similar problems has had success with Via. D. That gives us both hope.


35 posted on 10/26/2009 7:11:09 AM PDT by JenB987
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To: goodwithagun
Is there a natural med or homeopathy ping list?

Not that I know.

36 posted on 10/26/2009 7:12:50 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

Even Flintstone Vitamins now have 400 UI of Vitamin D folks ... Kick your kids outside, let them get some sun, that and the sheer excercise of being outdoors will make for healthier kids ...


37 posted on 10/26/2009 7:16:24 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: goodwithagun

Yep, so today’s hyper-concerned parents are breeding a generation of pale-skinned, effeminate metrosexuals who are heavily susceptible to influenza.

Go outside, drink yer whole milk, and quit whining - you don’t always win!


38 posted on 10/26/2009 7:16:49 AM PDT by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible.)
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To: Scythian

http://flintstonesvitamins.com/complete/index.html#supplement


39 posted on 10/26/2009 7:17:20 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: PugetSoundSoldier

My sis-in-law drenches her kids in sunblock every day. Of course I use it when my son is going to be outside for an extended amount of time, but we’ve been out for about 30 minutes the last couple of days and he’s been just fine. Sunblock contains xenoestrogens which do the same thing as phytoestrogens. I use Burts Bee’s natural sunblock. It’s expensive, but it doesn’t have any harmful additives.


40 posted on 10/26/2009 7:22:27 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: CholeraJoe

Many thanks for your response; I am very interested in this. I think I can see where your patients got into trouble. Not only were they taking D2 instead of D3, but 1 mg (milligram) of D = 40,000 IU. I can certainly see where 2-3 grams would them out! I have become convinced that up to 10,000 IU/Day is not harmful but beneficial. I’ve been on 6000 for years; If I go down from toxicity, I’ll post from my death bed. The conversion of D from IU to mg is difficult. Here are my sources:

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_convert_vitamin_d_iu_to_mg

http://riteaid.naturemade.com/faq/faq.asp?s=108#505


41 posted on 10/26/2009 7:51:11 AM PDT by Liberty Ship ("Lord, make me fast and accurate.")
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To: decimon

i got my 3 year old on 500 iu’s a day and im taking 5k iu’s a day. my dr said to take that instead of flu vacine


42 posted on 10/26/2009 8:11:43 AM PDT by remaxagnt (`)
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To: aimhigh
How many ulcers have you seen caused by ibuprofen?

TNTC. Too numerous to count.

43 posted on 10/26/2009 8:27:29 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("I want to see you make decisions without your televisions.")
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To: decimon

I don’t believe the tablets they were taking were quite that potent. I figured it up and they received 15 years of the minimum daily requirement in about 3 weeks.


44 posted on 10/26/2009 8:31:35 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("I want to see you make decisions without your televisions.")
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To: goodwithagun
Except soy milk has phytoestrogens, giving boys girl characteristics and vice versa.

These phytoestrogens are also found in more than 300 plants that may also bind with receptors of humans. Naturally occurring estrogens are common in many cereals, legumes, fruits, and tubers. These "endocrine disruptors" are all around us and can be found in the natural foods we eat every day. If you fear soy milk then you must also fear any human diet containing cereals, fruits, and vegetables.

Asians have regularly consumed soyfoods without fertility disorders for ages and Asian countries have been producing healthy and highly functioning children for centuries. The myth about soy turning boys into girls, and vice-versa, is nothing but a myth. Legitimate research has not shown that consuming isoflavones negatively impact our hormonal systems.

45 posted on 10/26/2009 8:57:10 AM PDT by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: CholeraJoe

That’s still a boatload! 400IU x 356 x 15 = 2,190,000 over 3 weeks. 2,190,000/21 = 104,258 IU/day!


46 posted on 10/26/2009 9:26:09 AM PDT by Liberty Ship ("Lord, make me fast and accurate.")
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To: Liberty Ship

Yeah it was a boatload. No one on the medical service was surprised that they were comatose and in renal failure. I treated the first one, and suddenly I was considered the local expert on Vitamin D poisoning. That’s why I was called in to consult on the second one. It was at a different hospital, but someone remembered that I had treated one the year before.


47 posted on 10/26/2009 9:54:06 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("I want to see you make decisions without your televisions.")
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To: Mase

Thanks for reading way to much into what I wrote. While there is no way to avoid all forms of this, I do try to avoid soy milk because it is not a great alternative to cow’s milk. I never implied that it does cause reproductive issues in Asians, but I will add that I have reproductive issues that have decreased since avoiding soy products. I also have noticed a difference in my PCOS since I have been avoiding xenoestrogens (no small fete since they are found in most body care products). There was a study done by a group that gets donations from American Dairy Farmers, so it is safe to say it might be biased, but the group’s study compared height of Asians born and raised on Asian soy diets to height of Asians born and raised on American non-soy diets. The latter groups average heights were taller.


48 posted on 10/26/2009 9:54:24 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: decimon; Mother Abigail; EBH; vetvetdoug; Smokin' Joe; Global2010; Battle Axe; null and void; ...
Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels Among US Children Aged 1 to 11 Years: Do Children Need More Vitamin D?

Bump & a ping

49 posted on 10/26/2009 10:25:14 AM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: 2ndreconmarine; Fitzcarraldo; Covenantor; Mother Abigail; EBH; Dog Gone; ...
Ping... (Thanks, neverdem!)



Also, Keep up with other H1N1 update stories on this thread: H1N1 flu victim collapsed on way to hospital [Latest H1N1 updates downthread] thanks to DvdMom and others.

50 posted on 10/26/2009 10:54:50 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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