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ISLAMIC SHARIA COURT in TEXAS
2ndcoa.courts.state.tx.us/opinions/ ^ | May 8, 2003 judicial opinion | 322ND DISTRICT COURT OF TARRANT COUNTY

Posted on 10/04/2011 7:13:56 AM PDT by Liz

TEXAS ISLAMIC COURT, 888 S. Greenville Ave, Suite 188, Richardson, Texas.

EXCERPT On September 25, 2002, all five parties to the divorce signed an "Arbitration Agreement." This document recites, in full, that the parties: after consultation with their respective attorneys, agree to submit all claims and disputes among them to arbitration by the TEXAS ISLAMIC COURT (entire opinion at link)


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: agakhan; corruption; crushislam; fraud; islam; khan; mohammedanism; sharia; sharialaw; texas
REFERENCE Gov Perry addresses the Aga Khan: “It is a great honor to be in the presence of the Imam of 16 million Muslims around the world, a global humanitarian leader, a man of peace with a pluralistic vision for people around the world, His Highness, the Aga Khan, the 49th Hereditary Imam of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims. Your Highness, on behalf of 23 million Texans, and over 600,000 thousand Muslims living in Texas, I extend our heartfelt appreciation for your 50 years of great international leadership.

We are delighted to welcome you to the Lone Star State and participate in the celebration of your Golden Jubilee. I am also grateful to the many federal, state and local leaders in attendance tonight. By their presence, these special guests convey the profound respect that exists in the Western World for His Highness’ work and leadership.”

In April 2004, the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) and Univ of Texas-Austin finalized a grant proposal that created the partnership that became known as the Muslim Histories and Cultures Program (MHC). MHC recruited and directly trained 80 teachers affecting approximately 15,150 students of World History and World Geography in ten key Texas districts in 2005 and 2006. The purpose is two-fold 1) to fulfill Governor Rick Perry’s desire to better educate Texas teachers on Muslim topics and 2) to train teachers to use a cultural lens approach to understanding other cultures. Governor Perry was instrumental in getting this program off the ground.

1 posted on 10/04/2011 7:13:57 AM PDT by Liz
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To: Liz

Nauseating.

“The purpose is two-fold 1) to fulfill Governor Rick Perry’s desire to better educate Texas teachers on Muslim topics and 2) to train teachers to use a cultural lens approach to understanding other cultures.”

Where’s that FReeper with the tagline?

I LEARNED ALL I NEED TO KNOW @ ISLAM ON 9-11


2 posted on 10/04/2011 7:24:40 AM PDT by spankalib
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To: Liz; MestaMachine

that case was from 2002.
so Perry can hardly be blamed for that.

...but, i still have no respect, for any evangelical Christian who quotes from the Quran approvingly.

or PROUDLY signs a “Halal” meat law, so that animals can be sacrificed (with slit throat), in the name of Allah.

or who is endorsed by C.A.I.R.
(CAIR Houston
“The Muslim community has a significant number of political conservatives,
and they do support Perry,”
said Mustafaa Carroll, executive director of the Council on American Islamic Relations in Houston, “)

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2764459/posts?page=4#4

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2767346/posts?page=18#18

or who HELPS Gulen build Islamist schools in Texas,
with taxpayer money!
(”Fethullah Gulen, dubbed “the most dangerous Islamist on planet earth,” is now under investigation by the F.B.I. for his network of charter schools throughout the country.” )
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/2694001/posts


3 posted on 10/04/2011 7:32:21 AM PDT by Elendur (It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Liz
Your Highness, on behalf of 23 million Texans, and over 600,000 thousand Muslims living in Texas, I extend our heartfelt appreciation for your 50 years of great international leadership.

600,000 thousand?? as in 600,000,000 which is 600 Million - Muslims in Texas? I don't think so.

There are a reported 2.2 Billion Muslims in the world, and Texas has fewer than 25% of them. You can tell, Texas is prosperous, has hard working folk, with a sense of dignity, intelligence, honor and no overwhelming urge to destroy civilization.

Further, any Governor who would address a Cleric as "Your Highness" has as much business being a Govenor, as a President who bows and grovels to foreign dictators.

4 posted on 10/04/2011 7:35:51 AM PDT by Hodar ( Who needs laws; when this FEELS so right?)
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To: Liz

Sounds like more gross Islamic/globalist traitorousness, to me.

Maybe it’s time for any still patriotic Texas Rangers to kick donkeys and take names.


5 posted on 10/04/2011 7:49:50 AM PDT by Quix (Times are a changin' INSURE you have believed in your heart & confessed Jesus as Lord Come NtheFlesh)
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To: spankalib; Diogenesis

ping....


6 posted on 10/04/2011 8:04:50 AM PDT by onedoug (If)
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To: Liz

” and over 600,000 thousand Muslims living in Texas, “

...and 99% of them, don’t believe in Jihad, or killing apostates, or “honor killings”, or ...

(even though those are direct commands from Allah, in the Quran. along with lying to kaffirs, and not taking them even as friends...
but we’re told, that 99% of Muslims, don’t follow basic commands from their own religion, words they believe were directly and literally from God?)


7 posted on 10/04/2011 8:06:40 AM PDT by Elendur (It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Liz

This is a standard arbitration court, like rabbinical court or even the Chamber of Commerce’ arbitration panel. It decides contractual disputes (including family law matters), both parties have to agree in advance that they will accept it, and it cannot conflict with US law.

Contracts are voluntary agreements by which the parties agree to be bound and arbitration courts merely decide between the parties’ two conflicting interpretations of a contract (which could be a business deal but could also include something like a marriage settlement). There’s nothing unusual or even ominous about this.


8 posted on 10/04/2011 8:08:41 AM PDT by livius
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To: Elendur
Re:” and over 600,000 thousand Muslims living in Texas, “

...and 99% of them, don’t believe in Jihad, or killing apostates, or “honor killings”, or ...

(even though those are direct commands from Allah, in the Quran. along with lying to kaffirs, and not taking them even as friends...
but we’re told, that 99% of Muslims, don’t follow basic commands from their own religion, words they believe were directly and literally from God?)


Even IF only 1% believed in Jihad, and 600,000 lived in texas, that is 6,000 Jihadis dedicated to the violent conversion or death of the citizens of Texas and the US.

AND 22,000,000 violent Jihadis world wide dedicated to the establishment of the world wide caliphate.

9 posted on 10/04/2011 8:26:11 AM PDT by algernonpj (He who pays the piper . . .)
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To: Hodar

I have mixed emotions about this. The courts allow arbitration on a multitude of civil proceedings based on relegious canons or halakha or shariah, etc...

but something doesn’t seem right about letting Muslims getting a foot in the door of our legal system, when they have avowed that they want shariah to be the supreme law of the US., where halakha and canons do not espouse that.
The U.S. Constitution is not a suicide pact.

I think you mean approx. 2.5%.
The US Census Bureau, while not allowed to ask about religion, does collect data from self-described and it estimates that, as of 2010, Texas has a Muslim population of 581. and estimates the U.S. has a Muslim poulation of approx. 7 million.

http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf

As for your last “further” ? I agree...in spades.


10 posted on 10/04/2011 8:30:17 AM PDT by stylin19a (obama..."Fredo-Smart")
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To: livius
There’s nothing unusual or even ominous about this.

Don't confuse matters with facts.

11 posted on 10/04/2011 8:39:48 AM PDT by Jeff Chandler (I never win at Scrable.)
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To: livius
There’s nothing unusual or even ominous about this.

I used to wonder how Hitler came so easily to power.

All that time wasted on wondering, and all I had to do was wait 60 years and watch it first hand. Cool.

12 posted on 10/04/2011 9:00:47 AM PDT by itsahoot (Amazon Fire--Apple is doomed. In other news, Timex will kill Rolex-Details at 11:00)
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To: Liz
I'm no fan of Islam, but this is a boy who cried wolf. There's no wolf or conspiracy here.

The key word here is arbitration. Arbitration agreements are private contractual provisions agreed to by both parties. They are in all 50 states and are used often in business proceedings, most often in employment. Your TV judge shows are also a form of arbitration. This is a divorce case being settled under Islamic religious principles. That is their choice. It's no different than Catholic Canon Law annulments.

This is nothing more than a contract, and I'm glad we still live in a society where we can have private contracts governed by terms we agree on.

13 posted on 10/04/2011 9:08:52 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (Detroit Tigers - First major league team to clinch division title this year.)
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To: Liz

Any attempt to link a contract dispute between parties to Rick Perry and Khan is extremely dishonest. You should have this thread pulled.

Rick Perry has nothing to do with and no authority over contract law in Texas. Further, the so-called “Texas Islamic Court” is not a court of law under the State of Texas. It’s a panel of imams from an Islamic association who arbitrate disputes between Muslims. They call themselves the “Texas Islamic Court.” That doesn’t make them one.

3.The panel of arbitrators of Texas Islamic Court will be formed according to the rules and regulations of Texas Islamic Court. However, the parties agree and suggest the following names for the panel: .Mujahid Bakhash, the Imam of the Islamic Association of Tarrant County, Fort Worth, Texas. .Main El-quda, the Imam of the Islamic Society of Arlington, Arlington, Texas. .Abdel Salam Abu-Nar, the Imam of Dar Assalam Islamic Center, Arlington, Texas


14 posted on 10/04/2011 9:11:18 AM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: livius

Exactly. People see the word Islam and flip out.


15 posted on 10/04/2011 9:15:17 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (Detroit Tigers - First major league team to clinch division title this year.)
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To: Elendur

Perry was Lt Governor-—then became Governor in 2000.


16 posted on 10/04/2011 9:52:02 AM PDT by Liz (The rule of law must prevail. We can’t govern ourselves by our personal point of view.)
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To: livius; Liz

I’m thinking Liz is a big-government type who doesn’t think individuals should have the right to make private contracts and have their own religious beliefs written into those contracts as a method of adjudication. She thinks government should enforce her will on those people, and that people who disagree are actually liberals.

Beware the “conservatives” who want to take away religious liberty because they “know better”.

Maybe next she’ll go after the Kosher laws.


17 posted on 10/04/2011 10:06:41 AM PDT by CharlesWayneCT
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To: stylin19a
but something doesn’t seem right about letting Muslims getting a foot in the door of our legal system

Unless we are going to modify the 1st amendment with a clause allowing government to define which religions are acceptable, and which are not, I don't see how you prevent people who decide to practice the muslim faith from building houses of worship, or entering into contracts that are based on their religious beliefs.

18 posted on 10/04/2011 10:09:36 AM PDT by CharlesWayneCT
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To: Darren McCarty

COnservatives apparently now oppose the rights of people to enter into private consensual contracts.


19 posted on 10/04/2011 10:11:02 AM PDT by CharlesWayneCT
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To: Liz

bump perry


20 posted on 10/04/2011 11:45:48 AM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: Liz

Personally, I think marriage is a religious institution. I don’t believe government should be involved at all. In divorce, where separation of property and where children wind up, it should be an issue for the civil courts. If gays want to have gay churches and get married, it’s none of my business. This would keep gubmint from attempting to force Christian churches to perform ceremonies where their beliefs are compromised.


21 posted on 10/04/2011 12:30:29 PM PDT by TStro
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To: Carry_Okie; NYer; The Mayor; Sun; CynicalBear; South40; cripplecreek; indylindy; Just mythoughts; ..
Perry laid the first brick at the groundbreaking ceremony for an Ismaili mosque in Plano in 2005.

REFERENCE Dallas Morning News, June 14, 2005 Gov. Rick Perry flew in to lay the first ceremonial brick for the center's foundation. It was a symbolic gesture since the site for the new center will be a few miles northeast of the Gleneagles Country Club in Plano, where the foundation ceremony was held.

The governor, who is friends with the Ismaili Muslims' spiritual leader, His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, said he was honored to participate.

"Our culture is enriched and our society strengthened by a diverse mixture of traditions, heritages and faiths," Mr. Perry said. "While differences may exist on the surface, there is a common hope for the future that dwells in the heart of every Texan."

The Ismaili Jamatkhana and Center is a house of worship for Ismailis and a gathering place for youths. The proposed 30,000-square-foot Plano facility will be the first one in Collin County and one of five Jamatkhanas in North Texas.

22 posted on 10/04/2011 4:12:20 PM PDT by Liz (The rule of law must prevail. We can’t govern ourselves by our personal point of view.)
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To: Liz

So does this mean he would have a muslime in his cabinet? /s


23 posted on 10/04/2011 4:15:08 PM PDT by South40 (Rick Perry = The next John McCain)
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To: Liz

You can be assured I am not going to support Perry with that attitude. If he’s not intelligent enough to realize the danger Muslims present to this country he is not someone I want leading this country. We’ve got a Muslim apologist now.


24 posted on 10/04/2011 4:57:04 PM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: Liz
Muy G'bye-bye Ricardo.

Or as Popeye once said, "Swami, Salaami, Baloney!"

25 posted on 10/04/2011 5:14:40 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (GunWalker: Arming "a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as well funded")
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To: Liz
His thinking is lost in the fez.


26 posted on 10/04/2011 5:20:11 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (GunWalker: Arming "a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as well funded")
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To: Liz; All

” REFERENCE Dallas Morning News, June 14, 2005 Gov. Rick Perry flew in to lay the first ceremonial brick for the center’s foundation “

Yeah....we need that....


27 posted on 10/04/2011 9:47:23 PM PDT by stephenjohnbanker (God, family, country, mom, apple pie, the girl next door and a Ford F250 to pull my boat.)
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To: South40; Carry_Okie; CynicalBear; stephenjohnbanker; org.whodat; cripplecreek; fieldmarshaldj; ...
.....does Perry's sucking up mean he would have muslims in his cabinet?.......

Of course---to his inferior way of thinking---he o-w-e-s 'em plenty. There'll be federal goodies all around.

======================================

Looking at the way Ricky operates, he seems to have a checklist of Texas voting blocs. He and his henchmen figure out how to use tax dollars nail those votes.

Perry then gets on all fours, puckers up, and sucks-up up for votes.

Ergo---Texas gets in-state tuition, sharia courts, the largest mosque in the US, numerous "funds" and non-profits that giveaway tax dollars to his supporters, etc, etc, etc.

One news report entitled “The Governor’s Gusher,” documents 100 campaign donors who “have sought corporate welfare, relaxed regulatory rules or other government favors” from Ricky, in exchange for political largess in his gubernatorial races. A disturbing number of these profiteers made a fortune off Texas government handouts or by bending or breaking regulatory rules.

Take a look at the tangle of self-interest surrounding the $200 million Texas Emergency Technology Fund, created at Perry's behest, and the $295 million Texas Enterprise Fund which doles out millions of tax dollars to Perry supporters.

God knows what Ricky would do with federal power after getting his hands on the US Treasury.

28 posted on 10/05/2011 5:07:47 AM PDT by Liz (The rule of law must prevail. We can’t govern ourselves by our personal point of view.)
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To: Carry_Okie; Liz

” His thinking is lost in the fez. “

And he will never fez up : )


29 posted on 10/05/2011 6:19:17 AM PDT by stephenjohnbanker (God, family, country, mom, apple pie, the girl next door and a Ford F250 to pull my boat.)
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To: livius; CharlesWayneCT; Liz
Contracts are voluntary agreements by which the parties agree to be bound and arbitration courts merely decide between the parties’ two conflicting interpretations of a contract (which could be a business deal but could also include something like a marriage settlement). There’s nothing unusual or even ominous about this.

The essential concept here is "voluntary". An "agreement" where one or more of the parties was compelled to sign because of duress or undue influence can be invalidated.

In Islam, rejecting the jurisdiction of a Sharia court where one is available makes one an apostate. Apostates are marked for death in Islamic communities. At minimum, they are shunned.

No Muslim woman, especially one living in a heavily Muslim community, can be considered able to freely consent to Sharia jurisdiction because of the strong elements of duress present.

30 posted on 10/05/2011 6:35:33 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (When you've only heard lies your entire life, the truth sounds insane.)
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To: PapaBear3625
An "agreement" where one or more of the parties was compelled to sign because of duress or undue influence can be invalidated.

There is a movement to make the teaching of the concept of heaven and hell to young children a form of emotional child abuse. The argument is remarkably the same as the argument you make here -- that people, especially the younger people, but also all people who would fall for religion, are easily led, can easily be pushed under duress to accept whatever beliefs they are told.

And by telling a young child that they could die and go to a place of fire and brimstone, you are emotionally scarring them, in order to force them to accept your religion.

There is a good reason to keep government out of ANY judgment of religion -- because they ARE coming for the Christians. They are warming up on the minor religious practices, and like in WW2, if we don't stand up for the rights of all to make stupid decisions about their own religious beliefs, when they are ready to persecute US, there will be nobody else left to help defend our liberty.

I fully support laws in this country that will prosecute people for murder if they kill others, for whatever reason. That would hold true for "apostates" marked for death, for kids who don't join the right gang and are marked for death, for people who draw pictures of Mohamed, for people who testify against killers in court.

31 posted on 10/05/2011 8:51:08 AM PDT by CharlesWayneCT
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To: BuckeyeTexan

This has nothing to do with Rick Perry, either way. There should not BE a panel of anything Sharia, in America. Don’t be deceived. It is the FIRST steps of leeching it into our system. That’s why it’s called “Creeping Sharia”. Nor could it be more contrary to America’s laws. And broadly so, as is dictated by Islam. It is also in full misalignment with the Word of God.

As the 11th hour approaches us, we are going to see exactly WHY this nation should have never turned it’s back on God. He said this would come to pass. And it is.


32 posted on 10/09/2011 4:06:32 PM PDT by ourworldawry
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To: ourworldawry
There should not BE a panel of anything Sharia, in America.

The ability to arbitrate legal contract disputes is a fundamental tenet of contract law in the U.S.

Two parties to a legal contract decided before signing the contract that any disputes about the contract would be arbitrated by a panel of Muslims of their choosing.

Amish, Jewish, and various other religious groups also want their own advisors to mediate contract disputes between two parties in their group. They have the right to establish how they want to resolve contract disputes.

If you say there can be no Muslim arbitration panel established by Muslims, then you must also say that no other religious group can establish an arbitration panel for its members. In so doing you are fundamentally changing contract law in the U.S. by revoking the rights of parties to a contract to arbitrate disputes and forcing them into a court of law.

33 posted on 10/09/2011 5:26:07 PM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

The poster is no conservative.


34 posted on 10/09/2011 5:34:33 PM PDT by magritte
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To: BuckeyeTexan

No faith-based arbitration, is what I’m saying. That’s all.


35 posted on 10/10/2011 9:56:04 PM PDT by ourworldawry
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To: Hodar

What is your evidence that the number is that high?

If you CANT PROVE the number is that high, what should be our response to a religion that openly says it is supposed to be 100% of them that believe that?

I’ll ask you again: If the religion believes that 100% of the people of that religion should kill Jews and conquor the world, what should be our response?


36 posted on 10/13/2011 3:35:05 AM PDT by RaceBannon (Ron Paul is to the Constitution what Fred Phelps is to the Bible.)
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To: RaceBannon

I got my number from Wikipedia, where it goes into some detail listing the countries and their reported populations of Muslims.

Feel free to google “How many muslims in the world” - and you should get all the data you need. There are quite a few of them in Asia, and Africa, as well as the middle east


37 posted on 10/13/2011 6:13:31 AM PDT by Hodar ( Who needs laws; when this FEELS so right?)
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