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Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 23, June 8, 2012
June 8, 2012 | JustaDumbBlonde

Posted on 06/08/2012 7:26:30 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde

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Good morning! Hope that all of my FRiends and fellow gardeners have had a good and productive week.

Began the Spring harvest in my apiary yesterday, which yielded 7 gallons of beautiful honey from 3 hives. Still have 3 hives from which to pull the honey boxes, and the remaining hives will not harvest until Fall because they are relatively new. Bit of trivia here ... a gallon of honey weighs 12 pounds.

The wheat harvest is over and the farm is buzzing with tractors getting cotton and soybeans planted on the wheat ground. The field corn has tassled and pollinated, and the wells are running almost continuously to keep it watered. It is very hot and dry here.

My local garden center has all of their plants 75% off, and I went crazy in the hibiscus department. I'm adding them all over the property ... even at the gates to the donkey pasture. I also purchased several mandevilla vines to plant with some hibiscus around the back porch. We are really going to enjoy a tropical view!

My earliest sweet corn has tassled and is pollinating. I am hoping to get several acres of cowpeas planted today. Wish me luck!

Please check in and let us all know how your gardening ventures are going. I get such inspiration from reading what you're doing, and I'm sure that others do as well.

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The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!


TOPICS: Agriculture; Food; Gardening; Hobbies
KEYWORDS: garden; gardening
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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Weekly Gardening Thread (Catalog Fever) Vol. 1 Jan 6, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Seeds) Vol. 2, January 13, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 3, January 20, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (U.S. Hardiness Zones) Supplemental Vol. 1
Weekly Gardening Thread (Soil Types) Vol. 4, January 27, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation) Vol. 5, February 03, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation) Vol. 6, February 10, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation?) Vol. 7, February 17, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Home Sweet Home) Vol. 8, February 24, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Soil Structure Part 1) Vol. 9, March 2, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Transplanting Tomatoes) Vol. 10, March 9, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Useful Links) Vol. 11, March 16, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread -- Vol. 12, March 23, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread -- Vol. 13, March 31, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Happy Easter!) Vol. 14, April 6, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 15, April 13, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 16, April 20, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 17, April 27, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 18, May 4, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 19 (Getting Projects Done) May 11, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Harvesting Wheat) Vol. 20, May 18, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 21 (Keywords) May 25, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 22 (Keywords 2) June 1, 2012
1 posted on 06/08/2012 7:26:39 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...
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Ping to the Weekly Gardening Thread Member List

Please let me know if you would like to be added to or removed from the ping list.

2 posted on 06/08/2012 7:28:30 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
A timely thread.
Our daughter is moving down from Illinois (Chicago) to Dallas in June and is an avid Gardener.

Here in Austin we have a great resource, a fellow by the name of John Dromgoole who is big into organic gardening and he is the best local source for what to plant when for best results.

Since Dallas has a different climate from Austin, does anyone know of a Dallas-area counterpart to John for that kind of local gardening knowledge and guidance?

3 posted on 06/08/2012 7:32:39 AM PDT by grobdriver (Proud Member, Party of NO! No Obama, No Way, No How!)
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To: grobdriver
A must-have resource for any Texan


4 posted on 06/08/2012 7:35:04 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I bought some calla lily plants and their leaves are drooping and turning yellow. I put them in potting soil in containers. What am I doing wrong?


5 posted on 06/08/2012 7:44:24 AM PDT by Taffini ( Mr. Pippen and Mr. Waffles do not approve and neither do I)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I’m losing my squashes to some sort of rot. I put Sevin dust on them 3 weeks ago to take care of the squash bugs. Then they started rotting at the stems and the fruits so sprayed them with a 3-fer fungicide/insecticide/something. I’ve read to add calcium but don’t know anything about that. They get watered every other day because of the heat. No, I don’t use mulch as that tends to add to the problems here. Any suggestions on how to save them?


6 posted on 06/08/2012 7:53:13 AM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill

I have no immediate solution but I would suggest a soil test right away. Calcium deficiency will surely cause blossom end rot. But it takes a while to get the calcium distributed throughout the soil and digestible for plants. I try to do organic gardening which means being pro-active for the next year. By adding the needed calcium for next years heavy feeders I eliminate blossom end rot. Just make sure you are not overwatering. I mulch about everything especially squash. I water less frequently and eliminate problems associated with overwatering. I manually squash the squash bugs and use homemade organic spray to deter them. Anyone else want to weigh in?


7 posted on 06/08/2012 8:09:04 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: bgill

I always have that same squash problem. Sometimes I see those “come in the night, and poke a hole in the vine” bugs, and sometimes ants. Either that or powdery mildew get them.. I have no luck with squash.


8 posted on 06/08/2012 8:12:22 AM PDT by sockmonkey
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; All
Mowing the other day and spotted something under the old elm tree ... hmmm, a branch? Looks mighty 'black' to be a branch ....

Realized it was a snake, parked the mower & ran for the camera, hit the zoom button & started walking closer & closer & closer ..... surprisingly, the snake didn't move ... finally got this close:

When I touched his tail lightly, zzzzzziiipp .... off in the grass like a flash. I think this might be a Black Northern Racer. I saw him again later, hanging out under the pomegranate bush. Fortunately, the bluebird babies have recently fledged so if the plan for being in the area was to raid the bluebird box that was nearby, he would have found it empty.

9 posted on 06/08/2012 8:24:08 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

This is the first year that I planted a Mandevilla vine. The red is so vibrant! I used a small trellis and planted it by the light post. It has taken off and you can see vine growth every morning. It truly is a beautiful vine!


10 posted on 06/08/2012 8:33:30 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I have a horrible garden story to share. My 4 year old pulled “weeds” in my garden while outside playing yesterday. When I went to water, all but two of my tomatoes were gone. I felt sick! After struggling to get them to grow from seeds, they were gone in a matter of minutes.

We put seeds directly into the ground yesterday afternoon. With any luck, I may have a few tomatoes before the first frost date. *sigh*


11 posted on 06/08/2012 8:38:24 AM PDT by samiam1972 ("It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish."-Mother Teresa)
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To: BipolarBob

It’s already hit 100 a time or two in Texas so the garden needs the every other day or so watering. Everything else is happy with the watering. I’ve hand squished some of the squash bugs but haven’t seen any since the Sevin dust but now that I’ve said it they’ll be baaaack. I haven’t had too much trouble with any other plants getting chewed on - a few of the mustards and a little on a broccoli so that’s not bad (knock on wood). There had been lots of bees when the squashes (yellow crookneck, zuke, sweet dumpling and delicata) were blooming but only I saw one earlier this week so at one time it seemed they were happy.

BTW, we’re in the country so we get our water from our own well that’s fed from the aquifer up in the hills and from the river we’re on. There shouldn’t be much chemical fertilizer run-off since there’s only one small farm that just grows hay. All the other land is natural except for a half dozen houses up from us. I’m sure there is some mixture of underground water coming from the river but it has an “excellent” water rating even with the lawn chemicals and boating activity on it. Bottom line, the squash are getting about the best water they could wish for.


12 posted on 06/08/2012 8:59:10 AM PDT by bgill
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; All

Weather in South East/Central Missouri has been unusually dry for May. Hope it doesn’t continue into June. We could probably get another batch of strawberries, but we don’t want to water them this early in the season, so unless it rains, the berries are done.

Male kiwi expired again, so females will have no fruit again this year. Orchard is coming along nicely. We are cutting oak trees to make way for additional fruit trees.

Wild blackberries are smaller this year probably due to sparse rain. Hubby has his gardens completed. I am still sowing my raised beds, planting in 2 week intervals, so the crop will be somewhat staggered.

Have a great weekend everyone. God Bless.


13 posted on 06/08/2012 9:09:58 AM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: samiam1972

Oh, my, no. Sorry, about your tomatoes but I have to laugh because when lil’ miss was about that age she thought her job was to water mama’s flowers. She watered and she watered and she watered and she watered for hours every day with her little watering can and nearly drowned everything. It was too much fun watching her but I would have put my foot down if they’d been tomatoes. Don’t nobody mess with mama’s tomatoes!


14 posted on 06/08/2012 9:10:15 AM PDT by bgill
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Our tomatos are doing well, we have two that are about ready to pick. Some of our grape tomatos are starting to ripen also. Our squash, we have written them off for this year and maybe forever. Banana peppers are going strong, and our okry are doing good and ready to thin the herd tomorrow morning.

We got 5" of rain last night, here 40 mi north of Houston. Though we have drip irrigation system on the gardens, our trees and grass needed it. We had been watering our trees for a couple of weeks; not looking forward to the water bill.

15 posted on 06/08/2012 9:18:14 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: bgill
They make some foliar sprays for calcium to help with blossom end rot, assuming that is what you have. I have also read that adding a tums to the hole when transplanting helps.

I often add banana peels and crushed eggshells for melons, tomatoes etc, and haven't really had any problems with BER when I do that. I assume it would work for squash.

I try to find organic solutions and cheap solutions (banana peels and egg shells) for my garden, as I want to avoid pesticides etc.

16 posted on 06/08/2012 9:19:50 AM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: samiam1972

I know the feeling. Last year my young children helped me plant sunflower seeds along our privacy fence. When they were 4-5 inches tall my husband used the weedeater to “trim” the “weeds”. He didn’t notice the “weeds” were perfectly spaced, and happened to be the only weeds in the area. Ugg. He is no longer allowed to use the weedeater anywhere other than immediately adjancent to the grass.


17 posted on 06/08/2012 9:21:40 AM PDT by shatcher
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; tubebender

Good morning, all. I’m in CA trying to take care of some of the needs of my mother who broke her hip. She’s 98 and in rehab.

But, gardens. Everything is very lush here in Central CA, but only because of irrigation. The ground is powder dry. Water restrictions are in place in the city — every other day, but you can only water before 7 AM or after 7 PMon your designated day. And not a drop of water had better fall on the sidewalk. This means my mom’s yard is brown.

I picked up a book to read at Mom’s — The King of California. It is all about how one family accumulated more than 200,000 acres of cotton land, etc. from 1906 until the present (plus 60,000 acres in Australia). I looked into the front cover and found the book dedicated to Mom from the author who happened to have been one of her students.

It is a fascinating tale (so far) of the Boswell family. I can’t believe how a dry tale (no pun intended) of cotton farming, water rights, and land acquisition could be so exciting. If my mom taught this Mark Arax (co-author) to write so well, I have to be proud of her.

One other observation: We drove south to the Central Valled from San Francisco. To do so we had to cross the South Bay on one of the Bridges. The San Francisco water was brown and grimy, whereas Lake Michigan is pristine, blue, and sparkling. I know the Bay is more shallow than Lake Michigan, but I think this is an example of the environmentalists who keep a dirty back yard and push their rules onto others.


18 posted on 06/08/2012 9:37:18 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: shatcher

Sometimes I think husbands do those things just so that they won’t be asked to keep doing them. (Mine pulled up all my chrysanthemums one time.)

The husband of a friend of mine sprayed deer repellent on all of her garden — especially the hostas. The “deer repellent” happened to be Round Up. Need I say more?


19 posted on 06/08/2012 9:41:46 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: rightly_dividing

God love you! I love your tag line. :)


20 posted on 06/08/2012 9:44:03 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: MissMagnolia

You are braver than I. I would have run for the house, phoned my husband, and demanded that he come home from work immediately. Then I would have refused to do any more mowing. Ever!


21 posted on 06/08/2012 9:47:20 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Thanks, I am a big Scott Walker fan. I would like to see him in the White Hut.


22 posted on 06/08/2012 9:52:27 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

The only venomous snakes in this area are copperheads & this obviously wasn’t one of those .... so I wasn’t afraid of him .... nor was he overly concerned about me, either!


23 posted on 06/08/2012 9:54:30 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
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To: rightly_dividing

Did you read this this morning?

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303753904577452793597495290.html#

Noon is right on a lot of stuff in this essay, except on Scott Walker. He is inspiring, he is a great campaigner, and we love him. I guess Noonen is just not used to politicians telling the truth and being straight forward.

Did you know that Scott was (is) a minister’s son? An Eagle Scout? and former President of the United States at Boys’ State? He’s been marked for greatness since he was a kid, but he is the most self effacing, sweetest guy you’d ever want to meet.


24 posted on 06/08/2012 9:57:54 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: MissMagnolia; afraidfortherepublic

My wife is terrified of snakes also, but she took pictures of one that invaded on of her flower beds. I never would have thought that she would do that, go figure!


25 posted on 06/08/2012 10:00:16 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: MissMagnolia

That’s the advantage of knowing the snakes where you live. Luckily, we have no venomous snakes in Wisconsin and very few snakes at all. The ones we have are shy, and I seldom see them. Sometimes the dog points them out, but they want nothing to do with me, nor I with them. I think you are brave to “touch his tail”. LOL


26 posted on 06/08/2012 10:01:38 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

If he’d been coiled up and defensive, no way .... but his tail was 2-1/2 to 3 feet away from his head which was up like a little periscope so I got brave and did it. Instant reaction .... that fella’ could some kinda move ... guess that’s why they call them ‘racers’.


27 posted on 06/08/2012 10:06:12 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
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To: shatcher; bgill

LOL! Oh, thank you for those stories! It brightens my day to know that others have the same kind of luck I’m having. Ha!

Did I mention that this is the same child that took his 2 year old brother to the garden beds with their diggers and dump trucks and took care of what would have been carrots. I’m going to try to find a spot for those in a container or something that they can’t get to.

It’s a good thing we’re looking at this first year as practice. I’m sure learning a few things! Like I really need to put up a gate that prevents the boys from getting in! :0)


28 posted on 06/08/2012 10:07:01 AM PDT by samiam1972 ("It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish."-Mother Teresa)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I found out this week that those seeds that I assumed just weren’t growing, probably were growing, but something furry came and ate them. This time it took out all but one of my watermelon seedlings, and left a hole almost deep enough to qualify as a tunnel. I’m grating some soap out there to try and keep it away, and replanting one LAST last time. The soap is a handmade one that we got as a gift, but has so much essential oil in it that nobody can stand the smell! We had it sitting in the garage to keep the mice away. As for the seeds I’m replanting, I’m using every trick I know of to make them sprout fast. Hopefully they can catch up. It’s all summer veggies, no long-season stuff, so I should be able to get at least a little out of it.

The strawberries are starting to slow down, but I think it’s because they need rain, not because they’re done. The last few pickings were very tart. Great for cooking with, but not so much for fresh eating unless you enjoy reflux. Last night mom watered them for a while, she’d had a bad day at work and felt the need to shoot something, and decided that shooting water at the ground was probably her safest bet! I love my mom.

I got permission to add some “potato towers” to the backyard garden, and got the first one up ad planted. Like with everything, the work goes kind of slow due to my messed-up shoulders, but it gets done eventually.


29 posted on 06/08/2012 10:25:32 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; Diana in Wisconsin

Hi and thanks for the ping. I used to have a large garden, inheiritated from the woman who we bought our first house from. The soil was incredibly fertile and anything I plant grew fabulously! My first learning experience in gardening, do not plant 6 hills of cucumbers! My second experience in gardening, do not us fresh horse manure as fertilizer. You get a very nice crop of grass, alfalfa and field corn.

Anyway, I haven’t been much of a gardener since we built our ‘new’ house in ‘88. I’ve mainly grown raspberries (easy) herbs (easy) and tomatoes, easy now that I got some great advice from Diana in Wisconsin about hour to fertilize and prevent fungus. Thank you Diana! I’ve shared your advice with more people than I can count.

I had a smallish perennial garden which became overgrown. My dear husband dug it all up for me this spring and I am back to gardening, although at a much smaller scale then most of you,

I planted one hill of cukes, one hill of pickling cukes, pole beans, spinnach, radishes, 3 peppers, 3 okra that a friend gave me and a row of brussel sprouts because I love the plants.

I will be paying much nore attention to these threads now and probably asking a lot more questions.

First question. What is the best method for fertilizing? I have rather sandy soil.

The tomatoes are in a separate area in a raised bed with different soil and dear Diana helped me handle that.

Thanks guys! I love these threads.


30 posted on 06/08/2012 10:35:36 AM PDT by Jean S
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Still hot and dry here in Central Missouri. I stopped at Lowe’s on the way home from work yesterday and bought a new tripod sprinkler. Set it up in the middle of the garden after I got home and let it run for a couple hours. It covers everything but the outer fence and is going to be a wonderful time saver for me. The tomato plants are the only thing that I’ll have to drag hose to water.

I figured out the nectarine problem. It is a bug of some sort. Every one of the bad ones has a little worm ~.25” long inside. I guess next year I’ll have to spray the tree if I want good fruit. It looks like I’m going to get half a bushel or so in spite of the infestation. Not bad for a tree that’s only been in the ground four years.


31 posted on 06/08/2012 10:43:34 AM PDT by Augie
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To: All

Need some advice on something: one of the neighbors apparently hired a lawn service, and among other things they sprayed something on the fence line, probably Roundup but we’re not sure. All we do know for sure is that there is suddenly a 3-foot wide strip of dead grass on BOTH sides of the fence. Dad says that because the runoff from that area with go near my raspberry patch, the entire patch should be either moved or destroyed because it’s now pure poison.

This is the same dad who picks and eats soybeans out of a freshly sprayed field, and makes fun of me for expressing concern. He has also been trying to convince mom and I that the raspberry patch needs to be moved or destroyed, starting exactly 2 weeks after he decided to put it where it currently is. Maybe I’m biased or maybe I’m too close to the problem, but his logic doesn’t seem to track. Is anyone familiar enough with herbicides to tell me if my raspberries are about to turn poisonous because the neighbors sprayed something uphill from them?

(The patch itself is big enough that I seriously doubt that it would kill many of the plants themselves.)


32 posted on 06/08/2012 10:44:26 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
This is amazing and what a time saver....even week old (a crime) corn tastes sweet, firm, simply delicious. For those of you who might have missed this:

Corn on the cob via microwave video

(corn on the cob via microwave video)

I have lost count of the times we have had this for supper, so easy and so good...a little melted butter and salt. I've no idea where our fresh corn is coming from here in Tucson, but our greengrocer man loves this way of fixing ContheC, and finds us the freshest he has...good marketing! Enjoy!

33 posted on 06/08/2012 10:50:48 AM PDT by yoe (Proud to be part of the Tea Party movement.....!!!!!)
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To: yoe

Great video. Thanks.


34 posted on 06/08/2012 11:00:19 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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Comment #35 Removed by Moderator

To: JustaDumbBlonde

We went to a Bible conferance in Baton Rouge last weekend and I met a gentleman that I had a number of common interest with. For one, he is a beginner bee keeper. We talked at length about his experiances starting out. I guess I may put in a hive sometime and see how it goes.


36 posted on 06/08/2012 11:10:55 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

As I wrote in earlier threads, I did a lot to improve the soil in the raised beds this year. I am starting to see the results.

* The Cucumbers are about a foot tall and learning how to hang on the the chain link fencing.

* The Kohlrabi is growing gangbusters.

* Sweet Peppers are about 10” high and growing nicely.

* Summer Squash is starting to put out flowers

* Yellow Beets are about 2” high and look healthy. They are now big enough I can tell the difference between Beet sprouts and weeds.

Speaking of weeds . . . The weeds are doing FANTASTIC! I think I have the best weed crop in the County! I think a neighborhood prankster snuck (sneaked?) into my garden at night and over-seeded everything with 5lbs. of weed seeds.

[grumble - grumble - grumble]

Why do weeds seem to grow 3X better than veggies???


37 posted on 06/08/2012 11:12:31 AM PDT by Petruchio (I Think . . . Therefor I FReep.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

We went to a Bible conferance in Baton Rouge last weekend and I met a gentleman that I had a number of common interest with. For one, he is a beginner bee keeper. We talked at length about his experiances starting out. I guess I may put in a hive sometime and see how it goes.


38 posted on 06/08/2012 11:15:17 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: rightly_dividing

Love your tagline!


39 posted on 06/08/2012 11:34:18 AM PDT by Jean S
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To: Ellendra

I forgot to add a detail: part of the reason his logic doesn’t seem to track is that the place where he wants to move my raspberries is about a foot from the fence that got sprayed. Which means, they would have taken the herbicide directly instead of getting it through the runoff.


40 posted on 06/08/2012 12:55:10 PM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

On and off (mostly on) light rain this week around Tampa. It’s gotten very green, very fast.

If anyone has a recipe for salsa that cans well and wants to share, I would appreciate it. It’s time to put up some tomatoes, probably the last until fall, and I’ve got cilantro that’s about to be coriander.

Made a lasagne this week with zucchini slices instead of pasta noodles. It was really good. Going to try to see if I can freeze some “noodles”. First try failed miserably, as the slices were too thin and they just fell apart after blanching. Plenty more where that came from.


41 posted on 06/08/2012 2:15:41 PM PDT by Darth Reardon (No offense to drunken sailors)
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To: rightly_dividing

Does anybody know how to make a good fly trap? For flies already in the house somehow? Some days I enjoy the flyswatter rampage, some days I just really don’t.


42 posted on 06/08/2012 3:24:16 PM PDT by txhurl (Scott Walker is my President.)
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To: sockmonkey
I have no luck with squash.

People around here lock their cars for the first time in a year when the squash harvest comes in. They are afraid of winding up with (yet another) bag of zuchinni in the passenger seat. ;)

/johnny

43 posted on 06/08/2012 3:29:33 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: rightly_dividing

Be careful though. Wear protective clothing. A man from our daughter’s church on the SC/NC border got stung to death a few months ago by at least one of his several hives. He’d been at it for some time too.


44 posted on 06/08/2012 3:31:19 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: txhurl
My wife is world class with the swatter.

If I remember right, a mason jar with sugar water an inch deep or so with a small hole in the cap for them to enter. The flys are not smart enough to fly upwards toward the hole to excape.

45 posted on 06/08/2012 3:40:07 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Scott Walker.)
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To: txhurl

I just plug in the bug zapper and set it on a table.

FYI - - - Moths smoke a lot! LOL!


46 posted on 06/08/2012 3:40:50 PM PDT by Petruchio (I Think . . . Therefor I FReep.)
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To: rightly_dividing; Petruchio

I’m handy with a flyswatter, too, and it’s as good as a tennis workout, but today I just don’t have the necessary reserve of rage and hate to start swatting. I put a cup of vinegar, orange juice and dish soap and filled with water to bubble it up - someone on yahoo help recommended this - and they’re entirely avoiding it.

Bug zapper sound like a good idea - flies really like them? I was thinking about using the shop-vac on them, too.

They just show up out of nowhere this time of year. No horse stables, turkey farms, anything that might explain their sudden everywhereness.


47 posted on 06/08/2012 4:02:27 PM PDT by txhurl (Scott Walker is my President.)
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To: bgill
Can you post a picture of the affected fruits so we can ge a better idea of what you're looking at?

If it's blossom end rot, you can spray the plants with epsom salts in the evening and spread some on the soil around the plants prior to a deep watering. That should take care calcium deficiency problems.

48 posted on 06/08/2012 4:13:21 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Don't take life too seriously; No one gets out alive.)
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To: samiam1972

Give your 4 y.o. a hug. The child meant well.


49 posted on 06/08/2012 4:15:44 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Don't take life too seriously; No one gets out alive.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Yeahbut... Michigan is full of liberals!!!


50 posted on 06/08/2012 4:19:57 PM PDT by tubebender
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