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World's 7 most dangerous and remote islands
CNN ^ | January 30, 2013 -- Updated 1755 GMT (0155 HKT) | Mike Sowden

Posted on 01/30/2013 5:41:50 PM PST by Pan_Yan

CNN) -- Idiotic TV shows and all the latest apps bumming you out on the 21st century? Ready for some "me time" on the world's remotest islands?

Forget golden sands and swaying palms -- the reality of solitude is different as these terrifyingly distant landfalls demonstrate.

...

Bear Island
400 miles off Europe's north coast

Bjornoya, better known as Bear Island, is the southernmost island in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, 400 miles north of mainland Europe -- but only on paper, given that it's almost 150 miles south of the Norwegian island chain with which it's lumped.

It's been a nature reserve since 2002 and has a lively history of failed occupation -- hard to believe for a place of barren cliffs, near-zero precipitation and risk of leaks of radioactive material from the nearby wreck of a nuclear submarine.

...

Rockall
270 miles from Ireland

If you think Boreray sounds forbidding, try sailing 187 miles west of it. Rockall is the tip of an extinct volcano reaching 20 meters (about 65 feet) above sea level, in seas with waves recorded as high as 29 meters (95 feet).

In 1955, the British Empire, in its final territorial acquisition, seized Rockall -- allegedly due to fears the Soviets would build a missile battery on it.

Reaching Rockall: In the words of the recently minted Rockall Club, "visiting Rockall is difficult, completely weather dependent and not cheap."

(Excerpt) Read more at edition.cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Outdoors; Reference; Travel
KEYWORDS: antarctica; bearisland; bishoprock; boreray; bouvet; fartyshadesofgreen; ireland; islands; northsentinelisland; rockall; scotland; scotlandyet; svalbard; tristandacunha
Bishop's Rock:


1 posted on 01/30/2013 5:41:58 PM PST by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

St. Kilda is not that far from Scotland yet is one of the most remote places on earth. It is difficult to even land there except in the Summer.

There was an excellent movie made about the last inhabitants called “The Edge of the World”. It is now technically inhabited again as the British Army or Navy has a very small base there.

I recently read that it had been inhabited for at least 2000 years.


2 posted on 01/30/2013 6:00:47 PM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: yarddog
There was an excellent movie made about the last inhabitants called “The Edge of the World”. It is now technically inhabited again as the British Army or Navy has a very small base there.

Found it. 1937. It's not available for streaming but I'll keep an eye out for it.

Thanks!

3 posted on 01/30/2013 6:29:01 PM PST by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan
I believe it's incumbent on our outgoing Secretary of State to accompany our incoming Secretary of State on a goodwill tour, over the next 3 months, focused solely on these 7 islands.
4 posted on 01/30/2013 6:36:44 PM PST by G Larry (Which of Obama's policies do you think I'd support if he were white?)
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To: G Larry
I believe it's incumbent on our outgoing Secretary of State to accompany our incoming Secretary of State on a goodwill tour, over the next 3 months, focused solely on these 7 islands.

Ironically the few inhabitants of these islands probably moved there to get away from people exactly like that.

5 posted on 01/30/2013 6:44:29 PM PST by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

I bought if off ebay for a pretty cheap price. It was the wrong region code but I had read that my DVD player could be hacked to play any region and that turned out to be true.

I also noticed my computer will play it with no problem. It includes a whole lot of extra information both from Michael Powell and his widow. They also had a short movie of a return to Foula which is the island they filmed on. Nearly all the actors came back tho they were mostly in their 90s. Many of the Island’s inhabitants who were extras in the original movie were still alive too. The main actress who was a real beauty did not come but she was still alive as she lived to 93.

The actors director film crew etc. had to build their own shelter. Foula was just as remote as St. Kilda but was close to main shipping lanes so was far less isolated.

The owner of St. Kilda would not let them film there so they found what was basicall a twin to St. Kilda in the Orkneys I think. That Island such a close match it was almost weird. St. Kilda has the highest cliffs in Scotland and Foula had the exact same type of sheer cliffs which were only something like 10 feet less that Sr. Kilda.


6 posted on 01/30/2013 6:47:51 PM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: Pan_Yan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AH6ROxt83T4


7 posted on 01/30/2013 7:08:15 PM PST by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole..)
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To: Pan_Yan
Another remote island of historical interest, but which is difficult to reach is Iwō-tō, better known as Iwō Jima, located in the western Pacific about 700 miles south of Tokyo. The Japanese, who maintain a naval base and weather station on the island, restrict civilian access--and this probably won't change, given tensions with China in the region.
8 posted on 01/30/2013 7:57:15 PM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: Red Badger; BenLurkin; AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; ...

Thanks Pan_Yan. G’night all.


9 posted on 01/30/2013 9:05:39 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: Pan_Yan
Here's one of my favorites. Quite a history too... Some might recognize it right off. A clue? Earhart's "Final Destination," officially, though she never arrived.

Since the earliest days of the Internet, since the earliest days of "Search Engine Optimization," or "SEO," I've used this very remote American territory as a test of any given search engine's power. In recent years, finally, more and more images have surfaced, other than those of a remote ham radio DX'pedition in the early nineties and at least one persistent hand-held photograph taken from ISS, along with the Amelia lore.

< /br> Here's about all there is to see on Howland Island, aside from the Boobies who live there year round. It was inhabited as a source of phosphorus-rich bird guano for many decades, 1200 miles ssw of Hawai'i. It has a great reef for a half-mile long strip of peanut shaped desert island. No fresh water, but plenty of sun shine, right on the equator and the 180th meridian. The former might make it a great place for an eventual spaceport, with the nearly 1200 meters per second of angular momentum of Earth's rotation under foot, as an added boost to orbit. That's about three times the natural boost available at Cape Kennedy.

Along with what's left of the landing strip prepared but never used by Amelia visible in the shot above, a good picture of what remains of Earhart Light, her memorial, has finally surfaced on the Interwebs:

I often go there, in my head, when trying to get to sleep after consuming too much newsreader-news.

Take care...

10 posted on 01/30/2013 9:48:49 PM PST by Prospero (Si Deus trucido mihi, ego etiam fides Deus.)
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To: Pan_Yan
 
 
North Sentinel Island
 
400 miles from Myanmar
 
North Sentinel is one of the 572 islands making up the Andaman chain in the Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal.
 
It's surrounded by dangerous reefs, but North Sentinel is intimidating because of its inhabitants. The Sentinelese want nothing to do with the modern world and have repeatedly rebuffed attempts to make peaceful contact.
 
Reaching North Sentinel Island: You're kidding, right? If the above description didn't put you off, this article about a pair of fishermen who strayed onto the island certainly should.
 
 
------------------------------------------------------
 

Stone Age cultures survive tsunami waves

 

alt
Indian Coast Guard / AP
A Sentinelese man aims his bow and arrow at an Indian Coast Guard helicopter as it flies over his island on Dec. 28, surveying for tsunami damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests the indigenous tribes of the southern archipelago of Andaman and Nicobar used ancient know-how to save themselves from the catastrophic tsunami.
 
 
 
updated 4:38 p.m. ET 4/1/2005 00:00:00

PORT BLAIR, India - Two days after a tsunami thrashed the island where his ancestors have lived for tens of thousands of years, a lone tribesman stood naked on the beach and looked up at a hovering coast guard helicopter.

He then took out his bow and shot an arrow toward the rescue chopper.

It was a signal the Sentinelese have sent out to the world for millennia: They want to be left alone. Isolated from the rest of the world, the tribesmen needed to learn nature's sights, sounds and smells to survive.


Government officials and anthropologists believe that ancient knowledge of the movement of wind, sea and birds may have saved the five indigenous tribes on the Indian archipelago of Andaman and Nicobar islands from the tsunami that hit the Asian coastline Dec. 26.

"They can smell the wind. They can gauge the depth of the sea with the sound of their oars. They have a sixth sense which we don't possess," said Ashish Roy, a local environmentalist and lawyer who has called on the courts to protect the tribes by preventing their contact with the outside world.

Frozen in the Paleolithic past
The tribes live the most ancient, nomadic lifestyle known to man, frozen in their Paleolithic past. Many produce fire by rubbing stones, fish and hunt with bow and arrow and live in leaf and straw community huts. And they don't take kindly to intrusions.

Anil Thapliyal, a commander in the Indian coast guard, said he spotted the lone tribesman on the island of Sentinel, a 23-square-mile (60-square-kilometer) key, on Dec. 28.

"There was a naked Sentinelese man," Thapliyal told The Associated Press. "He came out and shot an arrow at the helicopter."

 

According to varying estimates, there are only about 400 to 1,000 members alive today from the Great Andamanese, Onges, Jarawas, Sentinelese and Shompens. Some anthropological DNA studies indicate the generations may have spanned back 70,000 years. They originated in Africa and migrated to India through Indonesia, anthropologists say.

 

It appears that many tribesman fled the shores well before the waves hit the coast, where they would typically be fishing at this time of year.

After the tsunami, local officials spotted 41 Great Andamanese — out of 43 in a 2001 Indian census — who had fled the submerged portion of their Strait Island. They also reported seeing 73 Onges — out of 98 in the census — who fled to highland forests in Dugong Creek on the Little Andaman island, or Hut Bay, a government anthropologist said.

However, the fate of the three other tribes won't be known until officials complete a survey of the remote islands this week, he said. The government reconnaissance mission will also assess how the ecosystem — most crucially, the water sources — has been damaged.

 

 

'Islands of the cannibals'
Taking surveys of these areas is dangerous work.

The more than 500 islands across a 3,200-square-mile (8,288-square-kilometer) chain in the southern reaches of the Bay of Bengal appear at first glance to be a tropical paradise. But even one of the earliest visitors, Marco Polo, called the atolls "the land of the head hunters." Roman geographer Claudius Ptolemaeus called the Andamans the "islands of the cannibals."

 

Image: Jarawa tribe boys
Anthropological Survey of India / AP
Three boys from the Jawara tribe in India's Andaman and Nicobar archipelago pose in a photo released by the Anthropological Survey of India.

The Sentinelese are fiercely protective of their coral reef-ringed terrain. They used to shoot arrows at government officials when they came ashore and offered gifts of coconuts, fruit and machetes on the beach.

 

The Jarawas had armed clashes with authorities until the 1990s, killing several police officers.

Samir Acharya, head of the independent Society for Andaman and Nicobar Ecology, said the Jarawas were peaceful until the British, and later the Indians, began encroaching on their territory. Thousands of bow-wielding Jarawas were killed by British bullets in 1859.

Improving relations
Over the past few years, however, relations have improved and some friendly contacts have been made. The government has banned interaction with the tribes, and even taking their pictures is an offense. Many tribe members have visited Port Blair, capital of the Indian-administered territory, and a few Great Andamanese and Onges work in government offices.

Outsiders are forbidden from interacting with the tribesmen because such contact has led in the past to alcoholism and disease among the islanders, and sexual abuse of local women.

 

"They have often been sexually exploited by influential people — they give the tribal women ... sugar, a gift wrapped in a colored cloth that makes them happy, and that's it," said Roy.

One of the most celebrated stories of a tribal man straddling both worlds is that of En-Mai, a Jarawa teenager brought to Port Blair in 1996 after he broke his leg. Six months later, he looked like any urban kid, in a T-shirt, denim jeans and a reversed baseball cap. But he is back on his island now, having shunned Western ways.

"He took to the ways ... out of a certain novelty," said Acharya. "It's like eating Chinese food on a weekend."


11 posted on 01/30/2013 10:19:37 PM PST by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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Bear Island

Bear Island
Bishop Rock

Bishop Rock
Boreray

Boreray
Bouvet

Bouvet
North Sentinel Island

North Sentinel Island
Rockall

Rockall
Tristan da Cunha

Tristan da Cunha

12 posted on 08/16/2015 2:26:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (What do we want? REGIME CHANGE! When do we want it? NOW)
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...
Note: this topic is from 1/30/2013. Thanks Pan_Yan.

13 posted on 08/16/2015 2:29:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (What do we want? REGIME CHANGE! When do we want it? NOW)
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To: SunkenCiv

Could any of these places house our incarcerated folks?


14 posted on 08/16/2015 2:43:15 PM PDT by DIRTYSECRET (urope. Why do they put up with this.)
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To: Pan_Yan

Sounds like some great places to exile certain statist leaders after we take back the nation.


15 posted on 08/16/2015 3:52:16 PM PDT by COBOL2Java (I'll vote for Jeb when Terri Schiavo endorses him.)
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To: Pan_Yan

Hah! What does CNN know?

Those islands are for pantywaists. The real most deadly island is off the coast of Brazil and it takes a permit to go there because of the danger of a lethal snake bite.

Ilha de Queimada Grande: World’s Deadliest Island | Science | Smithsonian
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/snake-infested-island-deadliest-place-brazil-180951782/?no-ist


16 posted on 08/16/2015 4:20:10 PM PDT by wildbill (If you check behind the shower curtain for a murderer, and find one.... what's yoIur plan?)
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To: Pan_Yan
Very surprised that Kerguelen was not listed.


17 posted on 08/16/2015 4:38:05 PM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Liberals support high taxes on alcohol, tobacco and wealth. And all for the same reason.)
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To: Pan_Yan
And the #1 most dangerous island in the world =>

Rikers Island

18 posted on 08/16/2015 4:55:17 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: Pan_Yan

Free Streaming of The Edge of the World here:

http://free-classic-movies.com/movies-03e/03e-1938-01-10-The-Edge-of-the-World/index.php


19 posted on 08/16/2015 5:50:10 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: Straight Vermonter; SunkenCiv
Kerguelen was the model for "Desolation Island" where Aubrey and Maturin put in to repair their badly damaged ship. O'Brien had some fun with this by having Aubrey deny in a later book that Kerguelen was "our" Desolation Island.


20 posted on 08/17/2015 3:25:04 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Pan_Yan

Desolate, as away from land and people?
My idea would be Ile St. Paul in the Indian ocean, west of Australia.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%8Ele_Saint-Paul


21 posted on 08/17/2015 3:51:04 PM PDT by GOYAKLA
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