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Keyword: antarctica

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Why Modern Meteorologists Use a 19th-Century Crystal Ball

    04/22/2016 12:04:14 PM PDT · by NYer · 3 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | April 19, 2016 | Ella Morton
    Crystal balls at the South Pole. (Photo: Eli Duke/CC BY-SA 2.0)It sounds like the premise for a riddle: At the South Pole are two crystal balls that provides unfailingly accurate information—not about the future, but about the past. This is no trick. It's just meteorology. The dual glass spheres at the South Pole are Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorders, orbs that capture the number of hours of direct sunlight each day, as well as its intensity.Sunshine recorders first came about in the 1850s, thanks to John Francis Campbell—the Campbell in Campbell-Stokes. Around 1853, Campbell, a Scottish author who focused on Celtic folklore, developed a desire to quantify...
  • Ancient Vegetation, Insect Fossils Found in Antarctica

    08/05/2008 9:56:54 AM PDT · by Scythian · 45 replies · 151+ views
    Fourteen million years ago the now lifeless valleys were tundra, similar to parts of Alaska, Canada and Siberia — cold but able to support life, researchers report. The moss was essentially freeze dried, he said. Unlike fossils, where minerals replace soft materials, the moss tissues were still there, he said. "The really cool thing is that all the details are still there," even though the plant has been dead for 14 million years. "These are actually the plant tissues themselves." ==================================================== And they redicule me for believing in the bible ... 14 million years, ya right
  • Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change

    04/16/2004 5:29:53 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 29 replies · 347+ views
    Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) ^ | APRIL 15, 2004 | PRESS RELEASE
    Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PRESS RELEASE APRIL 15, 2004 EMBARGOED: Not for release until Thursday, 15 April 2004 at 14:00 Eastern Time MOSS LANDING RESEARCHERS REVEAL IRON AS KEY TO CLIMATE CHANGE MOSS LANDING, California - A remarkable expedition to the waters of Antarctica reveals that iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have controlled Earth's climate during past ice ages. A multi-institutional group of scientists, led by Dr. Kenneth Coale of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) and Dr. Ken Johnson of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), fertilized two key areas...
  • West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study

    01/06/2003 8:04:04 AM PST · by boris · 27 replies · 407+ views
    www.spacedaily.com ^ | 01-06-2003 | not given
    LINK West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study WASHINGTON (AFP) Jan 04, 2003 The West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away some 10,000 years ago and should continue to shrink, according to a study released Friday. A team of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle found that rock fragments were left behind by glaciers that disappeared over 10,000 years ago, according to the study out Friday in the latest issue of Science. "This work establishes a background pattern of steady decline in the West Antarctic ice sheet," said John Stone, an associate professor of...
  • Meet the 'water bear,' the world’s toughest animal

    11/28/2015 7:54:46 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 29 replies
    Maclean's ^ | Nov. 26, 2015 | Cathy Gulli
    Everything about tardigrades sounds like a riddle: What creature can survive both freezing and boiling temperatures; you can't see it, but it's everywhere; it can survive outer space; and after being dried up for years, it can reanimate in water within a few minutes? The answer is just as puzzling: tardigrades, which are also called "water bears" or "moss piglets," are aquatic, microscopic invertebrates that have recently captivated evolutionary biologists and science enthusiasts alike for their unique ability to withstand extreme conditions. There is photographic evidence too that tardigrades are adorable. Now, researchers at the University of North Carolina at...
  • "Water Bears" First Animals to Survive Trip Into Space Naked (Where's PETA?)

    09/09/2008 7:12:32 PM PDT · by Clint Williams · 9 replies · 130+ views
    Slashdot ^ | 9/9/8 | timothy
    Adam Korbitz writes "New Scientist and Science Daily are reporting the results of an intriguing experiment in which scientists launched tardigrades or 'water bears' — tiny invertebrates about one millimeter long — into space onboard the European Space Agency's FOTON-M3 spacecraft. After 10 days in the vacuum of space, the satellite returned to Earth and the tardigrades were recovered. The tardigrades survived the vacuum just fine, but exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation proved deadly for most of the water bears. However, some did survive. The tardigrades are the first animals to have survived such an experiment, a feat previously...
  • Moss Frozen for 1500 Years. . . It’s Alive!

    04/18/2016 10:08:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Mysterious Universe ^ | March 19, 2014 | Paul Seaburn
    We’ve all found wrapped-but-unlabeled steaks that have been buried in a deep, dark crevice of a freezer for an unknown number of years and have attempted to revive them to a state where they can be grilled and served with copious amounts of steak sauce. Scientists with the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Reading would scoff at this trivial effort. They dug into the Antarctic permafrost and extracted frozen moss that they determined, using carbon dating, to have been frozen for over 1500 years. The icy moss was placed in an incubator, given an ideal environment and, within...
  • West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, causing significant sea level rise, experts warn

    03/31/2016 8:51:14 AM PDT · by rktman · 122 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 3/31/2016 | unknown
    Scientists are warning that the West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, potentially causing sea levels to rise more than 49 feet by 2500. The study published in the journal Nature this week, cites the impact of greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decades. Collapsing Antarctic ice could cause sea levels to rise more than 3 feet by 2100, say co-authors Rob DeConto, a geoscientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and David Pollard, a palaeoclimatologist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. If emissions continue unabated, the scientists warn, atmospheric warming will soon become a “dominant driver” of ice loss,...
  • Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says

    10/24/2007 2:48:01 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,449+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 10-24-2007 | Julian Ryall
    Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says Julian Ryall for National Geographic NewsOctober 24, 2007 A cataclysm 50 million years ago changed the face of the planet from the Hawaiian Islands to Antarctica, according to new research. The collapse of an underwater mountain range in the Pacific Ocean turned Australia into a warm and sunny continent instead of a snowbound wasteland and created some of the islands that dot the South Pacific today. "We have found that the destruction of an entire mid-ocean ridge, known as the Izanagi Ridge, initiated a chain reaction of geological events," said Joanne Whittaker, a...
  • Antarctica Was Just Declared ‘The World’s First LGBT-Friendly Continent’

    03/24/2016 5:28:14 PM PDT · by Samwell Tarly · 45 replies
    Huffington Post ^ | March 24, 2016 | JamesMichael Nichols
    Antarctica is known for frigid temperatures, parading penguins and now... being “the world’s first LGBT-friendly continent”?That’s right — at least if Planting Peace has anything to say about it.The non-profit advocacy organization, which created the pro-queer rainbow Equality House adjacent to the Westboro Baptist Church compound in Topeka, Kansas, recently traveled across Antarctica carrying a Pride flag in a symbolic effort to declare full human rights for all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people living in or visiting Antartica. The gesture is also meant to raise awareness about securing equality for queer people on a global level.
  • Meteor mega-hit spawned Australian continent: researchers

    06/03/2006 3:23:27 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 774+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 6/2/06 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) - A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said. Ohio State University scientists said the 483-kilometer-wide (300-mile-wide) crater is now hidden more than 1.6 kilometers (one mile) beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. "Gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out," the university said in a statement Thursday....
  • Global warming, not asteroid, cause of extinction?

    01/21/2005 7:09:59 AM PST · by Zon · 45 replies · 1,455+ views
    c|net news.com ^ | 1/20/2005 | Michael Kanellos
    Two hundred and fifty million years ago, the majority of life on earth may have suffocated. The "Great Dying," a catastrophic event that killed 90 percent of Earth's marine life and 75 percent of the life on land, was caused by a combination of warmer temperatures and lower oxygen levels, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Washington. In other words, the extinction was precipitated by global warming, rather than an asteroid collision, the reigning theory. The findings, to be published in the magazine Science, are largely based on comparisons of fossils found in South Africa's...
  • Iron meteorites 'buried in Antarctica' by the Sun

    02/22/2016 9:23:26 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 02/17/2016 | Jonathan Webb
    Antarctica is known by meteorite specialists as a fruitful hunting ground, because the rocks are collected from their landing sites by glacial flows and transported to concentrated dumping-grounds. ... Among this Antarctic haul, however, researchers have noticed that iron-rich meteorites - whether partly or wholly made of the metal - are surprisingly scarce, compared to the percentage collected in other places around the world. Dr Joy and her colleagues think they may have discovered why. They froze two small meteorites of similar size and shape, one made of iron and the other rocky and non-metallic, inside blocks of ice. A...
  • Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries

    02/22/2016 12:56:48 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 154 replies
    New York Times ^ | February 22, 2016 | By JUSTIN GILLIS
    The oceans are rising faster than at any point in the last 28 centuries, and human emissions of greenhouse gases are primarily responsible, scientists reported Monday. They added that the flooding that is starting to make life miserable in many coastal towns - like Miami Beach; Norfolk, Va.; and Charleston, S.C. - was largely a consequence of those emissions, and that it is likely to grow worse in coming years. The ocean could rise as much as three or four feet by 2100, as ocean water expands and the great ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica begin to collapse. Experts...
  • ...Antarctic fungi survives Martian conditions...strapped outside the space station for 18 months

    01/28/2016 6:28:56 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    daily mail uk ^ | 01/25/2016 | cheyenne macdonald
    After a year-and-a-half long voyage aboard the International Space Station, a group of fungi collected from Antarctica has proven its ability to withstand harsh, Mars-like conditions. More than half of the cells remained intact over the course of the 18-month study, providing new insight for the possibility of life on Mars. These fungal samples, along with lichens from Spain and Austria, have allowed European researchers to assess the survivability and stability of microscopic lifeforms on the red planet. The tiny fungi taken from Antarctica are typically found in the cracks of rocks in this dry, hostile region. Scientists took samples...
  • Prince William's friend Henry Worsley dies trying to recreate Shackleton's Antarctic crossing

    01/25/2016 8:01:01 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | gordan raynor
    A friend of the Duke of Cambridge has died attempting to make a solo crossing of Antarctica to raise money for one of the Duke's charities. Kensington Palace announced that Henry Worsley, 55, died in hospital in Chile, where he had undergone surgery after falling ill with bacterial peritonitis just 30 miles short of his goal. The Duke, who was Patron of the expedition, said he was "incredibly proud" of the former SAS officer's effort, which raised more than ÂŁ100,000 for the Endeavour Fund, part of the Duke's Royal Foundation charity. Mr Worsley was trying to complete the journey that...
  • World's largest canyon discovered beneath Antarctica

    01/13/2016 11:24:39 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 27 replies
    ninemsn ^ | January 14, 2016 | James Gorman
    The worlds largest canyon may lie deep beneath the ice sheets on Antarctica, according to a new discovery by UK scientists. While the depth of the discovery is comparative to the Grand Canyon it dwarfs the US landmark by 555km in length. Satellite data recovered by a team of scientists led by Durham University revealed the previously unknown canyon system which is thought to be more than 1000km long and 1km deep buried under several kilometres of ice. While the discovery is yet to be confirmed by direct measurements, researchers believe the canyon beneath the ice sheet may be so...
  • Breaking Icebergs Unexpectedly Slow Global Warming

    01/11/2016 10:42:43 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 15 replies
    Al Jazeera America ^ | 1-11-2016 | Reuters
    The biggest icebergs breaking off Antarctica unexpectedly help to slow global warming as they melt away into the chill Southern Ocean, scientists said Monday. The rare Manhattan-sized icebergs, which may become more frequent in coming decades because of climate change, release a vast trail of iron and other nutrients that act as fertilizers for algae and other tiny plant-like organisms in the ocean. These extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, a natural ally for human efforts to limit the pace of climate change blamed on manmade greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean blooms in the wake of giant icebergs...
  • Countries Rush for Upper Hand in Antarctica (Russia plants flag and church)

    01/06/2016 1:23:46 PM PST · by Trumpinator · 23 replies
    nytimes.com ^ | December 29, 2015 | SIMON ROMERO
    On a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals, Russia has built Antarctica’s first Orthodox church on a hill overlooking its research base, transporting the logs all the way from Siberia. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese laborers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate five bases on Antarctica, complete with an indoor badminton court, domes to protect satellite stations and sleeping quarters for 150 people. Not to be outdone, India’s futuristic new Bharathi base, built on stilts using 134 interlocking shipping containers, resembles a spaceship. Turkey and Iran have announced plans...
  • Massive Eltanin Meteor 2.5 million years ago set off mass tsunami, changed the climate?

    09/28/2012 11:55:36 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    JoNova ^ | September 21st, 2012 | Joanne
    From the file of “Things that would really be catastrophic”. Did a meteor have a role in a major shift in Earth’s Climate?The start of the Quaternary period (2.588 million years ago, where the Pliocene became Pleistocene) coincides with evidence of a mega tsunami in the South Pacific.The Eltanin Meteor fell into the South Pacific 2.5 million years ago setting off a (likely) tsunami that was hundreds of meters high and theoretically pushed mass material into the atmosphere which may have contributed to the cooling the globe had already started on. This meteor was hard to detect because it hit...
  • How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky (Shackleton's Antartica Scotch)

    01/22/2012 4:18:28 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 52 replies
    PopSci ^ | 01.04.2012 | Paul Adams
    How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky Preserved in Antarctica since 1907, the Scotch that Ernest Shackleton drank is now available in stores In 1907, Ernest Shackleton and crew set out on the ship Nimrod to visit Antarctica and, they hoped, the South Pole. The good news was, the entire party survived the trip, thanks in part to the Rare Old Highland Whisky they brought to the frozen continent. But the expedition was forced to evacuate in 1909, some 100 miles short of the Pole they sought. And, as winter ice encroached and the men hurried home, they left behind...
  • New Zealand museum thaws 100-year-old whisky

    07/24/2010 5:20:35 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/22/2010
    A crate of Scotch whisky that has been frozen in Antarctic ice for more than a century is being slowly thawed by New Zealand museum officials. The crate of whisky was recovered earlier this year - along with four other crates containing whisky and brandy - beneath the floor of a hut built by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton during his 1908 Antarctic expedition. Four of the crates were left in the ice, but one labelled Mackinlay's whisky was brought to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand's South Island, where officials said it was being thawed in a...
  • World's oldest malt whisky ($15,000 a bottle) goes on sale

    03/12/2010 7:10:30 AM PST · by envisio · 74 replies · 1,308+ views
    DAILYMAIL ^ | 12th March 2010 | By Daily Mail Reporter
    The world's oldest malt whisky - costing up to Ł10,000 a bottle - went on sale today. The Mortlach 70-year-old Speyside was sampled by a select group of tasters at a ceremony in Edinburgh Castle. Bottles of the rare piece of Scotland's 'liquid history' have now hit the market. Only 54 full-size bottles, costing Ł10,000 each, and 162 smaller bottles at Ł2,500 have been made available. The whisky has been released under Gordon and MacPhail's Generations brand. It was filled into its cask on October 15 1938 on the order of John Urquhart, the grandfather of the firm's joint managing...
  • Scotch Whisky Meant To Warm Antarctic Explorers Retrieved After Century Locked In Ice

    02/06/2010 9:26:13 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 30 replies · 1,108+ views
    StarTribune.com ^ | February 5, 2010 | AP
    Scotch whisky meant to warm Antarctic explorers retrieved after century locked in ice Associated Press WELLINGTON, New Zealand - This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved." New Zealand Antarctic...
  • Shackleton's whisky recovered

    02/05/2010 7:52:41 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies · 815+ views
    Guardian.co.uk ^ | February 2010 12.20 GMT | Rick Peters
    That's the spirit! Cases of Mackinlay's 'Rare Old' scotch whisky have been recovered from the ice outside Shackleton's Antarctic hut. What will it taste like? After some hype and anticipation news has emerged that the crates of whisky long suspected to have been entombed by ice outside Sir Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic hut have finally been recovered. A team from the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust have managed to extract five cases, three of Chas Mackinlay & Co's whisky and two containing brandy made by the Hunter Valley Distillery Limited, Allandale (Australia), which were abandoned by the expedition in 1909 as...
  • Explorers' century-old whisky found in Antarctic

    02/05/2010 5:57:24 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 32 replies · 994+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Fri Feb 5, 4:49 am ET | unknown
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand – This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved."
  • Preserved in ice for 100 years, the whisky Shackleton used to keep out the cold.

    11/04/2009 6:03:37 PM PST · by GSP.FAN · 41 replies · 1,672+ views
    MailOnline ^ | 03 March 2007 | Peter Gillman
    They say whisky matures with age...but leaving it embedded in the Antarctic ice for almost 100 years may be going a bit far.
  • Whisky on (Antarctic) ice: Ernest Shackleton...left a stash at the bottom of the world.

    10/26/2009 6:07:49 PM PDT · by xzins · 45 replies · 3,035+ views
    Global Post ^ | October 26, 2009 | Emily Stone
    CAPE ROYDS, Antarctica — This spit of black volcanic rock that juts out along the coast of Antarctica is an inhospitable place. Temperatures drop below –50 Fahrenheit and high winds cause blinding snowstorms... But if you happen upon the small wooden hut that sits at Cape Royds and wriggled yourself underneath, you'd find a surprise stashed in the foot and a half of space beneath the floorboards. Tucked in the shadows and frozen to the ground are two cases of Scotch whisky left behind 100 years ago by Sir Ernest Shackleton after a failed attempt at the South Pole. Conservators...
  • Now That’s What I Call On The Rocks! 107-Y/O Crates Of Whisky Found Frozen In Antarctica

    11/27/2015 3:31:17 PM PST · by NYer · 32 replies
    Dusty Old Things ^ | November 26, 2015
    In 2010, researchers and conservators from the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand made quite the interesting discovery. Hidden beneath the hut legendary explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton used during his 1908 Antarctica expedition (known as the Nimrod) were five crates covered in ice: three containing whisky and two containing scotch! This wasn’t the only discovery made by the Trust either; they also found a notebook and photos from similar expeditions on the continent.From: Youtube / Shackleton Whisky After the whisky was discovered, one crate was sent to New Zealand where it was thawed and displayed for the public at Canterbury Museum. Three of the bottles...
  • What’s Going on in Antarctica? Is the Ice Melting or Growing?

    11/10/2015 5:09:52 PM PST · by ForYourChildren · 27 replies
    EcoWatch ^ | November 10, 2015 | na
    Last week a study was published in the Journal of Glaciology by a group of NASA researchers reporting that satellite data shows that, as a whole, Antarctica has been gaining-rather than losing-ice mass during the past two or more decades. So was NASA and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) wrong about Antarctica's ice loss? Is the Antarctic ice growing? The short answer is best summarized by the title of Andrew Freedman's article on Mashable (which everyone should read): "No, NASA has not reversed itself on the dangerous melting of Antarctica." However, in less enlightened (or maybe honest) circles,...
  • Global warming caused FOURTEEN extreme weather events last year and affected every continent but...

    11/06/2015 5:29:18 PM PST · by Libloather · 53 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11/05/15
    Global warming caused FOURTEEN extreme weather events last year and affected every continent but Antarctica, researchers reveal New scientific analysis shows the fingerprints of man-made climate change on 14 extreme weather events in 2014, hitting every continent but Antarctica. Dozens of scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and across the world examined 28 strange weather conditions last year to see if global warming partly increased their likelihood or their strength. In a series of papers in a 180-page, peer-reviewed report, the scientists spotted some effects of climate change in half of them.
  • Ooops! New NASA study: Antarctica isn’t losing ice mass after all !

    11/03/2015 10:01:52 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 21 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | October 31, 2015 | Anthony Watts
    From the “settled science” department and former chief alarmist Jay Zwally, who for years had said the Arctic was in big trouble (only to have his prediction falsified), comes this Emily Litella moment in climate science: “Never mind!”. Curiously, WUWT reported back in 2012 about an ICEsat study by Zwally that said: ICESAT Data Shows Mass Gains of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Exceed Losses. I surmise that with the publication of this second study, the original is now confirmed. I suppose John Cook will have to revise his “Denial 101” video on Antarctica now. This map shows the rates of mass changes...
  • Another Inconvenient Truth? New NASA Study Finds Antarctica Is Gaining Ice!

    11/03/2015 1:00:24 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 11/03/2015 | Tyler Durden
    Well this is awkward. Just a month after former Aussie PM Tony Abbott openly questioned global warming data (and was 'replaced'), a new NASA study finds another inconvenient truth - Antarctica has been adding more ice than it's been losing, challenging other research, including that of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, that concludes that Earth’s southern continent is losing land ice overall.As Christian Science Monitor reports, In a paper published in the Journal of Glaciology on Friday, researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Maryland in College Park, and the engineering firm Sigma Space...
  • Global Warming blamed for antarctic snow growth as data wrong again, Putin says warming is fraud

    11/03/2015 7:32:04 AM PST · by Trumpinator · 6 replies
    theglobaldispatch.com ^ | Mon, Nov 2nd, 2015 | Brandon Jones
    Gobal Warming blamed for antarctic snow growth as IPCC data wrong again, Putin says warming is a ‘fraud’ Warming equates to more snow is the latest update from global warming enthusiasts as the latest report from NASA and the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) points out that from 1992 to 2001, Antarctica was estimated to have gained 112 billion tons of ice every year. Even when growth slowed, it still continued, adding 82 billion tons of ice during 2003 t0 2008. “We’re essentially in agreement with other studies that show an increase in ice discharge in the Antarctic Peninsula...
  • Russia thwarts plan for Antarctic ocean sanctuary, China on board - declares global warming fraud

    11/03/2015 7:02:56 AM PST · by Trumpinator · 21 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | Lincoln Feast
    Russia thwarts plan for Antarctic ocean sanctuary, China on board Reuters By Lincoln Feast October 30, 2015 12:50 AM SYDNEY, Australia - Russia has again thwarted attempts to create the world’s largest ocean sanctuary in Antarctica, the final country opposing the protection of a vast swathe of rich waters from fishing, after a revised international plan won support from China. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) ends a 10-day meeting in Hobart, Australia on Friday without the consensus needed for a deal to conserve and manage the marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean. While Russia...
  • What global warming? Antarctic ice is INCREASING by 135billion tonnes a year, says NASA

    11/02/2015 8:08:07 AM PST · by GonzoII · 25 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | Mon, Nov 2, 2015 | Jon Austin
    A NEW Nasa study of the Antarctic from space has thrown the case for climate change into disarray after finding that more NEW new ice has formed at the Antarctic than has been lost to its thinning glaciers. The US space agency research claims an increase in Antarctic snow accumulation that began 10,000 years ago is "currently adding enough ice to the continent to outweigh the increased losses from melting glaciers. Global warming theories have been thrown into doubt after Nasa also claimed current horror predictions into future sea-level rises may not be as severe. Major studies previously made the...
  • Did we really save the Ozone Layer?

    11/02/2015 5:02:13 AM PST · by norwaypinesavage · 23 replies
    Watt's Up With That ^ | October 26, 2015 | Steve Goreham
    Another year has passed and that stubborn Ozone Hole over Antarctica refuses to go away...The Ozone Layer is known to block ultraviolet rays, shielding the surface of Earth from high-energy radiation. Scientists were concerned that degradation of the ozone layer would increase rates of skin cancer and cataracts and cause immune system problems in humans...World consumption of Ozone Depleting Substances has been reduced to zero over the last three decades
  • Penguin Eggs to Die For

    10/26/2015 10:52:44 AM PDT · by fishtank · 13 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Oct. 2015 | James J.S. Johnson
    Penguin Eggs to Die For by James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. * "There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death. (Proverbs 14:12)" During January–March 1912, Captain Robert Scott and four other optimistic members of the British Antarctic Terra Nova Expedition braved the bitter-cold summer weather of Antarctica’s Ross Ice Sheet, hoping to be the first to discover the South Pole. Another hope of his team’s quixotic quest was to acquire early-development-stage emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) eggs for marshaling scientific evidence trying to prove the so-called “law” of phylogenetic recapitulation,...
  • Audit: Scientists in Antarctica prone to alcohol-fueled fights, indecent exposure

    10/08/2015 5:59:17 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 44 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 7, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    WASHINGTON, - An audit of the U.S. Antarctic Program revealed alcohol-fueled "unpredictable behavior" by scientists including "fights" and "indecent exposure." The health and safety audit, conducted by the National Science Foundation's Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Antarctic Program, said "alcohol consumption" on the part of scientists has been found to cause "unpredictable behavior" and "has led to fights, indecent exposure, and employees arriving to work under the influence." The program bans alcohol consumption in work areas and during work hours, but one human resources manager interviewed for the report said about 75 percent of disciplinary actions taken...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Antarctic Analemma

    09/23/2015 3:56:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | September 23, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Does the Sun return to the same spot on the sky every day? No. A better and more visual answer to that question is an analemma, a composite image taken from the same spot at the same time over the course of a year. The featured weekly analemma was taken despite cold temperatures and high winds near the Concordia Station in Antarctica. The position of the Sun at 4 pm was captured on multiple days in the digital composite image, believed to be the first analemma constructed from Antarctica. The reason the image only shows the Sun from September...
  • The George 1 Antarctic Repatriation Project [Operation Highjump]

    09/20/2015 8:40:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    North South Polar ^ | since 2012 | unattributed
    Working at the request of the surviving families nearly 75 years after the crash, a specialized NSP team is planning an expedition to Antarctica to perform a site survey in order to locate the preserved frozen bodies of (3) US Navy air crewmen from a depth of up to 150 feet under the glacier’s surface. Following the extremely hazardous survey expedition, NSP will work with the U.S. DoD to repatriate the men with proper honors. The men died when their converted reconnaissance patrol bomber, a U.S. Navy Martin Mariner PBM-5 flying boat codenamed George 1, grazed a ridgeline, then exploded...
  • NO SEA LEVEL danger from Antarctic this century, even if ALL COAL and OIL burned

    09/15/2015 9:17:58 AM PDT · by dayglored · 22 replies
    The Register ^ | Sep 15, 2015 | Lewis Page
    Hardcore warmist's amazing admission One of the world's most firmly global-warmist scientists has put his name to a scientific paper which says that even if humanity deliberately sets out to burn all the fossil fuels it can find, as fast as it can, there will be no troublesome sea level rise due to melting Antarctic ice this century. Dr Ken Caldeira's credentials as a global warmist are impeccable. He is not a true green hardliner - he has signed a plea to his fellow greens to get over their objections to nuclear power, for instance, and he doesn't totally rule...
  • Study Predicts Antarctica Ice Melt if All Fossil Fuels Are Burned

    09/12/2015 1:51:58 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 59 replies
    nytimes.com ^ | SEPT. 11, 2015 | JUSTIN GILLIS
    Burning all the world’s deposits of coal, oil and natural gas would raise the temperature enough to melt the entire ice sheet covering Antarctica, driving the level of the sea up by more than 160 feet, scientists reported Friday.In a major surprise to the scientists, they found that half the melting could occur in as little as a thousand years, causing the ocean to rise by something on the order of a foot per decade, roughly 10 times the rate at which it is rising now. Such a pace would almost certainly throw human society into chaos, forcing a rapid...
  • Ross Sea Party Lost Photos (Amazing Century-Old Photos Found Preserved in Antarctic Ice Slideshow)

    09/01/2015 8:40:28 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 42 replies
    A team of conservationists were working on restoring an old hut that served as an Antarctic exploration outpost when they discovered a box full of undeveloped negatives, frozen in a solid block of ice.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Distant Neutrinos Detected Below Antarctic Ice

    09/01/2015 4:19:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | September 01, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: From where do these neutrinos come? The IceCube Neutrino Observatory near the South Pole of the Earth has begun to detect nearly invisible particles of very high energy. Although these rarely-interacting neutrinos pass through much of the Earth just before being detected, where they started remains a mystery. Pictured here is IceCube's Antarctic lab accompanied by a cartoon depicting long strands of detectors frozen into the crystal clear ice below. Candidate origins for these cosmic neutrinos include the violent surroundings of supermassive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies, and tremendous stellar explosions culminating in gamma ray bursts...
  • World's 7 most dangerous and remote islands

    01/30/2013 5:41:50 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies
    CNN ^ | January 30, 2013 -- Updated 1755 GMT (0155 HKT) | Mike Sowden
    CNN) -- Idiotic TV shows and all the latest apps bumming you out on the 21st century? Ready for some "me time" on the world's remotest islands? Forget golden sands and swaying palms -- the reality of solitude is different as these terrifyingly distant landfalls demonstrate. ... Bear Island 400 miles off Europe's north coast Bjornoya, better known as Bear Island, is the southernmost island in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, 400 miles north of mainland Europe -- but only on paper, given that it's almost 150 miles south of the Norwegian island chain with which it's lumped. It's been...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Blue Moon Halo over Antarctica

    08/11/2015 2:59:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | August 11, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever seen a halo around the Moon? Such 22 degree rings around the Moon -- caused by ice crystals falling in the Earth's atmosphere -- are somewhat rare. OK, but have you ever seen a blue moon? Given the modern definition of blue moon -- the second full moon occurring in a calendar month -- these are also rare. What is featured above might therefore be considered doubly rare -- a halo surrounding a blue moon. The featured image was taken late last month near Zhongshan Station in Antarctica. Visible in the foreground are a power generating...
  • Does Global Warming Actually Increase Antarctic Sea Ice?

    07/31/2015 2:28:06 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 100 replies
    Discovery News ^ | July 31, 2015 | BY PATRICK J. KIGER
    People who insist that climate change isn’t happening often try to disprove it by pointing to what they see as contradictory phenomena. One of their most visually compelling arguments has centered upon Antarctic sea ice, which expanded to reach record levels in 2014. If the planet really is warming, they ask, then shouldn’t the ice in the southern ocean be melting? But now, in a new, not-yet-published paper, James Hansen, former director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and colleagues push back even harder. They argue that the increase in Antarctic sea ice not only doesn’t refute climate...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day - Milky Way and Aurora over Antarctica

    07/26/2015 9:41:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | July 27, 2015 | Image Credit & Copyright: LI Hang
    Explanation: It has been one of the better skies of this long night. In parts of Antarctica, not only is it winter, but the Sun can spend weeks below the horizon. At China's Zhongshan Station, people sometimes venture out into the cold to photograph a spectacular night sky. The featured image from one such outing was taken in mid-July, just before the end of this polar night. Pointing up, the wide angle lens captured not only the ground at the bottom, but at the top as well. In the foreground is a colleague also taking pictures. In the distance, a...
  • Earth’s Most Famous Climate Scientist Issues Bombshell Sea Level Warning (Guess who?)

    07/23/2015 2:04:34 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 61 replies
    Slate ^ | July 20, 2015 | Eric Holthaus
    In what may prove to be a turning point for political action on climate change, a breathtaking new study casts extreme doubt about the near-term stability of global sea levels. The study—written by James Hansen, NASA’s former lead climate scientist, and 16 co-authors, many of whom are considered among the top in their fields—concludes that glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica will melt 10 times faster than previous consensus estimates, resulting in sea level rise of at least 10 feet in as little as 50 years. The study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, brings new importance to a feedback loop...