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Potential Successors to Pope John Paul II
NPR Online ^ | April 2, 2005 | Barbara Bradley Hagerty

Posted on 04/03/2005 9:26:09 PM PDT by iceemonster

NPR.org, April 2, 2005 · "Tip O'Neill was correct," says Father Tom Reese, editor in chief of America, the Catholic weekly magazine. "All politics is local... even in the Catholic Church."

Reese suggests that instead of focusing on the possible papal candidates as a bookie would look at horses in the starting gate, try to think about the election from the point of view of the electors, the cardinals who cast the votes.

"Each cardinal is thinking, how will this candidate go over in my diocese?" Reese says. "If you're from the Third World, you're concerned with people who are starving and suffering from the negative impact of globalization of the economy. You'll want a pope who will speak out for social justice, forgiveness of Third World debt and be willing to stand up to the American superpower."

Cardinals from Africa and Asia, he says, are confronted by growing Islamic fundamentalism. They will want a pope who understands Islam and will not use inflammatory words like "crusade," as did President George W. Bush. They want a pope who, like John Paul II, will support dialogue with Muslims but at the same time stand up for the rights of Catholics.

On the other hand, he says, in Latin America there are few Muslims. Their concern is the Evangelicals and Pentecostals who are "stealing their sheep."

In North America and Europe, the cardinals will want a pope who supports ecumenical dialogue with Protestants and Jews. Given the growing alienation of educated women, they would also want someone who projects an understanding of women's concerns. The last thing they would want, for example, is a pope who decided to get rid of altar girls. The American cardinals would also want someone who understands and supports what they are doing to deal with the sexual abuse crisis.

It's a safe bet that an American will not be elected pope. Reese suggests three reasons. One is that Americans are not great linguists. Some U.S. bishops speak Spanish, but Reese says a pope needs to speak several languages, preferably including Italian and French.

The second, far weightier reason involves the reaction from the Third World. "There's a love-hate relationship with the U.S.," Reese says. "On the one hand, everyone wants to move to the U.S., but they're often not pleased with American foreign policy." He says the Catholic Church is concerned about its relationship with other faiths, especially Islam; and at this point, a U.S. pope would go over poorly in the Muslim world.

The final reason for an American shutout comes from history -- in particular, the lessons learned from giving the papacy to a citizen of the world's superpower at any given point in time. The electors shied away from Italian popes during the Roman Empire, from Spanish popes during Spain's dominance. And, Reese notes, "when they elected a French Pope" (Clement V in 1305), "he moved the church to Avignon."

The Men to Watch

Below is an assessment of some of the top candidates, by region, as viewed by Reese and John L. Allen, the Rome correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter. The names are not in order of electability.

AFRICA

Francis Arinze (Nigeria, born 11/1/32). Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship. Cardinal Arinze is at the top of most Vatican-watchers' short list, and the prospect of a "black Pope" has captivated the media. Arinze was born into the Ibo tribe of Nigeria -- his father was a chief -- and converted to Catholicism at age nine. Arinze became a priest when he was 26, and an archbishop at 34. Arinze's strengths include his experience with Protestants and other religions. Protestants and Catholics share much of southern Nigeria, allowing him to hone his ecumenism; in the north of the country, Arinze has developed a good relationship with the Muslim majority. With this background, Pope John Paul II called him to Rome to oversee the Vatican's inter-religious dialogue (with Muslims, Buddhists, etc).

Arinze is conservative theologically, charismatic and sophisticated with a sharp sense of humor. Electing an African pope would appeal to the fastest growing part of the Church -- the Southern Hemisphere. And it would signal that the Church is not just Catholic but catholic -- universal -- no longer a European church.

Wilfrid Fox Napier (South Africa, 3/8/1941). Archbishop of Durban. Ordained at 28, Napier became a cardinal at 58. A quiet man, Napier has seen his share of upheaval: He was archbishop through apartheid, and, as a close friend of Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu, he also witnessed at close range the rise of the independence movement in South Africa. He has a strong ecumenical record, and his election would also symbolize the church's transition to the Third World. But he is young, and not widely known.

ITALY

Dionigi Tettamanzi (Italy, 3/14/34). Archbishop of Milan. This man, too, is at the top of everyone's list. Ordained at age 20, and a Cardinal at 63, Tettamanzi appeals to the media and to fellow priests for his personable, low-key style. He is a conservative moral theologian who agrees with Pope John Paul II's views on birth control and sexual matters. He spent 32 years teaching future priests and running seminaries in Milan and Rome.

Some believe that after the long papacy of John Paul of Poland, it's time to elevate an Italian to the papacy. Currently there are 20 Italian cardinals who are eligible to vote, making the Italian contingent the largest voting bloc. And Italy (along with France) embodies the decline of Catholicism in Europe; some observers believe that electing an Italian Pope would spark a greater effort to, as John Allen puts it, "bring prodigal European Catholics back to the fold."

Giovanni Battista Re (Italy, 1/30/1934). Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops (which recommends bishops for the various dioceses). Ordained at 23, he became an archbishop at 53. He also served in the Secretariat of State under Paul VI, responsible for the day-to-day management of church affairs. This job has been in the past a springboard to the papacy, and Re is considered a strong Italian candidate. His downside is that he has always served in the Vatican, and never served as a diocesan bishop, which is a typical qualification for the papacy. Re has exhibited conservative tendencies; for example, he demanded disciplinary action for a priest who took part in a pro-gay rally. However, he is by and large seen as a moderate, and has signaled his support for decentralizing the church. Re could appeal to those looking for a compromise candidate.

Angelo Scola (Italy, 11/7/1941). Patriarch of Venice. Ordained at 28, Scola became a cardinal in 2003. Polished and approachable, Scola is considered an intellectual: He studied at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and speaks fluent English, as well as several other languages. His particular interest is bioethics and the "culture of life," and he could be expected to be a vigorous advocate of conservative church teachings in that area. Scola told CNN in 2003 that the main challenge to the church is the "fracture" between the church and contemporary culture: "It's very difficult to determine whether this is the fault of the world that has abandoned the church, or the church that does not know how to relate to the world." Allen suggests that Scola is a strong candidate.

Ennio Antonelli (Italy, 11/18/1936) Archbishop of Florence. Ordained at 23, archbishop at 45. Should Antonelli be selected, he would travel the same little-used path as Pope John Paul II -- as an outsider seen more as a pastor than a politician or diplomat. According to Allen, Antonelli has struggled in his relations with the curia and the Italian bishops' conference, where he served as secretary. His special interests are peace and justice. On doctrinal issues, he is orthodox, although he has shown moderation in applying doctrine. For example, he defended divorced Italian politicians, arguing that the church should care more about their policy stands than their personal behavior. He loves the arts, and taught art for several years in Italian public schools.

EUROPE

Godfried Danneels (Belgium, 6/4/33). Archbishop of Mechelen-Brussels. Danneels was ordained when he was 24, and became a cardinal at 49. Some believe that at 77, Danneels may be past the age of electability; moreover, he had a serious heart attack in 1997, which calls his health into question.

Danneels speaks several languages well, including Italian and English. He's a favorite of liberal reformers, as he has expressed what (to this Vatican) are radical ideas. For example, he has suggested that those infected with AIDS should use condoms. He told Allen that he is open to appointing women to run curial agencies. He has advocated that sick or incapacitated popes retire rather than serve for life. And contrary to the pessimism that pervades the church over Western secularism, he has said that there is much of value in Western culture.

Lubomyr Husar (Ukraine, 2/26/1933) Major Archbishop of Lviv for Ukrainians. Husar was ordained at age 25, and became cardinal at 67. This could be the only "American" candidate: Husar fled Ukraine with his parents in 1944, and became a U.S. citizen. He earned a masters degree in social work at Fordham University; he returned to Ukraine in 1978. He's considered a long shot: After the long papacy of a Pole, many believe it unlikely that the electors will choose another East European -- and an erstwhile American to boot. (Husar gave up his U.S. citizenship in 2002. Moreover, Husar would have to move from the Ukrainian church to the Roman Church. But he is very bright, very spiritual, and very popular among fellow Cardinals. And he has presided over a church with married priests, which could kick up some dust on the issue of celibacy.

Walter Kasper (Germany, 3/5/33). President of the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity. Kasper became a priest at 24 and a bishop at 56. Kasper is considered an intellectual and theological heavyweight, having studied at Tubingen (the "big leagues" of European theological academia), and later teaching at Catholic University of America as a visiting professor. He has jousted often and publicly with German Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the dean of the College of Cardinals and one of the most powerful men in Rome. Kasper leans toward the progressive, reformist end of the spectrum, for example, encouraging divorced and civilly remarried Catholics to return to the sacraments. He has indicated he would like to see a decentralization of the curia. Along with his intellect, Kasper is known for his kind and open manner.

Christoph Schönborn (Austria, 1/22/45). Archbishop of Vienna. Ordained at 25 and a cardinal at 53, Schönborn comes from a priestly background: Over the centuries, some 19 members of his family have been archbishops, bishops or priests. He is fluent in several languages, including English, Italian and French, as well as German, and has traveled widely around the world. His aristocratic sensibilities have not always served him well, however. In recent years, he has made political stumbles in his own archdiocese, and has developed a reputation for being rigid in his theological views. Still, some Vatican watchers consider him the man of the future.

LATIN AMERICA

Jorge Mario Bergoglio (Argentina, 12/17/36), archbishop of Buenos Aires. Trained as a chemist, Bergoglio became a priest when he was 32 and an archbishop in 1998. Bergoglio is a Jesuit, which would make him an unusual and perhaps controversial choice for the papacy. His academic credentials abound: He pursued theological studies in Germany, has published three books and has served as grand chancellor of The Catholic University in Argentina.

Bergoglio has been praised as being a "good pastor" with a "strong capacity for governance with unusual gifts of humility." Indeed, the archbishop shuns a chauffeur-driven limousine, in favor of public transportation.

Cláudio Hummes (Brazil, 8/8/34). Archbishop of Sao Paolo. Ordained at 23 and a cardinal at 66, Hummes began his career as a progressive, opposing Brazil's military government and supporting worker strikes. He became more conservative under Pope John Paul II. In July 2000, when a Brazilian priest suggested that condoms could be justified to fight AIDS, Hummes threatened disciplinary action. Yet he still has strong social justice inclinations, arguing that people should organize to defend their rights, and often reminding government leaders that the church defends private property, but "with social responsibility." Many believe his balance of doctrinal orthodoxy and social engagement would make him an appealing candidate for Pope.

Norberto Rivera Carrera (Mexico, 6/6/42). Archbishop of Mexico City. Ordained at 24, Cardinal at 55, Rivera Carrera has been outspoken against globalization, poverty, and political corruption in Mexico. He taught ecclesiology at the Pontifical University of Mexico in the 1980s, and since 1995, he has served as Archbishop of Mexico City, one of the most complex archdioceses in the world. Although he has strong social justice credentials, Rivera Carrera is a conservative on virtually all church matters; for example, he closed a seminary that he said was teaching Marxism under the guise of liberation theology.

Oscar Andrés Rodriguez Maradiaga (Honduras, 12/29/42). Archbishop of Tegucigalpa. Ordained at 27 and an archbishop at 50, Rodriguez Maradiaga is seen as a rising star in the Latin American church. His main handicap could be his youth: The electors may not want to repeat Pope John Paul II's long legacy. As with other Latin American candidates, Rodriguez Maradiaga is a strong advocate of social justice. According to John Allen, he is "one of the world's leading champions of debt relief for developing nations. In June 1999, Rodriguez Maradiaga and rock star Bono, from U2, joined forces at a G8 meeting to present a petition with 17 million signatures demanding debt relief. Rodriguez Maradiaga is also an advocate for women and improved race relations, and generally strives to be a voice of conscience within the process of globalization."

ASIA

Ivan Dias (India, 4/14/36). Archbishop of Bombay (Mumbai). Dias was ordained at 22 and became an archbishop at 60. This is possibly the most globe-trotting of all candidates. Dias rose through the Vatican's diplomatic ranks with postings in Ghana, Togo, Benin, Korea and Albania. He also served in the Holy See's embassies in Scandinavia, Indonesia and Madagascar. He worked in the Secretariat of State as the desk officer for countries in Europe, Africa and Asia, including China and the then-Soviet Union. He speaks a little bit of at least 16 languages.

Dias is thus cosmopolitan and fluent in world affairs. But he is also conservative -- shunning, for example, the theology of religious pluralism so common in India. He takes a conservative line on abortion, has called homosexuality a disease of the soul.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Germany; Government; Mexico; News/Current Events; Philosophy
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1 posted on 04/03/2005 9:26:27 PM PDT by iceemonster
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To: iceemonster
"If you're from the Third World, you're concerned with people who are starving and suffering from the negative impact of globalization of the economy. You'll want a pope who will speak out for social justice, forgiveness of Third World debt and be willing to stand up to the American superpower."

I am wondering where the Bible addresses these as being the primary areas of concern for religious leaders.

2 posted on 04/03/2005 9:28:46 PM PDT by sharktrager (The masses will trade liberty for a more quiet life.)
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To: iceemonster
The liberal press will chose one and make him appear as Christ returning to earth to save all man kind.
I hope the Church ignores them like the American people do during a presidential election.
3 posted on 04/03/2005 9:30:49 PM PDT by concerned about politics (Vote Republican - Vote morally correct!)
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To: iceemonster
NPR babbles on about how important "social justice" will be for the next man who is Pope, then lists a bunch of guys who largely agree with John Paul II.

Idiots...

4 posted on 04/03/2005 9:33:04 PM PDT by THX 1138
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To: iceemonster
This NPR article is hilarious. the get a direct dig at Bush...they imply about how considerate we need to be of radical Islamist, they state the majority of the world hates the US.

Then they list several names posted in the AP story, but left out the AP's tag line which was:

One only has to recall that after two days and eight rounds of voting 26 years ago, the name of Karol Wojtyla — never mentioned as a serious candidate — was announced to the crowd in St. Peter's Square. Many there were baffled.

http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/pope/3115811

5 posted on 04/03/2005 9:33:18 PM PDT by Jalapeno
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To: iceemonster

You know, thanks for posting this as a prime example of stupid analysis.

John Kerry for pope, Francois I, let's vote for him before we vote against him.

Etc.


6 posted on 04/03/2005 9:33:43 PM PDT by jocon307 (We can try to understand the New York Times effect on man)
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To: jocon307
Francois I would move the Vatican to Fox Chapel, Pennsylvania.


7 posted on 04/03/2005 9:36:28 PM PDT by Jalapeno
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To: sharktrager
I am wondering where the Bible addresses these as being the primary areas of concern for religious leaders.

I guess this is what happens when man puts his concerns above God's.

8 posted on 04/03/2005 9:38:10 PM PDT by Netizen (USA - Land of the free, home of the brave, where the handicapped are legally starved and dehydrated!)
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To: Jalapeno

Interesting point.


9 posted on 04/03/2005 9:39:20 PM PDT by Sabatier
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To: sharktrager
I am wondering where the Bible addresses these as being the primary areas of concern for religious leaders.

Yes. Those "in need" should be given charity. The problem is, those "in want" jump on the band wagon and deplete the necessary resources so much it never reaches the hungry and needy. If those "in want" would get out of the way, there would be more than plenty to help all the starving people in the world.

10 posted on 04/03/2005 9:39:24 PM PDT by concerned about politics (Vote Republican - Vote morally correct!)
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Comment #11 Removed by Moderator

To: sharktrager
I am wondering where the Bible addresses these as being the primary areas of concern for religious leaders.

Feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and so forth.

12 posted on 04/03/2005 9:42:11 PM PDT by JohnnyZ (“When you’re hungry, you eat; when you’re a frog, you leap; if you’re scared, get a dog.”)
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To: THX 1138
NPR babbles on about how important "social justice" will be for the next man who is Pope, then lists a bunch of guys who largely agree with John Paul II. Idiots...

I think there's a movement among the Left to claim the next Pope as a liberal, whether he is or no. That way they can run around saying they have new impetus to demand priestesses and whatnot, advance their agenda and drive a wedge between the Pope and conservatives.

13 posted on 04/03/2005 9:45:46 PM PDT by JohnnyZ (“When you’re hungry, you eat; when you’re a frog, you leap; if you’re scared, get a dog.”)
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To: iceemonster

I bet the next pope will be from South America.


14 posted on 04/03/2005 9:49:02 PM PDT by Echo Talon (http://echotalon.blogspot.com)
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To: JohnnyZ

"The poor will always be among you."


15 posted on 04/03/2005 9:51:30 PM PDT by sharktrager (The masses will trade liberty for a more quiet life.)
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To: iceemonster

PELL for POPE!!

Put an Aussie in the Vatican!


16 posted on 04/03/2005 9:53:52 PM PDT by Aussie Dasher (Stop Hillary - PEGGY NOONAN '08)
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To: JohnnyZ
I think there's a movement among the Left to claim the next Pope as a liberal, whether he is or no.

You mean a denial of reality?

Yeah, maybe the libs ought to try that...

17 posted on 04/03/2005 9:54:38 PM PDT by THX 1138
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To: iceemonster

Since when is the pope suppose to be a social/political science major/ leader? I always thought he was suppose to be a spiritual leader of catholics? None of these fit the biblical credentials as far as I can see. Where does the Gospel fit into the picture?


18 posted on 04/03/2005 10:02:11 PM PDT by Daisy4
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To: sharktrager
I think there's a movement among the Left to claim the next Pope as a liberal, whether he is or no.

Social justice means to be charitable to the poor and needy.
There's a difference between those who are "in need" because of circumstances beyond their control and those "in want" due to consequences of choice and free will.
For example:
In America, we have the psychically disabled. They did not choose their circumstances, and we should care for them. Their poverty is beyond their control.
We also have lazy SOB's who think they should get a free handout because getting up out of bed is too hard. Their poverty is chosen, and we owe them nothing. Let them get their own jobs. "Thou shall not covet they neighbors goods", nor shall one man be used as another mans slave.

19 posted on 04/03/2005 10:12:36 PM PDT by concerned about politics (Vote Republican - Vote morally correct!)
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To: iceemonster
According to the prophecy of Saint Malachy the next Pope will be of the Benedictine Order.

De Gloria Olivae/From the Glory of the Olives: The Order of Saint Benedict has claimed that this pope will come from their ranks. Saint Benedict himself prophesied that before the end of the world his Order, known also as the Olivetans, will triumphantly lead the Catholic Church in its fight against evil. There is only one Cardinal I have come across in my reseach that could possibly fit the Benedictine prophecy, but his connections to the order are loose at best.

Could this man be "the Glory of the Olives" :

Cardinal Puljic

Name: H.E. Vinco Card. PULJIC

Position: Archbishop of the Vrhbosna

Age: 59 (Born Saturday, September 08, 1945)

From: Bosnia

Cardinal since: Monday, February 28, 1994

Title: Cardinal Priest of S Chiara a Vigna Clara

Cardinal Vinko Puljic, Archbishop of Vrhbosna, Sarajevo, was born on 8 September 1945 in Prijecani, in the Diocese of Banja Luka. He completed his secondary education at the interdiocesan minor seminary of Zagreb and the minor seminary of Djakovo. He studied philosophy and theology at the major seminary of Djakovo and was ordained a priest in the Cathedral of Djakovo on 29 June 1970. Pope John Paul II appointed him Archbishop of Vrhbosna, Sarajevo on 19 November 1990 and in 1991 at the tomb of St Peter ordained him Bishop on the Solemnity of the Epiphany.

His family was materially poor but rich in the Catholic faith. He was the 12th of 13 children. When he was barely three years old, his mother Kaja, died. His father remarried and the little Vinko with his other brothers and sisters found a new mother in his step-mother Ana, who brought him up as if he were her own son.

Already as a child he displayed the great piety which he had inherited from his family when every evening they knelt to pray the Holy Rosary. His father Ivan, led the prayers. Later, as spiritual director at the minor seminary ‘Vicko Zmajevic’ of Zara (Croatia) whenever he saw a boy having difficulty praying with his arms extended, Fr Vinko would frequently remember the words of his father who used to say to him: 'Son, remember, Jesus hung on the cross with his arms extended, while you cannot even manage to pray for a couple of minutes extending yours!' One of the characteristics of young Vinko's piety was a special devotion to the Mother of God, which he has always retained.

In addition to his family, young Vinko's spiritual formation was deeply influenced by the Trappist Monastery of Marija Zvijezda, located not far from his native village. It was one of the monks precisely, who helped Vinko's father to send his son to the minor seminary of Zagreb. Actually, Fr Ante Artner sold his motorbike and gave the proceeds to Vinko's father who did not have enough money to pay his board there. This story was only told by Father Ante on the occasion when the new priest Vinko celebrated his first Mass in 1970.

After his ordination to the priesthood, he became chaplain in Banja Luka, until spring 1973. Before moving to the parish of Sasina, where he stayed from June to November 1973, for three months, from April to June, he worked in the Episcopal Curia of Banja Luka. From 1973 to 1978 he was parish priest of Ravska, near the mine of Ljubija. In autumn 1978, he was named spiritual director of the minor seminary ‘Vicko Zmajevic’ of Zara.

As soon as he arrived at the seminary, he immediately made it into a large family. The seminarians were like younger brothers to him, while for them, he was a real father and elder brother whom they could trust. During the summer holidays, he did not lose touch with his seminarians, but visited them in their villages, and corresponded with them. He was concerned above all that his boys should understand and better accept their priestly vocation. During one of his stays in Zadar, he was confessor at the Benedictine monastery and organized numerous spiritual retreats for priests, seminarians and women religious.

When his work as spiritual director of the minor seminary of Zadar came to an end in summer 1987, he returned to his Diocese and was named parish priest of Bosanska Gradiška. He stayed there until summer 1990 when he was transferred to Sarajevo as vice- rector of the major seminary of the ecclesiastical province of Vrhbosna. On 19 November 1990, while he was in Sarajevo the news of his appointment as Archbishop reached him. He thus became the sixth Archbishop of that See after the reconstruction of the ordinary ecclesiastical hierarchy in 1881 in present-day Bosnia-Herzegovina, after the Turkish occupation which had lasted more than four centuries.

His pastoral ministry in the Archdiocese of Vrhbosna, Sarajevo began on 19 January 1991. In those months in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, as also in the rest of what used to be Yugoslavia and in other formerly communist countries, after the collapse of the Berlin Wall, there was a spell of freedom and democracy. As Archbishop, he immediately focused on making pastoral visits in the Diocese in order to become more familiar with the religious and social situation there.

During these visits he paid particular attention to the meetings with priests. But signs of the evil to come were soon evident. In August 1991 hostilities in Croatia began. In Bosnia-Herzegovina fighting broke out in November and in Ravno in the south of the country, and in April 1992 attacks on the towns, including Sarajevo began.

In the situation created by the war, he immediately became involved in helping the thousands of refugees and exiles, mobilizing all the forces of the Church and people of good will. He began in particular to launch heartfelt appeals for the respect of the inalienable rights of the human person without distinction of race or religious creed, for the right of each to live in his own home, for mutual respect, for unity in plurality. At times, there was opposition to such appeals.

In his tireless work of peace making, he met with many political figures and politicians, at home and abroad. In addition, to give a greater impulse to the commitment of religion for a just peace, he met more than once with the Orthodox and Muslim religious leaders of Bosnia-Herzegovina. In this respect, it is enough to remember the interreligious meeting held from 1-3 October 1993 in Sarajevo with Cardinal Roger Etchegaray, President of the Pontifical Councils of Justice and Peace and 'Cor Unum'; with the Apostolic Nuncio in Bosnia-Hercegovina, Archbishop Francesco Monterisi; with the Catholic, Orthodox, Jewish and Muslim religious leaders of the city and of the country. And also, the meeting on 17 May 1994 at Sarajevo airport, with the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church, Alexis II, Patriarch Pavle of the Serbian Orthodox Church, and Cardinal Franjo Kuharic, Metropolitan Archbishop of Zagreb.

During the war, he frequently risked his life while making pastoral trips to his parishes, especially those affected by the scourge of war. In one of these visits he was imprisoned for twelve hours by the Serbian military in Ilida, near Sarajevo, running a serious risk when he rode in a UN military tank of UNPROFOR to Vareš, a town held by the Croatians but which precisely at that time was occupied by the Muslims.

Although he was in the way of those who did not agree with his attitude, he gained widespread esteem among the people and politicians, becoming a reference point at the most difficult moments and in the most acute crises. His radio and written messages have always been positively accepted by the people, both Catholic and Muslim and of other religions. As a witness to so many bitter tears, on behalf of the people suffering because of the war, he has often said: 'Do not leave us alone!', as he said in Milan on 23 September 1993 at an interreligious meeting. More than once he has clearly stated: 'I must raise my voice against all crimes'. Confirming the readiness of Catholics to live together with others, in his speech during his ad limina Apostolorum visit in January 1993, he told the Holy Father: As for us, we are seeking to make contact with the representatives of other religious communities: with the Serbian Orthodox Church and with the Islamic Community'.

On various occasions he has shown his ability to be a true Gospel peace-maker, sensitive to the people's suffering, open to dialogue and faithful to the principles of coexistence among the various social, religious and ethnic groups. On 12 November 1992, Pope John Paul II in his letter addressed to all the Bishops of Bosnia-Herzegovina wrote to him: 'When I imposed hands on you on 6 January 1991 to consecrate you in the office of Pastor of the Church of Sarajevo, I had no idea that very shortly your cross would be so heavy and your cup so bitter'.

In April 1997, Cardinal Puljic welcomes John Paul II to Sarajevo; a pastoral visit the Holy Father had desired to make in September 1994 but was unable to due to the war.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by John Paul II in the consistory of 26 November 1994. Titular church St. Clare in Vigna Clara.

Since 1995 until March 2002, he was the President of the Bishops’ Conference of Bosnia-Ercegovina.

On CNN this morning, a guest, a Catholic writer for a Catholic newspaper spoke with Ukranian Cardinal Husar on a plane from the US to Rome. The Cardinal said they are looking for a Pope that could unite all the Christian churches, and whom could change the papacy to allow this. They are considering a Bishop instead of a Cardinal, this means there are potentially 3,000 Plus candidates for Pope. OK here we go, these are my best bets as to who will be Pope if it is to be a Benedictine Bishop....

Arch-Bishop

Francesco Pio Tamburrino OSB (Italy) born at Oppido Lucano (Acerenza) 6 January 1939; professed 11 October 1955; priest 29 August 1965; Abbot Ordinary of Montevergine 29 November 1989; confirmed 20 January 1990; abbatial blessing 24 March 1990; named Bishop of Teggiano-Policastro 14 February 1998; consecrated 25 March 1998 at Montevergine, in the Basilica Cathedral of Santa Maria, by Michele Cardinal Giordano, Archbishop of Napoli, assisted by Gerardo Pierro, Archbishop of Salerno-Campagna-Acerno, and by Serafino Sprovieri, Archbishop of Benevento; resigned and named Archbishop ad personam and Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments 27 April 1999. Named Metropolitan-Archbishop of Foggia-Bovino 2 August 2003.

Bishop

Mathew Moolakkatt OSB (India) born at Uzhavoor (Kottayam) 27 February 1953; priest 27 December 1978; professed in 1994; named Titular Bishop of Hclar and Auxiliary of Kottayam 6 November 1998; consecrated 6 January 1999 at Rome, in Saint Peter's Basilica, by His Holiness Pope John Paul II, assisted by Giovanni Battista Re, Titular Archbishop of Vescovio and Substitute of the Secretariat of State for General Affairs, and by Francesco Monterisi, Titular Archbishop of Alba maritima and Secretary of the Congregation for Bishops. Named Coadjutor Bishop of Kottayam 29 August 2003

Bishop

Martín de Elizalde OSB (Argentina) born at Buenos Aires 23 October 1940; professed in the Abbey of San Benito 11 February 1961; priest 5 January 1971; named Prior Administrator of San Benito 5 March 1971; Conventual Prior of San Benito 18 November 1976; Abbot of San Benito 9 February 1983; abbatial blessing 22 February 1983; Apostolic Administrator of Nueve de Julio, sede vacante, 21 September 1998; named Bishop of Nueve de Julio 6 July 1999; consecrated 14 September 1999 at Luján, in the Basilica of Nuestra Se¤ora de Luján, by Carlos Walter Galán, Archbishop of La Plata, assisted by Emilio Og¤énovich, Archbishop of Mercedes-Luján, and by Estanislao Esteban Karlic, Archbishop of Paraná.

Bishop

António Fernando Saburido OSB (Brazil) born at Juçaral, Cabo de Santo Agostinho (Olinda e Recife) 10 June 1947; professed in the Abbey of São Bento, Olinda, 21 March 1978; priest 17 December 1983; named Titular Bishop of Tacia montana and Auxiliary of Olinda e Recife 31 May 2000; consecrated 20 August 2000 at Recife, in the Ginásio de Esportes Geraldo Magalhães (Geraldão), by José Cardoso Sobrinho OCarm, Archbishop of Olinda e Recife, assisted by Marcelo Pinto Carvalheira, Archbishop of Paraíba, and by Clemente José Carlos Isnard OSB, Bishop emeritus of Nova Friburgo.

Bishop

Jean-Baptist Gurion OSB Oliv (Israel) born at Oran (Algeria) 24 October 1934; professed 8 December 1962; solemn vows 12 December 1965; priest 29 June 1967; elected Abbot of St. Mary of the Resurrection 1999; received the abbatial blessing 11 July 1999; named Titular Bishop of Lydda and auxiliary of the Patriarch of Jerusalem for the pastoral care of Hebrew-speaking Catholics, 14 August 2003; consecrated 9 November 2003, at Kiryat Yearim, Israel, in the Church of Notre-Dame Arche d'Alliance, by Michel Sabbah, Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, assisted by Cardinal Roger Marie Élie Etchegaray, and by Pietro Sambi, Titular Archbishop of Belcastro, Apostolic Nuncio to Israel and Apostolic Delegate in Jerusalem and Palestine.

Bishop

Francis Alleyne OSB (Guyana, Antilles) born at Point-à-Pierre (Trinidad and Tobago) 3 December 1951; professed 8 December 1975; solemn vows 1978; priest 7 July 1985; elected Abbot of Mount Saint Benedict 24 October 1995; received the abbatial blessing 10 December 1995; named Bishop of Georgetown (Guyana) 30 October 2003; consecrated 30 January 2004 in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Georgetown, by Edward Joseph Gilbert, C.Ss.R., Archbishop of Port of Spain, assisted by Lawrence Aloysius Burke, S.J., Archbishop of Nassau, and by Benedict Singh, Bishop emeritus of Georgetown.

Bishop

Fabio Bernardo D’Onorio OSB (Italy) born at Veroli 20 August 1940; professed 30 September 1962; priest 4 June 1966; elected 190th Abbot of Montecassino 25 April 1983 and confirmed by Pope John Paul II as Ordinary of the Diocese of Montecassino; received the abbatial blessing 19 June 1983; named Titular Bishop of Minturno 13 April 2004. Giovanni Cardinal Battista Re, Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops, will be the principal consecrator at Archabbot Bernardo's ordination on 16 May 2004 at Montecassino.

20 posted on 04/03/2005 10:16:49 PM PDT by AKSurprise
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To: iceemonster

I remember when John Paul II was selected. He wasn't on any list of possible picks that I ever saw. I'm betting that no one on this or any other published list will get picked.


21 posted on 04/03/2005 10:19:56 PM PDT by kennedy ("Why would I listen to losers?")
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To: AKSurprise
According to the prophecy of Saint Malachy the next Pope will be of the Benedictine Order.

Where did he say that?

22 posted on 04/03/2005 10:27:35 PM PDT by Krodg
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To: Krodg

Here are descriptions of the final popes according to Malachy:

Pastor et Nauta/Shepherd and Navigator: John XXIII (1958 -1963), patriarch of Venice (a city full of sailors) led his flock to a modernization of the Church through the Ecumenical Council. John chose two symbols for this Council -- a cross and a ship.

Flors Florum/Flower of Flowers: Paul VI (1963-1978) had a coat-of-arms depicting three fleurs-de-lis.

De Medietate Lunae/From the Half Moon: John Paul I (1978-1978) had the given name of Albino Luciani or "white light." Half-way into his short reign, a lunar eclipse occurred.

De Labore Solis/From the Toil of the Sun [Labore could also be Effort, Distress, Suffering, Trouble, leading to quite a few variations. The preceding is the usual translation.]: John Paul II was born during the solar eclipse of May 18, 1920.

De Gloria Olivae/From the Glory of the Olives: The Order of Saint Benedict has claimed that this pope will come from their ranks. Saint Benedict himself prophesied that before the end of the world his Order, known also as the Olivetans, will triumphantly lead the Catholic Church in its fight against evil.

Petrus Romanus/Peter of Rome: The Final Pope? "In the final persecution of the Holy Roman Church there will reign Peter the Roman, who will feed his flock among many tribulations, after which the seven-hilled city will be destroyed and the dreadful Judge will judge the people."


23 posted on 04/03/2005 10:30:07 PM PDT by AKSurprise
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To: AKSurprise
De Gloria Olivae/From the Glory of the Olives: The Order of Saint Benedict has claimed that this pope will come from their ranks. Saint Benedict himself prophesied that before the end of the world his Order, known also as the Olivetans, will triumphantly lead the Catholic Church in its fight against evil.

Where does Malachy say that?

24 posted on 04/03/2005 10:38:52 PM PDT by Krodg
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To: iceemonster
"Each cardinal is thinking, how will this candidate go over in my diocese?" Reese says.

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Not a single one of them is asking himself what God's will is. None of them are asking God for wisdom and direction. Narry a supplication is whispered in prayer to the Almighty.

Reese is such a spiritual giant.

25 posted on 04/03/2005 10:45:22 PM PDT by delacoert (imperat animus corpori, et paretur statim: imperat animus sibi, et resistitur. -AUGUSTINI)
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To: Krodg

Maybe I should be more accurate, the interpretation of Malachy's prophecy has traditionally been that the "Glory of the Olives" is to be a Benedictine, though I would readily admit it could symbolize anything to do with Olives, for example a Pope from Italy or Greece or Spain, all olive producing nations. It could also mean the next Pontiff would take the name Benedict, there are a variety of possibilities, I do not advocate one over another. I am merely pointing out that if the Benedictine interpretation is correct then it has to be one of the above listed men who will be the next Pope.


26 posted on 04/03/2005 10:47:34 PM PDT by AKSurprise
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To: AKSurprise

Okay. Thanks for clarifying.


27 posted on 04/03/2005 10:50:29 PM PDT by Krodg
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To: iceemonster
I pray it would be Arinze or Ivan Dias is thus cosmopolitan and fluent in world affairs. But he is also conservative -- shunning, for example, the theology of religious pluralism so common in India. He takes a conservative line on abortion, has called homosexuality a disease of the soul.
28 posted on 04/03/2005 11:59:15 PM PDT by Cronos (Never forget 9/11)
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To: iceemonster

My prediction for the papacy: Jose da Cruz Policarpo.

Who for those Malachy subscribers graduated from the Olivais Seminary in Lisbon with a degree in Philosophy and Theology.


29 posted on 04/04/2005 12:50:54 AM PDT by Castro (Moses supposes his toeses are roses...)
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To: William Creel

I'm backing Arinze.


30 posted on 04/04/2005 12:54:41 AM PDT by HitmanLV
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To: Aussie Dasher
PELL for POPE!!

Put an Aussie in the Vatican!

Would that mean communion wine would be distributed in giant 22oz cans?

31 posted on 04/04/2005 1:03:43 AM PDT by Petronski (I thank God Almighty for a most remarkable blessing: John Paul the Great.)
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To: Aussie Dasher
PELL for POPE!!
Put an Aussie in the Vatican!


Sure gets my vote - not that I'm a Cardinal. But I fear little chance, he would be magnificent though.

Otherwise I'd love Cardinal Arinze, Cardinal Ratzinger (strange that he's not mentioned), or possibly my fav. Cardinal Castrillon Hoyos.
32 posted on 04/04/2005 4:26:49 AM PDT by tjwmason (For he himself has said, and it's greatly to his credit, he remains an Englishman.)
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To: Petronski

Now, THERE'S a good idea!!!


33 posted on 04/04/2005 4:55:30 AM PDT by Aussie Dasher (The Great Ronald Reagan & John Paul II - Heaven's Dream Team)
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To: tjwmason

The new Pope will only need ONE supporter.

Once the Bloke Upstairs gives his OK, the rest will follow.

"Our George" might get up yet!


34 posted on 04/04/2005 4:57:56 AM PDT by Aussie Dasher (The Great Ronald Reagan & John Paul II - Heaven's Dream Team)
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To: concerned about politics

That does not, however, explain the desire to relieve nations of debt and control trade. These are not governments that are going to use excess funds for welfare programs by any stretch of the imagination, and it is their own policies that allow and even encourage the exploitation of their labor force.


35 posted on 04/04/2005 10:49:12 AM PDT by sharktrager (The masses will trade liberty for a more quiet life.)
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To: Castro

That is interesting. I had not considered the "olive" as pertaining to the seminary. There was much talk about the "olive" meaning he would have been born Jewish. Cardinal Lustiger was born Jewish, but I think he is retired. Not sure how a Cardinal retires, but it's probably not him.


36 posted on 04/10/2005 10:06:30 AM PDT by skirmisher2006
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To: Castro

"Francis was born 73 years ago into the family of Joseph Arinze Nwankwu and Benedict Arinze. Pa. Arinze Nwankwu who died at about the age of 87 was converted and baptised in the Catholic Church along with his wife, Benedict, now deceased, in about 1957. It was then that he adopted the baptismal name of "Joseph" with his wife, adopting "Benedict", according to Chief Christopher Arinze, 79, the cardinal's eldest brother." - http://allafrica.com/stories/200504090142.html

Could still be Francis Arinze.


37 posted on 04/11/2005 12:55:52 AM PDT by ChrisV
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To: ChrisV

Policarpo owns an olive tree farm along with his brothers.

Olive Oil, golden and glorious, you see?

And yes, Our Lady appeared atop an Olive tree.

And the seminar where he comes from is "dos Olivais".


38 posted on 04/12/2005 12:54:23 AM PDT by ringthane
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To: AKSurprise

Just a comment...A pope should be one that speaks both Italian (being that the Vatican is located in Rome and Spanish (since a great many followers hail from Spanish speaking countries). Portuguese is also very important for the pope to know. Aside from that, I would have to say, in order of importance is English and then French. France itself does not have a high percentage of catholics. I understand that many parts of Africa speak French, but I wouldn't put French as one of the more important languages for the Papacy. I do believe, however, that the United States has a much larger population than France; thus, many more followers when percentages of catholics are multiplied by total population.


39 posted on 04/20/2005 9:37:05 AM PDT by thadea
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To: thadea

It is Cardinal Ratzinger that is our new pope. Benedict XVI.


40 posted on 04/20/2005 9:43:29 AM PDT by thadea
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