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Does a New Pill Contain the Fountain of Youth?
ABC News Primetime ^ | 6/2/05

Posted on 06/03/2005 7:26:49 AM PDT by Lathspell

Protandim May Slow Aging Process by Increasing Enzymes That Fight Free Radicals

- Dr. Joe McCord's latest research may unravel the mystery of aging. And if he succeeds, the answer could come in the form of a little yellow pill called Protandim.

The University of Colorado at Denver biochemistry professor has conducted decades of experiments into a special class of enzymes in the cell that some hope have the potential of extending lives and possibly preventing chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

Much of his work has centered on oxidative stress -- which increases with age. TBARS, which are a measure of oxidative stress, can also be a rough indicator of a person's actual age.

But, McCord has found that the ingredients in Protandim lowered the test subject's level of oxidative stress.

"They all are reduced to the level of oxidative stress that one would expect, frankly, in a newborn. Or a very young child,' he said.

Dangerous Radicals

To be sure, there have been other supposed "miracle" drugs and treatments that never delivered on their promise to delay or even stop human aging. But McCord, research director in the company that makes Protandim, believes this pill might be different.

To understand how Protandim works, you have to first understand how aging occurs.

Aging is "a slow progression of oxidative stress," McCord said. Much of oxidative stress comes from the basic function of eating.

As cells burn food, they also release toxic chemicals known as "free radicals" which cause cell damage and consequently -- oxidative stress.

The body fights back by making two anti-oxidant enzymes -- Catalase and SOD. But as people get older, those enzymes can get overwhelmed.

For a long time, scientists thought that anti-oxidant vitamins like C and E could lower oxidation, but many experts now believe they aren't effective.

Protandim, McCord said, is much more powerful. Tests on both mice and humans have already shown that it revs up the body's manufacture of those enzymes -- thereby reducing the presence of those harmful free radicals.

However, McCord cannot say at this point whether or not Protandim could lead to a longer life. Experiments to see if mice live longer are about to get under way.

Studies have not yet been conducted to determine whether Protandim can prevent disease.

"Right now, all we know is that this preparation decreases oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is not a disease, just like aging is not, in itself, a disease," he said. "But it's something that accompanies, and is attached, to many disease processes."

The Power of Enzymes

McCord said Protandim could be "something that will tell us a lot more about how we age. What happens biochemically. And maybe how we can slow it down."

And there is some other promising independent evidence that seems to back him up.

Dr. Douglas Wallace of the University of California at Irvine conducted an experiment and found that mice that have been genetically engineered to produce more catalase, one of the enzymes that Protandim increases, lived about 20 percent longer.

Wallace believes that with better techniques the lifespan for humans can eventually be extended too. "We might be able to increase the lifespan by 50 percent. And of course if that was a human being, then that might be in the order of 130 to 150 years," he said.

Dr. Michael Brownlee, who heads the Center for Research on Diabetic Complications at Albert Einstein Medical College, conducted another experiment involving another enzyme boosted by Protandim called SOD.

He tested diabetic mice and found their wounds simply don't heal -- a problem common for diabetics. But when another diabetic mouse that was genetically engineered to have more SOD was wounded, it healed much better.

"Even though they were diabetic, they healed, just like the normal," he said. "It is a breakthrough."

Secret Formula

Protandim may seem to have incredible potential, but its roots are actually very humble.

It is a combination of five plant ingredients. Two of them are pretty commonplace -- green tea and turmeric, a spice used in Indian cooking. The others, among them withania somnifera, and silybum marianum, are more exotic.

"There's a huge human experience with each of these ingredients," McCord said. "They've been used often in traditional medicine in India and China and many other cultures in some cases for centuries and centuries."

And that experience, plus his tests on human subjects so far, indicates that the ingredients are safe.

And so, ancient Eastern healing and modern Western medicine may soon be working together.

High oxidative stress is associated with more than aging. It's been linked to hundreds of illnesses, from cancer to heart disease to Parkinson's and even depression.

But McCord said: "We make no claims about curing any disease, or preventing any disease. We hope that when enough studies are done, perhaps such claims might be made in the future."

Because Protandim is composed of herbal ingredients with a long history of use, it is being marketed as a nutraceutical, and does not require FDA approval.

However, the company is planning further clinical studies in three to four months to assess Protandim in both diabetes and heart disease, which will be submitted for substantiation.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aging; antioxidant; catalase; enzymes; free; freeradicals; greentea; health; mccord; nutrition; oxidative; oxidativestress; protandim; radicals; science; sod; stress; supplements; turmeric; vitamins
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1 posted on 06/03/2005 7:26:51 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: Lathspell
Step right up, getcher Fountain of Youth pills right here, get them while they last, they're going like hot cakes here!
2 posted on 06/03/2005 7:28:25 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Drug prohibition laws spawned the federal health care monopoly and fund terrorism.)
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To: Lathspell
Can you combine it with Viagra and that anti-premature E pill...just wondering...research purposes for a friend.
3 posted on 06/03/2005 7:29:58 AM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - They want to die for Islam, and we want to kill them.)
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To: Lathspell
Hmmm.

But will Medicare cover it? If it prolongs life, it would be self defeating for the Government prescription plan..

4 posted on 06/03/2005 7:33:03 AM PDT by Thommas (The snout of the camel is in the tent...)
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To: Lathspell

So why is this being broadcast as a medical breakthrough before it's been tried out on mice?


5 posted on 06/03/2005 7:33:11 AM PDT by fso301
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To: 2banana
I think you can combine it, yes. Check out their FAQ at protandim.com

Disclaimer: I have no interest, financial or otherwise, in Protandim. My physician wife saw Primetime last night and thought the segment on Protandim was very interesting.

6 posted on 06/03/2005 7:36:33 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: Lathspell

Ill news is an ill guest.


7 posted on 06/03/2005 7:38:02 AM PDT by ItsOurTimeNow ("Para espanol, marque el dos.")
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

I bet there are alot of empty PC chairs right now. In fact, is that the shuffling of old feet and the squeak of wheel chairs I hear?

Living for 150 years would be murder on the Social security system, and just about any other underfunded saving plan.


8 posted on 06/03/2005 7:38:04 AM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: fso301

It has been successfully tested on mice.


9 posted on 06/03/2005 7:38:15 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: ItsOurTimeNow

Lol...I loved that line, as you can tell!


10 posted on 06/03/2005 7:39:18 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: Lathspell
....the ingredients in Protandim lowered the test subject's level of oxidative stress.

Lotta effective antioxidants out there.

11 posted on 06/03/2005 7:39:40 AM PDT by Mr. Mojo
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To: Mr. Mojo

Mmmmmmm . . . Single malt scotch!


12 posted on 06/03/2005 7:41:30 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Great, now retirement age will be 1000.

Do you know how badly something like this could screw up society if people stopped dying?

Who gets the pills first? who is worthy to live longer?

Social security? yeah right.

massive changes would be necessary to accomadate millions of people living beyond what we do today. Lifespans have been inscreasing slowly. Sudden inscrease will create many problems.


13 posted on 06/03/2005 7:42:40 AM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

And a new wave of spam is born.


14 posted on 06/03/2005 7:43:52 AM PDT by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: Lathspell
It's amazing how behind the 8 ball the media is. This information has been available over 25 years.

A healthy diet, nonsmoking and exercise with proper supplementation will give you the same result as this so called youth pill.

This pill will never get results because the only people who will use it are people who have abused themselves and are looking for a quick fix.

15 posted on 06/03/2005 7:45:40 AM PDT by zarf
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To: Lathspell
I went to www.protandim.com -- it's $49.95 for a 30-day supply -- might be worth trying?

Carolyn

16 posted on 06/03/2005 7:53:09 AM PDT by CDHart (The world has become a lunatic asylum and the lunatics are in charge.)
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To: Names Ash Housewares
Great, now retirement age will be 1000.

Don't worry, this is just another scam.

17 posted on 06/03/2005 8:03:33 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Drug prohibition laws spawned the federal health care monopoly and fund terrorism.)
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To: Lathspell
My physician wife saw Primetime last night and thought the segment on Protandim was very interesting.

I'm neither a physician nor a wife, and I thought it was interesting, too. There's nothing new about linking aging with free radicals, but this does seem to be an especially effective antioxidant mix. The research looked kosher.

18 posted on 06/03/2005 8:13:42 AM PDT by prion (Yes, as a matter of fact, I AM the spelling police)
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To: Mr. Mojo

Isnt broccoli one of them ?


19 posted on 06/03/2005 8:18:30 AM PDT by dartuser (Many people think that questioning Darwinian evolution must be equivalent to espousing creationism.)
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To: fso301

Tests on both mice and humans have already shown that it revs up the body's manufacture of those enzymes


20 posted on 06/03/2005 8:19:30 AM PDT by chaosagent (It's all right to be crazy. Just don't let it drive you nuts.)
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To: Nathan Zachary
Living for 150 years would be murder on the Social security system, and just about any other underfunded saving plan.

Eventually, if human lifespan does increase greatly, two things will happen. First, retirement age will no longer be a set number. If you aren't facing the prospect of losing your ability to be productive, you don't have to worry so much about planning around it. If people start regularly living to be 150 and increase their productive years as well, it will all work out. Retirement age could then be 120.

The problem will be if people age just as much, but don't get sick and die until later. That would be a disaster, and it doesn't seem possible.

Second, retirement will be tied to your economic condition more than anything else. You will be able to retire when you have a sustainable investment income. Retiring at sixty will seem like retiring at thirty does now.

As long as death is in the picture, you can still amortize that retirement income, but if humans ever do become effectively immortal it will be necessary to sustain that investment indefinitely.

21 posted on 06/03/2005 8:23:35 AM PDT by hopespringseternal (</i>)
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To: Nathan Zachary
"Living for 150 years would be murder on the Social security system,"

Save Soc. Sec NOW! Light up!/sarcasm off

22 posted on 06/03/2005 8:23:57 AM PDT by litehaus
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To: Lathspell

BUMP


23 posted on 06/03/2005 8:24:09 AM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: CDHart
I don't know, seems a little steep to me for an herbal remedy. Don't like these things as a rule. But my wife is very big on antioxidants. So we're personally going to give it try. Don't have a clue how we're going to evaluate it though. The website makes no promise that you'll feel better if you go on it. So how would you know?

Incidentally, I understand why some people might think this is a scam. I think they're wrong, but I understand why they would say that. I'm no biochemist myself, but as I understand it, there isn't much debate any longer that free radicals are bad for us and/or that anti-oxidants neutralize them. Nor is there much question that ingestion of antioxidants is a pretty inefficient way to increase the their levels in our bodies. McCord seems to be a legitimate researcher, and this approach seems to be promising.

24 posted on 06/03/2005 8:28:50 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: CDHart

I already ordered it. We'll see ........


25 posted on 06/03/2005 8:36:20 AM PDT by Aria (Terri: Do not ask for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee)
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To: prion

Lol, THANK YOU for saying that! I only posted this because (1) it's a legitimate news story, and (2) because my wife -- whom I have practically infinite respect for -- thinks the approach is a good one, and (3) it might help some of my fellow Freepers. Conversely, I would never tell a liberal; the SOBs can all drop dead as far as I'm concerned.


26 posted on 06/03/2005 8:37:11 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: Lathspell

now if only they could fix the aging in the skin,
THEN they would really have something. Not this BS skin cream, or collagin injections. Something real.

Then again it would kill the cosmetics industry if all women had perfect skin.


27 posted on 06/03/2005 8:44:25 AM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
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To: hopespringseternal
but if humans ever do become effectively immortal it will be necessary to sustain that investment indefinitely.

Or you can work 40 years, vacation 40 years, run out of money and go back to work...
28 posted on 06/03/2005 9:04:58 AM PDT by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (Give Them Liberty Or Give Them Death! - Islam Delenda Est! - Rumble thee forth...)
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To: Lathspell
"So how would you know?"

Good question -- maybe there's a way to e-mail him and ask? If you find out, please let me know.

Carolyn

29 posted on 06/03/2005 9:34:41 AM PDT by CDHart (u)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
There can be only ONE!!!!


30 posted on 06/03/2005 9:37:52 AM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: chaosagent; Lathspell
However, McCord cannot say at this point whether or not Protandim could lead to a longer life. Experiments to see if mice live longer are about to get under way.

Studies have not yet been conducted to determine whether Protandim can prevent disease.

31 posted on 06/03/2005 9:42:09 AM PDT by fso301
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To: Lathspell
Oxidative stress is not a disease, just like aging is not, in itself, a disease," he said.

Hmph! I've always advocated the position that all of us mortals are afflicted with a terminal condition called, "life"...

32 posted on 06/03/2005 9:44:18 AM PDT by TXnMA (ATTN, ACLU & NAACP: There's no constitutionally protected right to NOT be offended -- Shove It!)
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To: UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide
Or you can work 40 years, vacation 40 years, run out of money and go back to work...

Exactly. Why work non-stop for 900 years, plan on retiring for the last 100, and then get hit by a space bus...
33 posted on 06/03/2005 9:46:21 AM PDT by beezdotcom (I'm usually either right or wrong...)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum; Lathspell
Hey, don't laugh. Here's a picture of me from last year:

I started taking this stuff in an FDA trial, and here's what I look like now:


34 posted on 06/03/2005 9:53:28 AM PDT by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: Lathspell

That explains the mice with the long grey beards!


35 posted on 06/03/2005 9:55:50 AM PDT by texson66 ("Tyranny is yielding to the lust of the governing." - Lord Moulton)
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To: Lathspell

You think SS is in trouble now? Wait til this stuff gets approved!


36 posted on 06/03/2005 10:05:38 AM PDT by Protagoras (Iíve had all I can stands and I canít stands no more.....Popeye)
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To: Names Ash Housewares
Great, now retirement age will be 1000.

Your comment brought to mind some lyrics from an old Don Henley tune Building the Perfect Beast.

"Turn us all into Methuselah - But where are we gonna park? "

37 posted on 06/03/2005 10:11:08 AM PDT by Freebird Forever (Imagine if islam controlled the internet.)
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To: Freebird Forever

Were supposed to die. I want to see as much of the future as possible, I am endlessly curious and amazed at all the wonders around us every day. But at what cost? More people? Longer lives? that does not neccessarily mean a fuller life. A life worth living. Some people fit several lifetimes into a rather short life. Others never really live at all. Its what you do with your time not how much you get. Treat it preciously. LIVE.


38 posted on 06/03/2005 10:15:41 AM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: All
And now, the other side of the coin (to prove I'm not shilling for this company, and to help fellow Freepers make a more informed choice as to whether or not to take this stuff!). From http://www.betterhumans.com/News/News/tabid/61/News/386/Default.aspx:


GET YOUR OWN PROFILE, BLOG AND MORE! JOIN ME FREE!
   
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News

The Uncertain Antiaging Pill

On the eve of its launch, the touted life extender Protandim faces marketing ambiguity and scientific reservations

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by Patrick Bailey | 11.29.2004 @11:54 AM

Pill
Credit: Joe Condor
Hype or help? Just months from market, Protandim has been heavily marketed and covered by the media, but human trials of its purported antiaging abilities are only just beginning
Clarification: Moniker Mix-up
(December 7, 2004) After this article was published, Betterhumans was notified of an important clarification regarding the Protandim product that Lifeline Nutraceuticals aims to release in February 2005: It is not the peptide known as CMX-1152.

The article states: "Protandim was developed by Maynard, Massachusetts-based biotechnology company CereMedix, from which Lifeline has a license for the product. CereMedix discovered a group of peptides derived from proteins in the body that activate genes for natural antioxidant defenses."

This statement appears because Lifeline's initial Protandim product candidate was CMX-1152. The Protandim product slated for market in 2005, however, is not CMX-1152.

To support and complement CMX-1152, Lifeline developed a cofactor formulation called Protandim CF that it says is "a proprietary, patent-pending blend of botanicals, amino acids and various vitamins and minerals." In April 2004, Lifeline changed its focus to bring Protandim CF to market. "Due to contractual and developmental issues/delays/changes with CereMedix, Lifeline has redirected its efforts to concentrate initially on the Protandim CF product," the company stated.

A few months later, in October 2004, the company announced that it would now refer to Protandim CF simply as Protandim, the same name previously used for its CMX-1152 product candidate. "Protandim CF has demonstrated remarkable results in pre-clinical studies as the better choice for an initial standalone nutraceutical product. As such, Lifeline has dropped the 'CF' from the name in order to underscore Protandim's uniqueness and efficacy," the company stated.

The name change caused some confusion in this article. For example, the Denver Post ("once-a-day pill they say could extend life spans to 120 years or more") and 9News ("promises to not only make you live longer, but make you feel younger") quotes were for CMX-1152, not the compound now known as Protandim.

Lifeline says that the Protandim slated for market in February 2005 "has been demonstrated to decrease oxidation by as much as 60% in humans in just the first 30 days of intake" and that this amount "is expected to increase even further after prolonged supplementation." It also says that while its research has not yet been completed, it has to date shown "shown consistent and beneficial results."

We regret any confusion caused by the failure to properly distinguish between CMX-1152 and the Protandim product scheduled for release in February 2005.

Last year, the Denver Post described it as a "once-a-day pill they say could extend life spans to 120 years or more." As recently as February of this year, the Denver, Colorado-based NBC affiliate 9News stated that it "promises to not only make you live longer, but make you feel younger."

The pill in question, Protandim, purportedly causes the body to produce more of its own powerful antioxidants to fight the damaging effects of free radicals. While many people ingest antioxidants such as vitamin C in food and supplements, these must pass through digestive and other barriers, while Protandim is said to spur an increase in the body's internal defenses.

And you'll soon have a chance to buy it. The Denver, Colorado-based company behind Protandim, Lifeline Nutraceuticals, says that the pill will be released in February 2005. Armed with preclinical results from animals, and with a human trial underway, company president Bill Driscoll calls Protandim "the first true antiaging pill that the market has very eagerly been waiting for," one that is "measurably better than any combinations of currently available antioxidant supplements."

But on the eve of Protandim's launch, it's still not entirely certain what consumers should expect. Lifeline is unclear about Protandim's benefits, and recent research questions the effect it might have in humans. With so many supposed antiaging products on the market already, jaded consumers can be forgiven for skepticism. Protandim may overcome these challenges but for now its future's uncertain.

Longer life—or not

The main issues around Protandim, as it's readied for market, revolve around what exactly it's supposed to do, how exactly it works and whether its actions achieve the desired goals.

It's not easy to answer the first question. From the media coverage Lifeline endorses on its own Website, it's clear that over the past few years, the company's position on Protandim's benefits has fluctuated.

With the product just months from market, this inconsistency continues. The company's Website clearly states: "Lifeline's goal is to not only extend life expectancy, but to increase 'healthy life expectancy.'" Yet this isn't the position of Lifeline's director of science, Joe McCord of Denver's Webb-Waring Institute for Cancer, Aging and Antioxidant Research. When asked, McCord stated, "We are not conducting studies to extend the lifespan of mice, or of humans." Furthermore, he says, "Protandim is not a cosmetic product, nor is it designed to be an antiaging drug. It is designed to reduce oxidative stress due to elevated production of reactive oxygen species associated with various kinds of stress and with age-related diseases."

What does this mean? It means that, according to McCord, Protandim isn't expected to increase human lifespan nor reverse visible signs of aging. So why take it?

Protandim's supposed payoff is an increase in "healthy life expectancy," which Lifeline defines as "a term used to describe general improvement in health, increased energy, reduction of incidence and severity of age-related diseases typically experienced in the last ten years of life, and general improvement in the quality of life in these latter years."

So, while we won't become immortal supermodels taking Protandim, it might reduce or eliminate risks associated with some age-related illnesses. But does research support even these more modest benefits?

From semantics to science

What sets Lifeline apart from other supplement companies claiming the next big thing in antiaging? The science behind Protandim is part of the difference, says Lifeline.

To understand why Protandim might extend healthy life expectancy, you need to understand the free radical theory of aging. According to this theory, aging is at least partly a result of the damage caused by free radicals—harmful substances produced by metabolic activity in our bodies. "In essence, these are fragments of molecules that are inherently unstable and reactive. They are usually minor byproducts of incomplete combustion, not unlike the tailpipe emissions of a worn-out automobile," says McCord.

Protandim was developed by Maynard, Massachusetts-based biotechnology company CereMedix, from which Lifeline has a license for the product. CereMedix discovered a group of peptides derived from proteins in the body that activate genes for natural antioxidant defenses. Specifically, Protandim upregulates the production of three antioxidants: Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). These provide a ready defense against the damage caused by free radicals.

There is much evidence that free radicals contribute to disease and aging, and that antioxidants can help stem some of the damage. SOD—codiscovered by McCord in 1969—is sometimes stated to be the most significant antioxidant enzyme in the body. In a press release, Lifeline calls SOD the body's primary antioxidant and points out that studies have linked it to aging in 14 different species, including humans. Species with the most SOD have been found to live the longest, and Lifeline says that studies have found that the longer life comes in the form of extended youthfulness.

Are antioxidants enough?

But despite such findings, we don't have a complete picture yet of how free radicals and antioxidants affect aging.

A recent critic of the free radical theory of aging is Tony Segal, director of University College London's Centre for Molecular Medicine. In a study published this February, Segal and colleagues found reason to question the basis for antioxidant supplementation. The researchers found that certain immune system cells kill microbes using enzymes rather than free radicals, which contradicted the theory that free radicals were the killers, and hence were toxic enough to damage cells. "Our work shows that the basic theory underlying the toxicity of oxygen radicals is flawed," Segal said of the study. "Many patients might be using expensive antioxidant drugs based upon completely invalid theories as to their therapeutic potential. All the theories relating to their causation of disease by antioxidants must, at the very least, be evaluated."

Another study by Joel Parker of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and colleagues, published this March, also found reason to question the antioxidant-longevity link—and more specifically, to question the link between SOD and longevity. Examining the production of a form of SOD in ants, the researchers found that the ants' production of free radicals was more important than their production of antioxidants in determining their longevity.

While it's doubtful that such findings are enough to undo the entire free radical theory of aging, they remind us at the very least that there are still unknown aspects to it. So while Protandim may very well increase the body's production of powerful antioxidants, this in itself is no guarantee that it will extend healthy life expectancy.

There are also competing theories of aging that look beyond the damaging effects of free radicals and oxidative stress. One such school of thought is the evolutionary theory of aging, which states that aging is caused by both an organism's genetics and its environment.

The idea driving the evolutionary theory is that organisms living in protected environments age more slowly than those in hazardous environments. The environmental factors help determine lifespan by regulating how genetics retard or hasten the aging process. In a 2002 publication, evolutionary theorist Thomas B.L. Kirkwood says, "If 90% of wild mice are dead by the age of 10 months, any investment in programming survival much beyond this point can benefit at most 10% of the population. This immediately suggests that there will be little evolutionary advantage in programming long-term survival capacity into a mouse." So, rather than proposing that there are genes whose primary function is to control aging, evolutionary theorists say that genes affect aging by determining how cellular resources are used.

If the evolutionary theory of aging is valid, then how much of the aging process is determined genetically, rather than by the damage of oxidative stress? Although it may not be a clear-cut matter of genetics versus oxidative stress, we can at least formulate a preliminary estimate. According to Kirkwood's publication, twin studies show that genetics determine a quarter to one-third of the lifespan puzzle.

Still, this only complicates rather than refutes the free radical theory. As Aubrey de Gray of the University of Cambridge's Department of Genetics in the UK says, "It's not possible to partition things into free radical damage versus other things, because everything affects everything else: our genetics determines the rate of free radical production, free radical scavenging, repair of free radical damage..."

Work in progress

What are consumers to make of all this when it comes to a buying decision?

With antiaging research still in its early stages, it's too early to tell for sure whether Protandim will offer tangible benefits.

To date, Lifeline has released statements indicating that its preclinical trials are completed and the first phase of human trials has begun. The preclinical study involved a 23-day experiment on mice. The results showed a reduction of lipid peroxidation by 60% to 75% in both plasma and liver, as well as a decrease of more than 90% percent in brain tissue. Lipid peroxidation refers to the oxidation of lipids, a process that can destroy cell membranes. The human trials will involve a 120-day study on volunteers over 18 years old.

So while Protandim has shown promise, and Lifeline appears genuinely committed to marketing a scientifically reputable product, there are still many questions. Is antioxidant upregulation in mammals enough to increase "healthy life expectancy?" Only long-term clinical trials can detail the good (and possibly bad) of Protandim's method of action. And then there's another nagging question: If Protandim works, will it work for everybody? Says Parker, "Evolutionary theory predicts that it is very unlikely to have one magic bullet that would work for everyone."

Patrick Bailey holds a master's degree in philosophy from the University of South Florida. He specializes in the philosophy of mind, neuroscience and theory of knowledge, and is a technical writer for the IT industry.

Copyright © 2004 Patrick Bailey

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39 posted on 06/03/2005 10:17:55 AM PDT by Lathspell
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To: Lathspell

I have been practicing life extension since 1978 when I discovered the work of Durk Pearson/Sandy Shaw. He pointed out that Dr. Denham Harman extended the life spans of rats by dosing them with synthetic antioxidants (food preservatives) in the early 1950s. Specifially, BHT caused extension of 30%, BHA extended them 50%, and ethoxyquin extended them 70% over the control group. I have been taking 250 mg. each of BHA and BHT daily since 1979. I have been taking 5 mg. of ethoxyquin daily since 1985. If I am still around in 30 years we will have another datapoint indicating that antioxidants work. However, remember that Dr. Harman dosed the rats for their entire lives, not just from adulthood, so I don't expect to get quite the same results. I have also added most of the herbs like green tea to my plan.


40 posted on 06/03/2005 11:45:43 AM PDT by darth
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To: Lathspell

The company's stock has already risen 3 points today.


41 posted on 06/03/2005 12:52:31 PM PDT by aimhigh
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To: zarf

" A healthy diet, nonsmoking and exercise with proper supplementation will give you the same result as this so called youth pill."

Is that why there are so many 150 year-olds around>


42 posted on 06/03/2005 2:38:16 PM PDT by gcruse (http://gcruse.typepad.com/)
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To: Oberon

A buddy of mine saw your post and said "That's an argument for taking it for six months and then stopping. Another two months and they'll be using him for stem cell research." :-)


43 posted on 06/03/2005 4:14:21 PM PDT by Lathspell
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To: darth

You are the reason Social Security is in trouble today. ;-)


44 posted on 06/03/2005 4:17:16 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
Don't worry, this is just another scam.

Aren't you glad there's honest pills like CortaSlim out there?

45 posted on 06/03/2005 4:21:50 PM PDT by Lizavetta
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To: Dog Gone

Hopefully, I will be earning too much income to benefit from Social Security for a very long time.


46 posted on 06/03/2005 5:02:50 PM PDT by darth
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To: darth

errrr...so how is your health? I'm a member of Life Extension and totally interested.


47 posted on 06/03/2005 8:30:51 PM PDT by Aria (Terri: Do not ask for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee)
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To: Lathspell
A buddy of mine saw your post and said "That's an argument for taking it for six months and then stopping. Another two months and they'll be using him for stem cell research." :-)

There are other effects, too. At first my wife was all for me taking the drug...now she's not nearly as happy with it.

48 posted on 06/04/2005 6:44:18 AM PDT by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: SunkenCiv; cyborg; neverdem

http://www.protandim.com/
http://www.protandim.com/about-protandim.htm


49 posted on 06/04/2005 8:56:40 PM PDT by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, algae)
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To: Coleus

Thanks for the links, but I think I'll pass on this for now.


50 posted on 06/04/2005 9:36:28 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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