Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Iwo Jima Anniversary Remembered Across The Nation
WebProNews ^ | 2-20-14 | Emily Greene

Posted on 02/23/2014 7:08:38 PM PST by kingattax

Wednesday marked the 69th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima – one of the worst battles of World War II.

Across the nation many remembered this day from 69 years ago.

In Newington, Connecticut, a memorial was recently built and is the only flag raising memorial built by survivors of the Battle of Iwo Jima. The flag flown at the memorial is historically correct with 48 stars. There is also sand from Iwo Jima beaches in the concrete base. The memorial also includes inscriptions of the names of 100 men from Connecticut who died during the battle.

The 69th anniversary will be marked on February 22 and 23 by events being held by members of the Iwo Jima Memorial Historical Foundation.


(Excerpt) Read more at webpronews.com ...


TOPICS: Japan; News/Current Events; US: Connecticut; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: 5thmarinedivision; anniversary; battleofiwojima; connecticut; godsgravesglyphs; iwo; iwojima; japan; ltgenrockey; militaryhistory; newington; usmc; waronterror; worldwareleven; worldwarii; wwii
Today is the 69th anniversary of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.

Thank God for so many brave Marines -- true American heroes.

1 posted on 02/23/2014 7:08:38 PM PST by kingattax
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: kingattax

The raising of both flags, even!


2 posted on 02/23/2014 7:15:11 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

I can’t remember who said it but I recall roughly this quote: “Iwo Jima where uncommon valor was a common virtue”. One of America’s greatest moments


3 posted on 02/23/2014 7:18:54 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax
Here's a great tribute:

Stars and Stripes on Iwō-Jima--Judy Canova & the Riders of the Purple Sage (1945)

4 posted on 02/23/2014 7:18:55 PM PST by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

Accept for the MSM, Google, et al .....


5 posted on 02/23/2014 7:19:10 PM PST by SkyDancer (I Believe In The Law Until It Intereferes With Justice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

Today is the anniversary of an historic day in the annals of American history. The raising of the flag on Iwo Jima is one of the most iconic images to ever represent the American struggle for democracy and freedom in the world. The image is as recognizably American as the Statue of Liberty and Mount Rushmore.

By the morning of February 23rd, 1945 the battle of Iwo Jima had already been underway for several days. The 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines battled to the top of Mount Suribachi, a huge volcanic mountain that overlooks the rest of the island.

As you may have seen in the film “Flags of Our Fathers” directed by Clint Eastwood, the first flag raised over Iwo Jima was a small one crudely tied to a metal pole salvaged from wreckage found on top of Mount Suribachi. The second, larger flag, raised on a better-suited flagpole, is what we recognize today as the famous depiction of the 4 Marines atop the mountain.

The dramatic photograph was taken on February 23, 1945 by Joe Rosenthal an Associated Press photographer shadowing US Marines in the Pacific. It won him a Pulitzer Prize and went down in history as the inspiration for the USMC Memorial, various stamps, posters, and other timeless depictions of the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Please use this anniversary to honor the memory of all veterans who have served their country in wartime throughout the years. We owe everything we have today to the service and sacrifices of our veterans, especially those who served in our most recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars.


6 posted on 02/23/2014 7:22:58 PM PST by SandRat (Duty - Honor - Country! What else needs said?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

I don’t think they are 100 American men in Connecticut today who could match up with those 100 that died there.


7 posted on 02/23/2014 7:26:12 PM PST by AlmaKing
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax; mylife; Kathy in Alaska; LUV W; Brucifer

8 posted on 02/23/2014 7:34:06 PM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax; blueyon; KitJ; T Minus Four; xzins; CMS; The Sailor; ab01; txradioguy; Jet Jaguar; ...

Active Duty/Retiree ping.


9 posted on 02/23/2014 7:36:56 PM PST by Jet Jaguar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

God bless Ira Hayes.


10 posted on 02/23/2014 7:43:39 PM PST by Lisbon1940
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: left that other site

PING


11 posted on 02/23/2014 7:45:48 PM PST by kingattax (America needs more real Americans.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Liberty Valance

We must never forget the bravery of those who paid for our freedom with their blood!


12 posted on 02/23/2014 7:54:11 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: kingattax; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...
Thanks kingattax for the topic, thanks US veterans for everything.

13 posted on 02/23/2014 7:54:53 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Lisbon1940
God bless Ira Hayes.

"The Ballad of Ira Hayes" by Johnny Cash

There they battled up Iwo Jima hill,
Two hundred and fifty men
But only twenty-seven lived to walk back down again

And when the fight was over
And when Old Glory raised
Among the men who held it high
Was the Indian, Ira Hayes


14 posted on 02/23/2014 7:57:32 PM PST by Iron Munro (Eight died on that bridge at Concord, back in 1775. How many will it take this time?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-r/k-rocky.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keller_E._Rockey


15 posted on 02/23/2014 8:00:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

The 36-day assault resulted in more than 26,000 American
casualties, including 6,800 dead. Of the 20,000 Japanese
defenders, only 1,083 survived.

Twenty-seven Medals of Honor were awarded to Marines and
sailors, many posthumously, more than were awarded for any
other single operation during the war.

http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/battleiwojima.htm


16 posted on 02/23/2014 8:05:05 PM PST by Iron Munro (Eight died on that bridge at Concord, back in 1775. How many will it take this time?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

It is rightfully a proud day in Marine history. However, another
heroic event happened in the Pacific Theater at the same time
that never gets recognition. In the Philippines 2147 mostly
American civilians were rescued from a Japanese prison camp
thirty miles south of Manila. The behind the lines rescue executed
by the US Army 11th Airborne Div included a parachute assault,
infiltration by the 11th AB Recon platoon and guerillas, a diversionary
operation, and an evacuation by amtracs across a vast lake. Over
150 Japanese guards were killed or scattered. No prisoners were
lost.

The raising of the US flag on Mt Surabachi was truly a memorable
historic event. However, that it completely over shadows an
event like the Los Banos Raid is somewhat sad IMO.


17 posted on 02/23/2014 8:10:30 PM PST by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Iron Munro

We should have annexed it after the war.


18 posted on 02/23/2014 8:11:21 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Sivad

http://www.thedropzone.org/pacific/Ringler.html


19 posted on 02/23/2014 8:20:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

http://www.blackfive.net/main/2005/02/angels_at_dawn_.html

http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii-liberating-los-banos-internment-camp.htm


20 posted on 02/23/2014 8:22:11 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
We should have annexed it after the war.

We follow a higher standard....that is truly American Exceptionalism.

21 posted on 02/23/2014 8:26:07 PM PST by lightman (O Lord, save Thy people and bless Thine inheritance, giving to Thy Church vict'ry o'er Her enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: lightman

Well said!


22 posted on 02/23/2014 8:32:45 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Iron Munro

I am surprised so many Japanese survived. I would have guessed maybe 15-20 instead of over a thousand. I suspect many of them were badly wounded and unable to resist.


23 posted on 02/23/2014 8:37:51 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Jet Jaguar; Liberty Valance

24 posted on 02/23/2014 8:45:17 PM PST by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Lt John Ringler was a good friend of my dad’s. Prior to becoming
CO of B Co 511 PIR and leading the parachute assault on Los Banos
Ringler was a Lt in my dad’s Co (H 511). He was paymaster and
my PFC dad was his bodyguard. Years later my dad, Ringler, and
Col Ed Lahti worked together on 511 PIR Assoc matters such as
reunions.


25 posted on 02/23/2014 9:03:21 PM PST by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

Throw in an Army unit, too. My father-in-law’s 75th JASCO - Joint Assault Signal Company - 3rd wave. Ran the communications lines between units at minimum. In many landings they also served as Forward Artillery Spotters (called Observers than).

You can find out about the Signal Corps ops in the Pacific in the official history volumes, by organization, known as the “Green Books”.

Father-in-law is still alive and sharp at 94. Don’t know how many Purple Hearts he got in the Pacific campaigns (Saipan, Eniwetok, Tinian, etc. Heard he had at least three.

Later rose to become a Lt. Col. with the Army Security Agency and turned down a Brigadier General position to be with his family and soon deceased wife.

Signal Corps frontline units suffered up to 60-75% casualties in many of the Pacific campaigns.

The 75th was the only Army unit to land on Iwo in an assault wave. Combat Engineers (Navy Seebees if I recall correctly), lost a whole company on the beaches due to a mix-up in request for personnel (they needed one man and got a whole company, largely unarmed by mistake. Took the brunt of a Japanese suicide attack).

The Army brought the troops in on assault transports. A late cardio-rehab friend of mine, Gen. Bruce Jacobson, was the commander of one of those transports.

Everybody fought or served at Iwo, though the Marines did literally all of the ground fighting.

We must never forget any of them. Back then we had real military leaders and politically incorrect soldiers, which is why we won the war.


26 posted on 02/23/2014 9:36:20 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax
Let me put in a good word for at least one Army sergeant.

My Dad, who passed away last April, was a field radar specialist who came ashore on D+1.

He set up at least one radar unit under mortar and sniper fire, and he was one of the lead radar operations NCO’s on the island until it was pacified in late March.

Naval intelligence had predicted a high probability for Kamikaze attacks, so my Dad's work was considered an essential part of Naval defense.

In the event, only a few Kamikaze attacks took place, but a carrier was sunk, and more than 300 personnel were killed.

My Dad had the same job on Saipan, but I don't know any interesting details about his time there.

Truth be told, my Dad and I did not get along well for the last 30 years - he remarried after my Mom died, and, as so often happens, that didn't work out well for his own kids.

But, that aside, I think he might be pleased that I remembered him on this day.

27 posted on 02/24/2014 2:47:19 AM PST by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: yarddog

RE: “I am surprised so many Japanese survived.”

That’s an interesting story.

Many of the “survivors” were Korean forced laborers.

Before the invasion, there were up to 10,000 Koreans working mainly on the tunnels.

No one is sure how many were still there when the invasion began.


28 posted on 02/24/2014 3:00:25 AM PST by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

I didn’t see your Comment until after I posted.

My Dad was an Army radar specialist who went in D+1.

Please check out my Comment #27.

I have no idea what unit my Father was attached to, but he and his lieutenant and squad were bunked all alone with Marines on their transport ship.

Is it possible radar guys were in Army Signals, too?


29 posted on 02/24/2014 3:19:44 AM PST by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

My Dad was There.


30 posted on 02/24/2014 3:58:26 AM PST by left that other site
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax

Isn’t Iwo Jima memorial in New Britian? Or did Newington build another memorial?


31 posted on 02/24/2014 4:50:47 AM PST by ExCTCitizen (2014: The Year of DEAD RINOS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kingattax
Years ago, before the National Museum of the Marine Corps was built in Quantico, the Marine Corps Museum was a tiny little 2-story building at the Washington Navy Yard.

On the second floor of that building were both Flags raised on Suribachi. Wish I had the pictures handy.

I have yet to visit the Museum in Quantico, hopefully some day. Semper Fi

32 posted on 02/24/2014 4:52:40 AM PST by real saxophonist (Rock, Paper, Scissors, GUN! I win.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: real saxophonist; RaceBannon
RaceBannon and I visited the Marine Museum a must see, even for Army guys like me. All of my friends and relatives served in Viet Nam with the Marines it is a must place to go.
33 posted on 02/24/2014 12:02:11 PM PST by Little Bill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

Re “Is it possible radar guys were in Army Signals, too?”

I would say yes based on what I’ve read in the official military histories of WW2 in the “Green Books”.

Radar specialists were in the Signal Corps (see if your father graduated from Ft. Monmouth, NJ SC school). They set up anti-aircraft radar units all over the Pacific, esp. where the Japs had airfields or carrier task forces.

Also used to pick up incoming US bombers and fighters who needed guidance to emergency bases, esp. on Iwo Jima.

My father-in-law was in an Assault Wave while others came in, possibly like your father, as detached elements to the Marines. Or perhaps your father was in an Assault Wave but after the beaches and shorefronts had been secured. Signal Corps men were not trained to be frontline assault troops but did fight when necessary.

They were electronics specialists - radio communications, radar, Forward Observers who called in target positions to both ships and land artillery, etc. They were the communications lifeline people for the Marines.
Very brave men.


34 posted on 02/24/2014 5:54:38 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
My Dad did his radar training at MIT.

He made a lifelong joke out of that connection.

Anytime someone challenged him on a technical issue, he would say, “Well, I studied at MIT.”

Post-war, he got in one year at Northwestern, but had to drop out and work full time when my older brother was born.

35 posted on 02/25/2014 2:54:10 AM PST by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: kingattax
“Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”

--Pres. Reagan

36 posted on 02/19/2015 10:03:04 AM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson