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Ancient Cities Discovered In Yangtze Valley
Independent (UK) ^ | 8-3-2003 | David Keys

Posted on 08/02/2003 4:01:46 PM PDT by blam

Ancient cities discovered in Yangtze Valley

By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
03 August 2003

China's Yangtze River was once home to an ancient civilisation, just as the Nile, the Tigris-Euphrates and the Indus rivers were, according to new archaeological research.

A series of 13 walled towns and cities have so far been discovered. Dating from around 3000BC these ancient urban centres - excavated by Chinese and Japanese archaeological teams over the past decade - appear to have had populations of up to 10,000. The largest cities had up to three miles of defensive walls. The discoveries show that exactly the same process of urbanisation and state formation was taking place in China in the same river valley environment and in roughly the same period that similar developments were occurring in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley.

Like the earliest phases of the other great riverine civilisations, the newly discovered Yangtze civilisation belonged to the neolithic period - substantially prior to the development in China of metal technology.

The culture that gave rise to these first Chinese towns had its origins in around 7000BC, when the first villages started appearing on the banks of the Yangtze. Indeed the Yangtze area was one of the first in the world to produce pottery - an amazing 13,000 years ago.

Archaeological investigations have so far revealed the sites of nine ancient towns in the Middle Yangtze Valley between Wuhan and Jiangling, and four in the Upper Yangtze near Chendu.

The excavations - carried out by the local Hubei Province Archaeological Institute and other Chinese and Japanese archaeological units - have been revealing evidence of the Yangtze Valley civilisation's culture. Stone weapons and sickles have been unearthed as well as jade statuettes of humans, birds and animals. Beautiful pottery with geometric designs is also being found. The three biggest urban sites each cover up to 2,250 acres.

The archaeological discoveries, revealed in the current issue of BBC History Magazine, show that the Yangtze Valley civilisation lasted for 500 years and collapsed as a result of climatic and environmental problems and warfare.

It is not clear who the people were who created China's first civilisation. They may have been related ethnically to Malays, Burmese or Tibetans, and were probably pushed south as peoples from further north invaded the Yangtze Valley. According to one leading authority on Yangtze Valley archaeology, Professor Kazuo Miyamoto of Japan's Kyushu University, the discoveries are "transforming the academic world's understanding of early China".


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ancient; archaeology; china; cities; discovered; economic; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; rivers; valley; yangtze

1 posted on 08/02/2003 4:01:46 PM PDT by blam
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To: farmfriend; RightWhale; JudyB1938
ping.
2 posted on 08/02/2003 4:02:30 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Some people go around thinking that we know all there is to know about the past, but there is so much more out there waiting to be discovered.
3 posted on 08/02/2003 4:04:41 PM PDT by Grig
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To: Grig
Some people go around thinking that we know all there is to know about the past, but there is so much more out there waiting to be discovered.

Especially when one realizes that gradualism is a silly science busy making the facts fit their own pre-conceieved notions.

4 posted on 08/02/2003 4:28:17 PM PDT by Centurion2000 (We are crushing our enemies, seeing him driven before us and hearing the lamentations of the liberal)
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To: Grig
"but there is so much more out there waiting to be discovered."

Yup. IMO, the good stuff is out on the continental shelf, underwater. The melt from the Ice Age must have covered many coastal cities.

5 posted on 08/02/2003 4:30:29 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
When it came time for cities, cities appeared all over the earth. What was it that caused this to happen? Seems like only some kind of technology would cause such a revolution. The discovery of the Wheel? The Cam-phone?
6 posted on 08/02/2003 4:56:27 PM PDT by RightWhale (Destroy the dark; restore the light)
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To: blam
In the print copy of National Review this week, they state that this find is baloney concocted to support the "Chinese Center of Civilization" argument of the regime.

Hmmmmmmm......
7 posted on 08/02/2003 5:00:56 PM PDT by Uncle Miltie ("Leave Pat, Leave!")
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To: RightWhale
It was beer.

Making beer requires an agrarian society to grow the hopps. Once the nomadic people tasted beer, they settled down to grow hopps. Each year after the harvest there was a big celebration.

The agrarians invented games to honor their hunter-gatherer heritage, and one of them was exceptionally fun to watch while drinking beer, especially on Monday nights. The game involved chasing a pig into a cage that was called a "gule".

As time went on this game was passed down through history to become what we now call baseball. ;^)

8 posted on 08/02/2003 5:12:36 PM PDT by e_engineer
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To: e_engineer
That's right. It was bread and beer, both using domesticated yeast. Of course they had to provide the brewer and dough-maker with grain flour, which required agriculture, grain storage, pottery and furnaces, milling machinery, and they had to distribute beer and bread fairly which required ethics and economics. That's just the first year.

Before domesticated yeast they had nothing but unleavened bread and rice milk to supplement the natural food: bugs and berries. What a horrible time it was before civilization. Golden Age? Oh, sure.

9 posted on 08/02/2003 5:22:06 PM PDT by RightWhale (Destroy the dark; restore the light)
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To: RightWhale
When it came time for cities, cities appeared all over the earth. What was it that caused this to happen? Seems like only some kind of technology would cause such a revolution. The discovery of the Wheel? The Cam-phone?

Agriculture. Farmers need plows, hoes, scythes, pottery to store the harvest in, lots of stuff. The purpose of cities is to enable manufactoring by bringing suppliers for the various manufactoring processes close together

10 posted on 08/02/2003 6:22:02 PM PDT by SauronOfMordor (Java/C++/Unix/Web Developer === needs a job at the moment)
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To: blam; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; carenot; freedom9; FreeLibertarian; lizma; Notforprophet; Rutabega; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.

11 posted on 08/02/2003 6:25:46 PM PDT by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
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To: Grig
China is a country that I don't know much about but didn't the first Emporer Chin have nearly all historical texts about Ancient china before his rule destroyed and declared that history only started with him and his rule?
12 posted on 08/02/2003 6:43:59 PM PDT by Burkeman1 (If you see ten troubles comin down the road, Nine will run into the ditch before they reach you.)
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To: blam
Indeed the Yangtze area was one of the first in the world to produce pottery - an amazing 13,000 years ago.

Apparently, along about that time, some of them grabbed their Clovis-pointed spears, said, "This place is going to pot!" and headed northeastward for that new land bridge... ;-}

13 posted on 08/02/2003 8:37:58 PM PDT by TXnMA (No Longer!!! -- and glad to be back home in God's Gountry!!)
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To: blam
I read recently somewhere about a city discovered in Mexico with a fully functional ocean port. Trouble is, the city sits at 10,000 feet.
14 posted on 08/02/2003 8:50:52 PM PDT by djf
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To: blam
... so far revealed the sites of nine ancient towns in the Middle Yangtze Valley between Wuhan and Jiangling...

Jiangling--Sounds like a nice name for a Christmas village.

15 posted on 08/02/2003 9:05:47 PM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: blam
"The largest cities had up to three miles of defensive walls."

It seems to me that inhabitants of these first early cities
all had one thing in common--they were all afraid of something.

16 posted on 08/02/2003 9:19:16 PM PDT by StormEye
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To: Burkeman1
"China is a country that I don't know much about but didn't the first Emporer Chin have nearly all historical texts about Ancient china before his rule destroyed and declared that history only started with him and his rule?"

Yes and they enacted a form of genocide against anyone who had any Caucasian features. The Hakka Chinese who migrated from north China all the way across China to the south were such people. However, they still express such features on occasion. They were 'off-spring' of these people:Mystery Of The Desert Mummies

17 posted on 08/02/2003 10:05:00 PM PDT by blam
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To: djf
"I read recently somewhere about a city discovered in Mexico with a fully functional ocean port. Trouble is, the city sits at 10,000 feet."

You may be thinking of this

18 posted on 08/02/2003 10:10:46 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Not a sunken city, a raised city. I'll see if I can find it again.
19 posted on 08/02/2003 10:21:41 PM PDT by djf
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To: SauronOfMordor
hoes

Especially hoes, practitioners of the world's oldest profession (actually, I think jewelers were first).

I think you're entirely correct: cities were the manifestation of agricultural life, when people could settle down and stop being nomads for a living. Technology like beer and bread require a settled life, with nutritional protein supplied by herds of domesticated creatures. (Prior to that, fermented mare's milk probably got everyone going on Saturday night). Since these discoveries were diffused around the populated world at approximately the same time, cities emerged everywhere roughly simultaneously.

20 posted on 08/02/2003 10:23:30 PM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: djf
"Not a sunken city, a raised city. I'll see if I can find it again."

The Altiplano (from the link I provided) is 13,000 feet high. You said it was in the mountains.

21 posted on 08/02/2003 10:31:44 PM PDT by blam
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To: djf
I read recently somewhere about a city discovered in Mexico with a fully functional ocean port. Trouble is, the city sits at 10,000 feet.

Another chapter for the next edition of Forbidden Archeology?

22 posted on 08/02/2003 11:43:37 PM PDT by Publius6961 (Californians are as dumm as a sack of rocks)
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To: StormEye
they were all afraid of something

The walls were to protect beer-making supplies from wild animals. They also served to keep drunks from wandering off where they might be eaten by lions and tigers.

23 posted on 08/03/2003 9:07:09 AM PDT by RightWhale (Destroy the dark; restore the light)
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To: RightWhale
interesting thread
24 posted on 08/10/2003 10:05:37 PM PDT by I'm ALL Right!
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Not a ping, just an update.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
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The GGG Digest
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25 posted on 04/30/2005 5:13:38 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FR profiled updated Monday, April 11, 2005. Fewer graphics, faster loading.)
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26 posted on 06/04/2010 7:52:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: RightWhale

Beer...we have so much to thank it for.


27 posted on 06/14/2010 3:32:44 AM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus)
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