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Was America Founded As A Christian Nation?
Forbes ^ | 9/25/2012 | Bill Flax

Posted on 09/25/2012 7:24:27 PM PDT by billflax

Few matters ignite more controversy than America’s Christian roots. The issue reverberates anew this electoral season where the faiths of both major candidates have been questioned. Religion imbues politics.

The battle over America’s beginnings muddles wishful hero worship with efforts to commandeer America’s past so to steer her future. The most vocal proponents of Christian America and their counterparts advocating a completely secular state necessarily cherry-pick data to prove exaggerations while discarding inconvenient details.

By transforming our Forefathers into faithful servants of Christ the Religious Right risks compromising the biblical message. Baptist theologian Al Mohler warns advocates of Christian America have “confused their cultural heritage with biblical Christianity.” While Believers must exercise their views, cheapening what constitutes Christianity for political gain profanes the Gospel.

Moreover, Believers should refuse Big Government operating in Christ’s name. As empty pews in Europe testify, politicized religion impedes ministry. Beautiful cathedrals dot the Old World, but with scant congregants, they memorialize a funereal dearth of faith coming from state sanctioned pulpits.

Meanwhile, those most ardently challenging America’s Christian origins wrongly portray the Founders as rank secularists. They would seemingly reduce religious liberty to mere freedom of worship letting Believers pray in their hovels, but in public: Be seen and not heard. Some liberals seem inclined on expunging Christianity. Democrats nearly revolted over a fleeting reference to “God-given potential” at their convention.

(Excerpt) Read more at forbes.com ...


TOPICS: History; Moral Issues; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS: americachristian; christian; christiannation; constitution; declaration; forefathers; founders; nation
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The secularists are wrong, period. But we cannot remake the Founders in our image to claim they were something they weren't.
1 posted on 09/25/2012 7:24:34 PM PDT by billflax
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To: billflax

Well, of course this country was not founded on Christian Principles That would be wrong /s.


2 posted on 09/25/2012 7:26:44 PM PDT by KittenClaws (You may have to fight a battle more than once in order to win it." - Margaret Thatcher)
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To: billflax

30% of the founders were ministers. Most were religious men.

They came here to practice Christianity out from under the control of the King.


3 posted on 09/25/2012 7:27:09 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver

exactly..


4 posted on 09/25/2012 7:28:40 PM PDT by dalebert
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To: dalebert

“One Nation Under God”, and all that stuff.


5 posted on 09/25/2012 7:30:05 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: billflax

America was NOT founded as a Christian nation.

A true Christian nation would not have allowed false gods to be worshipped in it’s society.

Islam, Buddhism and satanism would have been banned outright.


6 posted on 09/25/2012 7:31:49 PM PDT by 353FMG (The US Constitution is only as effective as those who enforce it.)
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To: billflax

Jamestown first settlement.

” The first representative assembly in the New World convened in the Jamestown church on July 30, 1619. The General Assembly met in response to orders from the Virginia Company “to establish one equal and uniform government over all Virginia” which would provide “just laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people there inhabiting.” The other crucial event that would play a role in the development of America was the arrival of Africans to Jamestown. A Dutch slave trader exchanged his cargo of Africans for food in 1619. The Africans became indentured servants, similar in legal position to many poor Englishmen who traded several years of labor in exchange for passage to America. The popular conception of a race-based slave system did not fully develop until the 1680s.”

http://www.apva.org/history/


7 posted on 09/25/2012 7:31:58 PM PDT by cruise_missile (')
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To: driftdiver

yes..the proof is all over the place


8 posted on 09/25/2012 7:31:58 PM PDT by dalebert
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To: billflax

To the headline: yes


9 posted on 09/25/2012 7:33:03 PM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: billflax; 353FMG

Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.

—Thomas Jefferson, November 29, 1775


10 posted on 09/25/2012 7:33:11 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: billflax
Well, whatever, King Philippe II/III, of Spain, founded America with the Treaty of London 1604. He was very much a Christian man ~ and at the time the richest man in the world.

He set aside a desolate and nearly abandoned portion of North America for the exclusive use of Protestants.

Considering who his father was, this was a magnificent gesture ~ worthy of memory.

11 posted on 09/25/2012 7:36:10 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: billflax
George Washington, November 5, 1775, General Orders
George Washington: Letter to the Roman Catholics

George Washington's Prophesy [sic] of America
Happy 278th Birthday George Washington, The 1st and Best President the US has ever had.
The Character of George Washington
10 Things We Should Know About George Washington
The Popes on "the Great Washington"
Where Have you Gone George Washington?
A Few Quotes from George Washington
Mighty Washington: The greatest President
George Washington’s Tear-Jerker
This Day In History February 4,1789 George Washington is elected president

12 posted on 09/25/2012 7:41:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: cruise_missile
Catholics settled in Floriday long before Jamestown.

How The Catholic Church Built Western Civilization
America’s Catholic Colony [Ecumenical]
The Catholic Church in the United States of America [Ecumenical]
Catholic Founding Fathers - The Carroll Family [Ecumenical]
Charles Carroll, founding father and "an exemplar of Catholic and republican virtue" [Ecumenical]

13 posted on 09/25/2012 7:43:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: billflax

Our Constitution is based on the Ten Commandments, not the koran.


14 posted on 09/25/2012 7:43:02 PM PDT by Slyfox
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To: Slyfox

Muslims have started the rewrite and are saying they were here before we were.


15 posted on 09/25/2012 7:44:47 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver

“Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.

—Thomas Jefferson, November 29, 1775”

Is that statement supposed to prove Jefferson was a Christian rather than a Deist?


16 posted on 09/25/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: 353FMG
Christian missionaries regularly pushed back the boundaries between barbarism and civilization and lived side by side with pagans of all sorts in the process.

Back when King Philippe I of Spain was favoring the Jesuits (I belive that's the order) as the bearers of Christianity to the Indians the chief Cardinal of Spain prevailed on him to allow all the orders in Europe to send missionaries to the New World ~ else he promised schism with Rome ~ meaning the same sort of Protestant/Catholic dispute as they had in France.

That squared away the old guy for a while, at least on that issue, and the settlement of America proceded with input from virtually every nation ~

Every part of America had been the subject of intense lobbying by Christian institutions long before the Founders managed to get here.

This was the GREAT PRIZE OF ALL HISTORY ~ a whole new world!

17 posted on 09/25/2012 7:45:27 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Okieshooter

Its intended to show what his motivations were and that he believed in a creator.


18 posted on 09/25/2012 7:47:37 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: 353FMG

Technically, freedom of religion in the colonies only applied to Christianity as all other “comparative religions” were considered pagan or false religions.

This was especially true of British, Scottish, French, Dutch, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swiss, and Russian settlers.

Judaism was also considered consistent with Christianity as the root of Christianity. Islam was not in consideration except as a false belief system.

Just study Church History and a globe and follow the growth of freedom in the West.


19 posted on 09/25/2012 7:51:55 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Salvation

“Oldest church structure in the U.S. The original adobe walls and altar were built by Tlaxcala Indians from Mexico under the direction of Franciscan Padres, circa 1610”

http://www.evanderputten.org/special/newmexico/sanmiguel.htm


20 posted on 09/25/2012 7:52:11 PM PDT by cruise_missile (')
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To: Salvation
Actually, there were Catholics at what is now Jamestown BEFORE the spot we now know as St. Augustine was built. This was where you went to escape the Atlantic storms ~ an inland harbor. The Booke of the Livinge and ye Deade names some of the earlier settlers there on behalf of Spanish interests.

Most earlier records regarding Spanish involvement in Chesapeake Bay are lost of course, but to give you an idea what they could do they actually sailed up the Susquehanna to survey the line between Acadia and Virginia ~ we know that because archaeologists found one of their boats in the mud, as well as Spanish artifacts, armor, skeletons ~ if you can sail up the Susquehanna you can explore and make use of Chesapeake Bay as well.

Then there were the pirates in Maryland ~ the Spanish and the Brits cooperated to a degree in clearing out pirates in the Carribean in the mid 1500s! This is where those guys went ~ and later on in later centuries ~ lots of wild country there until the 1800s.

21 posted on 09/25/2012 7:53:17 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: billflax; betty boop; marron; Alamo-Girl; little jeremiah; metmom; xzins; GodGunsGuts; Fichori; ...

Oh, Boy! . . . Here we go.


22 posted on 09/25/2012 7:54:07 PM PDT by YHAOS (you betcha!)
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To: billflax

In my opinion, nations are not religious. The leaders and the people of a nation may belong to one religion or another, and they may govern by principles according to their religion(s), but the nation itself does not belong to a particular religion.

On another line of thought, each of the early colonies came here to practice their particular brand of religion free from whatever interference that they had received in their homelands. But to the best of my knowledge, none of the early colonies practiced what we would call “freedom of religion”. They came here to be free to practice their own religion, but they were not interested in allowing others to practice a different religion within their colony.

By the time of the revolution, this had changed in some of the colonies, but several of the thirteen original states still had official state religions even after the passage of the Bill of Rights and its guarantee of what we now call “freedom of religion”.

This alone should tell you whether the constitution was intended to apply to the states as well as the nation.


23 posted on 09/25/2012 7:57:30 PM PDT by Stegall Tx (Living off your tax dollars can be kinda fun, but not terribly profitable.)
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To: Okieshooter; driftdiver
"Is that statement supposed to prove Jefferson was a Christian rather than a Deist?"

Your point being?

24 posted on 09/25/2012 7:57:49 PM PDT by YHAOS (you betcha!)
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To: cruise_missile
Still in use ~ critical phrase. There's another structure in East Central Ohio that is probably several decades older ~ looks like a sacrasty ~ first part of a church you might build out in the wilderness before you had any parishners. You can go on the net and in moments match up the style with that of standard Spanish frontier stuctures ~ all the way back!

They owned the Ohio Valley for a good long while ~ a couple of centuries before the French tried to move in! They did things ~ long forgotten things. (SEE: Old Stone Fort ~ http://www.midwesternepigraphic.org/croghan.html )

25 posted on 09/25/2012 7:58:50 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: billflax

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflower_Compact

In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, defender of the Faith, etc.

Having undertaken, for the Glory of God, and advancements of the Christian faith and honor of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic; for our better ordering, and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
In witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France, and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth, 1620.[13]

Note: They landed not in Virginia, but Cape Cod.


26 posted on 09/25/2012 7:59:54 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
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To: billflax

Articles / writers use the ‘controversial’ meme to rewrite history in support of liberalism. And they/their publications should be told in great number that their credibility ends, as does their income, when they attempt to blatantly lie.

Whether it’s this, the gay ‘rights’ bs or Dem anything, Stop patronizing them, inform them why and that’s about all we can do.

Why people still watch TV or by MSM pubs/visit their websites/then wonder why the MSM has such influence, is beyond me.


27 posted on 09/25/2012 8:02:02 PM PDT by Norm Lenhart
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To: Stegall Tx
You need to read the Treaty of London 1604 ~ the King of Spain dictated religious tolerance in the territory.

True enough Puritans came here to escape official Anglican dictat, and Catholics from England came here to escape both, but there was a lot less of that than is popularly imagined.

America was a tough place to live ~ people struggled to survive ~ many early settlements had a single building used by several religious bodies ~ even those whose members didn't intermarry or socialize ~ try looking up OLD YELLOW CHURCH ~ there are several of them. Everybody went there.

28 posted on 09/25/2012 8:02:29 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Stegall Tx
In my opinion, nations are not religious.

Apparently you have never heard of Islam before and how the countries which have implemented Islam as their official religion go about their daily lives.

Of course, the fact that Islam is more of a cult and pseudo form of government, I can see where you might not consider it a "religion." Just messing with you!
29 posted on 09/25/2012 8:03:01 PM PDT by ExTxMarine (PRAYER: It's the only HOPE for real CHANGE in America!)
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To: KittenClaws

I wouldn’t say were founded as a Christian nation as our founding documents don’t specifically mention Christ and that our authority in our Constituiion powers come from the people and not God, an Enlightement idea. However, there many christians founders who had a alot of influence so I would say we were a country with judeo christian influence.


30 posted on 09/25/2012 8:03:41 PM PDT by scbison
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To: driftdiver

I just wondered since the subject of the thread is were we founded as a Christian nation. I agree that Jefferson believed in a creator as do all Deist.

I agree that Christian principles had a very strong influence on the founding of this nation, but to me a Christain nation implies almost a theocracy which it is not. As a matter a fact the theocracies of Europe was one of the reasons people came to America to escape.


31 posted on 09/25/2012 8:03:47 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: billflax

Arrrrghh! No time tonight, but I must return to demonstrate at length that America was most assuredly founded on Christian principles....but not for the reasons usually advanced.

Your article was interesting, but weak kneed. The truth seldom lies in the center between “extremes” as liberals and moderates seem to fancy. The truth makes it’s own path irrespective of what is today novel or trendy.

Quickly this. We are a republic and republic’s make an end of Kings. Such an end was only made possible by Christ.

The moment Christ died a new covenant was born. The curtain in Herod’s Temple which separated the holy of holies from the people was torn asunder. From that moment forward no one stood between each person and their God. No Priest. No King.

We have a one on one with God. Oh my...that means we are born with rights from God. Oh my....then there is no such thing as a noble. I am equal to any man and every man before God and the law.

It took another 1750 years, a Reformation, and an ocean between us to figure it out....but we did.

All men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with unalienable rights among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.....is indeed a Christian principle.

As is the tolerance for sinners and heretics who must find salvation and repentance on their own....not by force or compulsion.

Not all men who say they are Christian were or are. Likewise, not all men who say they are or were irreligious can be so easily filed.

The founders, like all of us, undoubtedly went through many phases of belief and unbelief in their long lives. They would be far too remarkable had they not. But the record does show that for most of them most of the time they lived....they abided by Christian principles as well as any sinner might.


32 posted on 09/25/2012 8:05:42 PM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: billflax

Surely developed under Biblical principals and Christians are the majority of the population, but, no, not a Christian nation. I don’t see where Christ would support abortion, pornography, gambling, name your sin. The US is like any other nation, populated with Christians, but it doesn’t have any unique covenant with God, at least not one that can be found in the Bible.


33 posted on 09/25/2012 8:15:02 PM PDT by InvisibleChurch (the mature Christian is almost impossible to offend)
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To: billflax

NO.

It was founded on Christian principles by a majority of Christians


34 posted on 09/25/2012 8:16:19 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: muawiyah
All of these old churches must have been built by deists. ;-)
35 posted on 09/25/2012 8:18:39 PM PDT by cruise_missile (')
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To: scbison
I'm sorry, Scbison, but you are not correct on this.

The Declaration of Independence specifically cites that our rights come from God. The Founders were very particular on that point, because it assured that any government was subject to the authority of God.

The State is comprised of people; fallible, whimsical people. Our rights are an integral component of our humanity. The State cannot strip of us our rights, since they are God-given. The State can only actively force or passively coerce us into not exercising them. People-driven (or State granted) rights are not rights at all; they are privileges.

This is NOT what the Founders intended or designed for America.

History clearly shows that whenever a people reach a certain point of oppression, where working within the system does not achieve happiness or when freedoms are seriously broached, the people will rise up. This is a universal trait of humanity. The Founders were looking for an authority higher than any on Earth as justification for rising up - they chose God.

36 posted on 09/25/2012 8:28:50 PM PDT by TheWriterTX (Riding the Long-Wave Economic Contraction, Baby!)
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To: billflax

“Was America Founded As A Christian Nation?”

Yes, of course it was.

To try to deny this is to deny Western culture and history.


37 posted on 09/25/2012 8:57:13 PM PDT by Road Glide
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To: Cvengr
Technically, freedom of religion in the colonies only applied to Christianity as all other “comparative religions” were considered pagan or false religions.

The bill for establishing religious freedom, the principles of which had, to a certain degree, been enacted before, I had drawn in all the latitude of reason & right. It still met with opposition; but, with some mutilations in the preamble, it was finally past; and a singular proposition proved that it’s protection of opinion was meant to be universal. Where the preamble declares that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, an amendment was proposed, by inserting the word “Jesus Christ,” so that it should read "” departure from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy author of our religion” the insertion was rejected by a great majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of it's protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mahometan, the Hindoo, and infidel of every denomination.

Thomas Jefferson on the 1786 Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom

38 posted on 09/25/2012 8:57:15 PM PDT by JerseyanExile
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To: TheWriterTX

Yes, Declaration of Independence cites our rights come from our Creator but not specifically the Triune God and specifically Christ. If the founders wanted this to be a christian nation, you would think they wouldhave specifically mentioned Christ in founding documents but they didn’t. Got to remember there were Christians, Jews, Deists, masons that were founding fathers and they all had defition of who God but they never specifically defined who God was. Also many founders were Masons, which is a univeralists form of a relgion and denies the deity of Christ. Hard to argue that this was founded as Christian when many of the founders belonged a non Christian religion. Obviously there many good Christians in the founding and had a alot of influence and still have influence today.. Like I said, we were never founded as Christian but a nation that was influnced by many christians.


39 posted on 09/25/2012 9:00:25 PM PDT by scbison
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To: Okieshooter

“Whatever makes you happy”


40 posted on 09/25/2012 9:01:37 PM PDT by Letmarch75 ( If a man knows the right way to live and does not live it, there is no greater coward).)
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To: billflax

On April 30, 1789, George Washington took the oath as the first president of the United States. The oath was administered by Robert R. Livingston, the Chancellor of New York, on a second floor balcony of Federal Hall, above a crowd assembled in the streets to witness this historic event. President Washington and the members of Congress then retired to the Senate Chamber, where Washington delivered the first inaugural address to a joint session of Congress. Washington humbly noted the power of the nations’ call for him to serve as president and the shared responsibility of the president and Congress to preserve “the sacred fire of liberty” and a republican form of government.

After concluding his remarks, the President and Congress proceeded through crowds lined up on Broadway to St. Paul’s Church, where a service was conducted. 

www.archives.gov/legislative/features/gw-inauguration/#images

The service held at St.Paul’s was where the Founding Fathers dedicated America to God.


41 posted on 09/25/2012 9:06:53 PM PDT by PMAS (All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing)
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To: Slyfox
Our Constitution is based on the Ten Commandments

Yes, and the dead giveaway is how the Constitution contains precisely none of them.

42 posted on 09/25/2012 9:08:34 PM PDT by ReignOfError
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To: 353FMG

I have records of my ancestors from the 1600’s where my (many,many removed) great grandfather’s sister married a quaker. She along with him were banished and they moved to Rhode Island.

Here is an excerpt from a book written about the intolerance they held towards other faiths:

” Here hath arriyed amosgst us several persons professing
themselves Quakers, fit instruments to propagate the kingdom of Satan. For the securing of ourselves and our neighbours from such pests, we have imprisoned them, until they be des-patched away to the place from whence they came,” &c. They then request that certain laws may be propounded by the Commissioners to the General Court of each of the United Colonies. In pursuance of this impulse, and ^’acknowledging the Godly care and zeal of the gentlemen of Massachusetts,” the Commissioners at their meeting in Boston 1657, began with recommending to the Government of Rhode Island, “ that means be taken to banish the Quakers, be.” Capt. James Cudworth of Scituate, one of the Commissioners, refused to subscribe to this instrument, and from this time suffered much persecution himself, (see life of Cudworth In Family Sketches).

The reply of the Government of Rhode Island is to be admired for its moderation and discretion. We give a brief extract, viz.

” We have no law amongst us, whereby to punish any for only
declaring their minds concerning the things and ways of God. We are informed that they begin to loathe this place, for that they are not opposed by the civil authority, but with all patience and meekness are suffered to say over dieir pretended revelations,” &c. At their meeting in Boston 1658, the Commissioners addressed a circular to the Government of all the United Colonies, propounding laws against the Quakers, be. e. g. ‘’that after due conviction diat either he or she is of that cursed sect of hereticks, they be banished under pain of severe corporal punishment, and if they return again, then to be punished accordingly, and banished under pain of death : and if afterwards they shall yet presume to come again, then to be put to death as aforesaid, except they do then and there plainly and publickly renounce their said cursed opinions and develish
tenets.” The General Court of Massachusetts followed out
this recommendation to its greatest extent:* but Plymouth

* The preamble of the law of MatsachuseUa, in 1668, is as follows :
“ Whereas there is a pernicious sect commonly called Quakers lately risen, who by word and writing have published and maintained many dangerous and horrid tenets, and do take upon themselves to change and alter the received laudable customs of our Nation, in giving civil respect to equals or reverence to superiors, whose actions tend to undermine the authority of civil government, and also to destroy the order of the churches, by denying
aU established forms of worship, and by withdrawing from the orderly assemblies allowed and approved by all orthodox professors of the truth, Sdc, therefore ordered, that if any person or persons of the cursed sect of the Quakers shall be apprehended, ^c. upon trial and conviction they shall be banished on pain of death.”

I’d say they clearly established what faith this country was built upon. These were the men of Kent from Scituate, MA.


43 posted on 09/25/2012 9:16:43 PM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: driftdiver

That was added to the Pledge of Alligence in 1954.


44 posted on 09/25/2012 9:23:58 PM PDT by turn_to
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Well, all the Founders were Christians and the document could have only been written by Christians. And at the time of the Document’s adoption, about 99.9 percent of the non-Native people living here were Christians.
45 posted on 09/25/2012 9:37:44 PM PDT by Godwin1
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To: driftdiver

without stone or paper, any hard drive can be re-formatted. :)


46 posted on 09/25/2012 9:57:08 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: scbison

I wondered how long before someone would post the real truth. Some 39 posts later we have it, thank you sir.

As someone who at one time bought into David Barton’s stuff, who sincerely wanted to believe our founders founded a Christian nation, the facts say otherwise. Truth is, the founders were universalist Masons who purposely made sure that it BE NOT A CHRISTIAN NATION.

Ben Franklin and Jefferson were the most adamant of the lot. Thomas Paine, who’s “common Sense” pamphlet played such a major role, was a rabid infidel, antichrist, and a Mason. He desired a revolution and founding of a nation emphatically minus Christ having anything to do with it. He got his wish. He said, once founded, Christianity wouldn’t last 30 years. That was his hope. Roll over in your grave, antichrist, we Christians are still here!

Truth is, Christianity and antichristianity have been locked in mortal combat in America since day one. The Pilgrims representing the former, the Masons the latter. Like the devil making his appearance right away in the garden of Eden, like the tares appearing right away amongst the wheat in Christ’s parable of the wheat and tares, Matt. 13, it’s just the way it is...and will continue so till the 2nd coming.

For a great amount of eye opening documentation about what the founding fathers really were, check out this youtube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=X-a9i0FCEqk


47 posted on 09/25/2012 10:21:14 PM PDT by sasportas
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To: sasportas

Mistake, wrong video, here’s the one I meant: “The Hidden Faith of the Founding Fathers.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xU24fJ4NQxo&feature=related


48 posted on 09/25/2012 10:28:46 PM PDT by sasportas
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To: Cvengr

Jefferson, who authored the Virginia statute of religious freedom that the first amendment was based upon was of the opinion that all religious faiths were to be protected from the intrusion of the government.


49 posted on 09/25/2012 10:33:44 PM PDT by allmendream (Tea Party did not send GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism)
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To: scbison; All

If you were to read the original State Constitutions you would find things like this from Delaware.

“ART. 22. Every person who shall be chosen a member of either house, or appointed to any office or place of trust, before taking his seat, or entering upon the execution of his office, shall take the following oath, or affirmation, if conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath, to wit:

” I, A B. will bear true allegiance to the Delaware State, submit to its constitution and laws, and do no act wittingly whereby the freedom thereof may be prejudiced.”

And also make and subscribe the following declaration, to wit:

” I, A B. do profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ His only Son, and in the Holy Ghost, one God, blessed for evermore; and I do acknowledge the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by divine inspiration.”

And all officers shall also take an oath of office.”

They didn’t have it in the Federal Constitution because they looked at such things as states rights. BVB


50 posted on 09/25/2012 10:37:16 PM PDT by Bobsvainbabblings
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