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Keyword: atkinsdiet

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  • Editorial: The heretical Minnesota heart study: When science stops asking questions

    04/30/2016 4:16:08 AM PDT · by rellimpank · 31 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 30 apr 2016
    In the second half of the 20th century, conventional wisdom in the medical community held that overconsumption of saturated fats — the kind found in milk, cheese, meats and butter — was dangerous. And so, between 1968 and 1973, a well-planned, well-executed study involving more than 9,000 patients was performed to test this widely accepted relationship between diet and heart disease. The results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment were notable for two reasons. First, the findings contradicted much of what was believed at the time: The study demonstrated that people who ate a diet rich in saturated fats did not...
  • Anthropologists: Ancient man was an opportunist, not a paleo dieter

    12/19/2014 8:55:32 AM PST · by Gamecock · 46 replies
    UPI ^ | Dec. 18, 2014 | Brooks Hays
    ATLANTA, Dec. 18 (UPI) -- A new survey by anthropologists calls into question the scientific and historical justification for the paleo diet. Early man, they say, was an opportunist, not a nutritionist or dieter. By now, most people have heard of the paleo diet. The popular diet is named for the Paleolithic Age, the expansive period of prehistory characterized by so-called cavemen and primitive stone tools. Its followers forgo grains and processed foods in favor of meat, fish and vegetables. Its emphasis on protein and whole foods isn't without merit, but its genesis is based on the idea that humans...
  • Sweden Becomes First Western Nation to Reject Low-fat Diet Dogma

    11/24/2013 6:50:06 PM PST · by bkopto · 54 replies
    Health Impact News ^ | Nov 24, 2013 | Brian Shilhavy
    Sweden has become the first Western nation to develop national dietary guidelines that reject the popular low-fat diet dogma in favor of low-carb high-fat nutrition advice. The switch in dietary advice followed the publication of a two-year study by the independent Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment. The committee reviewed 16,000 studies published through May 31, 2013. Butter, olive oil, heavy cream, and bacon are not harmful foods. Quite the opposite. Fat is the best thing for those who want to lose weight. And there are no connections between a high fat intake and cardiovascular disease. On Monday, SBU, the...
  • High-protein diet ‘as bad for health as smoking’ (USC study)

    03/04/2014 10:40:22 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 49 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10:00PM GMT 04 Mar 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    Eating too much protein could be as dangerous as smoking for middle-aged people, a scientific study has found. Research which tracked thousands of adults for nearly 20 years found that people who eat a diet rich in animal protein are four times more likely to die of cancer than someone with a low protein diet. The risk is nearly as high as the danger of developing cancer by smoking 20 cigarettes each day. […] The US study found that people with a high protein diet were 74 percent more likely to die of any cause within the study period than...
  • Fat Head VS. Super size me

    01/25/2014 10:13:27 PM PST · by restornu · 15 replies
    Gravitas Ventures ^ | 2012 | Tom Naughton,
    Fat Head VS Super size me Subtitulado 1-10 2004 Sorry this one you will have to follow the links it is in English
  • What Grain Is Doing To Your Brain

    11/21/2013 4:24:03 AM PST · by Renfield · 132 replies
    Forbes ^ | 11-14-2013 | Gary Drevitch
    It’s tempting to call David Perlmutter’s dietary advice radical. The neurologist and president of the Perlmutter Health Center in Naples, Fla., believes all carbs, including highly touted whole grains, are devastating to our brains. He claims we must make major changes in our eating habits as a society to ward off terrifying increases in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia rates. And yet Perlmutter argues that his recommendations are not radical at all. In fact, he says, his suggested menu adheres more closely to the way mankind has eaten for most of human history. What’s deviant, he insists, is our modern diet....
  • Weight Gain May Be Influenced By Fructose Consumption

    08/02/2013 2:18:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 36 replies
    Note: USC researcher Kathleen Page, MD, is an SC CTSI KL2 Alumnae. As part of the program, she recieved support and acquired skills needed to secure a subsequent K23 Career Training Award to continue this research. Feeling hungry after drinking something sweet? It could have something to do with the type of sugar you consumed, according to research at Yale University led by SC CTSI K Scholar Kathleen Page, principal investigator and assistant professor of medicine at the USC Keck School of Medicine.  Kathleen Page The research determined that fructose and glucose, the two forms of simple sugars, are processed differently in the...
  • What Really Makes Us Fat

    05/27/2013 2:35:55 PM PDT · by Altariel · 145 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 30, 2012 | Gary Taubes
    A CALORIE is a calorie. This truism has been the foundation of nutritional wisdom and our beliefs about obesity since the 1960s. What it means is that a calorie of protein will generate the same energy when metabolized in a living organism as a calorie of fat or carbohydrate. When talking about obesity or why we get fat, evoking the phrase “a calorie is a calorie” is almost invariably used to imply that what we eat is relatively unimportant. We get fat because we take in more calories than we expend; we get lean if we do the opposite. Anyone...
  • Everything you thought you knew about food is WRONG...

    11/01/2010 12:15:18 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 125 replies · 1+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | 1st November 2010 | Alice Hart-Davis
    Fibre's bad for you. Fat's healthy. And five-a-day is a gimmick to make fruit and veg firms rich. Or so claims a remarkable new book 'We think we know what to eat: less red meat and more fibre, less saturated fat and more fruit and veg, right? Wrong, according to a controversial new book by obesity researcher and nutritionist Zoe Harcombe. In The Obesity Epidemic: What Caused It? How Can We Stop It? Harcombe charts her meticulous journey of research into studies that underpin dietary advice — and her myth-busting conclusions are startling.'
  • Move over Atkins: the South Beach Diet is Hot, Hot Hot!

    06/17/2003 8:46:37 AM PDT · by sinkspur · 56 replies · 3,136+ views
    Web MD ^ | 6/17/2003 | John Casey
    The South Beach Diet produces rapid weight loss without counting carbs, fats, or calories. It started out simply enough. Arthur Agatston, MD, a cardiologist, decided to develop an eating plan that would improve the cholesterol and insulin levels of his patients with heart disease. Now, the South Beach diet has grown into something much bigger. That's because the plan Agatston created not only improves cholesterol and insulin levels, but it also has helped many people lose weight. "We've had people lose anywhere from five to 100 pounds on the diet," says Agatston, who is director of the Mount Sinai Cardiac...
  • Atkins Lifestyle Fits Government Guidelines

    01/21/2005 1:25:54 PM PST · by ConservativeBamaFan · 25 replies · 878+ views
    Atkins Nutritionals ^ | January 21, 2005 | Stuart L. Trager, M.D.
    Changing the way the world eats is an ambitious goal. The significant changes in the government’s dietary guidelines are an important step forward and a clear signal that the message Dr. Atkins long championed is increasingly heeded. I’m delighted to see the much-awaited dietary guidelines of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A close look at the recommendations released last week shows how closely these recommendations reflect our efforts to raise carbohydrate awareness and emphasize the importance of weight management. It appears that government officials have listened to the Atkins’...
  • High-protein diet reduces appetite

    09/05/2006 12:57:57 PM PDT · by Mount Athos · 106 replies · 2,845+ views
    News@nature.com ^ | 5 September 2006 | Michael Hopkin
    Eating a high-protein diet can boost the release of a hunger-suppressing hormone, according to new study on mice. The research suggests that a diet rich in protein may be a good way to lose weight and keep it off. Mice fed a protein-heavy diet produced higher levels of an appetite-regulating protein called peptide YY (PYY), which has been linked to reduced appetite in human studies. What's more, the high-protein mice put on less fat than mice on a low-protein regime. The discovery boosts the theory that eating more protein might help to reduce appetite and lead to sustained weight loss,...
  • Carbs against Cardio: More Evidence that Refined Carbohydrates, not Fats, Threaten the Heart

    04/29/2010 3:05:37 AM PDT · by Future Useless Eater · 68 replies · 2,170+ views
    Scientific American Magazine ^ | May 2010 | Melinda Wenner Moyer
    Eat less saturated fat: that has been the take-home message from the U.S. government for the past 30 years. But while Americans have dutifully reduced the percentage of daily calories from saturated fat since 1970, the obesity rate during that time has more than doubled, diabetes has tripled, and heart disease is still the country’s biggest killer. Now a spate of new research, including a meta-analysis of nearly two dozen studies, suggests a reason why: investigators may have picked the wrong culprit. Processed carbohydrates, which many Americans eat today in place of fat, may increase the risk of obesity, diabetes...
  • The Cholesterol Myths: Exposing the Fallacy that Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Cause Heart Disease

    10/30/2001 9:25:13 AM PST · by sourcery · 45 replies · 13,962+ views
    Health911.com ^ | Review: [Joel M. Kauffman, Research Professor Chemistry]; Book: [Uffe Ravnskov, M. D., Ph. D.]
    <p>With courage and care Dr. Ravnskov exposes the lack of experimental evidence for the diet-heart theory, which claims that eating less fat and cholesterol will prevent atheroslcerosis (hardening of the arteries) and myocardial infarctions (heart attacks). By examining original peer-reviewed literature, the author finds no support for the diet-heart theory. He gives examples of scientific fraud among efforts to support the theory, including the deliberate selective omission of data points, and the deliberate assignment of subjects in a clinical trial to treatment or to control groups by physicians with the subject's medical records in hand. He shows how the abstract or conclusions of a number of papers are at odds with the actual data in the papers. He demonstrates how the use of one statistical method in preference to another can give a false impression that there is an effect, where there is, in fact, none. He shows how the reporting of differences in fatality rates by per cent reduction (say, a 50% reduction in relative risk) is actually misleading when the actual death rates are quite small in both the treatment and control groups of subjects in diet or drug studies. For example, a treatment that changes the absolute survival rate over a multi-year period from 99.0% to 99.5% represents a 50% reduction in relative risk, from 1% to 0.5% absolute. This is often described in papers as a 50% reduction in death rate. However, when the difference is barely significant statistically, as was often the case, Ravnskov points out that there is no real reason to recommend adoption of the treatment, especially if there are serious side-effects.</p>
  • New Atkins Diet is better than ever: Flexibilty in veggies, caffeine revamps popular regimen

    03/23/2010 1:43:41 PM PDT · by Coleus · 15 replies · 1,006+ views
    ny daily news ^ | 03.23.10 | Jacob E. Osterhout
    The world's most famous diet is back.  And this time around, it's easier to swallow.  The Atkins Diet, the original low-carbohydrate regimen launched by Dr. Robert Atkins in the '70s, has been reworked in a new book that promises it's healthier and more effective than ever.   "The New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great," penned by Dr. Eric Westman, Dr. Stephen Phinney and Dr. Jeff Volek, adapts the infamous plan for the 21st century.  "The best way to describe this book is that it makes it easier to do the Atkins Diet...
  • Meta-analysis evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease

    01/25/2010 10:04:28 PM PST · by Coleus · 27 replies · 969+ views
    American Society for Clinical Nutrition ^ | January 13, 2010 | Patty W Siri-Tarino, Qi Sun, Frank B Hu and Ronald M Krauss
    Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease1,2,3,4,5Patty W Siri-Tarino, Qi Sun, Frank B Hu and Ronald M Krauss1 From the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute Oakland CA (PWS-TRMK)the Departments of Nutrition (QSFBH)Epidemiology (FBH) Harvard School of Public Health Boston MA. 2 PWS-T and QS contributed equally to this work. 3 The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the National Center for Research Resources (http://www.ncrr.nih.gov) or the National Institutes of Health. 4 Supported by the National Dairy Council (PWS-T and...
  • What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?

    07/05/2002 5:34:43 PM PDT · by Pokey78 · 421 replies · 9,011+ views
    The New York Times Magazine ^ | 07/07/2002 | GARY TAUBES
    If the members of the American medical establishment were to have a collective find-yourself-standing-naked-in-Times-Square-type nightmare, this might be it. They spend 30 years ridiculing Robert Atkins, author of the phenomenally-best-selling ''Dr. Atkins' Diet Revolution'' and ''Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution,'' accusing the Manhattan doctor of quackery and fraud, only to discover that the unrepentant Atkins was right all along. Or maybe it's this: they find that their very own dietary recommendations -- eat less fat and more carbohydrates -- are the cause of the rampaging epidemic of obesity in America. Or, just possibly this: they find out both of the...
  • Arterial Function Deteriorates on Atkins Diet

    09/05/2009 5:10:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 75 replies · 2,667+ views
    Family Practice News ^ | 1 August 2009 | NEIL OSTERWEIL
    BOSTON — Proponents of the Atkins low-carbohydrate/high saturated fat diet say that you can have your steak and eat it, too, and still lose weight. But the adverse metabolic consequences are too heavy a price to pay, Australian investigators reported at a symposium sponsored by the International Atherosclerosis Society. After 1 year, overweight and obese patients randomly assigned to the Atkins diet or to a low-saturated-fat, high-carbohydrate diet lost similar amounts of weight. But patients on the Atkins diet had a deterioration in flow-mediated arterial dilatation, a marker for cardiovascular disease, and higher levels of LDL cholesterol than at baseline,...
  • Fat Head the movie

    02/03/2009 4:41:11 PM PST · by MetaThought · 14 replies · 809+ views
    Have you seen the news stories about the obesity epidemic? Did you see Super Size Me? Then guess what? ... You've been fed a load of bologna. Comedian (and former health writer) Tom Naughton replies to the blame-McDonald's crowd by losing weight on a fat-laden fast-food diet while demonstrating that nearly everything we've been told about obesity and healthy eating is wrong. Along with some delicious parody of Super Size Me Naughton serves up plenty of no-bologna facts that will stun most viewers, such as: The obesity "epidemic" has been wildly exaggerated by the CDC. People the government classifies as...
  • Low-carbohydrate diet burns more excess liver fat than low-calorie diet

    01/20/2009 5:27:39 AM PST · by decimon · 27 replies · 8,329+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | January 20th, 2009 | Unknown
    People on low-carbohydrate diets are more dependent on the oxidation of fat in the liver for energy than those on a low-calorie diet, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a small clinical study.The findings, published in the journal Hepatology, could have implications for treating obesity and related diseases such as diabetes, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, said Dr. Jeffrey Browning, assistant professor in the UT Southwestern Advanced Imaging Research Center and of internal medicine at the medical center. "Instead of looking at drugs to combat obesity and the diseases that stem from it, maybe optimizing...