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Keyword: cave

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  • Michelle Obama on White House: ‘It’s Like I’ve Been Living in a Cave’

    06/16/2016 3:41:11 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 93 replies
    PJ Media ^ | June 16, 2016 | Nicholas Ballasy
    WASHINGTON – First Lady Michelle Obama told Oprah Winfrey that she and Barack are “regular folks” who don’t want to "waste our talents just making money for ourselves.”She said President Obama “hasn’t changed” because he is “an authentic man” who is going to leave the White House as the same person.“So I want to know, what are those days when you just say, mmm, mmm, mmm — look at me in the White House,” Winfrey asked Obama at the White House’s United State of Women Summit in Washington.“There are so — yeah, just sitting up here, mmm, mmm, mmm. There...
  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • Official: 19 People Trapped By Rising Water in Kentucky Cave

    05/26/2016 3:04:40 PM PDT · by Morgana · 43 replies
    wowktv.com ^ | May 26, 2016 | wowk
    HORSE CAVE, Ky. (AP) -- Authorities say rising water from heavy rains has trapped 19 people in a Kentucky cave. Horse Cave Fire Chief Donnie Parker says Thursday that two tour groups are trapped in Hidden River Cave in south-central Kentucky. Parker says two local police officers who tried to rescue the tourists are among those still inside. He says the tour groups have been in the cave for several hours.
  • Why Some Republicans Are Publicly Bucking Their Party On LGBT Rights

    05/25/2016 8:08:04 AM PDT · by Cyberman · 23 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 05/24/2016 | Amber Phillips
    To the casual observer, it would seem that gay rights falls neatly on the political spectrum. Democrats champion bills that aim to protect LGBT people from discrimination, and Republicans increasingly propose and pass ones aimed to protect the religiously devout. But there's growing evidence that Republicans in Congress and across the country are sidestepping the more controversial religious protection and bathroom bills and, in some cases, embracing LGBT non-discrimination laws instead.... And more broadly, Republicans in Congress, Southern-state governors and a business community that usually aligns with the GOP seem to be eschewing some of the more controversial religious freedom...
  • Prehistoric Hand Stencils In Spanish Caves Not Randomly Placed, Say Researchers

    04/23/2016 11:54:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, April 17, 2016 | editors
    Prehistoric cave occupants paid attention to cave wall morphology and touch when creating hand stencils. Human occupants of two caves in Northern Spain put some thought into where they placed their hand stencils on cave walls as much as 37,000 years ago, during Palaeolithic times. The topography and physical characteristics of the walls in the low light conditions of the caves seem to have mattered to them, suggest a team of researchers... What they found was a pattern that indicated selection or attention to certain types of natural cave wall features for placement of the stencils. "In total 80% of...
  • Kartchner voted nation's ‘best cave’ in USA Today

    04/20/2016 7:22:23 AM PDT · by SandRat · 12 replies
    BENSON — Kartchner Caverns State Park has been voted the best cave in the nation as part of the 2016 USA Today 10 Best Readers’ Choice Awards. Twenty of the country’s top caves were nominated for the distinction. According to a USA Today press release, “Kartchner Caverns’ supporters quickly rallied to take the number one spot, holding there for the majority of the contest,” with voting lasting several weeks. Along with Kartchner Caverns, the Readers’ Choice top five caves include: Niagara Cave in Harmony, Minn., with a passage sculptured from an underground spring one mile beneath the earth’s surface; Fantastic...
  • New dating puts cave art in the age of Neanderthals

    06/15/2012 9:26:33 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 25 replies
    post-gazette ^ | June 15, 2012 | John Noble Wilford
    Stone Age artists were painting red disks, handprints, clublike symbols and geometric patterns on European cave walls long before previously thought, in some cases more than 40,000 years ago, scientists reported Thursday, after completing more reliable dating tests that raised a possibility that Neanderthals were the artists. A more likely situation, the researchers said, is that the art -- 50 samples from 11 caves in northwestern Spain-- was created by anatomically modern humans fairly soon after their arrival in Europe. The findings seem to put an exclamation point to a run of recent discoveries: direct evidence from fossils that Homo...
  • Modern humans, Neanderthals shared earth for 1,000 years

    09/02/2005 2:31:25 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 85 replies · 2,234+ views
    ABC NEWSonline ^ | Thursday, September 1, 2005. 3:29pm (AEST)
    Last Update: Thursday, September 1, 2005. 3:29pm (AEST) A reconstruction of the face of a young female Neanderthal who lived about 35,000 years ago in France. (AFP) Modern humans, Neanderthals shared earth for 1,000 years New evidence has emerged that Neanderthals co-existed with anatomically modern humans for at least 1,000 years in central France.The finding suggests Neanderthals came to a tragic and lingering end.Few chapters in the rise of Homo sapiens, as modern mankind is known, have triggered as much debate as the fate of the Neanderthals.Smaller and squatter than Homo sapiens but with larger brains, Neanderthals lived in Europe,...
  • Modern humans 'blitzed Europe'(Radiocarbon Dating Development)

    02/23/2006 10:22:51 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies · 998+ views
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 23/02/2006 | Roger Highfield
    Our ancestors colonised Europe and wiped out their Neanderthal cousins even faster than we thought, says a study published today. Argument has raged for years about whether our ancestors from Africa outsurvived, killed or bred with the Neanderthals, who were stronger, bulkier and shorter but had equally large brains. Now developments in radiocarbon dating suggest that many of the dates published over the past 40 years are likely to underestimate the true ages of the samples. Prof Paul Mellars, of the University of Cambridge, describes today in the journal Nature how better calibration of radiocarbon ages have led to revisions...
  • Modern humans took over Europe in just 5,000 years

    02/23/2006 4:20:40 AM PST · by S0122017 · 14 replies · 1,069+ views
    www.nature.com/news ^ | 22 February 2006 | Michael Hopkin
    Published online: 22 February 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060220-11 Better bone dates reveal bad news for Neanderthals Modern humans took over Europe in just 5,000 years. Michael Hopkin These drawings from the Chauvet cave were originally dated to around 31,000 years ago. But a new analysis pushes that back four or five thousand years. © Nature, with permission from the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. Advances in the science of radiocarbon dating - a common, but oft-maligned palaeontological tool - have narrowed down the overlap between Europe's earliest modern humans and the Neanderthals that preceded them. Refinements to the technique, which...
  • Humans vs. Neanderthals: Game Over Earlier

    02/22/2006 10:25:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 734+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 22 February 2006 | Associated Press
    Humans and Neanderthals, thought to have coexisted for 10,000 years across the whole of Europe, are more likely to have lived at the same time for only 6,000 years, the new study suggests. Scientists believe the two species could have lived side by side at specific sites for periods of only about 2,000 years, but Mellars claims they would have lived in competition at each site for only 1,000 years... Two new studies of stratified radiocarbon in the Cariaco Basin, near Venezuela, and of radiocarbon on fossilized coral formations in the tropical Atlantic and Pacific have given scientists a better...
  • Study: Modern Humans Killed Off Neanderthals Quickly

    02/25/2006 5:11:22 AM PST · by ThreePuttinDude · 356 replies · 26,781+ views
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | Saturday, February 25, 2006 | AP
    LONDON — Neanderthals in Europe were killed off by the advance of modern humans thousands of years earlier than previously believed, losing a competition for food and shelter, according to a scientific study published Wednesday. The research uses advances in radiocarbon dating to revise understanding of early humans, suggesting they colonized Europe more rapidly and coexisted for a much shorter period with genetic ancestors. Paul Mellars, professor of prehistory and human evolution at the University of Cambridge and author of the study, said Neanderthals — the species of the Homo genus that lived in Europe and western Asia from around...
  • Missing Parts of Sphinx Found in German Cave

    04/30/2011 12:57:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Monsters and Critics ^ | Sunday, April 24, 2011 | Jean-Baptiste Piggin (DPA)
    Archaeologists have discovered fragments of one of the world's oldest sculptures, a lion-faced figurine estimated at 32,000 years old, from the dirt floor of a cave in southern Germany. The ivory figure, along with a tiny figurine known as the Venus of Hohle Fels, marks the foundation of human artistry. Both were created by a Stone Age European culture that historians call Aurignacian. The Aurignacians appear to have been the first modern humans, with handicrafts, social customs and beliefs. They hunted reindeer, woolly rhinoceros, mammoths and other animals. The Lion-Man sculpture, gradually re-assembled in workshops over decades after the fragments...
  • The 30,000 Year Old Cave that Descends into Hell

    01/21/2011 2:53:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 62 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 1-20-2011 | Jesus Diaz
    There's a cave in France where no humans have been in 26,000 years. The walls are full of fantastic, perfectly-preserved paintings of animals, ending in a chamber full of monsters 1312-feet underground, where CO2 and radon gas concentrations provoke hallucinations. It's called the the Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave, a really weird and mysterious place. The walls contain hundreds of animals—like the typical Paleolithic horses and bisons—but some of them are not supposed to be there, like lions, panthers, rhinos and hyenas. A few are not even supposed to exist, like weird butterflyish animals or chimerical figures half bison half woman. These may...
  • Chauvet Cave: The Most Accurate Timeline Yet Of Who Used The Cave And When

    04/18/2016 8:22:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Science Now ^ | Tuesday, April 12, 2016 | Deborah Netburn
    The cave, declared a UNESCO World Heritage site two years ago, was discovered in the south of France in 1994... Now, scientists have assembled more than 250 radiocarbon dates made from rock art samples, animal bones and the remains of charcoal used by humans... The newly synthesized data suggest the first period of human occupation lasted from 37,000 to 33,500 years ago. The second prehistoric occupation began 31,000 to 28,000 years ago and lasted for 2,000 to 3,000 years, the researchers wrote... The two groups, separated by millenniums, had no connection with each other, they said. The first round of...
  • Lawmakers to vote next week on House speaker: Representative Mica

    10/21/2015 7:01:55 AM PDT · by prisoner6 · 28 replies
    Business IInsider ^ | 10/21/2015 | Richard Cowan
    U.S. House Speaker John Boehner has set Oct. 28 as the date for House Republicans to select their nominee for his replacement, with the full chamber voting on Oct. 29, Republican Representative John Mica of Florida said on Wednesday.
  • Discovery Of 47 Teeth In Chinese Cave Changes Picture Of Human Migration Out Of Africa

    10/17/2015 9:09:33 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 33 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 15 October 2015 | Amina Khan
    Forty-seven smooth teeth dug out of a cave in southern China reveal that Homo sapiens may have arrived there 80,000 years ago...The findings, published this week in the journal Nature, may compel researchers to reconsider their theories about human migrations out of Africa.
  • Religious beliefs are the basis of the origins of Palaeolithic art

    03/31/2010 6:33:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 371+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | Friday, March 26, 2010 | FECYT & SINC
    This statement isn't new, but for years anthropologists, archaeologists and historians of art understood these artistic manifestations as purely aesthetic and decorative motives. Eduardo Palacio-Pérez, researcher at the University of Cantabria (UC), now reveals the origins of a theory that remains nowadays/lasts into our days. "This theory is does not originate with the prehistorians, in other words, those who started to develop the idea that the art of primitive peoples was linked with beliefs of a symbolic-religious nature were the anthropologists"... This idea appeared at the end of the XIX century and the beginning of the XX century. Up until...
  • Neanderthal survival story revealed in Jersey caves

    08/30/2011 8:16:45 PM PDT · by decimon · 58 replies
    BBC ^ | August 29, 2011 | Becky Evans
    New investigations at an iconic cave site on the Channel Island of Jersey have led archaeologists to believe the Neanderthals have been widely under-estimated.Neanderthals survived in Europe through a number of ice ages and died out only about 30,000 years ago. The site at La Cotte de St Brelade reveals a near-continuous use of the cave site spanning over a quarter of a million years, suggesting a considerable success story in adapting to a changing climate and landscape, prior to the arrival of Homo sapiens. New investigations at an iconic cave site on the Channel Island of Jersey have led...
  • Jerusalem Burial Cave Reveals: Apostle Simon Peter buried in the Patriarchate of Jerusalem

    11/23/2003 3:39:24 AM PST · by OrthodoxPresbyterian · 522 replies · 4,531+ views
    Jerusalem Burial Cave Reveals:Names, Testimonies of First Christiansby Jean Gilman JERUSALEM, Israel - Does your heart quicken when you hear someone give a personal testimony about Jesus? Do you feel excited when you read about the ways the Lord has worked in someone's life? The first century catacomb, uncovered by archaeologist P. Bagatti on the Mount of Olives, contains inscriptions clearly indicating its use, "by the very first Christians in Jerusalem."If you know the feeling of genuine excitement about the workings of the Lord, then you will be ecstatic to learn that archaeologists have found first-century dedications with the names...
  • Cave records provide clues to climate change

    09/26/2007 11:09:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies · 105+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 09/26/2007 | Georgia Institute of Technology
    A close up of one of the stalagmites analyzed in the study. Credit: Jud Partin When Georgia Tech Assistant Professor Kim Cobb and graduate student Jud Partin wanted to understand the mechanisms that drove the abrupt climate change events that occurred thousands of years ago, they didn't drill for ice cores from the glaciers of Greenland or the icy plains of Antarctica, as is customary for paleoclimatolgists. Instead, they went underground. Growing inside the caves of the tropical Pacific island of Borneo are some of the keys to understanding how the Earth's climate suddenly changed - several times -...
  • Is the Mysterious Siberian “X-Woman” a New Hominid Species?

    03/25/2010 9:09:33 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies · 932+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | March 25, 2010 | Smriti Rao
    In 2008, archeologists working at the Denisova Cave in Siberia’s Altai Mountains discovered a tiny piece of a finger bone, believed to be a pinky, buried with ornaments in the cave. Scientists extracted the mitochondrial DNA (genetic material from the mother’s side) from the ancient bone and checked to see if its genetic code matched with the other two known forms of early hominids–Neanderthals and the ancestors of modern humans. What they found was a real surprise. The team, led by geneticist Svaante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute, discovered that the mtDNA from the finger bone matched neither–suggesting there...
  • Climate Cycles in China as Revealed by a Stalagmite from Buddha Cave(Journal Review)

    07/08/2003 3:48:19 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 65 replies · 1,131+ views
    CO2 Science Magazine ^ | July 08, 2003 | Staff
    Reference Paulsen, D.E., Li, H.-C. and Ku, T.-L. 2003. Climate variability in central China over the last 1270 years revealed by high-resolution stalagmite records. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 691-701. What was done In the words of the authors, "high-resolution records of ð13C and ð18O in stalagmite SF-1 from Buddha Cave [33°40'N, 109°05'E] are used to infer changes in climate in central China for the last 1270 years in terms of warmer, colder, wetter and drier conditions." What was learned Among the climatic episodes evident in the authors' data were "those corresponding to the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and...
  • The benefits of eating bugs

    03/02/2014 7:16:51 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 57 replies
    The Week ^ | March 1, 2014 | Daniella Martin
    YOU'VE PROBABLY HEARD of the Stone Age diet craze known as the Paleolithic Diet, made popular most recently by Dr. Loren Cordain's best-seller The Paleo Diet. The premise is simple: If our early human ancestors couldn't have eaten it, we shouldn't, either. It's the one time, it seems, that being like a caveman is a good thing. The theory goes (and archaeological evidence corroborates) that early hunter-gatherers, while they may not have lived as long, still had some major health advantages on most of us modern humans. They were much taller, averaging 6-foot-5 to our 5-foot-11; had stronger, heavier bones;...
  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    popular-archaeology.com ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • Fossilized human feces hints at long-lost, 13,500-year-old West Coast culture

    07/12/2012 2:19:04 PM PDT · by Sopater · 41 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 12, 2012 | Gene J. Koprowski
    <p>Maybe the 1992 movie Brendan Fraser film Encino Man wasn’t too far from the mark?</p> <p>Fossilized human feces and other evidence from a West Coast cave demonstrates the existence of a long-lost, 13,500-year-old American culture, scientists said Thursday.</p> <p>The fossilized feces, known to researchers as a coprolite, from the Paisley Caves in Oregon has turned assumptions about the history of the Americas on its ear.</p>
  • Ancient Human Behavior Uncovered

    06/24/2007 6:46:20 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 871+ views
    Medical News Today ^ | 6-24-2007 | Sofia Valleley
    Ancient Human Behavior Uncovered Article Date: 24 Jun 2007 - 4:00 PDT A major question in evolutionary studies today is how early did humans begin to think and behave in ways we would see as fundamentally modern" One index of 'behavioural modernity' is in the appearance of objects used purely as decoration or ornaments. Such items are widely regarded as having symbolic rather than practical value. By displaying them on the body as necklaces, pendants or bracelets or attached to clothing this also greatly increased their visual impact. The appearance of ornaments may be linked to a growing sense of...
  • Neanderthals changed hunting strategy with climate change

    05/09/2015 8:44:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, May 07, 2015 | editors
    Gideon Hartman of the University of Connecticut and colleagues from an international group of universities and research institutions came to this conclusion by reconstructing the hunting ranges of Neanderthals who occupied the cave at two distinct Ice Age occupational phases separated by about 10,000 years. The first phase occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 (71,000-129,000 years ago), and the second occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (57,000-70,000 years ago). They analyzed the comparison of oxygen, carbon, and strontium isotope samples from the tooth enamel of excavated gazelle remains with modern isotope data from the Amud Cave region. What they...
  • Neanderthals and human lived side by side in Middle Eastern caves and even interbred

    09/30/2012 5:19:02 AM PDT · by Renfield · 131 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 9-29-2012
    Neanderthals may have lived side by side with early humans and possibly interbred with them, according to new research. Stone axes and sharp flint arrowheads of both branches of the human race have been discovered in limestone caves in northern Israel. The findings, reported in the Times, have led archeologists to believe the two sub-species found harmony in a coastal mountain range that today is in a state of war with its neighbours...
  • DNA from Neandertal relative may shake up human family tree

    09/13/2015 1:17:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 103 replies
    Science Mag ^ | September 11, 2015 | Ann Gibbons
    In a remarkable technical feat, researchers have sequenced DNA from fossils in Spain that are about 300,000 to 400,000 years old and have found an ancestor -- or close relative -- of Neandertals. The nuclear DNA, which is the oldest ever sequenced from a member of the human family, may push back the date for the origins of the distinct ancestors of Neandertals and modern humans, according to a presentation here yesterday at the fifth annual meeting of the European Society for the study of human evolution. Ever since researchers first discovered thousands of bones and teeth from 28 individuals...
  • Fossil Remains Show The Merging Of Neandertals, Modern Humans

    10/12/2006 11:22:03 AM PDT · by blam · 142 replies · 3,208+ views
    Washington University ^ | 10-12-2006 | Neil Schoenherr
    Fossil remains show the merging of Neandertals, modern humans By Neil Schoenherr The early modern human remains from the Pestera Muierii (Cave of the Old Woman), Romania, which were discovered in 1952, have been poorly dated and largely ignored. But recently, a team of researchers from the Anthropological and Archaeological Institutes in Bucharest, Romania, and from WUSTL has been able to directly date the fossils to 30,000 years ago. The fossils prove that a strict population replacement of the Neandertals did not happen. "What these fossils show is that these earliest modern humans had a mosaic of distinctly modern human...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • Archaeology professor, students uncover history at Big Bone Lick State Park

    06/17/2015 2:35:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Herald-Leader ^ | June 10, 2013 | Cheryl Truman
    Thousands of years ago, a human -- probably hungry and right-handed -- found an old spear point amid these low hills and re-shaped it. Last week [in 2013] University of Cincinnati student Liz Ceddia found it again: flaked in a distinctive pattern and still sharp enough to break skin... The students are working with Ken Tankersley, a University of Cincinnati archaeology professor who first visited the area as a child. He keeps coming back to seek evidence of how climate change affects area flora and fauna. It's one of his major areas of research. Big Bone Lick State Park --...
  • When People Fled Hyenas

    11/20/2002 6:43:45 PM PST · by VadeRetro · 52 replies · 1,373+ views
    ABC News ^ | By Lee Dye
    When People Fled Hyenas By Lee Dye Special to ABCNEWS.com Nov. 20 — Deep inside a cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains, Christy Turner and his Russian colleagues may have found an answer to a question that has hounded him for more than three decades. As a young anthropologist, Turner spent time in Alaska's Aleutian Islands in the 1970s, working at several archaeological sites and occasionally gazing westward toward Siberia. "I thought, 'That's the place that Native Americans came from,' " he says now from his laboratory at Arizona State University in Tempe. But why, he wondered then as he still...
  • THE TWELVE STONES SET UP AT THE JORDAN FOUND WITH INSCRIPTIONS

    09/20/2009 6:22:46 PM PDT · by Jedediah · 17 replies · 3,246+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | jerusalem post
    http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?apage=1&cid=1249418627506&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull "Then Moses and the elders of Israel charged all the people as follows: 'Keep the entire commandment that I am commanding you today. On the day that you cross over the Jordan into the land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall set up great stones and cover them with plaster. You shall write on them all the words of this law when you have crossed over." (Deuteronomy 27:1-3). Rubble on floor may have fallen from the ceiling during earthquakes since the cavern was fashioned. Built on the foundations of an ancient Byzantine church, the Greek...
  • Armenian archeologists: 5,900-year-old skirt found

    10/28/2010 9:13:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Tuesday, October 26, 2010 | Associated Press
    YEREVAN, Armenia -- An Armenian archaeologist says that scientists have discovered a skirt that could be 5,900-year-old. Pavel Avetisian, the head of the Institute of Archeology and Ethnography in Yerevan, said a fragment of skirt made of reed was found during recent digging in the Areni-1 cave in southeastern Armenia. Avetisian told Tuesday's news conference in the Armenian capital that the find could be one of the world's oldest piece of reed clothing. Earlier excavation in the same location has produced what researchers believe is a 5,500-year-old shoe, making it the oldest piece of leather footwear known to researchers. Boris...
  • Archaeologists find blade production earlier than originally thought

    10/17/2011 8:23:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 17 OCT 2011 | Provided by Tel Aviv University
    Archaeology has long associated advanced blade production with the Upper Palaeolithic period, about 30,000-40,000 years ago, linked with the emergence of Homo Sapiens and cultural features such as cave art. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University have uncovered evidence which shows that "modern" blade production was also an element of Amudian industry during the late Lower Paleolithic period, 200,000-400,000 years ago as part of the Acheulo-Yabrudian cultural complex, a geographically limited group of hominins who lived in modern-day Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. Prof. Avi Gopher, Dr. Ran Barkai and Dr. Ron Shimelmitz of TAU's Department of Archaeology and Ancient...
  • Hallucinogenic Plants May Be Key to Decoding Ancient Southwestern Paintings, Expert Says

    11/16/2014 9:42:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Western Digs ^ | October 17, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    Dozens of rock art sites in southern New Mexico, recently documented for the first time, are revealing unexpected botanical clues that archaeologists say may help unlock the meaning of the ancient abstract paintings. Over a swath of the Chihuahuan Desert stretching from Carlsbad to Las Cruces, at least 24 rock art panels have been found bearing the same distinctive pictographs: repeated series of triangles painted in combinations of red, yellow, and black. And at each of these sites, archaeologists have noticed similarities not just on the rock, but in the ground. Hallucinogenic plants were found growing beneath the triangle designs,...
  • World's oldest map: Spanish cave has landscape from 14,000 years ago

    08/06/2009 5:51:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1,265+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Aug. 6, 2009 | Fiona Govan
    Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is man's earliest map, dating from almost 14,000 years ago Photo: EPA A stone tablet found in a cave in Abauntz in the Navarra region of northern Spain is believed to contain the earliest known representation of a landscape. Engravings on the stone, which measures less than seven inches by five inches, and is less than an inch thick, appear to depict mountains, meandering rivers and areas of good foraging and hunting.
  • Inside the amazing cave city that housed 25,000 Allied troops under German noses in WWI

    03/15/2008 9:11:29 AM PDT · by Stoat · 50 replies · 3,668+ views
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | March 15, 2008 | ROBERT HARDMAN
    Inside the amazing cave city that housed 25,000 Allied troops under German noses in WWIBy ROBERT HARDMAN - More by this author » Last updated at 11:53am on 15th March 2008  The wax is still melted on to the chalk pillar which served as an Easter Sunday altar for the men of the Suffolk Regiment more than 90 years ago.   Old helmets are scattered around the floor. A heap of cans, including a tin of Turnwrights Toffee Delight, lies alongside a collection of old stone jars - flagons of rum, perhaps, to numb the fear of the battle ahead....
  • True causes for extinction of cave bear revealed

    08/24/2010 6:46:14 AM PDT · by decimon · 66 replies
    The cave bear started to become extinct in Europe 24,000 years ago, but until now the cause was unknown. An international team of scientists has analysed mitochondrial DNA sequences from 17 new fossil samples, and compared these with the modern brown bear. The results show that the decline of the cave bear started 50,000 years ago, and was caused more by human expansion than by climate change. "The decline in the genetic diversity of the cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) began around 50,000 years ago, much earlier than previously suggested, at a time when no major climate change was taking place,...
  • Researchers open secret cave under Mexican pyramid

    07/04/2008 8:06:40 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies · 206+ views
    Reuters ^ | Thu Jul 3, 12:22 PM ET | Miguel Angel Gutierrez
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Archeologists are opening a cave sealed for more than 30 years deep beneath a Mexican pyramid to look for clues about the mysterious collapse of one of ancient civilization's largest cities. The soaring Teotihuacan stone pyramids, now a major tourist site about an hour outside Mexico City, were discovered by the ancient Aztecs around 1500 AD, not long before the arrival of Spanish explorers to Mexico. But little is known about the civilization that built the immense city, with its ceremonial architecture and geometric temples, and then torched and abandoned it around 700 AD. Archeologists are...
  • Palaeolithic cutlery 400 000-200 000 years ago: tiny meat-cutting tools from Qesem Cave, Israel

    08/31/2010 6:53:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Antiquity ^ | September 2010 | Ran Barkai, Cristina Lemorini & Avi Gopher
    Minuscule flakes made from recycled flint were identified at the late Lower Palaeolithic site of Qesem Cave in Israel (Figure 1), dated to 400-200 thousand years ago (kya) (Barkai et al. 2003; Gopher et al. In press). Our ongoing research at this exceptionally well-preserved site indicates that it was repeatedly occupied by early hominins, ancestral to Homo sapiens and/or Neanderthals (Hershkovitz et al. In press), who left ample evidence of their lifestyle. Our analysis of the tiny flakes (Figure 2) suggests that they were used to cut meat. The occupants of Qesem Cave produced innovative flint tools, and in particular...
  • Cave Drawings Reportedly 25,000 Years Old

    02/05/2006 7:34:22 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 88 replies · 2,543+ views
    Associated Press ^ | February 5, 2006 | Anon
    PARIS -- Cave drawings thought to be older than those in the famed caves of Lascaux have been discovered in a grotto in western France, officials from the Charente region said Sunday. A first analysis by officials from the office of cultural affairs suggests the drawings were made some 25,000 years ago, Henri de Marcellus, mayor of the town of Vilhonneur where the cave is located, told France-Info radio. He said, however, that the date could only be confirmed by further investigations. Cavers exploring a part of a grotto in the Vilhonneur forest made the discovery in December, the local...
  • Trove of Neanderthal Bones Found in Greek Cave

    04/07/2013 5:31:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 1 April 2013 | Charles Choi
    The archaeological deposits of the cave date back to between about 39,000 and 100,000 years ago to the Middle Paleolithic period. During the height of the ice age, the area still possessed a mild climate and supported a wide range of wildlife, including deer, wild boar, rabbits, elephants, weasels, foxes, wolves, leopards, bears, falcons, toads, vipers and tortoises. In the cave, the researchers found tools such as scrapers made of flint, quartz and seashells. The stone tools were all shaped, or knapped, in a way typical of Neanderthal artifacts. Now, the scientists reveal they discovered 14 specimens of child and...
  • Scientists say Indonesia cave drawings the same age as those in Europe

    10/09/2014 6:36:18 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    www.foxnews.com ^ | 10-09-2014 | Staff
    WASHINGTON – Ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe, according to a new study that shows our ancestors were drawing all over the world 40,000 years ago. And it hints at an even earlier dawn of creativity in modern humans, going back to Africa, than scientists had thought. Archaeologists calculated that a dozen stencils of hands in mulberry red and two detailed drawings of an animal described as a "pig-deer" are between 35,000 to 40,000 years old, based on levels of decay of the element uranium. That puts the art found in Sulawesi,...
  • Are cave paintings really little more than the testosterone-fuelled scribblings of young men?

    06/01/2006 7:17:07 AM PDT · by S0122017 · 33 replies · 1,672+ views
    nature news ^ | 31 may | some guy
    Nature Published online: 31 May 2006; | doi:10.1038/441575a Sex and violence in rock art Are cave paintings really little more than the testosterone-fuelled scribblings of young men? Reviewed by: Paul G. Bahn It is an odd fact that the art of the last Ice Age (the Upper Palaeolithic) is characterized by its numerous stylized or naturalistic animal images, and yet its study has rarely involved animal ethologists, apart from an occasional article by specialists in bison or big cats, or by a veterinarian keen to argue that some of the depicted animals were dead or dying. A palaeobiologist has now...
  • Cavegirls were first blondes to have fun

    02/26/2006 5:18:06 PM PST · by mathprof · 58 replies · 1,564+ views
    The Sunday Times - Britain ^ | 2/26/06 | Roger Dobson and Abul Taher
    THE modern gentleman may prefer blondes. But new research has found that it was cavemen who were the first to be lured by flaxen locks. According to the study, north European women evolved blonde hair and blue eyes at the end of the Ice Age to make them stand out from their rivals at a time of fierce competition for scarce males. The study argues that blond hair originated in the region because of food shortages 10,000-11,000 years ago. Until then, humans had the dark brown hair and dark eyes that still dominate in the rest of the world. Almost...
  • PICTURES: Prehistoric European Cave Artists Were Female

    06/30/2009 7:34:59 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 35 replies · 1,303+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | June 16, 2009
    Inside France's 25,000-year-old Pech Merle cave, hand stencils surround the famed "Spotted Horses" mural. For about as long as humans have created works of art, they've also left behind handprints. People began stenciling, painting, or chipping imprints of their hands onto rock walls at least 30,000 years ago. Until recently, most scientists assumed these prehistoric handprints were male. But "even a superficial examination of published photos suggested to me that there were lots of female hands there," Pennsylvania State University archaeologist Dean Snow said of European cave art. By measuring and analyzing the Pech Merle hand stencils, Snow found that...
  • Sky Caves of Nepal

    10/07/2012 3:21:14 AM PDT · by Renfield · 15 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 10-2012 | Michael Finkel
    The skull, a human skull, was perched atop a crumbly boulder in the remote northern reaches of the Nepalese district of Mustang. Pete Athans, the leader of an interdisciplinary team of mountaineers and archaeologists, stepped into his harness and tied himself to a rope. He scrambled up the 20-foot boulder, belayed by another climber, Ted Hesser. ~~~snip~~~ But more intriguing than the skull itself was where it fell from. The boulder Athans scaled sat directly below a soaring cliff, tan rock streaked with bands of pink and white. Toward the top of the cliff were several small caves, painstakingly hand-dug...