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Keyword: dmanisi

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  • Site in Germany yields human presence over 1 million years ago

    03/25/2016 5:53:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Spring 2016 Issue | Journal of Human Evolution
    The late Early Pleistocene site near Untermassfeld, in Germany, is now well known for a rich array of fauna dating back to about 1.07 million years ago, including simple 'Mode 1' (or Oldowan-type) stone tools evidencing early human occupation. Now researchers Günter Landeck and Joan Garcia Garriga report, for the first time, evidence of early human butchery in the form of cut marks on animal bones and intentional hammerstone-related bone breakage. These human-modified bones were recovered in a small faunal subsample excavated from levels with simple 'Mode 1' stone tools. The butchered assemblage was found during fieldwork and surveying of...
  • PALEOANTHROPOLOGY: Were 'Little People' the First to Venture Out of Africa?

    07/06/2002 7:17:49 AM PDT · by Lessismore · 2 replies
    Science Magazine | 2002-07-05 | Michael Balter and Ann Gibbons
    Not long ago, most paleoanthropologists thought that intercontinental travel was reserved for hominids who were big of brain and long of limb. Until very recently, the fossil evidence suggested that early humans did not journey out of Africa until they could walk long distances and were smart enough to invent sophisticated tools. Then, 2 years ago, a team working at Dmanisi, Georgia, shook up those ideas. It reported finding two small skulls dated to a surprisingly ancient 1.75 million years ago and associated with only primitive stone tools (Science, 12 May 2000, p. 948). Now, on page 85 of this...
  • Latest study suggests early human dispersal into Spain through Strait of Gibraltar

    01/02/2016 11:49:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Popular Archaeology, Journal of Human Evolution ^ | Saturday, January 2, 2016 | editors
    Most recent dating places one wave of human dispersal out of Africa into southeastern Spain at almost one million years ago. Using state-of-the-art dating methodologies, a team of scientists have obtained or confirmed a date range between .9 and .85 Mya (million years ago) as a time when a species of Old World monkey (Theropithecus) and an early species of human occupied the cave site of Cueva Victoria in southeastern Spain. It is a location not far from where many scientists have hypothesized that humans may have crossed over into Europe from North Africa through the Strait of Gibraltar at...
  • Ancient Mariners: Did Neanderthals Sail to Mediterranean?

    11/24/2012 8:17:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, November 15, 2012 | Charles Choi
    Neanderthals and other extinct human lineages might have been ancient mariners, venturing to the Mediterranean islands thousands of years earlier than previously thought. This prehistoric seafaring could shed light on the mental capabilities of these lost relatives of modern humans, researchers say. Scientists had thought the Mediterranean islands were first settled about 9,000 years ago by Neolithic or New Stone Age farmers and shepherds... For instance, obsidian from the Aegean island of Melos was uncovered at the mainland Greek coastal site of Franchthi cave in layers that were about 11,000 years old, while excavations on the southern coast of Cyprus...
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 4 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 10:22:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 18 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 29 February 2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of...
  • Cretan tools point to 130,000-year-old sea travel

    01/03/2011 1:35:19 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 19 replies
    AP via Google ^ | 3 January 2011
    Archaeologists on the island of Crete have discovered what may be evidence of one of the world's first sea voyages by human ancestors, the Greek Culture Ministry said Monday A ministry statement said experts from Greece and the U.S. have found rough axes and other tools thought to be between 130,000 and 700,000 years old close to shelters on the island's south coast. Crete has been separated from the mainland for about five million years, so whoever made the tools must have traveled there by sea (a distance of at least 40 miles). That would upset the current view that...
  • On Crete, New Evidence of Very Ancient Mariners

    02/17/2010 7:15:26 AM PST · by Palter · 27 replies · 531+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 15 Feb 2010 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    <p>Early humans, possibly even prehuman ancestors, appear to have been going to sea much longer than anyone had ever suspected.</p> <p>That is the startling implication of discoveries made the last two summers on the Greek island of Crete. Stone tools found there, archaeologists say, are at least 130,000 years old, which is considered strong evidence for the earliest known seafaring in the Mediterranean and cause for rethinking the maritime capabilities of prehuman cultures.</p>
  • Ancient hominids may have been seafarers

    01/14/2010 4:18:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 636+ views
    Science News ^ | Friday, January 8th, 2010 | Bruce Bower
    Human ancestors that left Africa hundreds of thousands of years ago to see the rest of the world were no landlubbers. Stone hand axes unearthed on the Mediterranean island of Crete indicate that an ancient Homo species -- perhaps Homo erectus -- had used rafts or other seagoing vessels to cross from northern Africa to Europe via at least some of the larger islands in between, says archaeologist Thomas Strasser of Providence College in Rhode Island. Several hundred double-edged cutting implements discovered at nine sites in southwestern Crete date to at least 130,000 years ago and probably much earlier, Strasser...
  • US scientists may have resolved 'Darwin's dilemma'

    11/16/2014 8:04:49 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 272 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/15/2014 | By Matt Cantor
    Charles Darwin worried about a possible hole in his theory of evolution, but some American scientists may just have plugged it. For about a billion years after the dawn of life on Earth, organisms didn't evolve all that much. Then about 600 million years ago came the "Cambrian explosion." Everything changed relatively quickly, with all kinds of plants and animals emerging—which doesn't quite seem to fit with Darwin's theory of slow change, hence "Darwin's dilemma." Now, within a few days of each other, two new studies have appeared that could explain the shift, ABC News reports. One, by scientists at...
  • The Earliest Group Of Modern Humans To Branch Off Survived Until Just 2,300 Years Ago

    10/03/2014 8:26:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/03/2014 | STEPHEN LUNTZ, IFL SCIENCE
    Oxford Journals, Genome Biology and EvolutionBurial site and skeletal remains of the St. Helena marine forager, who was at least 50 years old when he died DNA from a 2,300-year-old skeleton suggests that the earliest known group of modern humans to branch off from the wider genetic population survived until astonishingly recently. The finding supports the case that southern, rather than eastern, Africa is humanity's ancestral home.Mitochondrial DNA, passed on only from the mother, demonstrates that all humanity is descended from a single ancestor around 200,000 years ago. Archaeological evidence points to the Omo Valley, where fossil evidence suggests that Homo sapiens roamed Africa 195,000...
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • “Out of Africa” Theory Officially Debunked

    07/27/2014 9:49:37 AM PDT · by djf · 52 replies
    Scientific evidence refuting the theory of modern humanity’s African genesis is common knowledge among those familiar with the most recent scientific papers on the human Genome, Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. Regrettably, within mainstream press and academia circles, there seems to be a conspicuous – and dare we say it – deliberate vacuum when it comes to reporting news of these recent studies and their obvious implications.
  • Humans May Have Dispersed Out of Africa Earlier Than Thought

    04/21/2014 4:04:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    LiveScience ^ | April 21, 2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Scientists have suggested the exodus from Africa started between 40,000 and 70,000 years ago. However, stone artifacts dating to at least 100,000 years ago that were recently uncovered in the Arabian Desert suggested that modern humans might have begun their march across the globe earlier than once suspected. Out of Africa models To help solve this mystery, Katerina Harvati, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Tübingen in Germany, and her colleagues tested four competing out-of-Africa models. one involved a route northward, up the Nile River valley and then eastward across the northern end of the Arabian Peninsula into Asiathe other...
  • Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species (Not Neanderthals Or Denisovans)

    12/05/2013 6:33:43 AM PST · by blam · 130 replies
    BI/Live Science ^ | 12-4-2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species Stephanie Pappas Live Science Dec. 4, 2013, 3:33 PM A new, improved sequencing of ancient human relative genomes reveals that Homo sapiens didn't only have sex with Neanderthals and a little-understood line of humans called Denisovans. A fourth, mystery lineage of humans was in the mix, too. As reported by the news arm of the journal Nature, new genetic evidence suggests that several hominids — human relatives closer than humans' current living cousin, the chimpanzee — interbred more than 30,000 years ago. This group of kissing cousins included an unknown human ancestor...
  • Archaeologists Continue Searching for “First Humans” in Europe at Atapuerca Site in Spain

    07/27/2013 8:46:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Hispanically Speaking ^ | July 24, 2013 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Spain are busy excavating the Gran Dolonia portion of the Atapuerca archaeological site for clues to the first humans that arrived in Europe. Many archaeological treasures have come from this northern Spain location known as the caves of the Sierra de Atapuerca. In 2007 human remains were found that date back one and a half million years, considered the oldest Europeans remains ever found. Human remains have also been found from the "Homo antecessor" dating back 850,000-to-950,000-years ago. The youngest remains found here date back a mere 5,000-years ago from the homo sapien species. The site is in...
  • Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage

    06/06/2013 2:14:27 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 60 replies
    ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) ^ | June 6, 2013 | Kirstin Colvin
    The study of the world’s oldest early primate skeleton has brought light to a pivotal event in primate and human evolution: that of the branch split that led to monkeys, apes and humans (anthropoids) on one side, and living tarsiers on the other. The fossil, that was unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China’s Hubei Province, represents a previously unknown genus and species named Archicebus Achilles. The results of the research were published on 6 June 2013 in Nature. Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage The fossil, which is 55 million years old and dates...
  • Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone

    02/07/2013 4:04:53 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies
    TBI - Live Science ^ | 2-7-2013 | Tia Ghose
    Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone Tia Ghose, LiveScienceFebruary, 2013 . An ancient hominin jawbone unearthed in a Serbian cave may be more than half a million years old. Scientists have unearthed a jawbone from an ancient human ancestor in a cave in Serbia. The jawbone, which may have come from an ancient Homo erectus or a primitive-looking Neanderthal precursor, is more than 397,000 years old, and possibly more than 525,000 years old. The fossil, described today (Feb. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE, is the oldest hominin fossil found in this region of Europe, and may change...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 7:31:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 55 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 2-29-2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow....
  • Out of Africa? Data fail to support language origin in Africa

    02/20/2012 8:24:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | February 15, 2012 | Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen
    Last year, a report claiming to support the idea that the origin of language can be traced to West Africa appeared in Science. The article caused quite a stir. Now linguist Michael Cysouw from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich has challenged its conclusions, in a commentary just published in Science... Atkinson based his claim on a comparative analysis of the numbers of phonemes found in about 500 present-day languages. Phonemes are the most basic sound units -- consonants, vowels and tones -- that form the basis of semantic differentiation in all languages. The number of phonemes used in natural languages varies widely....