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Keyword: einstein

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  • String Theory May Create Far Fewer Universes Than Thought

    07/30/2018 3:26:36 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Space.com ^ | 7/30/18 | Clara Moskowitz
    The problem with string theory, according to some physicists, is that it makes too many universes. It predicts not one but some 10500 versions of spacetime, each with their own laws of physics. But with so many universes on the table, how can the theory explain why ours has the features it does? Now some theorists suggest most—if not all—of those universes are actually forbidden, at least if we want them to have stable dark energy, the supposed force accelerating the expansion of the cosmos. To some, eliminating so many possible universes is not a drawback but a major step...
  • First successful test of Einstein's general relativity near supermassive black hole (Update)

    07/26/2018 12:33:35 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 26, 2018, | ESO
    This artistÂ’s impression shows the path of the star S2 as it passes very close to the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. As it gets close to the black hole the very strong gravitational field causes the colour of the star to shift slightly to the red, an effect of EinsteinÂ’s general thery of relativity. In this graphic the colour effect and size of the objects have been exaggerated for clarity. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser _________________________________________________________________________ Observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope have for the first time revealed the effects predicted by Einstein's general relativity...
  • Could aliens harness stars to keep ahead of expanding universe?

    06/20/2018 8:29:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 20, 2018 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain _____________________________________________________________________________ Dan Hooper, a senior scientist with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has written a paper outlining a way future aliens could keep their civilizations alive in spite of the isolation due to an expanding universe. In his paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, he suggests they might consider collecting and storing stars. A Dyson sphere is a theoretical structure able to house a star. Originally proposed by Freeman Dyson, the sphere was originally envisioned as a group of satellites completely encompassing a star to capture all of its energy. That energy could then be...
  • Einstein's travel diaries reveal 'shocking' xenophobia

    06/13/2018 4:19:06 PM PDT · by RedMonqey · 72 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Tue 12 Jun 2018 | Alison Flood
    The publication of Albert Einstein’s private diaries detailing his tour of Asia in the 1920s reveals the theoretical physicist and humanitarian icon’s racist attitudes to the people he met on his travels, particularly the Chinese. Written between October 1922 and March 1923, the diaries see the scientist musing on his travels, science, philosophy and art. In China, the man who famously once described racism as “a disease of white people” describes the “industrious, filthy, obtuse people” he observes. He notes how the “Chinese don’t sit on benches while eating but squat like Europeans do when they relieve themselves out in...
  • Astronomers Use a Quirk of Physics to Spot the Most Distant Star Ever Seen

    04/03/2018 6:39:08 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | April 2, 2018 | John Wenz
    There are stars too faint to see in the night sky just a few light years away, yet a chance cosmic event gave us a glimpse of a star that would have otherwise been completely invisible due to its immense distance from Earth—a whopping 9 billion light-years away. A paper today in Nature Astronomy reports the discovery of the star, called MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1, or Icarus informally. Finding such a distant star is normally a tall order, but a larger object happened to pass in front of its home galaxy. When a large object passes in front of...
  • Black Hole Echoes Would Reveal Break With Einstein’s Theory

    03/28/2018 2:14:19 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 3/22/18 | Sabine Hossenfelder
    Gravitational waves have opened up new ways to test the properties of black holes — and Einstein’s theory of gravity along with them.We all dream the same dream, here in theoretical physics. We dream of the day when one of our equations will be plotted against data and fit spot on. It’s rare for this dream to come true. Even if it does, some don’t live to see it. Take, for example, Albert Einstein, who passed away in 1955, 60 years before his equations’ most stunning consequence was confirmed: Space-time has periodic ripples — gravitational waves — that can carry...
  • Einstein made his share of errors. Here are three of the biggest

    03/15/2018 9:29:33 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 69 replies
    nbc ^ | Mar.14.2018 / 8:14 AM ET | Dan Falk /
    1. Starlight bends — but how much? Einstein performed a series of calculations to determine the size of the predicted shift but initially muffed the effort, arriving at a number that was half the correct value. Had the astronomers managed to test this number in their initial eclipse-viewing efforts, their observations wouldn’t have matched his prediction. But their attempts were stymied by weather in 1912 and by war in 1914. By the time they made the necessary observation, in the spring of 1919, Einstein had corrected his blunder — and astronomers saw exactly the shift that he had predicted. 2....
  • Einstein's theory of happiness sells for $1.56M at auction

    10/25/2017 5:10:45 PM PDT · by ETL · 11 replies
    FoxNews: Science ^ | Oct 25, 2017
    The note largely exceeded the estimated pre-auction price, which was placed between $5,000 and $8,000. The $1.56 million price included the buyer’s fee, the auction site stated. The Nobel-winning scientist wrote the note while he was in Tokyo, just after he was told he would be awarded a Nobel Prize in physics, Winner’s Auctions and Exhibitions said. A bellboy arrived at his room to deliver an item and Einstein didn't have cash to tip him. Instead, the scientist handed him a piece of paper with a message. "A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success...
  • Einstein proof: Nobel winners find ripples in the universe

    10/03/2017 4:03:34 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 3, 2017 5:14 PM EDT | Seth Borenstein and Jim Heintz
    For decades astronomers tried to prove Albert Einstein right by doing what Einstein thought was impossible: detecting the faint ripples in the universe called gravitational waves. They failed repeatedly until two years ago when they finally spotted one. Then another. And another. And another. Three American scientists — including one who initially flunked out of MIT — won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday that launched a whole new way to observe the cosmos. Sweden’s Royal Academy of Sciences cited the combination of highly advanced theory and ingenious equipment design in awarding Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology...
  • Sound Pulses Exceed Speed of Light

    09/02/2017 12:06:20 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 12, 2007 | Charles Q. Choi
    A group of high school and college teachers and students has transmitted sound pulses faster than light travels—at least according to one understanding of the speed of light. The results conform to Einstein's theory of relativity, so don't expect this research to lead to sound-propelled spaceships that fly faster than light. Still, the work could help spur research that boosts the speed of electrical and other signals higher than before. The standard metric for the speed of light is that of light traveling in vacuum. This constant, known as c, is roughly 186,000 miles per second, or roughly one million...
  • Exclusive: The OPM breach details you haven't seen

    08/23/2015 6:26:02 PM PDT · by markomalley · 18 replies
    FCW Federal Computer Week ^ | August 21, 2015 | Sean Lyngass
    An official timeline of the Office of Personnel Management breach obtained by FCW pinpoints the hackers' calibrated extraction of data and the government's step-by-step response. It illuminates a sequence of events that lawmakers have struggled to pin down in public hearings with Obama administration officials. The timeline makes clear that the heist of data on 22 million current and former federal employees was one sustained assault rather than two separate intrusions to steal background investigation data and personnel records. The document, which bears the seals of OPM and the Department of Homeland Security, is dated July 14 and was prepared...
  • What Campus Conservatives Can Learn From Albert Einstein

    06/12/2017 8:32:19 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 3 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | June 12, 2017 | Malcolm A. Kline
    Recently on the academe blog maintained by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), Hank Reichman ran some thoughts on academic freedom that Albert Einstein delivered more than half a century ago. If Reichman's hope in doing so was to provide comfort to progressives, the ironic effect is that, although that may have been the target audience in the 1950s, modern-day conservatives, particularly in the academy, are more likely to identify with Einsten's observations. "The threat to academic freedom in our time must be seen in the fact that, because of the alleged external danger to our country, freedom of...
  • ‘Sexist Pig!’ Albert Einstein Slammed for Sexism After Premiere of NatGeo’s ‘Genius’

    04/27/2017 10:57:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 83 replies
    Heat Street ^ | April 26, 2017 | Tom Teodorczuk
    Much-hyped new National Geographic series Genius chronicles the life of Albert Einstein. The first episode premiered last night and right from its opening scene, in which the groundbreaking theoretical physicist has extra-marital sex with his office assistant, we know we’re probably not going to be subjected to long-winded digressions on the theory of relativity.
  • The (not-so) observable universe

    04/01/2017 9:38:29 AM PDT · by boycott · 18 replies
    AL.com ^ | April 01, 2017 | Steven Austad
    In case you haven't been paying attention, it has been a pretty exciting last few years for what astronomers call the "observable universe." It's been a particularly rewarding stretch for Albert Einstein too, even though he died in 1955. For instance, last year astrophysicists made the first observations of gravitational waves, which Einstein, exactly 100 years ago, predicted should exist. These waves, which I won't even try to explain, were observed when two black holes crashed into one another and merged. A black hole is formed from matter so dense, and with gravity so strong, that anything near it -...
  • The Most Persuasive Scientific Reason to Believe?

    What scientific argument for the truth of Christianity do you find the most persuasive? As I contemplated this question, my answer was big bang cosmology. Here’s why. All big bang models include three essential features: (1) constant laws of physics throughout the universe; (2) a dynamic universe, one either expanding or contracting; and (3) a beginning to the universe. Remarkably, the biblical description matches these essential features. Constant Laws of Physics The scientific enterprise depends on a universe governed by constant laws of physics. If measurements today have no bearing on what happened yesterday or will happen tomorrow, no scientific...
  • Teach Einstein's Theories in School

    12/20/2016 7:24:12 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 42 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 20 Dec, 2016 | Martin Hendry , Ellen Karoline Henriksen & David Blair
    The discovery of gravitational waves, announced earlier this year, marked the ultimate test of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Einstein published his theory in the form of 10 abstract equations 101 years ago. The equations did away with Newton’s theory of gravity and replaced it with curved space and warped time. Within weeks, Karl Schwarzschild found a solution to Einstein’s equations. His conclusion was astonishing and almost unbelievable: it told us that time depends on altitude and that matter can create holes where space and time come to an end. A few months later, Einstein himself found a solution to...
  • Variable, Not Constant: Speed Of Light Theory Challenging Einstein’s Physics Can Now Be Tested

    11/27/2016 11:30:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 27 November 2016, 1:16 am EST | Dianne Depra
    Researchers suggesting that the speed of light varies have come up with a numerical prediction that will allow their theory to be tested. Many theories in physics are built upon the idea that the speed of light is at a constant rate, but João Magueijo and Niayesh Afshordi think otherwise. In a paper published in the journal Physical Review D, they detailed the creation of an exact figure on the spectral index, a model that can be used to determine if their theory is valid or not. All structures in the universe today were created when fluctuations occurred in the...
  • Chelsea Clinton: The Photo That Influenced Me Most

    11/20/2016 5:06:15 PM PST · by simpson96 · 121 replies
    Time ^ | 11/17/2016 | Chelsea Clinton
    (To celebrate the launch of TIME’s new multimedia project – 100 Photographs: The Most Influential Images of All Time – we asked leaders in a number of fields, from technology to the arts to business, to share the single photograph that most influenced their lives. Purchase the 100 Photographs book now.) 'The Solvay Conference in 1927 brought together the world’s most prominent scientists and physicists, including Albert Einstein, who you can see front and center here. Seventeen of them were or would become Nobel Prize winners. At first glance this may not be the most moving photo, but to me...
  • Marilyn Monroe Or Albert Einstein? Optical Illusion Can Tell If You Need Glasses Or Not

    09/16/2016 6:12:59 AM PDT · by RummyChick · 103 replies
    tech times ^ | 4/14/15 | arce
    ...Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) developed the hybrid image called "Marilyn Einstein," which, if you have clear vision, will look like the Hollywood bombshell from afar but will shift into an image of the revered physicist when it gets up close. People who have vision problems may not be able to see a picture of Einstein anywhere....
  • Cruz is the Smartest: The Delegate Hunt (John Batchelor--AUDIO)

    04/14/2016 9:14:29 PM PDT · by AmericanInTokyo · 51 replies
    The John Batchelor Show ^ | 14 April 2016 | The John Batchelor Show (audio link)
    AUDIO LINK (40 MINUTE SEGMENT) “Cruz's roots: Asked by (Anderson) Cooper if he was more a product of the Northeast or Texas, Cruz chose the Lone Star State. "When I went off to Harvard Law School my dad jokingly referred to it as missionary work," Cruz said. Cruz had completed his undergrad studies at Princeton University by then, becoming the first member of his family to attend an Ivy League school. "To be admitted to Princeton was an extraordinary thing," he said. "It was a world, frankly, that I didn't know. When I arrived there it was a scary place....