Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $21,923
24%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 24% is IN!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Jerusalem dig finds big gold hoard from 7th century

    12/22/2008 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 26 replies · 1,152+ views
    Reuters ^ | 22 Dec 2008 | Douglas Hamilton
    Excavations have unearthed a hoard of more than 1,300-year-old gold coins under a car park by the ancient walls of Jerusalem, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said on Monday. Archaeologists said the discovery of the 264 coins, in the ruins of a building dating to about the 7th century, the end of the Byzantine period, was one of the largest coin hoards uncovered in Jerusalem. "We've had pottery, we've had glass, but we've had nothing like this," said British archaeologist Nadine Ross, who found the hoard under a large rock on Sunday, in the fourth and final week of a trip...
  • Etruscan Code Uncracked

    07/09/2016 1:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An inscribed stone slab unearthed at an Etruscan site in Tuscany is proving to contain one of the most difficult texts to decipher. It was believed that the sixth-century B.C. stela would shed light on the still-mysterious Etruscan language, but so far it remains a puzzle. “To be honest, I’m not yet sure what type of text was incised on the stela,” says Rex Wallace, professor of classics at the University of Massachusetts. Inscribed with vertical dots and at least 70 legible letters, the four-foot-tall and two-foot-wide slab had been buried for more than 2,500 years in the foundations of...
  • WORD FOR THE DAY: DEMOTIC

    07/05/2016 6:38:43 PM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 33 replies
    2000 Most Challenging and Obscure Words | July 56, 2016 | Norman Schur
    In order that we might all raise the level of discourse and expand our language abilities, here is the daily post of "Word for the Day". demotic [dig MOT ik]hear it pronounced adjective Demotic pertains to anything relating to the common people. In that sense, it can be use as synonymous with "popular."Demotic has a narrow, specialized sense as a designation of a simplified form of ancient Egyptian writing in which the priests kept their records.The adjective comes from the Greek demotikus (popular, plebian), based on 111111111111,i1.demotes (a plebian) and demos (the common people, the populas.King Demos is a facetious...
  • Semerano, The Scholar Feared By The Academy, Awarded (2001)

    02/27/2005 9:36:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 471+ views
    Giovanni Semerano had to wait 90 years before receiving his first institutional acknowledgement for his important discoveries concerning ancient languages, in particular, the Etruscan language. Semerano has revolutionized the theories tied to the Indo-European languages as the root of the current Mediterranean and European languages. He was defined a "heretic" scholar because he erased centuries of philosophical studies that saw in the Greek-Latin philosophies the origins of European culture. Thanks to his etymological studies the 90-year-old philosopher instead sustains that Western culture derives from the Shiites and the Assyrians.
  • Finnish was the second language of Sweden for centuries. Now Arabic is overtaking it.

    04/07/2016 12:57:31 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 04/07/2016 | Adam Taylor
    Officially, Sweden doesn't keep a record of the languages its inhabitants speak. That fact was infuriating to Mikael Parkvall, a linguist at Stockholm University, so he decided to find out for himself. What is the most popular non-Swedish language in Sweden? After poring over various statistics and studies, Parkvall came to a conclusion: Arabic was very likely to now be the second most popular language in the Scandinavian country. Parkvall's study focused on native languages rather than second languages, which he says are a better judge of what languages are actually spoken in a country (while English is widely spoken...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Messages from the Dead [ Qatna's royal palace and cuneiform archive ]

    02/01/2007 8:39:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 235+ views
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2006 | Marco Merola
    Inscribed on the small, pillow-shaped tablet is a 3,000-year-old warning to Idanda, king of Qatna, from the Hittite general Hanutti, telling him to prepare for war. A small Bronze Age Syrian city-state, Qatna was once under Hittite control, but had been conquered by the Mitanni people from the north. The clay tablet, like others found with it, was fired twice--once just after it was written, to preserve it, and again when the ancient city was sacked and burned to the ground in 1340 B.C. by the Hittites, who ruled an empire that stretched from northern Turkey to Mesopotamia and Syria......
  • Crowdsourcing a modern means to crack code on Civil War texts

    07/03/2016 11:32:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    The Wall Street Journal reported on a trove of Civil War era telegrams — many of them to and from Abraham Lincoln — that have never been decoded. The telegrams are owned by the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. They have started a project, "Decoding the Civil War," to transcribe and decipher their collection of nearly 16,000 Civil War telegrams between Lincoln, his Cabinet and Union Army officers. About a third of the telegrams were written in code. The library is crowdsourcing the project through the largest online platform for collaborative volunteer research, Zooniverse. They...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Make It So! Sayeth Cleopatra

    06/21/2016 6:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 54 Number 1 ^ | January/February 2001 | Angela M. H. Schuster
    A single Greek word, ginesthoi, or "make it so," written at the bottom of a Ptolemaic papyrus may have been written by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII herself, says Dutch papyrologist Peter van Minnen of the University of Groningen. Received in Alexandria on Mecheir 26 (February 23, 33 B.C.), the papyrus text, recycled for use in the construction of a cartonnage mummy case found by a German expedition at Abusir in 1904, appears to be a royal ordinance granting tax exemption to one Publius Canidius, an associate of Mark Antony's who would command his land army during the Battle of...
  • The face of Cleopatra: Scientists recreate the first true image of the legendary beauty

    12/15/2008 9:59:29 AM PST · by yankeedame · 48 replies · 6,476+ views
    DailyMail.uk ^ | 15th December 2008 | Fiona Macrae
    The face of Cleopatra: Scientists recreate the first true image of the legendary beauty ...Cambridge University Egyptologist...believes the computer-generated 3D image is the best likeness of the legendary beauty... Pieced together from images on ancient artefacts, including a ring dating from Cleopatra's reign 2000 years ago, it is the culmination of more than a year of painstaking research. Likeness: The computer-generated 3D image has been pieced together from images on ancient artefacts The result is a strikingly beautiful young woman of mixed ethnicity... ...reflect the monarch's Greek heritage as well as her Egyptian upbringing. ...'She probably wasn’t just completely European....
  • Coin Shows Cleopatra's Ugly Truth

    02/14/2007 8:59:15 AM PST · by blam · 134 replies · 4,297+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-14-2007
    Coin shows Cleopatra's ugly truth The images of Antony and Cleopatra are less than flattering Antony and Cleopatra, one of history's most romantic couples, were not the great beauties that Hollywood would have us believe, academics have said. A study of a 2,000-year-old silver coin found the Egyptian queen, famously portrayed by Elizabeth Taylor, had a pointed chin, thin lips and sharp nose. Her Roman lover, played by Richard Burton, had bulging eyes, thick neck and a hook nose. The tiny coin was studied by experts at Newcastle University. The size of a modern 5p piece (18mm or 0.7in), the...
  • Cleopatra seduced the Romans with her irresistible . . . mind

    03/15/2005 8:10:16 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 110 replies · 2,420+ views
    The Times (U.K.) ^ | March 14, 2005 | Ben Hoyle
    LONG before Shakespeare portrayed her as history’s most exotic femme fatale, Cleopatra was revered throughout the Arab world — for her brain. Medieval Arab scholars never referred to the Egyptian queen’s appearance, and they made no mention of the dangerous sensuality which supposedly corrupted Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Instead they marvelled at her intellectual accomplishments: from alchemy and medicine to philosophy, mathematics and town planning, a new book has claimed. Even Elizabeth Taylor, who famously played the title role in the 1963 epic Cleopatra, would have struggled to inject sex appeal into this queen. Arab writers depict Cleopatra’s court...
  • 'Jesus's wife' papyrus is likely a fake, professor now says

    06/20/2016 11:26:12 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 74 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 20, 2016 2:16 PM EDT
    A Harvard professor who caused a huge splash when she unveiled a small fragment of papyrus that she said referred to Jesus being married now says it’s likely a forgery. In 2012, Harvard Divinity School Professor Karen King presented the fragment, which includes the phrase, “Jesus said to them, my wife.” Since then, other scholars have raised doubts about the fragment’s authenticity. …
  • Latin Course Stage 6 (Pompeii Slave Girl)

    07/18/2004 7:24:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 5,740+ views
    Cambridge ^ | 2004 | University of Cambridge
    Gold bracelet found on arm of (slave?) girl killed near Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. On the inside of the bracelet is carved "from the Master to his slave girl" (DOM[I]NUS ANCILLAE SUAE).
  • LATIN 1: THE EASY WAY

    09/25/2004 12:02:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies · 3,109+ views
    Cherryh website ^ | 1999 | C.J. Cherryh
    I used to teach this subject. I use a method that's a little different than the standard, a method aimed at results, not tradition, and no need to learn grammar at the outset, when you've got enough new things to learn. If you learned by the traditional method you may find this radically different; but trust me.
  • 'Believe Me, Father, the Latin for Hot Pants Is Brevissimae Bracae'

    08/28/2004 5:12:23 PM PDT · by quidnunc · 29 replies · 1,028+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | August 29, 2004 | Elizabeth Day
    As the iuvenis voluptarius might say, put on your brevissimae bracae femineae and let's go to the taberna nocturna and drink some vinum rubrum Burdigalense. The Vatican has helpfully produced a new lexicon of modern words in Latin, providing translations for such non-classical terms as playboy, hot pants, nightclub and Merlot. The lexicon, which has just been launched, is intended to provide updated vocabulary for theologians writing in Latin about current issues. For those wishing to write about anarchy or dissent in the 21st century, entries include tromocrates (terrorist) and punkianae catervae assecla (punk). Theologians referring to the modern vices...
  • (Vanity) Sunday Morning Chuckles: Latin Phrases for the Here-and-Now

    05/23/2004 6:59:08 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 27 replies · 1,602+ views
    Sunday May 23,'04 | submitted by Yankeedame
    (Gang, what you see is what I recieved from the friend of a friend kind of person. So if the Latin isn't exactly...well, "Latin" ... remember --as our liberal friends would say-- it's the intention that counts! [grin] -- YD.) -Pecunia in arbotis non cresat Money doesn't grow on trees. -Sane ego te vocavi. Forsitan capedictum tuum desit. I did call. Maybe your answering machine is broken.-Ne feceris ut ridram Don't make me laugh.-Te precor dulcissime supplex! Pretty please with a cherry on top!-Fac ut nemo me vocet Hold my calls-Ita erat quando hic adveni It was that way when...
  • Archaeologists Find Ancient Collector's Hoard of Hasmonean Coins

    06/14/2016 12:54:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nir Hasson
    A rare cache of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period, some 2,140 years ago, has been discovered in a salvage excavation in central Israel. The 16 coins, shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms), date from around 126 BCE. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority... Closer analysis of the coins showed that the cache contains one or two coins from every year between 135 to 126 BCE... Aside...