Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Vatican Reveals Secret Archives

    01/02/2010 9:42:37 AM PST · by Steelfish · 50 replies · 2,544+ views
    Telegraph(UK) ^ | January 02nd 2010 | Nick Squires
    Vatican Reveals Secret Archives A 13th-century letter from Genghis Khan’s grandson demanding homage from the pope is among a collection of documents from the Vatican’s Secret Archives that has been published for the first time. By Nick Squires in Rome 01 Jan 2010 In a letter dated 1246 from Grand Khan Guyuk, pictured, to Pope Innocent IV, Genghis Khan's grandson demands that the Pontiff travel to central Asia in person The Holy See’s archives contain scrolls, parchments and leather-bound volumes with correspondence dating back more than 1,000 years. High-quality reproductions of 105 documents, 19 of which have never been seen...
  • A Rebuilt Neanderthal

    12/31/2002 4:38:20 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 107 replies · 36,191+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 12-31-02 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    In a laboratory in the upper recesses of the American Museum of Natural History, away from the public galleries, Dr. Ian Tattersall, a tall Homo sapiens, stooped and came face to face with a Neanderthal man, short and robust but bearing a family resemblance — until one looked especially closely. A paleoanthropologist who has studied and written about Neanderthals, Dr. Tattersall was getting his first look at a virtually complete skeleton from this famously extinct branch of the hominid family. Nothing quite like it has ever been assembled before, the foot bones connected to the ankle bones and everything else...
  • The "Inscribed Wall" at Chatata, Tennessee

    09/16/2018 6:40:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Science Frontiers ^ | No. 97: Jan-Feb 1995 | William Corliss
    One of our favorite anomalies over the years has been the ancient "inscribed wall" at Chatata, near Cleveland, in Bradley County, Tennessee. The above quotation marks are intended to warn the reader that said wall may not be man-made, and its inscriptions may be natural rather than artificial... The wall was originally almost completely buried. It attracted attention only because its course was marked on the surface by stones projecting from the ground every 25-30 feet over a gently curving arc about 1,000 feet long. One of these surface stones seemed to be inscribed with strange symbols. Excavations, supported at...
  • Earliest human drawing discovered in South African cave

    09/13/2018 2:36:48 PM PDT · by ETL · 51 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Sept 13,2018 | Chris Ciaccia
    The earliest known drawing made by a human has been found in a South African cave and it looks very similar to a hashtag, the grouping and search feature made popular by the Jack Dorsey-led Twitter. The drawing is basically six red lines crossed by three other slightly curved lines. It appears on a tiny flake of mineral crust measuring only about 1.5 inches long and about half an inch tall. It's evidently part of a larger drawing because lines reaching the edge are cut off abruptly there, researchers said. "Before this discovery, Palaeolithic archaeologists have for a long time...
  • Ancient Egyptian visitors to Australia or miner's mishap? Riddle of the rainforest coin

    09/13/2018 11:50:39 AM PDT · by Theoria · 18 replies
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation ^ | 03 June 2018 | Mark Rigby
    Unearthed in 1912, squirreled away for a lifetime and then handed in to a museum — the story behind the discovery of an ancient Egyptian coin in far north Queensland is almost as mysterious as how it came to be there.The bronze coin — about the same size as a 50 cent piece — was minted during the reign of Ptolemy IV, between 221 and 204BC.More than two millennia later it was found about seven centimetres underground in the depths of the far north Queensland rainforest.The man who found it, Andrew Henderson, had abandoned the gold mining fields of...
  • $1 Million in Gold Coins From 1715 Shipwreck on the Market

    11/07/2016 6:57:31 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    WTOP ^ | November 7, 2016
    A New Orleans investment firm has begun marketing gold coins from a 300-year-old shipwreck discovered off Florida’s coast. Blanchard and Co. is one of two dealers offering the coins from an area where 11 treasure-laden ships of a Spanish fleet were smashed onto reefs by a hurricane on July 31, 1715. The other dealer is California-based Monaco Rare Coins. John Albanese, a New Jersey-based coin expert who brokered the sales, said in an interview Friday that most of the 295 coins being offered were found by divers exploring the area last year on the 300th anniversary of the disaster.
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • Roman coins discovered in ruins of Japanese castle

    09/28/2016 11:56:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    fox news ^ | 09/28/2016
    The coins were excavated from the ruins of Katsuren Castle in Okinawa Prefecture, according to the Japan Times, noting that this is the country’s first discovery of its kind. Citing the Board of Education in the city of Uruma, the Japan Times reports that the four copper coins are believed to be from the third to fourth centuries. ... X-ray analysis of the coins has apparently revealed the image of Emperor Constantine I and a soldier carrying a spear. Each coin measures 0.6 inches to 0.8 inches in diameter, according to the report.
  • Ancient Roman coins unearthed at Japan castle

    09/28/2016 8:40:35 AM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    AFP ^ | 28 September 2016 | AFP
    Japanese archaeologists said Wednesday they have for the first time unearthed ancient Roman coins at the ruins of an old castle. The discovery of 10 bronze and copper coins -- the oldest dating from about 300-400 AD -- in southern Okinawa caught researchers by surprise. It was the first time Roman Empire coins have been discovered in Japan, thousands of kilometres from where they were likely minted. "At first I thought they were one cent coins dropped by US soldiers," archaeologist Hiroki Miyagi told AFP. "But after washing them in water I realised they were much older. I was really...
  • Florida family unearths gold coins worth over $1M from 1715 shipwreck

    07/28/2015 7:57:31 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 10 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 27,2015
    A Florida man has uncovered gold artifacts worth over $1 million from the wreckage of a Spanish fleet that sank in a storm off the Florida coast three centuries ago. The find by Eric Schmitt was announced late Monday by a salvage company that owns the rights to the site where the coins and jewels were found. "The treasure was actually found a month ago,” Brent Brisben of 1715 Fleet — Queens Jewels LLC told Florida Today. Keeping word of the haul from getting out was "particularly hard for the family that found it," Brisben added. "They’ve been beside themselves."...
  • In mint condition! Millions of pounds-worth of pristine 5th-century gold coins are found buried [tr]

    09/10/2018 6:19:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 57 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 9, 2018 | Charlie Moore
    A stash of fifth-century gold coins worth millions has been found buried in a pot under an Italian theatre. Builders demolishing the former Cressoni theatre in Como were stunned to discover the cache last Wednesday. The Roman coins will be examined and dated before ending up in a museum, officials said.
  • Roman gold coins discovered in Italian theatre

    09/12/2018 7:10:49 AM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 27 replies
    The Local IT ^ | 9 September 2018 | staff
    Hundreds of ancient Roman gold coins have been discovered on the site of an old theatre in Como in northern Italy, the Ministry of Culture said. The coins date back to the end of the Roman Empire in the 5th century and were found in a kind of stone urn in the Cressoni theatre basement, not far from the site of the ancient city of Novum Comum.    According to Italian media, the coins could be worth millions of euros.   "We do not yet know in detail the historical and cultural significance of this discovery but this area is a real...
  • The Most Contrarian College in America

    09/11/2018 7:24:31 PM PDT · by proxy_user · 40 replies
    The New York Times ^ | Sept 11, 2018 | Frank Bruni
    SANTA FE, N.M. — Have I got a college for you. For your first two years, your regimen includes ancient Greek. And I do mean Greek, the language, not Greece, the civilization, though you’ll also hang with Aristotle, Aeschylus, Thucydides and the rest of the gang. There’s no choice in the matter. There’s little choice, period. Let your collegiate peers elsewhere design their own majors and frolic with Kerouac. For you it’s Kant. You have no major, only “the program,” an exploration of the Western canon that was implemented in 1937 and has barely changed. It’s intense. Learning astronomy and...
  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • Columbus Trying to Recruit the Chinese Emperor to Liberate Jerusalem and Stumbled on America

    07/08/2009 5:44:29 AM PDT · by SJackson · 16 replies · 585+ views
    MEMRI ^ | 7-8-09
    Egyptian Writer Muhammad Ibrahim Mabrouk: Columbus Was Trying to Recruit the Chinese Emperor to the Liberation of Jerusalem When He Stumbled Upon America Following are excerpts from an interview with Egyptian writer Muhammad Ibrahim Mabrouk, which aired on Al-Majd TV on April 27, 2009.To view this clip on MEMRI TV, visit http://www.memritv.org/clip/en/2167.htm. "Columbus Wanted to Liberate Jerusalem From the Muslims"Interviewer: "American society was not born and did not grow in the United States. It is a mixed society - a society of immigrants, of different nationalities. How can it be claimed that this society in its entirety was melted down...
  • Marco Polo discovered America 200 years before Colombus, according to map

    08/09/2007 3:28:45 AM PDT · by HAL9000 · 92 replies · 5,820+ views
    AFP via translation ^ | August 9, 2007
    Possible discovered of America by Marco Polo before Colomb: account in VSD 'America - its West coast - would have been discovered by Marco Polo some 200 years before Christophe Colomb, according to a chart of the Library of the Congress in Washington examined since 1943 by the FBI and whose history is told in published review VSD Wednesday. This document, brought to the Library in 1933 by Marcian Rossi, an American naturalized citizen originating in Italy, “represents a boat beside a chart showing part of India, China, Japan, the Eastern Indies and North America”, indicates the report/ratio of...
  • American Indians in Galway, Ireland?

    09/10/2018 8:20:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog ^ | November 17, 2012 | Dr. Beach Combing
    One of the most dramatic pieces of evidence for a pre-Columbian crossing of the Atlantic is to be found in a single Latin marginalia, that is some words scribbled into the margin of a book. The sentence in question appears in a copy of the Historia rerum ubique gestarum by Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini which was published in Venice in 1477. In that work Piccolomini discusses the arrival of Indians in Europe blown from across the Atlantic at a date when America was unknown to Europeans (another post another day). Next to this passage a reader has written in Latin the...
  • Student discovers writing on pieces of ancient Egyptian mummy case

    09/04/2018 9:15:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Phys.org ^ | August 30, 2018 | Alex Shashkevich, Stanford University
    When Ariela Algaze signed up for a spring 2018 course on museums, she didn't expect to get wrapped up in the mystery of an ancient Egyptian mummy case that Jane Stanford herself purchased more than 100 years ago... Algaze's research led her to discover information that was not known by university scholars - including inscriptions on the coffin and the name of the mummified woman inside it... Algaze learned that the artifact contained writing after sifting through hundreds of its fragments, which have been stored in three boxes, unstudied for decades. The mummy case, which Jane Stanford purchased in 1901,...
  • Advanced Technology Shines Light on More Dead Sea Scrolls

    08/28/2018 9:59:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Bible History Daily ^ | 05/04/2018 | Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
    Thanks to advanced imaging technology, Dead Sea Scroll fragments containing writing too faint to read with the naked eye have now been deciphered. Oren Ableman, a Ph.D. student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a researcher in the Israel Antiquities Authority's Dead Sea Scrolls Unit, examined these small manuscript pieces as part of the IAA's massive project to digitally document each Dead Sea Scroll fragment... From the letters Ableman could read after digitizing these Dead Sea Scroll fragments, he reconstructed the texts on the fragments and identified passages from the Books of Deuteronomy, Leviticus, and Jubilees. An IAA press...
  • Unpublished Egyptian texts reveal new insights into ancient medicine

    08/22/2018 7:52:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | August 14, 2018 | Lise Brix, tr by Catherine Jex
    The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus manuscripts. A large part of the collection has not yet been translated, leaving researchers in the dark about what they might contain. "A large part of the texts are still unpublished. Texts about medicine, botany, astronomy, astrology, and other sciences practiced in Ancient Egypt," says Egyptologist Kim Ryholt, Head of the Carlsberg Papyrus Collection at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark... "It's totally unique for me to be able to work with unpublished material. It doesn't happen in many places around the world," says PhD...