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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • 10 Controversial Artifacts That Could Have Changed History

    05/20/2016 10:12:43 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    listverse.com ^ | 05/09/2016 | Debra Kelly
    6. The Davenport Tablets The Davenport Academy was a major force in early American amateur archeology. Unfortunately, the organization ended up lending its name to one of the most ridiculous hoaxes in American history. In 1877, Reverend Jacob Gass claimed to have found a set of four inscribed tablets buried in an ancient mound in Iowa. Gass was quickly invited to join the Davenport Academy, which contained many supporters of the Mound Builders myth. This theory, now entirely discredited, argued that Native Americans were too primitive to have built the giant earthworks that dot the American countryside. Instead, 19th century...
  • Meet the UC Berkeley Grad Who Created the Dothraki Language for 'Game of Thrones'

    05/17/2016 11:08:00 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/17 | Lisa Fernandez
    David Peterson has so far created 4,000 Dothraki words When the misogynistic, male Dothraki characters launch into curse-laden tirades on "Game of Thrones," viewers have a 35-year-old Southern California father and a University of California Berkeley graduate to thank for what they hear. David J. Peterson invented Dothraki, the language spoken by the crass race of nomadic horse warriors first described in George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Fire and Ice," on which the HBO series is based. "It's a lot of fun," he said Tuesday, in his first, interactive Facetime Live interview. Especially coming up with the curse...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • What phrases commonly used today are derived from obsolete technologies?

    05/05/2016 5:03:45 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 159 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/04/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    "Hang up the phone." comes from one specific kind of land-line phone that had a kind of hook you'd hang the handset from when you were done. Doing so would pull down the hook that was connected to a switch inside the phone that would disconnect the line. And lots of nautical stuff: Groggy - In 1740, British Admiral Vernon (whose nickname was "Old Grogram" for the cloak of grogram which he wore) ordered that the sailors' daily ration of rum be diluted with water. The men called the mixture "grog". A sailor who drank too much grog was "groggy"....
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Birdwatcher Spies Egyptian Scarab Seal at Dor [Middle Kingdom]

    05/07/2016 4:24:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    BAR ^ | Wednesday, May 4, 2016 | Robin Ngo
    Birdwatcher Alexander Ternopolsky made a remarkable discovery one day at the archaeological site of Tel Dor on Israel's Carmel Coast -- not a bird, but a rare Egyptian scarab seal. The stone scarab -- an ancient Egyptian object shaped like a scarab beetle -- belonged to a high-ranking official of the 13th Dynasty (18th-17th centuries B.C.E.) in Middle Kingdom Egypt... The name of the scarab's owner, his position, and ankh and djed symbols (representing eternal life and stability, respectively) are engraved on the Egyptian scarab seal. While the owner's name hasn't been deciphered yet, he is described on the scarab...
  • Recently Discovered Mayan Pyramid Confirmed As One Of The Largest Ever Seen

    05/06/2016 7:31:17 AM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 132 replies
    Misterious Earth ^ | 6 May 2016
    Researchers have confirmed that the Mayan pyramid excavated at the Acropolis of Tonin, Chiapas is one the largest pyramids ever discovered. Discovered in 2010, Emiliano Gallaga and his team began their excavation under the impression that the pyramid was built on the top of a hill. It was not until recently that theyve managed to fully assess it and truly see what theyre working with. Wighing in at 75-meters tall with seven distinct districts all with their own purpose such as Temples, palaces, markets, housing, administration the magnitude of the Tonin pyramid compares even to that of the...
  • 1000 year old marks in tree found near Prague

    08/28/2009 11:50:37 AM PDT · by BGHater · 14 replies · 1,414+ views
    DiscoveryON ^ | 21 Aug 2009 | DO
    Czech archaeologists have uncovered a unique 1000-year-old mark engraved into an oak tree the remains of which were found near Celakovice in Prague, which is probably the oldest preserved sign of this kind in the world. According to a report from the Czech News Agency, the real meaning of the 10-cm star-shaped mark on the oak trunk is not certain. Experts say it may have marked the territory or serve some iconic purposes. This find is rare as so old engraved signs were not previously mapped and they are not systematically searched for either, archaeologist Jana Marikova of the Academy...
  • Medieval Doodles Of A 7-Year Old Boy Hints At The Universality Of Daydreaming

    05/02/2016 4:24:27 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 34 replies
    Realm Of History ^ | APRIL 30, 2016 | DATTATREYA MANDAL
    Novgorod or Veliky Novgorod, is one of the major historical cities of Russia, and it started out as a trading station for the Varangians who traveled from the Baltic region to Constantinople by (possibly) late 10th century AD. But as it turns out, this historically significant settlement of northern Russia is also home to around thousand personal tomes that are inscribed on bark of birch trees and are almost preserved in perfect condition. In fact, historians hypothesize that there are 20,000 similar specimens still waiting to be salvaged from the conducive anaerobic clay soil layers of the city environs. And...
  • Construction workers unearth over half a tonne of Roman coins in Spain

    04/29/2016 7:42:11 AM PDT · by wtd · 94 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 29 April 2016 | Keely Lockhart
    Construction workers unearth over half a tonne of Roman coins in Spain Workers laying pipes in a park in Seville have unearthed a 600-kilogram trove of Roman coins in what culture officials say is a unique historic discovery.
  • Who Wrote the Books of the Bible?: New Book Addresses Historical Origins of the Bible

    02/16/2007 2:06:00 PM PST · by Alex Murphy · 15 replies · 1,290+ views
    PR Newswire ^ | Feb. 16, 2007
    LAPORTE, Ind., Feb. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- C. Jack Trickler presents a clear and accessible study of the people who wrote the books of the Bible, their motivations and the historical, political and social settings in which they wrote in his new book, "A Layman's Guide to Who Wrote the Books of the Bible?" (now available through AuthorHouse). Trickler discusses his own theories, as well as those of other religious scholars, to offer a thorough, well-researched argument. "When you get into the Bible, you see enough evidence that the Bible was written by humans that you have to say, 'Well, who...
  • 'Lost' Shakespeare Play Double Falsehood Published

    03/16/2010 12:25:03 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies · 637+ views
    BBC ^ | Monday, 15 March 2010
    A play which was first discovered nearly 300 years ago has been credited to William Shakespeare. The work, titled Double Falsehood, was written by the playwright and another dramatist, John Fletcher. Theatre impresario Lewis Theobald presented the play in the 18th century as an adaptation of a Shakespeare play but it was dismissed as a forgery. But scholars for British Shakespeare publisher, Arden, now believe the Bard wrote large parts of the play. Researchers think the play is based on a long-lost work called Cardenio, which was itself based on Don Quixote. "I think Shakespeare's hand can be discerned in...
  • Computer program proves Shakespeare didn't work alone, researchers claim

    10/12/2009 10:28:02 AM PDT · by BGHater · 20 replies · 1,425+ views
    Times Online ^ | 12 Oct 2009 | Jack Malvern
    The 400-year-old mystery of whether William Shakespeare was the author of an unattributed play about Edward III may have been solved by a computer program designed to detect plagiarism. Sir Brian Vickers, an authority on Shakespeare at the Institute of English Studies at the University of London, believes that a comparison of phrases used in The Reign of King Edward III with Shakespeares early works proves conclusively that the Bard wrote the play in collaboration with Thomas Kyd, one of the most popular playwrights of his day. The professor used software called Pl@giarism, developed by the University of Maastricht to...
  • South Sudan adopts the language of Shakespeare

    10/09/2011 6:02:37 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | October 8, 2011 | Rosie Goldsmith
    The young nation of South Sudan has chosen English as its official language but after decades of civil war, the widespread learning of English presents a big challenge for a country brought up speaking a form of Arabic.I knew there might be problems as soon as I arrived at Juba International airport - and was asked to fill in my own visa form, as the immigration officer could not write English. The colourful banners and billboards hung out to celebrate South Sudan's independence back in July, and still adorning the streets now, are all in English. As are the names...
  • Director posits proof of biblical Exodus

    04/14/2006 5:58:16 AM PDT · by timsbella · 157 replies · 3,529+ views
    The Globe and Mail ^ | 14 April 2006 | Michael Posner
    A provocative $4-million documentary by Toronto filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici claims to have found archeological evidence verifying the story of the biblical Exodus from Egypt, 3,500 years ago. Religious Jews consider the biblical account incontrovertible the foundation story of the creation of the nation of Israel. Indeed, they celebrated the Exodus Wednesday night and last night with the annual Passover recitation of the Haggadah. But among scholars, the question of if and when Moses led an estimated two million Israelite slaves out of pharaonic Egypt, miraculously crossed the Red Sea ahead of the pursuing Egyptian army and received the Ten...
  • When Was The Bible Written? New Study Suggests Earlier Than We Thought

    04/13/2016 8:46:30 AM PDT · by avrakay · 29 replies
    Tech Times ^ | April 13 2016 | Deepthi B
    Certain texts of the Bible may have been written earlier than previously believed, according to a new research based on the handwriting analysis of ancient inscriptions. It is dated to be at least 600 B.C. and the presumption is that literacy was prevalent and the texts were composed in the kingdom of Judah, a city with biblical reverence, according to researchers from the Tel Aviv University. They suggest that the educational infrastructure to support Bible writing presumably existed at that time.
  • New Evidence on When Bible Was Written: Ancient Shopping Lists

    04/11/2016 5:41:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | April 11, 2016 | Isabel Kershner
    Based on a statistical analysis of the results, and taking into account the content of the texts that were chosen for the sample, the researchers concluded that at least six different hands had written the 18 missives at around the same time. Even soldiers in the lower ranks of the Judahite army, it appears, could read and write... The study was based on a trove of about 100 letters inscribed in ink on pieces of pottery, known as ostracons, that were unearthed near the Dead Sea in an excavation of the Arad fort decades ago and dated from about 600...
  • Easy as Alep, Bet, Gimel? Cambridge research explores social context of ancient writing

    04/08/2016 1:50:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 5, 2016 | University of Cambridge
    The project, called Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS)... is led by Dr Philippa Steele of the University's Faculty of Classics... For instance, today the notion of "alphabetical order" is used to arrange everything from dictionaries to telephone books, but why is the alphabet organised the way it is? Alphabetical order as we would recognise it first appeared over three thousand years ago in Ugaritic, written in a cuneiform script made of wedge-shaped signs impressed on clay tablets. The Ugaritic alphabet was in use in the ancient city of Ugarit, uncovered at Ras Shamra in modern Syria....
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions, said archaeologist...
  • The Muratorian fragment, dated 170 A.D., affirms 22 out of 27 New Testament books

    03/24/2016 5:42:06 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 92 replies
    Wintery Knight ^ | 03/19/2016
    The Muratorian fragment / The Muratorian canon (click for larger image) I sometimes hear this odd objection that the books that were to be included in the Bible were not decided until the 4th century. I think it comes from some Hollywood movie, or maybe a TV show. Anyway, this post should help fix that myth.I’m going to quote from New Testament expert Dr. Michael J. Kruger from his blog.He writes: One of the key data points in any discussion of canon is something called the Muratorian fragment (also known as the Muratorian canon). This fragment, named after its discoverer...
  • Metallic ink used in the Herculaneum scrolls

    03/23/2016 3:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, March 21, 2016 | editors, source Emmanuel Brun et al.
    Analysis of Herculaneum papyrus scroll fragments reveals the use of metallic ink in Greco-Roman literary inscription centuries earlier than previously thought, according to a study*. Scholars of ancient scrolls hold that texts from antiquity, particularly Greek and Latin literary manuscripts produced until the fourth century AD, were largely written in carbon-based ink on papyri, the fibrous structure of which allowed scribes to jettison ruling lines. Vito Mocella and colleagues used nondestructive synchrotron X-ray-based methods to chemically analyze the barely visible black inscriptions on two nearly flat, multilayered papyrus fragments that were found at the Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum in...
  • That's No Bottlecap! Hiker In Israel Finds Rare Gold Coin

    03/15/2016 9:40:40 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    npr ^ | Emily Harris
    Laurie Rimon spotted a gleam while on a hike in northern Israel with several friends. It turned out to be a gold coin so unusual, Israeli archaeologists say there is only one other one with the same symbols in the world. "It's extremely exciting," said Dr. Donald Ariel, an expert with the Israel Antiquities Authority, in comments released by the agency, which says the coin was struck by Roman Emperor Trajan in the year 107. "His gold coins are extremely rare." One side of the gold disc shows an image of Augustus, the founder of the Roman Empire more than...
  • Israeli hiker finds rare, 2,000-year-old gold coin

    03/15/2016 1:12:30 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 28 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | March 14, 2016 | Associated Press
    JERUSALEM Israels Antiquities Authority says a hiker has found a rare, nearly 2,000-year-old gold coin. The authority said Monday that the ancient coin appears to be only the second of its kind to have been found. It said Londons British Museum possesses the other coin. The coin, from the year A.D. 107, bears the image of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire. It was minted as part of a series of coins honoring Roman rulers.
  • Wari-Bateshwar One Of Earliest Kingdoms

    03/19/2008 3:01:13 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 709+ views
    The Daily Star ^ | 3-19-2008 | Emran Hossain
    Wari-Bateshwar one of earliest kingdomsSuggests find of pre-Mauryan silver coins in the area Emran Hossain, back from Narsingdi The coin hoard, unearthed by excavators from Wari-Bateshwar, containing silver punch-marked coin of Pre-Mauryan (right) and Mauryan (left) periods reveals that Wari-Batehswar was one of the Mahajanapadas in the Indian sub-continent. The discovery of silver punch-marked coins of the pre-Mauryan period dating back to 600 BC to 400 BC in Wari-Bateshwar reveals that the place was a Mahajanapada, one of the earliest kingdoms or states in the Indian subcontinent. The silver coins and artefacts unearthed and collected so far and geographical positioning...
  • TAG Great Tits Use Linguistic Traits Including Phrases Thought To Be Unique To Humans

    03/09/2016 7:49:22 AM PST · by DUMBGRUNT · 81 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 9 Mar 2016 | James Maynard
    Great tits use advanced syntax, including speaking in phrases, to warn their fellow birds of incoming danger, a new research reveals. This linguistic trait was previously believed to be unique to human beings.
  • Rare 3,000-year-old King David era seal discovered by Temple Mount Sifting Project

    10/04/2015 8:26:21 AM PDT · by UMCRevMom@aol.com · 33 replies
    www.jpost.com ^ | September 24, 2015 | By DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    A rare 3,000-year-old seal, from the time of King David in the 10th century BCE, was recently discovered by a 10-year-old Russian volunteer at Jerusalems Temple Mount Sifting Project. Dr. Gabriel Barkay, co-founder and director of the project which sifts through thousands of tons of illegally removed earth from the contested holy site in 1999 by the Wakf religious trust to build a mosque said that the finding is unprecedented. The seal is the first of its kind to be found in Jerusalem, said Barkay, a world-renowned archaeologist and Israel Prize laureate, who has led the project for...
  • Rare First Temple-era seal found in City of David

    03/07/2016 8:09:02 PM PST · by Lera · 20 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/7/16
    Archaeologists discover First Temple-era seals, one with a woman's name. Rare find that sheds significant light on owner's life. Archaeologists have found two ancient seals with Hebrew names, dating back to the time of the First Temple, in Jerusalem's City of David. The objects belonged to a woman and a man, Elihana bat Gael and Sa'aryahu ben Shabenyahu. "Finding seals that bear names from the time of the First Temple is hardly a commonplace occurrence, and finding a seal that belonged to a woman is an even rarer phenomenon," said a researcher with the project. The artifacts were discovered in...
  • Campaign to bring the Bayeux Tapestry back to Britain

    06/24/2008 5:22:08 AM PDT · by Renfield · 24 replies · 95+ views
    A campaign has been launched to bring the Bayeux Tapestry, one of the worlds great works of art, back to Britain for the first time centuries, and put it on display in Canterbury Cathedral. The famous embroidery of the 1066 Norman Conquest is the subject of a major conference of world experts being held at the British Museum next month......
  • Halley's Comet Portrayed On Ancient Coin

    05/19/2004 2:14:39 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 901+ views
    ABC.net ^ | 5-19-2004 | Heather Catchpole
    Halley's comet portrayed on ancient coin Heather Catchpole ABC Science Online Wednesday, 19 May 2004 Could the star shape on the king's crown be Halley's comet? A rare ancient coin may feature an early record of Halley's comet, researchers say. The coin features the head of the Armenian king Tigranes II the Great, who reigned from 95 to 55 BC. A symbol on his crown that features a star with a curved tail may represent the passage of Halley's comet in 87 BC, say the Armenian and Italian researchers. Their research will be published in Astronomy & Geophysics, a journal...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Julius Caesar and Leap Days

    02/28/2016 10:18:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | February 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today, February 29th, is a leap day - a relatively rare occurrence. In 46 BC, Julius Caesar, featured here in a self-decreed minted coin, created a calendar system that added one leap day every four years. Acting on advice by Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, Caesar did this to make up for the fact that the Earth's year is slightly more than 365 days. In modern terms, the time it takes for the Earth to circle the Sun is slightly more than the time it takes for the Earth to rotate 365 times (with respect to the Sun -- actually we...
  • Scholar sole speaker of Huron language[Canada]

    12/25/2007 10:24:50 AM PST · by BGHater · 32 replies · 122+ views
    The Star ^ | 24 Dec 2007 | John Goddard
    Teacher has published dictionary for once thriving Ontario tribe whose `Huron Carol' is Yule tradition The world's last Huron-language speaker is a white man teaching at Humber College. Anthropologist John Steckley has made the Huron tongue and Huron history his focus for more than 30 years, "and every year I think of how little I knew the year before," he says. Sometimes he feels alone in his interests, he says. At other times, he feels in demand especially around Christmas and particularly this one. Earlier this month Steckley published an authoritative Huron-English dictionary, the first such volume in more...
  • Rich pickings - "The library of the Mouseion in Alexandria" (might still exist?)

    09/30/2002 1:22:08 PM PDT · by vannrox · 8 replies · 327+ views
    Published in Cairo by AL-AHRAM ^ | 26 Sept. - 2 October 2002 | Jill Kamil.
    Rich pickings The library of the Mouseion in Alexandria may have ceased to exist but evidence of what it once contained can be gleaned from fragments of papyri found elsewhere in Egypt, writes Jill Kamil. Thanks to Egypt's dry climate and warm desert sand, papyrus texts in fragile and fragmentary form have survived from many sites -- among them Fayoum and Middle and Upper Egypt -- with the most expansive horde coming from Oxyrhynchus (modern Al-Bahnasa), a vast Graeco-Roman city once second in importance only to Alexandria. Oxyrhynchus was little more than a mass of ruins when, back in...
  • Jesus spoke Aramaic [Ecumenic]

    06/03/2008 7:55:15 AM PDT · by NYer · 94 replies · 222+ views
    Christusrex ^ | Autumn 1998 | Fr. Massimo Pazzini, O.F.M.
    A question arises time and again from prilgrims visiting the Holy Land: What was the language that Jesus spoke? They ask: What was the language of Palestine in the times of Jesus? What languages did Jesus speak? Were there any indications found in the Gospels? Palestine, given that it was always a crossroads for entire peoples in their spontaneous, and often times forced, migrations, was by necessity a multi-lingual land. It was a place where they spoke several languages at the same time. That is, in the times of Jesus, there were no less than two local languages spoken and...
  • Fort Pierce salvor declared owner of sunken treasure recovered off Panama

    02/15/2016 6:29:02 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 13 replies
    TC Palm ^ | 2-12-16 | Paul Ivice
    A portion of the Spanish treasure Fort Pierce salvor Daniel Porter recovered in 2012 from a galleon sunk in 1631 in a hurricane off Panama is back in his hands. Porter, 53, the managing partner of Fort Pierce-based Maritime Research and Recovery LLC, attempted in September to bring home about 100 silver coins and other artifacts with an estimated value of $500,000 when they were seized by the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol at the behest of Panama’s government. The items were part of Porter’ share of more than 10,000 such items minted in Peru that were recovered during a...
  • 700-year-old Danish 'Civil War' coins uncovered

    02/13/2016 1:07:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | unattributed
    A horde of 700 year-old coins has been found by a group of metal detectors in a Jutland field being excavated by archaeologists, the Viborg Museum announced on Wednesday. Coins dating back to a tumultuous period of civil war in Denmark were found in a field south of Foulum and are being put on display at the Viborg Museum. The museum said that three members of the Central Jutland Detector Society (Midtjysk Detektorforening) discovered the mediaeval coins, which are thought to have been hidden during the first half of the 1300s, a period of internal unrest in Denmark which culminated...
  • How religious schools led to the decline of Arabic science

    01/21/2016 6:54:33 AM PST · by C19fan · 56 replies
    Patheos ^ | January 14, 2016 | Epiphenom
    The world’s first scientific renaissance took place not in Italy, but in the Arab world. The period between the 9th and 11th centuries AD, when Islam took hold of a band of territory strategy from Spain in the West through to what is now Pakistan, saw an extraordinary intellectual flowering. Scientists in the Arab world during this period made important advances in fields as varied as astronomy, mathematics, medicine and optics – advances that fed into and stimulated the later European Renaissance. Which makes it all the stranger that modern Islamic nations have such a lamentable record in science. Where...
  • Why was a 9th century Viking woman buried with a ring that says ‘for Allah’ on it?

    02/05/2016 12:57:25 PM PST · by beaversmom · 90 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 18, 2015 | Adam Taylor
    By Adam Taylor March 18, 2015 Follow @mradamtaylor (Statens historiska museum / Christer Ahlin) In the modern-era, Scandinavian countries have become known for their sometimes awkward embrace of migrants from the Arab and Muslim world. But the history behind that relationship goes back far further than you might expect.Consider the case of a ring discovered in a Viking grave in Birka, a historic trading center in what is now Sweden. The woman in the grave died in the 9th century and was discovered around a thousand years later by the famous Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, who spent years excavating...
  • How Hebrew came to Yale

    12/07/2005 5:39:22 AM PST · by SJackson · 6 replies · 274+ views
    Jewish World Review ^ | 12-7-05 | Michael Feldberg
    Few Americans have heard of Rabbi Haim Isaac Carigal, but every Yale University graduate has seen the evidence of his influence over the history of that institution. Because of Carigal's relationship with Yale's fifth president, Reverend Ezra Stiles, in 1777 Hebrew became a required course in the freshman curriculum. Many colonial-era American Christians had a respect for even a fascination with the Hebrew language and Jewish religion. In part, their interest stemmed from a belief that the Hebrew Bible, which they dubbed the "Old Testament," laid the ground for the Christian "New Testament." Educated American Christians, especially New England...
  • Before Hatshepsut: Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in Hieroglyphs

    01/19/2016 11:23:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 19, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    About 60 drawings and hieroglyphic inscriptions, dating back around 5,000 years, have been discovered at a site called Wadi Ameyra in Egypt’s Sinai Desert. Carved in stone they were created by mining expeditions sent out by early Egyptian pharaohs archaeologists say. They reveal new information on the early pharaohs. For instance, one inscription the researchers found tells of a queen named Neith-Hotep who ruled Egypt 5,000 years ago as regent to a young pharaoh named Djer. Archaeologists estimate that the earliest carvings at Wadi Ameyra date back around 5,200 years, while the most recent date to the reign of a...
  • Who should keep Iraqi Jewry’s archives, saved from Saddam, now on tour in US?

    01/06/2016 6:57:35 PM PST · by OddLane · 2 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | January 6 2016 | Rich Tenorio
    American special forces stormed the basement of the notorious Mukhabarat, the headquarters of Saddam Hussein’s secret police, shortly after the invasion of Iraq in 2003. And while they didn’t find the alleged weapons of mass destruction, nor the Iraqi dictator himself, what they did find was a rare collection of artifacts from the Iraqi Jewish community dating back hundreds of years, including a Hebrew Bible and Babylonian Talmud. The collection was waterlogged and damaged, and the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq placed an urgent call to the United States National Archives and Records Administration in Maryland. With permission from local...
  • Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

    01/06/2016 12:06:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | January 2, 2016 | William Neuman
    In a dry canyon strewn with the ruins of a long-dead city, archaeologists have made a discovery they hope will help unravel one of the most tenacious mysteries of ancient Peru: how to read the knotted string records, known as khipus, kept by the Incas. At the site called Incahuasi, about 100 miles south of Lima, excavators have found, for the first time, several khipus in the place where they were used -- in this case, a storage house for agricultural products where they appear to have been used as accounting books to record the amount of peanuts, chili peppers,...
  • Earliest Sample of Minoan Hieroglyphics Found in Western Crete

    11/18/2011 7:13:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Thursday, November 17, 2011 | Stella Tsolakidou
    A four-sided red jasper sealstone is among the finds unearthed during this season's excavation of the Minoan peak sanctuary at Vrysinas, located south of the city of Rethymnon. The whole area was officially announced and included in the archaeological sites list by the Central Archaeological Council of Greece. The sealstone, which is carved on all four surfaces with characters of the Minoan Hieroglyphic script, constitutes the sole evidence to date for the presence of this earliest Minoan style of writing in Western Crete. The excavation, which began in 2004, is conducted by the Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities under...
  • Φωτογραφίες Χρονολογίου

    01/01/2016 10:43:30 PM PST · by Rabin · 5 replies
    http://el-gr.el-gr.fb.me/NationalCryptologicMuseum/photos/a.350346695032536.76645.318661104867762/99
    First use of Code Talkers in combat, 1918 The use of pre American languages to protect U.S. voice com began in, 1918. Early on, in World War I, "Captain Lawrence noted conscripts speaking Choctaw bla bla, and recognized a potential to secure line active, field communications. Choctaw com contributed directly to constriction and later withdrawal of two companies during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and were later used in the implementing a successful surprise attack on the Germans at Forest Farm. A belated program expanded in to World War II. http://www.comanchemuseum.com/code_talkers Comanche Code Talkers of World War II. In late 1940, 17...
  • How Muslims Did Not Invent Algebra

    08/11/2013 4:38:30 PM PDT · by Enza Ferreri · 86 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 2 August 2013 | Enza Ferreri
    Continuing on the theme of what Muslims did - or more likely did not do - for the world, there is a widespread misconception that they "invented algebra". Maybe this fallacy is due to the fact that "algebra" is a word of Arabic origin, but historical questions are not solved by etymological answers. Yes, the English word "algebra" derives from the Arabic. So does "sugar" (from the Arabic "sukkar") but that doesn't mean that Muslims invented sugar. The word "algebra" stems from the Arabic word "al-jabr", from the name of the treatise Book on Addition and Subtraction after the Method...
  • Kinder, Gentler Vikings? Not According to Their Slaves

    12/28/2015 10:24:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Monday, December 28, 2015 | Andrew Lawler
    New clues suggest slaves were vital to the Viking way of life -- and argue against attempts to soften the raiders' brutish reputation... Archaeologists are using recent finds and analyses of previous discoveries -- from iron collars in Ireland to possible plantation houses in Sweden -- to illuminate the role of slavery in creating and maintaining the Viking way of life. "This was a slave economy," said Neil Price, an archaeologist at Sweden's Uppsala University who spoke at a recent meeting that brought together archaeologists who study slavery and colonization. "Slavery has received hardly any attention in the past 30...
  • Vikings May Have Been More Social Than Savage

    10/05/2013 9:09:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 1, 2013 | Coventry University, via AlphaGalileo
    Academics at Coventry University have uncovered complex social networks within age-old Icelandic sagas, which challenge the stereotypical image of Vikings as unworldly, violent savages. Pdraig Mac Carron and Ralph Kenna from the University's Applied Mathematics Research Centre have carried out a detailed analysis of the relationships described in ancient Icelandic manuscripts to shed new light on Viking society. In a study published in the European Physical Journal, Mac Carron and Kenna have asked whether remnants of reality could lurk within the pages of the documents in which Viking sagas were preserved. They applied methods from statistical physics to social networks...
  • Israel in Canaan (Long) Before Pharaoh Merenptah? A Fresh Look at Berlin Statue Pedestal Relief...

    12/07/2010 6:48:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections ^ | 2010, v 2:4 | Peter van der Veen, Christoffer Theis, Manfred Gorg
    ...As for the name rings on the slab no. 21687, three names can be discerned. The first on the left reads... "Ashkelon." A similar writing (but with a vowel marker) is attested on Merenptah's Israel Stele... The name in the central ring reads... "Canaan." This form of the name is well attested during the Eighteenth Dynasty, and finds close parallels under Amenhotep II... Grg derives the name "Canaan"... translating it as "low land"... and suggests that the... ending reflects an Amorite name pattern. This too would underscore the antiquity of the name... As discussed above, evidence of early orthography is...
  • Syria's mysterious Dead Cities

    01/14/2010 7:09:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 678+ views
    The Guardian ^ | Saturday January 9, 2010 | Kevin Rushby
    The stone window ledge has two rows of seven shallow depressions cut into it, and I am sitting next to them, trying to remember where on earth I've seen this pattern before. Far away, beyond the massive fortifications and the moat, are the white-capped mountains of Lebanon. I had not expected to see so much snow around, but then Syria throws up surprises all the time. Even this 12th-century crusader castle, Krak des Chevaliers, a fabulous place long picked over by archaeologists and historians, is full of mysteries. Like the timeworn inscription I found tucked away in a corner: "Ceso:...
  • Newberry Tablet

    12/26/2015 5:57:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Fort de Buade Museum ^ | bef. 2015 | unattributed
    ...Why do the Greek descendants of the Minoans share a gene in their DNA with the Chippewas and no one else on the planet? In November of 1896, near the town of Newberry, Michigan. In Michigan's Upper Peninsula two woodsmen clearing land on a farm uprooted a tree and discovered three statues, and a clay tablet. The tablet was 19 by 26 inches in size. 140 small squares were cut into the stone. In each square a letter or character. The University of Michigan and the Smithsonian Institution were notified. Both of these institutions, at the time refused to look...
  • Is this the first EVER finished Koran? Fragments at Birmingham University may belong to the original

    Fragments of the oldest Koran in existence, which were discovered at a British university library, could be from the original copy of the Muslim holy book. Leading academic Jamal bin Huwareib believes the pages found at Birmingham University earlier this year are from the first assembled Koran by the Prophet Muhammad's close friend Abu Bakr. The pages, thought to be between 1,448 and 1,371 years old, were discovered bound within the pages of another Koran from the late seventh century at the university's library. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3373020/Is-finished-Koran.html#ixzz3vJuIrw7F Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook