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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • France seizes Corsica's Lava Treasure coins

    01/20/2019 8:07:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    TANN (The Archaeology News Network) ^ | December 14, 2010 | Richard Giedroyc | Source: Numismaster
    France recently seized an unannounced number of third century A.D. Roman gold coins as well as an ancient gold plate allegedly with a pedigree linking the material to the Lava Treasure... first encountered about 25 years ago when three Corsicans diving for sea urchins spotted gold in the shallow waters there... the official French national police statement released Oct. 27 in which it says, "This submerged treasure, identified as a maritime cultural asset, belongs to the state." ...As Ancient Coin Collectors Guild spokesman Wayne G. Sayles commented in the October 2010 issue of The Celator magazine, "[coins are] utilitarian objects...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • Ancient Inscription Identifies Gargilius Antiques as Roman Ruler on Eve of Bar Kochva Revolt

    12/02/2016 4:30:23 AM PST · by SJackson · 19 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | December 1st, 2016
    University of Haifa researchers have made an important discovery underwater: a rare inscription from the period preceding the Bar Kochva revolt offers for the first time the definite identification of Gargilius Antiques as the Roman prefect of Judea at that time. The inscription was found in a University of Haifa underwater excavation at Tel Dor, on Israel’s Mediterranean coast, about 20 miles south of Haifa. “For the first time, we can state with certainty the name of the Roman prefect of Judea during the critical period leading up to the Bar Kochva revolt,” stated Prof. Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University...
  • 2000-Year-Old Ring Uncovered in Ancient Jewish Ritual Bath in Old City of Jerusalem

    12/28/2018 5:51:05 AM PST · by SJackson · 11 replies
    A 2,000-year-old ring was uncovered in archaeological excavations in the City of David National Park in Jerusalem, dating back to the Second Temple period. Source: City of David A ring with a solitaire gem stone was found by Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists in what appears to be an ancient Mikveh (ritual bath) on the Pilgrimage Road which dates back to the time of the Second Temple period. The ancient paved road runs up from the Shiloach (Siloam) pool to the Temple Mount and is thought to have been the main thoroughfare taken by pilgrims to the Temple. According to archaeologists...
  • Misplaced 2,000-year-old ring discovered in Jerusalem’s City of David

    12/26/2018 7:02:57 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.timesofisrael.com ^ | 23 December 2018, 9:14 pm | By Amanda Borschel-Dan
    Unearthed in excavation of the monumental Pilgrims’ Path, the Second Temple-era adornment likely fell after use of a ritual bath, say archaeologists A 2,000-year-old bronze ring with a solitaire gem stone was uncovered in archaeological excavations in the City of David National Park in Jerusalem. (City of David) ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Some 2,000 years ago, a Jewish penitent misplaced a bronze ring during his climb of a 600-meter-long (about 2,000 feet) pilgrims’ thoroughfare leading to the Temple Mount. While the recently recovered ring is today heavily corroded, its central blue semi-precious stone still sparkles. The ring was recently discovered at the City...
  • Archaeologists Discover Pontius Pilate Reference On Ancient Ring

    12/26/2018 9:10:54 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    The Federalist ^ | 12/27/2018 | By G.W. Thielman
    New analysis has revealed an unusual inscription on a copper-alloy finger ring uncovered at Herodium 50 years ago. Documented by a team of archaeologists in Israel Exploration Journal, the ring briefly caught the media’s attention last month.Based on the surrounding material, the ring was presumably deposited towards the latter half of the first century, probably about the period of the first Jewish revolt against Rome in AD 66-71. The broken hoop has a diameter of two-thirds of an inch, while the oval bezel measures one-half inch by one-third inch. The bezel relief features a krater (mixing vessel) as the...
  • Who Were the Magi? Revelation of the Magi text gives wise men’s view of the Christmas story

    12/26/2018 1:58:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 12/23/2018 | Biblical Archaeology Society Staff
    One of the most compelling, recently translated into English by Bible scholar Brent Landau, is the so-called Revelation of the Magi, an apocryphal account of the traditional Christmas story that purports to have been written by the magi themselves. The account is preserved in an eighth-century C.E. Syriac manuscript held in the Vatican Library, although Brent Landau believes the earliest versions of the text may have been written as early as the mid-second century, less than a hundred years after Matthew’s gospel was composed. Written in the first person, the Revelation of the Magi narrates the mystical origins of the...
  • Ancient Aramaic Incantation Describes 'Devourer' that Brings 'Fire' to Victims

    12/26/2018 12:21:26 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Live Science ^ | December 20, 2018 | Owen Jarus
    Discovered in August 2017 within a small building, possibly a shrine, at the site of Zincirli (called "Sam'al" in ancient times), in Turkey, the incantation is inscribed on a stone cosmetic container. Written by a man who practiced magic who is called "Rahim son of Shadadan," the incantation "describes the seizure of a threatening creature [called] the 'devourer,'" wrote Madadh Richey and Dennis Pardee in the abstract of a presentation they gave recently at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting. That event took place in Denver between Nov 17 and 21. The blood of the devourer was used to...
  • Recently Deciphered 4,500-Year-Old Pillar Shows First Known Record of a Border Dispute

    12/17/2018 10:16:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | December 7, 2018 | Jason Daley
    ...the pillar sat in British Museum for 150 years until Irving Finkel, a curator in the Middle East department, deciphered the Sumerian cuneiform writing on the cylinder this year. As it turns out, the object, now on view in an exhibit called "No Man's Land," was erected to establish a border between the warring city states of Lagash and Umma, located in present-day southern Iraq. According to the museum, the two cities were disputing over a fertile area called Gu'edina or the 'Edge of the Plain.' Around 2400 B.C. Enmetena, king of Lagash, had the pillar erected to stake his...
  • Cache of gold coins and 900-year-old gold earring found in Caesarea

    12/10/2018 3:55:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | December 3, 2018 | Rachel Bernstein
    The coins are dated to the end of the 11th century, which would link the cache to the Crusader conquest of the city in the year 1101, one of the more critical events in the city's medieval history... A small bronze pot was found a few days ago at the Caesarea National Park, and inside it were 24 gold coins and a gold earring... found hidden between two stones in the side of a wall, located in a house in a neighborhood that dated from the Abbasid and Fatimid periods (909-1171 CE)... According to the Antiquities Authority, most inhabitants of...
  • Archaeologists found treasure of silver Celtic coins

    12/10/2018 1:02:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Slovak Spectator ^ | November 24, 2018 | SITA, Compiled by Spectator staff
    Archaeologists found a treasure of Celtic coins in Mosskaovce near Turăianske Teplice. The finding of 40 coins contains the most precious coins that Celts minted in this era, so-called tetradrachms. "The Celts had highly-developed coin system; tetradrachms have four times the higher value of other nominals," explains Karol Pieta, deputy of director from Archaeological Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV) in Nitra, as quoted by the SITA newswire. Tetradrachms are about nine to ten grams in weight, as if they have four drachms inside, which were the smallest coins in that time, Pieta explains. It is highly probable that...
  • [E]xplorers searching for the famed steamship Pulaski... find a wreck filled with silver coins

    01/27/2018 9:17:01 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    Dailymail.com ^ | 20 January 2018 | Forrest Hanson For
    A survivor's account in the Wilmington Advertiser tells of 'the wailing of the hopeless beings who were floating around in every direction, upon pieces of the wreck, to seek land'. McLeod's account, compiled from survivor's recollections, reads: 'The boat parted in two with a tremendous crash, and the bow and stern rose somewhat out of the water, but the latter again continued to sink until the water reached the promenade deck, when it separated into two parts, upset and precipitated all on it into the water.' The North Carolina Standard deemed the disaster to be 'the most painful catastrophe that...
  • Bronze ring found in ancient fortress near Bethlehem may have belonged to Pontius Pilate

    12/02/2018 7:59:52 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | Nov 30, 2018 | Nick Squires
    A 2,000-year-old bronze ring found near Bethlehem bears the name of Pontius Pilate, the Roman official who ordered Jesus Christ to be crucified, archeologists have revealed.
  • Ring of Pontius Pilate, who ordered Jesus Christ's crucifixion, discovered near Bethlehem

    12/02/2018 6:55:57 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 12/02/2018 | Stoyan Zaimov
    Researchers have deciphered an ancient inscription on a bronze ring first found 50 years ago pointing to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who ordered Jesus Christ’s crucifixion. Haaretz reported that the ring in question was first discovered at the site of Herodion near the West Bank’s Bethlehem by professor Gideon Forster from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, shortly after the Six-Day War in 1968-69. The owner of the ring had remained a mystery for some 50 years, however, but a recent cleansing and special camera work at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs found Greek writing on the ring, which translates...
  • Pontius Pilate’s ring discovered from site near Bethlehem

    11/29/2018 7:28:32 PM PST · by bkopto · 97 replies
    World Israel News ^ | 11/29/2018 | staff
    The Israeli daily Ha’aretz is reporting that a bronze ring found 50 years ago at the Herodion excavation near Bethlehem has been discovered to bear the name of Pontius Pilate, Roman governor of Jerusalem and the man who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus, according to the New Testament. Ha’aretz reports that the name was discovered on the ring with the use of a special camera at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs. The letters on the ring spelled out in Greek writing “Pilatus.” The words surrounded a picture of a wine vessel. Hebrew University Professor Danny Schwartz told Ha’aretz that Pilatus...
  • Can You Learn Two Languages At the Same Time?

    12/02/2018 1:28:11 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 75 replies
    Brainscape ^ | Oct 2018 | Kaitlin Goodrich
    Can I Learn Two Languages at the Same Time? In short, yes, it is possible to learn two languages simultaneously. Our brains are frequently required to learn similar topics at the same time. In fact, all educational curriculum count on the fact that you should be able to process and filter information from multiple categories concurrently. Even in other situations, our brains are primed to adjust to new tasks as needed on a regular basis. Motivation matters– especially when attempting to learn two languages at once. If your only goal in studying two languages at the same time is to...
  • Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

    02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, February 3, 2011 | University of Leeds
    The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...
  • New research forces U-turn in population migration theory

    05/23/2008 10:49:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies · 142+ views
    University of Leeds ^ | May 23, 2008 | Unknown
    Research led by the University of Leeds has discovered genetic evidence that overturns existing theories about human migration into Island Southeast Asia (covering the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysian Borneo) - taking the timeline back by nearly 10,000 years. Prevailing theory suggests that the present-day populations of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) originate largely from a Neolithic expansion from Taiwan driven by rice agriculture about 4,000 years ago - the so-called "Out of Taiwan" model. However an international research team, led by the UK’s first Professor of Archaeogenetics, Martin Richards, has shown that a substantial fraction of their mitochondrial DNA lineages (inherited...
  • Australian Neuroscientist Discovers Hidden Region in Human Brain: Endorestiform Nucleus

    11/24/2018 9:55:34 AM PST · by ETL · 10 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Nov 23, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    The newly-discovered region, named the endorestiform nucleus, is located within the inferior cerebellar peduncle, an area that integrates sensory and motor information to refine our posture, balance and fine motor movements. Professor Paxinos suspected its existence three decades ago but has only now been able to see it due to better staining and imaging techniques.“The endorestiform nucleus is intriguing because it seems to be absent in the rhesus monkey and other animals that we have studied,” Professor Paxinos said.“This region could be what makes humans unique besides our larger brain size.”“I can only guess as to its function, but given...
  • Ancient dialect extinct after last speaker dies

    02/05/2010 7:30:14 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 41 replies · 824+ views
    Yahoo News/Reuters ^ | Feb 5, 2010 | Sanjib Kumar Roy
    PORT BLAIR, India (Reuters) – One of the world's oldest dialects, which traces its origins to tens of thousands of years ago, has become extinct after the last person to speak it died on a remote Indian island. Boa Sr, the 85-year-old last speaker of "Bo," was the oldest member of the Great Andamanese tribe, R.C. Kar, deputy director of Tribal Health in Andaman, told Reuters on Friday. She died last week in Port Blair, the capital of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, which were hit by a devastating tsunami in 2004. "With the death of Boa Sr and the extinction...