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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • How Neanderthals met a grisly fate: devoured by humans

    05/17/2009 3:55:56 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 65 replies · 2,058+ views
    Guardian ^ | 5/17/09 | Robin McKie
    A fossil discovery bears marks of butchering similar to those made when cutting up a deerOne of science's most puzzling mysteries - the disappearance of the Neanderthals - may have been solved. Modern humans ate them, says a leading fossil expert. The controversial suggestion follows publication of a study in the Journal of Anthropological Sciences about a Neanderthal jawbone apparently butchered by modern humans. Now the leader of the research team says he believes the flesh had been eaten by humans, while its teeth may have been used to make a necklace.
  • Neanderthals in Color

    05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeology, v65, n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Zach Zorich
    In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvčdčre, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
  • Kerala's possible Mediterranean links unearthed by researchers

    03/19/2010 4:28:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 320+ views
    Business Ghana ^ | March 9th 2010 | GNA
    A wide range of megalithic burials recently discovered in some northern districts of Kerala during a research project have thrown light on possible links between the Mediterranean and Kerala coasts in the prehistoric stone age that occurred between 6000 BC and 2000 BC. The researchers, however, say further studies and analysis are required to establish the thesis. Interestingly, the finds were unearthed at a time when the researchers have firmly established the maritime links between the Mediterranean region with Kerala since ancient times... The recent study was done by V P Devadas, principal investigator, as part of a project of...
  • Seafaring in the Aegean: new dates

    03/02/2012 6:23:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | January 21, 2012 | Journal of Archaeological Science
    Seafaring before the Neolithic -- circa 7th millennium BCE -- is a controversial issue in the Mediterranean. However, evidence from different parts of the Aegean is gradually changing this, revealing the importance of early coastal and island environments. The site of Ouriakos on the island of Lemnos (Greece) tentatively dates to the end of the Pleistocene and possibly the beginning of the Holocene, circa 12,000 BP... Obsidian, or 'volcanic glass', has been a preferred material for stone tools wherever it is found or traded. It also absorbs water vapour when exposed to air -- for instance, when it is shaped...
  • Humans worked the Welsh hills 10,000 years ago

    06/17/2009 4:26:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 816+ views
    News Wales ^ | Wednesday, June 17, 2009 | unattributed
    Hunters and farmers were using the Clwydian Hills in North Wales 10,000 years ago, new research has revealed. Analysis of a sample of earth extracted from the Clwydian Range has pieced together the timeline of human activity on the hills dating back almost 10,000 years. The sample was taken from Moel Llys y Coed near Cilcain, to provide a picture for the change in the landscape over the years to become the heather moorland seen today... Techniques used included analysis of the pollen present in the sample and radio carbon dating. Evidence of burning in the Mesolithic period (8000-4000BC) implies...
  • Animal Connection: New Hypothesis for Human Evolution and Human Nature

    07/23/2010 3:11:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 20, 2010 | adapted from Penn State material written by Kevin Stacey
    It's no secret to any dog-lover or cat-lover that humans have a special connection with animals.... paleoanthropologist Pat Shipman of Penn State University argues that this human-animal connection goes well beyond simple affection. Shipman proposes that the interdependency of ancestral humans with other animal species... played a crucial and beneficial role in human evolution over the last 2.6 million years... "Having sharp tools transformed wimpy human ancestors into effective predators who left many cut marks on the fossilized bones of their prey," Shipman said. Becoming a predator also put our ancestors into direct competition with other carnivores for carcasses and...
  • 9500 year old obsidian bracelet shows exceptional craft skills

    12/29/2011 10:36:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, December 27, 2011 | LTDS press release
    Researchers have analysed the oldest obsidian bracelet ever identified, discovered in the 1990s at the site of Asikli Höyük, Turkey. A high level of technical expertise Using high-tech methods developed by LTDS to study the bracelet's surface and micro-topographic features, the researchers have revealed the astounding technical expertise of craftsmen in the eighth millennium BCE. Their skills were highly sophisticated for this period in late prehistory, and on a par with today's polishing techniques. This work is published in the December 2011 issue of Journal of Archaeological Science, and sheds new light on Neolithic societies. Dated to 7500 BCE, the...
  • Signs of world's first pictograph found in Gobeklitepe

    07/25/2015 4:58:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 15, 2015 | Anadolu Agency
    Turkey's Göbeklitepe, the site of the world's oldest temple, may be the home of the first pictograph, according to a scene etched into an obelisk. A scene on an obelisk found during excavations in Göbeklitepe, a 12,000-year-old site in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, could be humanity's first pictograph, according to researchers... Ercan said the artifacts found in Göbeklitepe provided information about ancient burial traditions. "There were no graves 12,000 years ago. The dead bodies were left outdoors and raptors ate them. In this way, people believed the soul goes to the sky," he added. Ercan said it was called...
  • Stone Age Fertility Ritual Object Found [...may have been used to promote fertility]

    02/21/2011 9:52:20 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Discovery News ^ | February 4, 2011 | Jennifer Viegas
    THE GIST A Paleolithic elk antler, carved with zigzag lines and a human figure, has been unearthed in Poland. Analysis of the figure indicates an image on it depicts a woman with spread legs. Carved zigzags on the object may symbolize water and life.
  • World's oldest map: Spanish cave has landscape from 14,000 years ago

    08/06/2009 5:51:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1,265+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Aug. 6, 2009 | Fiona Govan
    Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is man's earliest map, dating from almost 14,000 years ago Photo: EPA A stone tablet found in a cave in Abauntz in the Navarra region of northern Spain is believed to contain the earliest known representation of a landscape. Engravings on the stone, which measures less than seven inches by five inches, and is less than an inch thick, appear to depict mountains, meandering rivers and areas of good foraging and hunting.
  • Missing Parts of Sphinx Found in German Cave

    04/30/2011 12:57:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Monsters and Critics ^ | Sunday, April 24, 2011 | Jean-Baptiste Piggin (DPA)
    Archaeologists have discovered fragments of one of the world's oldest sculptures, a lion-faced figurine estimated at 32,000 years old, from the dirt floor of a cave in southern Germany. The ivory figure, along with a tiny figurine known as the Venus of Hohle Fels, marks the foundation of human artistry. Both were created by a Stone Age European culture that historians call Aurignacian. The Aurignacians appear to have been the first modern humans, with handicrafts, social customs and beliefs. They hunted reindeer, woolly rhinoceros, mammoths and other animals. The Lion-Man sculpture, gradually re-assembled in workshops over decades after the fragments...
  • Inside Lascaux: Rare, Unpublished (cave drawings - link only)

    09/23/2010 4:59:37 AM PDT · by decimon · 24 replies · 1+ views
    LIFE ^ | September 8, 2010 | Unknown
    Link only: An 'orse, of course
  • Were Cavemen Painting For Their Gods?

    03/06/2005 3:20:58 PM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 4,470+ views
    Were cavemen painting for their gods? (Filed: 23/02/2005) The meaning of Ice Age art has been endlessly debated, but evidence is increasing that some was religiously motivated, says Paul Bahn At least 70,000 years ago, our ancestors began to adorn their bodies with beads, pendants and perhaps tattoos; by 35,000 years ago, they had begun to paint and engrave animals, people and abstract motifs on cave walls, like those in Lascaux, France, and Altamira in Spain. They sculpted voluptuous figurines in ivory or stone, such as the Venus of Willendorf. Underestimating art: 35,000 years ago, our ancestors began painting representations...
  • Stone-age toddlers had art lessons, study says

    10/08/2011 9:33:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday 29 September 2011 | Caroline Davies
    Research on Dordogne cave art shows children learned to finger-paint in palaeolithic age, approximately 13,000 years ago -- Archaeologists at one of the most famous prehistoric decorated caves in France, the complex of caverns at Rouffignac in the Dordogne known as the Cave of a Hundred Mammoths, have discovered that children were actively helped to express themselves through finger fluting – running fingers over soft red clay to produce decorative crisscrossing lines, zig-zags and swirls. The stunning drawings, including 158 depictions of mammoths, 28 bisons, 15 horses, 12 goats, 10 woolly rhinoceroses, four human figures and one bear, form just...
  • Lost 'Epic of Gilgamesh' Verse Depicts Cacophonous Abode of Gods (New find)

    10/05/2015 7:25:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 2, 2015 | Elizabeth Palermo, Associate Editor
    A serendipitous deal between a history museum and a smuggler has provided new insight into one of the most famous stories ever told: "The Epic of Gilgamesh." The new finding, a clay tablet, reveals a previously unknown "chapter" of the epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia. This new section brings both noise and color to a forest for the gods that was thought to be a quiet place in the work of literature. The newfound verse also reveals details about the inner conflict the poem's heroes endured. In 2011, the Sulaymaniyah Museum in Slemani, in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, purchased...
  • Discovery of official clay seals support existence of biblical kings David and Solomon...

    12/17/2014 10:07:42 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 16, 2014 | Mississippi State University
    Six official clay seals found by an archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon. Many modern scholars dismiss David and Solomon as mythological figures and believe no kingdom could have existed in the region at the time the Bible recounted their activities. The new finds provide evidence that some type of government activity was conducted there in that period.A Mississippi State University team found this bulla, or ancient clay seal, on a dig site in southern Israel last summer. It offers evidence of government activity in the...
  • 1st Century AD Inscription Found in Ancient Thracian Tomb... Solon's 'Prayer to the Muses'

    10/01/2015 12:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | September 25, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    The 1st century AD inscription which has recently been discovered printed (most likely, by accident) on an ancient vessel in an Ancient Thracian burial mound near the town of Tatarevo in Southern Bulgaria has been found out to be a verse from the poem “Prayer to the Muses” by Ancient Greek poet and statesman Solon. The inscription, which was printed on a clay vessel, was found in August 2015 by the archaeologists excavating a Thracian tumulus (burial mound) repeatedly targeted by treasure hunters in the town of Tatarevo, Parvomay Municipality, in Southern Bulgaria. The vessel with the “printed” inscription in...
  • The World's Oldest Papyrus and What It Can Tell Us About the Great Pyramids

    09/29/2015 12:38:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | Monday, September 28, 2015 | Alexander Stille
    Astonishingly, the papyri were written by men who participated in the building of the Great Pyramid, the tomb of the Pharaoh Khufu, the first and largest of the three colossal pyramids at Giza just outside modern Cairo. Among the papyri was the journal of a previously unknown official named Merer, who led a crew of some 200 men who traveled from one end of Egypt to the other picking up and delivering goods of one kind or another. Merer, who accounted for his time in half-day increments, mentions stopping at Tura, a town along the Nile famous for its limestone...
  • Temple Mount Project Finds Rare Seal from King David Era [Psalm 85]

    09/26/2015 4:43:10 PM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 17 replies
    Israel National News ^ | 9/25/2015 | Ben Ariel
    A rare 3,000 year-old seal dating to the period of kings David and Solomon of the 10th century BCE was recently discovered at the Temple Mount Sifting Project in Jerusalem. According to Dr. Gabriel Barkay, co-founder and director of the Temple Mount Sifting Project, the seal is the first of its kind to be found in the Israeli capital. “The dating of the seal corresponds to the historical period of the Jebusites and the conquest of Jerusalem by King David, as well as the construction of the Temple and the royal official compound by his son, King Solomon… What makes...
  • New Tolkien book discovered

    01/02/2003 7:26:56 PM PST · by John Farson · 128 replies · 778+ views ^ | 12/30/02
    A yellowing manuscript by J.R.R.Tolkien discovered in an Oxford library could become one of the publishing sensations of 2003. The 2000 handwritten pages include Tolkien's translation and appraisal of Beowulf, the epic 8th century Anglo-Saxon poem of bravery, friendship and monster-slaying that is thought to have inspired The Lord of the Rings. He borrowed from early English verse to concoct the imaginary language spoken by Arwen, played by Liv Tyler, and other elves in the second film made from the Rings books, The Two Towers. A US academic, Michael Drout, found the Tolkien material by accident in a box of...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • Bulgarian archaeologists find nearly 3000 coins in clay pot at Sofia dig

    09/09/2015 1:33:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Sofia Globe ^ | September 4, 2015 | staff
    Archaeologists excavating under the Sveta Nedelya square in the centre of Bulgaria’s capital city of Sofia found a treasure trove of Roman era coins, the city hall said on September 4. A total of 2976 silver coins in a single clay pot make this the largest single find of its kind in Sofia, which stands on the same ground as the Roman administrative centre (municipium) of Serdica. The dig site itself is just 100 metres from the buildings that house Bulgaria’s Government and Presidency. The coins appear to have been collected over a period of more than a century, with...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Via handwriting analysis, scholar discovers unknown Magna Carta scribe

    09/04/2015 2:06:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | September 2, 2015 | Angela Becerra Vidergar
    Eight hundred years ago, one of the world's most important documents was born. Issued by King John of England in 1215, the Magna Carta ("Great Charter") acknowledged the rights of citizens and set restrictions on the power of the king. The Magna Carta has influenced the structures of modern democracies, including the writ of habeas corpus of the U.S. Constitution... According to Treharne, her research suggests the Salisbury Magna Carta was not just received and preserved at Salisbury, but that the Salisbury Magna Carta was written at Salisbury by one of the cathedral's own scribes. She recently co-published her findings...
  • One more ancient civilisation found in Lake Issyk-Kul: could this be where St Matthew is buried?

    09/04/2015 12:40:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | September 1, 2015 | Olga Gertcyk
    Siberian scientists make discovery of 2,500 year old Saka settlement in up to 23 metres of water in Kyrgyzstan. The new find at the lake is separate from the discovery in 2007 of the ruins of an ancient metropolis of roughly the same age and Scythian burial mounds under its waters... A piece of a large ceramic pot found in the lake has a stamp on it written in Armenian and Syrian scripts, which, if confirmed, gives credence to the theory that an Armenian monastery was on this site in Medieval times, it is claimed. An intriguing version is that...
  • Man With Metal Detector Finds Roman-Era Grave

    09/02/2015 10:47:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    LiveScience via Discovery News ^ | April 17, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    A man in England went exploring with a metal detector and made the discovery of a lifetime: an exquisitely preserved Roman-era grave filled with artifacts, including bronze jugs, mosaic glassware, coins and hobnails from a pair of shoes, all dating to about A.D. 200. The grave likely belonged to a wealthy individual, said Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews, the archaeology and outreach officer for the North Hertfordshire District Council. Once Fitzpatrick-Matthews and his colleagues located the grave, they also found evidence of a nearby building, likely a shrine or temple, attached to a villa. The man with the metal detector, Phil Kirk, found...
  • Inside the abandoned City of Libraries

    09/02/2015 4:02:19 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1st September 2015 | Michael Huniewicz
    'The desert city of Chinguetti, sinking ever-deeper under the sands of the Sahara, is the last place in the world you would expect to find a library. Yet this crumbling outpost in the west-African country of Mauritania is home to around 6,000 rare books and manuscripts, including some of the oldest Koranic texts in existence which date back to the 9th Century. It was once the prosperous and bustling trade centre of several 'trans-Sahara' trade routes. Traders from all over Europe, north-Africa and the Levant would stop in Chinguetti before moving on to sub-Saharan Africa. There, they would rub shoulders...
  • Does this coin found near Jerusalem prove that Samson lived?

    07/31/2012 9:12:13 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 34 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 31st July 2012 | Leon Watson
    'A tiny seal has been uncovered that could be the first archaeological evidence of Samson, the Biblical slayer of Philistines. Archaeologists discovered the ancient artifact while excavating the tell of Beit Shemesh in the Judaean Hills near Jerusalem, Israel. It appears to depict the Old Testament story of Samson, whose might was undone by his lust for the temptress Delilah, and his fight with a lion. The seal, which measures less than an inch in diameter, shows a large animal with a feline tail attacking a human figure. The seal was discovered at a level of excavation that dates it...
  • World's oldest wooden statue is TWICE as old as the pyramids: New analysis reveals Shigir Idol is...

    08/29/2015 7:40:54 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 45 replies ^ | Will Stewart
    A stunning wooden statue pulled from a Russian peat bog 125 years ago has been dated as being 11,000 years old after 'sensational' new analysis. This means the remarkable Shigir Idol, which is covered in ‘encrypted code’ and may be a message from ancient man, is by far the oldest wooden sculpture in the world. Previous dating attempts claimed it was made 9,500 years ago. ... The idol was originally dug out of a peat bog in the Ural Mountains in 1890. 'The first attempt to date the idol was made 107 years after its discovery, in 1997. The first...
  • Mysterious Russian Statue Is 11,000 Years Old - Twice As Old As The Pyramids

    08/30/2015 12:51:10 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 55 replies
    Yahoo News UK ^ | Saturday, August 29, 2015 | Rob Waugh
    <p>'A mysterious wooden idol found in a Russian peat bog has been dated to 11,000 years ago - and contains a code no one can decipher.</p> <p>The Shigir Idol is twice as old as the Pyramids and Stonehenge - and is by far the oldest wooden structure in the world.</p>
  • Oldest Koran ‘Destabilises’ Islamic History, Scientists Say It Pre-dates Mohammed

    08/31/2015 11:22:54 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 71 replies
    Breitbart ^ | August 31, 2015 | by Nick Hallett
    Fragments of an early Koran found in a Birmingham library may rewrite Islamic history after carbon dating revealed they could be older than Mohammed.
  • At the origin of language structure

    08/29/2015 10:29:43 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 61 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/27/2015 | Sissa Medialab
    There are languages that place the verb between the subject and the object (SVO order -- Subject/ Verb/ Object) while others place it at the end of the trio (SOV order). The order of these elements, far from being purely decorative, influences efficiency of expression. A team from SISSA's Language, Cognition and Development Lab (along with two Iranian institutions) studied the mechanism that controls the transition from the SOV form, considered the "basic" order by scientists, to the SVO order while the language is evolving, demonstrating that when the computational load on the brain is lightened, humans choose more efficient...
  • Coins worth $4.5m recovered from shipwreck

    08/22/2015 9:11:40 PM PDT · by bob_denard · 24 replies
    MIAMI: Treasure hunters off Florida have found $4.5 million in gold coins from a Spanish ship that sunk during a hurricane in the 18th century , the sal vage company said on Wednesday. The ship 'Ten Galleons' traveling from Havana to Spain... "Over 350 gold coins, including 9 Royals were recovered on July 30 & 31 on the actual 300th anniversary of the wreck,"
  • Runestone Fakery [from 2002]

    12/07/2009 7:43:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 659+ views
    Archaeological Institute of America ^ | January/February 2002 | Eric A. Powell
    When Minneapolis artist Janey Westin first came across the runes near the town of Kensington, she assumed they were left behind by the same Norse explorers who created the so-called Kensington Runestone, found nearby in 1898. The infamous 200-pound rock is covered with runes that describe the travails of a party of Scandinavians beset by Indians in 1362. Though most scholars doubt the stone's authenticity, it continues to fuel debate about a Norse presence in the Midwest. Excited by the new find, the Kensington Runestone Museum paid for archaeological testing at the site, which yielded only a few Native American...
  • New light on old mystery (Kensington Runestone)

    12/09/2005 8:22:17 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 13 replies · 4,962+ views
    Echo Press ^ | 12/9/05 | Celeste Beam
    The Kensington Rune Stone: Compelling New Evidence. That is the title of a new book published by Scott Wolter and Richard Nielsen. Wolter is a geologist and petrographer from St. Paul who has been working on the mysterious stone for the past several years. Nielsen is linguistic expert who has also been studying the Kensington Runestone (KRS). Nielsen said the 574-page book is quite comprehensive and provides information about the Ohman family in detail. Olof Ohman is the Swedish farmer who reportedly found the stone wrapped in the roots of an aspen tree on his farm near Kensington in the...
  • Geologist says 'Runestone' found in 1898 by Olof Ohman is not hoax; local descendents agree

    09/23/2005 7:25:11 PM PDT · by solitas · 47 replies · 4,008+ views
    Isanti County News Minnesota ^ | 9/21/05 | Rachel Kytonen
    The Kensington Runestone, one of Minnesota’s most debated artifacts is not a hoax — according to geologist Scott Wolter. Wolter spoke to a Minnesota History class at Anoka Ramsey Community College - Cambridge Campus Monday, Sept. 12. He has been researching the Runestone for five years along with Richard Nielsen, an engineer from Houston. Wolter, a geologist by education and profession works for Twin Cities Testing, performing detailed examinations on concrete and rock to determine if there are flaws in concrete projects. Wolter explained the Runestone was found by Olof Ohman in 1898 while clearing trees off his land in...
  • A Minnesota Mystery: The Kensington Runestone

    08/25/2007 12:21:22 PM PDT · by BGHater · 77 replies · 2,308+ views ^ | 18 Aug 2007 | Ben Tracy
    It's one of Minnesota's greatest mysteries. It's something that puts settlers in America well before Columbus. A Minnesota geologist thinks the controversial Kensington Runestone is the real thing and there is evidence that he says backs up the theory. The Kensington Runestone is a rock found near Alexandria a century ago. It's inscription speaking of Norwegians here in 1362. It begs the question. Were Vikings exploring our land more than 100 years before Columbus? Or is it just an elaborate hoax? New research shows that the stone is genuine and there's hidden code that may prove it. It contains carved...
  • Israelites Were In America Before Columbus

    04/16/2002 4:19:58 PM PDT · by blam · 51 replies · 1,635+ views
    Ensign Message ^ | Pastor Alan Campbell
    ISRAELITES WERE IN AMERICA BEFORE COLUMBUS! By Pastor Alan Campbell 1992 marked the 500th Anniversary of Columbus' voyage of discovery from Spain to what was then known as the New World in 1492. No doubt there were those who who exploited the celebration of this event to emphasize the Hispanic as opposed to the Anglo-Saxon element in American Culture and society. However it is becoming an increasingly well known and documented fact, that not only were there North Europeans on the American continent long before the voyage of Columbus, but also that Phoenicians/ Israelites sailed from the Middle East through...
  • Abandoned Anchors From Punic Wars Found Near Sicily

    07/03/2013 9:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, July 03, 2013 | from Discovery News
    More than 30 ancient anchors have been discovered near the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria. Leonardo Abelli of the University of Sassari says that the anchors were abandoned by the Carthaginians during the First Punic War more than 2,000 years ago. The Romans had captured the strategically located island with a fleet of more than 300 ships. “The Carthaginian ships that were stationing near Patelleria had no other choice than hiding near the northern coast and trying to escape. To do so, they cut the anchors free and left them in the sea. They also abandoned part of their cargo...
  • Incised stone sun discs found during Danish island excavations

    08/15/2015 6:50:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | August 13, 2015 | PAP – Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Evidence of the beliefs and rituals of the inhabitants of the Danish island of Bornholm (Baltic Sea) over 5,500 years ago, have been discovered by Warsaw University archaeologists during excavations in Vasagard. The research project is the result of several years of collaboration between the Institute of Archaeology of the University of Warsaw and Bornholms Museum. This year also included students from the University of Copenhagen. Sun worship The study site -- Vasagard, is a puzzling one, but is thought to be a temple for Sun worship. During this season of excavations, archaeologists have discovered several ditches, in which, in...
  • Symbols of Hittite goddess of sexuality found on 4,000-year-old tablet discovered in central Turkey

    08/15/2015 7:49:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | August 13, 2015 | Dogan News Agency
    Amid excavations at four different ancient sites in the Central Anatolian province of Yozgat, a cuneiform tablet has been unearthed in the Uflakle Mound at the Büyük Tafllek village. Thought to date back to around 2,000 B.C., the cuneiform tablet in the Sorgun district of Yozgat shows symbols of ishtar, known as the Hittite goddess of love, war, fertility and sexuality, more clearly than those on any other unearthed tablets. "Considering the intensity of archaeological materials on the surface and diffusion area, the mound tends to bear traces of Hittite Civilization. it is thought that the mound was affiliated to...
  • Biblical Pool Uncovered in Jerusalem

    08/09/2005 9:37:16 AM PDT · by monkeyshine · 55 replies · 2,023+ views
    L.A.. Times ^ | August 9, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II
    Workers repairing a sewage pipe in the Old City of Jerusalem have discovered the biblical Pool of Siloam, a freshwater reservoir that was a major gathering place [a mikvah, where Jews do a ritual cleansing] for ancient Jews making religious pilgrimages to the city and the reputed site where Jesus cured a man blind from birth, according to the Gospel of John. "Scholars have said that there wasn't a Pool of Siloam and that John was using a religious conceit" to illustrate a point, said New Testament scholar James H. Charlesworth of the Princeton Theological Seminary. "Now we have found...
  • Construction project leads to discovery of ancient Jewish ritual bath with mysterious writing

    08/12/2015 1:40:30 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies ^ | August 7, 2015 | by Bob Yirka
    Inscriptions on the walls of the ritual bath. Credit: Shai Halevy, the Israel Antiquities Authority ======================================================================================================================================== A team of researchers has descended down into what archaeologists are calling an ancient Jewish ritual bath with mysterious writing on the walls—dating back perhaps 2000 years. The bath was found by antiquity officials checking out a site designated for a new nursery building. The bath was found when a hole was discovered in a construction site and a rock fell down into it and disappeared. Investigation revealed an underground room, with a stone staircase. What was most surprising was the writing on the...
  • Mystery of Dead Sea Scroll unravels

    04/03/2002 9:55:46 AM PST · by It'salmosttolate · 16 replies ^ | 03 April 2002 | Claudia Joseph
    Mystery of Dead Sea Scroll unravels By Claudia Joseph 03 April 2002 19:23 It is a mystery that has baffled religious scholars for 50 years. Now the secret of the Copper Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, may finally be unravelled. Robert Feather, a member of the Institute of Metallurgists, will claim in a television documentary tonight that he has cracked the secret code of the Copper Scroll Mr Feather rejects current thinking that the copper document was written by the Essenes monastic sect 2,000 years ago. A member of the Jewish Historical Society, and the Egypt Exploration...
  • 'Ancient Hebrew inscriptions' baffle Israeli archaeologists

    08/08/2015 7:56:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 August 2015 | unattributed
    Israeli archaeologists say they are trying to decode ancient inscriptions written in Hebrew script discovered at a dig in Jerusalem. The writing was found on the walls of a room containing the remains of a Jewish ritual bath, or mikveh, believed to be about 2,000 years old. Experts are now trying to decipher words and symbols including a boat and palm trees. They say the markings may be graffiti or have some religious significance. One of the symbols could be a menorah - the seven-branched candelabrum which stood in the two Biblical Jewish Temples in Jerusalem - and some of...

    08/08/2015 2:14:11 PM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    ARCHAEOLOGY IN BULGARIA ^ | August 4, 2015
    The fragments making up the 6th century AD marble slab with a christogram and a donor’s inscription below it have been discovered by the archaeologists excavating the Bishop’s Basilica of Ancient Parthicopolis in Bulgaria’s Sandanski over a period of 25 years. Photo: TV grab from BNT Archaeologists excavating the so called Bishop’s Basilica of the Ancient Roman and Early Byzantine city of Parthicopolis located in the town of Sandanski in Southwest Bulgaria have discovered the last fragment from a marble slab with a christogram, a Christian symbol consisting of a monogram of letters standing for the name of Jesus Christ.The...
  • A handy little guide to small talk in the Stone Age

    03/04/2009 4:07:29 PM PST · by billorites · 20 replies · 564+ views
    Times online ^ | February 26, 2009 | Mark Henderson
    A “time traveller’s phrasebook” that could allow basic communication between modern English speakers and Stone Age cavemen is being compiled by scientists studying the evolution of language. Research has identified a handful of modern words that have changed so little in tens of thousands of years that ancient hunter-gatherers would probably have been able to understand them. Anybody who was catapulted back in time to Ice Age Europe would stand a good chance of being intelligible to the locals by using words such as “I”, “who” and “thou” and the numbers “two”, “three” and “five”, the work suggests. More nuanced...
  • 'Oldest English Words' Identified

    02/26/2009 4:51:56 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 46 replies · 1,010+ views
    BBC ^ | Thursday, 26 February 2009
    Some of the oldest words in English have been identified, scientists say.Reading University researchers claim "I", "we", "two" and "three" are among the most ancient, dating back tens of thousands of years. Their computer model analyses the rate of change of words in English and the languages that share a common heritage. The team says it can predict which words are likely to become extinct - citing "squeeze", "guts", "stick" and "bad" as probable first casualties. "We use a computer to fit a range of models that tell us how rapidly these words evolve," said Mark Pagel, an evolutionary biologist...
  • Israeli Archaeologists Discover 3,000-Year-Old Jar With Inscription of Name From the Bible

    07/27/2015 8:05:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 07/27/2015 | Anugrah Kumar
    Archaeologists in Israel have found a rare inscription of the name of an apparently influential person from the time of King David, a name that is also mentioned in the Bible, according to Israel Antiquities Authority. Archaeologists have discovered a 3,000-year-old large ceramic jar with the inscription of the name "Eshbaal Ben Beda," The Associated Press reported Sunday. The Old Testament book of 1 Chronicles in 8:33 and 9:39 identifies the fourth son of Saul as Eshbaal, also written as as Ish-bosheth. "Ner was the father of Kish, Kish the father of Saul, and Saul the father of Jonathan, Malki-Shua,...