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Keyword: etruria

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  • Etruscan Code Uncracked

    07/09/2016 1:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An inscribed stone slab unearthed at an Etruscan site in Tuscany is proving to contain one of the most difficult texts to decipher. It was believed that the sixth-century B.C. stela would shed light on the still-mysterious Etruscan language, but so far it remains a puzzle. “To be honest, I’m not yet sure what type of text was incised on the stela,” says Rex Wallace, professor of classics at the University of Massachusetts. Inscribed with vertical dots and at least 70 legible letters, the four-foot-tall and two-foot-wide slab had been buried for more than 2,500 years in the foundations of...
  • Semerano, The Scholar Feared By The Academy, Awarded (2001)

    02/27/2005 9:36:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 471+ views
    Giovanni Semerano had to wait 90 years before receiving his first institutional acknowledgement for his important discoveries concerning ancient languages, in particular, the Etruscan language. Semerano has revolutionized the theories tied to the Indo-European languages as the root of the current Mediterranean and European languages. He was defined a "heretic" scholar because he erased centuries of philosophical studies that saw in the Greek-Latin philosophies the origins of European culture. Thanks to his etymological studies the 90-year-old philosopher instead sustains that Western culture derives from the Shiites and the Assyrians.
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. “This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions,” said archaeologist...
  • Tomb excavations uncover treasures of an Etruscan princess [Egyptian gold scarab]

    03/11/2016 12:42:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    ANSA ^ | March 8, 2016 | unatributed
    Excavations of a tomb in northern Lazio dating to around the 8th century BC have uncovered treasures including an amber necklace, a golden Egyptian scarab amulet and rare pottery that archaeologists say likely belonged to an Etruscan princess. The excavation of the Tomb of the Golden Scarab follows its discovery earlier this year in the archaeological site of Vulci, a former Etruscan city. Anthropological research helped back the theory that the tomb belonged to a princess within the ranks of the nascent Etruscan aristocracy. A few bones wrapped in precious cloth are all that remains of her. The excavation of...
  • Intact, Packed Etruscan Tomb Found

    12/05/2015 10:33:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 83 replies
    Discovery News ^ | December 4, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An intact Etruscan tomb, complete with sarcophagi, a full array of grave goods and a mysterious marble head, has has been brought to light in the Umbria region of Italy, in what promises to be one of the most important archaeological findings in recent history. Dated to the end of the 4th century B.C., the burial site was found by a farmer who opened a void in the earth while working with his plow in a field near Citta della Pieve, a small town some 30 miles southwest of Perugia... Dated to the end of the 4th century B.C., the...
  • Huge Etruscan Road Brought To Light

    06/17/2004 3:38:42 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 4,329+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 6-16-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Huge Etruscan Road Brought to Light By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News The Excavated Road June 16, 2004 — A plain in Tuscany destined to become a dump has turned out to be an archaeologist's dream, revealing the biggest Etruscan road ever found. Digging in Capannori, near Lucca, archaeologist Michelangelo Zecchini has uncovered startling evidence of an Etruscan "highway" which presumably linked Etruscan Pisa, on the Tyrrhenian coast, to the Adriatic port of Spina. Passing through Bologna, the ancient "two-sea highway" runs just a few meters away from today's modern highway which links Florence to the Tyrrhenian coast. "It all started...
  • New Lemnian Inscription

    12/28/2014 11:18:54 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Rasenna Blog ^ | December 1, 2010 | rwallace
    A new Lemnian inscription was discovered recently during excavation of an ancient sanctuary at Efestia on the island of Lemnos. The inscription was incised in two lines on the upper portion of a rectangular altar measuring 50 cm. in length and 13.05 cm. in height (see photograph below). The direction of writing is boustrophedon. The upper line reads from left-to-right, the lower line from right-to-left. The inscription has 26 letters plus punctuation marks in the form of three vertically-aligned points separating words. The transcription provided below is that given by de Simone (2009). The letter âi (= palatal sibilant) is...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life

    09/28/2013 1:09:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Discovery News ^ | September 20, 2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods. "It's a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans," Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria. A fun loving and eclectic people who among other things taught the French...
  • Golden Bough from Roman mythology 'found in Italy'

    02/23/2010 6:45:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 664+ views
    Telegraph ^ | February 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    In Roman mythology, the bough was a tree branch with golden leaves that enabled the Trojan hero Aeneas to travel through the underworld safely. They discovered the remains while excavating religious sanctuary built in honour of the goddess Diana near an ancient volcanic lake in the Alban Hills, 20 miles south of Rome. They believe the enclosure protected a huge Cypress or oak tree which was sacred to the Latins, a powerful tribe which ruled the region before the rise of the Roman Empire. The tree was central to the myth of Aeneas, who was told by a spirit to...
  • Etruscan tomb unearthed in Perugia

    07/09/2008 9:46:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 201+ views
    ANSA.it ^ | Tuesday, July 8, 2008 | unattributed
    An ancient Etruscan tomb has resurfaced after centuries underground during the course of building work in the central Italian city of Perugia. The tomb, which has been preserved in excellent condition, contains seven funerary urns, the municipal archaeology department said. It is in the shape of a square and was covered by a sheet of travertine marble, which had apparently remained untouched since being laid centuries ago. The tomb is split into two halves by a pillar and there are two benches running along each side. The funerary urns, which were placed on the benches, were marked with brightly coloured...
  • Ancient Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia (Turkey)

    06/17/2007 4:55:52 PM PDT · by blam · 44 replies · 1,903+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 6-17-2007 | Mary Rice
    Contact: Mary Rice mary@mrcommunication.org European Society of Human Genetics Ancient Etruscans were immigrants from Anatolia, or what is now TurkeyGeneticists find the final piece in the puzzle Nice, France: The long-running controversy about the origins of the Etruscan people appears to be very close to being settled once and for all, a geneticist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. Professor Alberto Piazza, from the University of Turin, Italy, will say that there is overwhelming evidence that the Etruscans, whose brilliant civilisation flourished 3000 years ago in what is now Tuscany, were settlers from...
  • DNA Boosts Herodotus’ Account of Etruscans as Migrants to Italy

    04/03/2007 9:27:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 58 replies · 1,641+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 3, 2007 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Geneticists have added an edge to a 2,500-year-old debate over the origin of the Etruscans, a people whose brilliant and mysterious civilization dominated northwestern Italy for centuries until the rise of the Roman republic in 510 B.C. Several new findings support a view held by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus — but unpopular among archaeologists — that the Etruscans originally migrated to Italy from the Near East. Though Roman historians played down their debt to the Etruscans, Etruscan culture permeated Roman art, architecture and religion. The Etruscans were master metallurgists and skillful seafarers who for a time dominated much of...
  • Lost No More: An Etruscan Rebirth

    04/15/2003 10:36:32 AM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 543+ views
    New York Times ^ | 4-15-2003 | John Noble Wilford
    Lost No More: An Etruscan Rebirth By JOHN NOBLE WILFORDNY Times, 4-15-2003 HILADELPHIA — The Romans relished their founding myths. Aeneas, a fugitive from fallen Troy, anchored in the mouth of the Tiber River and there in the hills of Latium rekindled the flame of Trojan greatness. Romulus and Remus, twin sons of Mars and a sleeping beauty, were suckled by a she-wolf and grew up to establish the city destined for grandeur. In reality, though, the Romans owed more than they ever admitted to their accomplished predecessors and former enemies on the Italian peninsula, the Etruscans. They were known...
  • Archaeologists Investigate Underground Pyramidal Structure Beneath Orvieto, Italy

    11/15/2014 4:41:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tue, Nov 11, 2014 | editors
    Calling it the "cavitá" ('hole' or 'hollow' in Italian), or hypogeum, the archaeologists have thus far excavated about 15 meters down. They marked their third year at the site in 2014. By then they had uncovered significant amounts of what they classify as Gray and Black bucchero, commonware, and Red and Black Figure pottery remains. They have dated deposits to the middle to the end of the 6th century BCE. "We know that the site was sealed toward the end of the 5th century BCE," George, et al. continue. "It appears to have been a single event. Of great significance...
  • Fabled Etruscan Kingdom Emerging?

    04/22/2004 6:18:57 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 760+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 4-22-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Fabled Etruscan Kingdom Emerging? By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News April 21, 2004 — The fabled kingdom of the Etruscan king Lars Porsena is coming to light in the Tuscan hills near Florence, according to an Italian University professor. Known as Chamars, where the lucumo (king) Porsena reigned in the 6th century B.C., this was the leading city-state of the Etruscan civilization that dominated much of Italy before the emergence of Rome. It was from there that Porsena is said to have launched his most successful attack upon Rome in order to restore the exiled Tarquinius Superbus to the throne. Porsena...
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • Where Did The Etruscans Come From?

    08/06/2005 9:08:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies · 2,066+ views
    Etruscology website ^ | June 2002 | Dieter H. Steinbauer
    Nevertheless, after more than a century of research, the linguistic relationship between Lemnian and Etruscan -- despite the scanty material -- is nowadays established to a large extent as an undeniable fact. The phonemic systems can not be set to coincide completely, yet it is significant that apart from the already mentioned four vowel system parallels exist in the consonant inventory, too. There are two varieties of s (here written s and sh) and no indications of the voiced plosives b, d, g, while next to each other are to be found in both languages t and th (no aspirate...
  • Ancient Etruscan childbirth image is first for western art

    10/19/2011 9:01:38 AM PDT · by decimon · 33 replies
    An archaeological excavation at Poggio Colla, the site of a 2,700-year-old Etruscan settlement in Italy's Mugello Valley, has turned up a surprising and unique find: two images of a woman giving birth to a child. Researchers from the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project, which oversees the Poggio Colla excavation site some 20 miles northeast of Florence, discovered the images on a small fragment from a ceramic vessel that is more than 2,600 years old. The images show the head and shoulders of a baby emerging from a mother represented with her knees raised and her face shown in profile, one arm...