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Keyword: geology

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  • Welcome to the Meghalayan Age - a new phase in history

    07/19/2018 8:07:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    BBC ^ | 18 July 2018 | Jonathan Amos
    The Meghalayan...runs from 4,200 years ago to the present. It began with a destructive drought, whose effects lasted two centuries, and severely disrupted civilisations in Egypt, Greece, Syria, Palestine, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and the Yangtze River Valley. The Meghalayan Age is unique among the many intervals of the geologic timescale in that its beginning coincides with a global cultural event produced by a global climatic event... The middle phase of the Holocene will be referred to as the Northgrippian, and runs from 8,300 years ago up to the start of the Meghalayan. The onset for this age was an...
  • Geologists surprised to find huge magma blob under Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire

    06/26/2018 6:15:40 AM PDT · by ETL · 43 replies
    Something unexpected has been gradually making itself known to geologists in the United States. A huge mass of molten rock is creeping upwards beneath the nation’s north eastern states. “The upwelling we detected is like a hot-air balloon, and we infer that something is rising up through the deeper part of our planet under New England,” says Rutgers University geophysicist Professor Vadim Levin. Traces of the brooding mass only became evident through a large-scale new seismic study. The idea that there may be a super volcano brewing under Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire is something of a surprise. ..." So...
  • A Martian snake of collapsed hills

    04/10/2018 1:16:52 PM PDT · by Voption · 12 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | April 10, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    Time to once again delve into this month’s release of high resolution images from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
  • A Spray of Volcanic Ejecta on Mars?

    04/05/2018 11:11:20 AM PDT · by Voption · 19 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | April 5, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    "Time for some more weird Mars geology! Today the science team for the high resolution camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter released its monthly batch of new images. There is a lot of interesting stuff buried therein...."
  • Experts warn NYC could come down like a house of cards if a 5.0 earthquake struck along [tr]

    04/04/2018 8:24:32 AM PDT · by C19fan · 57 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2018 | Nic White
    New York City could be hit with a $39 billion in damage with 30 million tons of debris clogging the streets if a long-overdue earthquake hit. The city of 8.5 million people is not thought of as a tremor hot spot, but the five boroughs are riddled with fault lines that could bring dozens of buildings down. Because the city is so dense and littered with thousands of tall buildings, even a 5.0 magnitude earthquake nearby would cause such damage, experts fear.
  • "Near the Martian shoreline"

    04/02/2018 1:59:06 PM PDT · by Voption · 29 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | April 2, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    "One of the prime areas of research for Mars planetary geologists is the region on Mars where the geography appears to transition from the southern cratered, rough terrain to the northern low, generally smooth, and flat plains. It is theorized by some scientists that the northern plains were once an ocean, probably shallow and probably intermittent, but wet nonetheless for considerable periods..."
  • Mediterranean megaflood confirmed

    03/26/2018 7:54:10 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Cosmos ^ | March 26, 2018 | Andrew Masterson
    Once upon a time there was a massive flood across the Mediterranean Sea, an in-pouring of water so huge that it excavated a canyon five kilometres deep and 20 kilometres long, and created a waterfall with a 1.5 kilometre drop. Evidence for the great flood, long hypothesised, has now been found by a team of researchers led by geoscientist Aaron Micallef from the University of Malta. And while several Mediterranean traditions feature great flood narratives, the earliest arising from Sumeria and already well enough known to be recorded in cuneiform by the seventeenth century BCE, this one is unlikely to...
  • More Weird Mars Geology; New Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter images

    03/02/2018 10:47:13 AM PST · by Voption · 56 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | March 2, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    Cool image time! Yesterday the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter team released 460 images taken by the spacecraft’s high resolution camera, HiRISE, as part of their normal and routine image release program. As I am want to do, I like to scan through these new images to see if there is anything interesting hidden there that will show up eventually in a press release...Sometimes however I find images that might never get a press release but probably deserve it....
  • A powerful earthquake is shaking buildings in Mexico City

    02/16/2018 3:57:12 PM PST · by blueplum · 67 replies
    AP ^ | 16 Feb 2018 | AP
    happening now. USGS shows it as 7.5 M 7.5 - 2km SE of Pinotepa de Don Luis, Mexico no tsunami warning as yet breaking
  • Oldest fossils ever found show life on Earth began before 3.5 billion years ago

    12/19/2017 3:14:12 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 54 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 18 Dec 17 | University of Wisconsin-Madison Researchers
    Researchers at UCLA and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that microscopic fossils discovered in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old piece of rock in Western Australia are the oldest fossils ever found and indeed the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth. An example of one of the microfossils discovered in a sample of rock recovered from the Apex Chert, a rock formation in western Australia that is among the oldest and best-preserved rock deposits in the world. The fossils were first described in 1993 but a 2017 study published by UCLA and UW-Madison scientists used sophisticated chemical analysis to confirm...
  • From the Everglades to Kilimanjaro, climate change is destroying world wonders

    11/13/2017 10:55:22 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 31 replies
    The Guardian ^ | November 13, 2017 | by Damian Carrington
    From the Everglades in the US to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, climate change is destroying the many of the greatest wonders of the natural world. A new report on Monday from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reveals that the number of natural world heritage sites being damaged and at risk from global warming has almost doubled to 62 in the past three years. Those at high risk include iconic places from the Galapagos Islands to the central Amazon and less well known but equally vibrant and unique sites such as the karst caves of Hungary...
  • Yellowstone Volcano-Related Earthquake Swarm?

    09/03/2017 12:30:37 AM PDT · by Oscar in Batangas · 71 replies
    USGS ^ | unpublished | Self
    37 quakes -one was 5.3 on the Richter scale- NE of Soda Springs, Idaho (southwest of Yellowstone) in the past 7 hours. Close enough to be of possible concern?) Suspicious action from a fairly quiet area.
  • Experiments cast doubt on how the Earth was formed

    08/14/2017 9:04:24 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 55 replies
    <p>New geochemical research indicates that existing theories of the formation of the Earth may be mistaken. The results of experiments to show how zinc (Zn) relates to sulphur (S) under the conditions present at the time of the formation of the Earth more than 4 billion years ago, indicate that there is a substantial quantity of Zn in the Earth’s core, whereas previously there had been thought to be none. This implies that the building blocks of the Earth must be different to what has been supposed. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Paris.</p>
  • Q&A: Robert Hazen on studying 'deep carbon'

    06/28/2017 12:31:55 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 5 replies
    Robert Hazen's field -- mineralogy -- might seem like the most appropriate scientific specialty for studying what's happening below Earth's surface. But, he says, that job requires partnering with scientists from as many different disciplines as possible. Over more than two decades, NSF supported Hazen's research to address fundamental questions about what happens to minerals in hot, high-pressure environments as found in the deep interiors of Earth and other planets, and how minerals interact with the molecules of living beings. Now, Hazen is working in an area where NSF has also made significant investments: the study of "deep carbon," or...
  • China landslide: At least 15 dead and more than 100 feared buried (Video at link)

    06/24/2017 7:19:53 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    abc.net.au ^ | yesterday at 9:26pm
    Crews searching through the rubble left by a landslide that buried a mountain village under tons of soil and rocks in south-western China have found 15 bodies, but about 100 more people remain missing. Key points: 1,000 rescuers and dogs are looking for signs of lifeThis was the biggest landslide in the area since the Wenchuan earthquake, an official saidLandslide blocked two-kilometre section of river Xinhua, the official news agency, reported that about 1,000 rescuers were using detection devices and dogs to look for signs of life in an area that once held 62 homes and a hotel."We won't give...
  • At least 4 feared dead after tsunami in Greenland

    06/20/2017 9:51:56 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 6 replies
    CBC News ^ | 6/19/2017 | Mitch Wiles
    Four people are feared dead after tsunami waves struck the coast of Greenland on Saturday night. A 4.1 magnitude earthquake, which struck 28 kilometres north of the northwest village of Nuugaatsiaq, is believed to have partially triggered the tsunami, according to a report from Kalaallit Nunaata Radioa, the national broadcaster in Greenland. The local newspaper, Sermitsiaq, reported that the four feared dead were inside their home in Nuugaatsiaq when waves struck and swept the structure into the ocean. KNR says Nuugaatsiaq has been evacuated, adding that the waves also struck the communities of Uummannaq and Illorsuit. A helicopter and boats...
  • Can Volcanic Gas Levels Predict an Eruption?

    06/19/2017 1:25:15 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    EOS ^ | June 12, 2017 | Alexandria Branscomb
    Before a volcano erupts, there are usually signs of what’s to come; small earthquakes, heat emission, and ground swelling, to name a few, have all been observed to precede eruptions. Volcanologists also monitor the changing composition of gas emissions at volcanoes in the months leading up to an eruption. However, precursory variations in gas have not yet been verified to occur in volcanoes hosting active lava lakes. To find out if volcanic gas emissions might also be used to predict eruptions at lava lake–hosting, carbon-poor volcanoes, Aiuppa et al. looked at Chile’s Villarrica volcano. Villarrica towers 2847 meters over the...
  • Novarupta: The Most Powerful Volcanic Eruption of the 20th Century

    06/07/2017 10:44:30 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 4 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 06/07/2017 | Hobart King
    June 6th, 1912 The morning of June 6th arrived on the Alaska peninsula to find the area which is now Katmai National Monument being shaken by numerous strong, shallow earthquakes. The most powerful volcanic eruption of the 20th Century was about to begin – but very few people knew about it. The Alaska peninsula has a low population density today, but in 1912 it was even lower. Beyond the land shaken by the earthquake activity, the beginnings of this event were almost unnoticed. On June 6th, 1912, a tremendous blast sent a large cloud of ash skyward, and the eruption...
  • Extreme geothermal activity discovered beneath New Zealand’s Southern Alps

    06/03/2017 6:45:31 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/1/2017 | Rupert Sutherland, et al
    An international team, including University of Southampton scientists, has found unusually high temperatures, greater than 100°C, close to Earth's surface in New Zealand -- a phenomenon typically only seen in volcanic areas such as Iceland or Yellowstone, USA. The researchers made the discovery while boring almost a kilometre into the Alpine Fault, the major tectonic boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates -running the length of the country's South Island. The team was working to better understand what happens at a tectonic plate boundary in the build-up to a large earthquake. The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) borehole, was drilled...
  • Mount Everest's Hillary Step collapses, mountaineers confirm

    05/21/2017 6:11:22 PM PDT · by blueplum · 67 replies
    ABC News Australia ^ | 21 May 2017 5:30 PDT | staff writers
    A famous feature near the summit of Mount Everest, known as the Hillary Step, has collapsed, potentially making the world's highest peak even more dangerous for climbers. Last year, pictures appeared to show a change in shape to the 12-metre rocky outcrop, named after Sir Edmund Hillary, the first person to scale the mountain. It is thought to have been destroyed in Nepal's 2015 earthquake, but snow coverage made the news hard to confirm. British mountaineer Tim Mosedale confirmed the collapse after he reached the summit this week. "It's official — The Hillary Step is no more," he said in...