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Keyword: greece

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  • "Minimum Guaranteed Income" for 700,000 persons (Greece)

    10/18/2014 6:47:55 AM PDT · by dynachrome · 23 replies
    capital.gr ^ | 10-15-14 | unattributed
    The implementation of the "Minimum Guaranteed Income" (MGI) measure is the most important social reform, Labour Minister Yiannis Vroutsis said on Tuesday during the MGI presentation attended by Prime Minister Antonis Samaras and Government Vice-President and PASOK leader Evangelos Venizelos. According to AMNA, the crisis has revealed in the most obvious way the distortions, the gaps and the contradictions of the social protection system in Greece, Vroutsis noted, adding that the system was inefficient and incomplete both socially and economically. The MGI comes to give an answer to all these issues, he added. The implementation of the measure will start...
  • Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

    10/17/2014 3:37:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    University of Birmingham via EurekAlert! ^ | October 9, 2014 | Stuart Gillespie
    Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon analyses. While historical chronologies traditionally place the end of the Greek Bronze Age at around 1025 BCE, this latest research suggests a date 70 to 100 years earlier. Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham selected 60 samples of animal bones, plant remains and building timbers, excavated at Assiros in northern Greece, to be radiocarbon dated and correlated with 95.4% accuracy using Bayesian statistical methodology at the University of Oxford and the Akademie der Wissenschaften Heidelberg, Germany. 'Until very recently...
  • Greek paper: World Jewish plutocracy behind Gaza strife, global financial crisis

    12/29/2008 11:02:55 AM PST · by SmithL · 28 replies · 981+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 12/29/8 | Haaretz Service
    A daily newspaper in Greece has blamed Jews both for the world financial crisis and the Israeli operation in Gaza, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency reported this week. "After the American Jews acquired once again the world's wealth and plunged the planet into an unprecedented financial crisis, they started rehearsing for WWIII," JTA quoted the Avriani newspaper's front-page headline as reading Sunday. "Midway through the paper's story on Israel's operation in Gaza, the story, under the heading 'The Plan,' explains that a Jewish plutocracy, having made the 'wealth of the century at the expense of the economies of the world,' is...
  • Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found

    10/11/2014 9:03:49 AM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 21 replies
    Discovery.com News ^ | October 10, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis's mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great's father. The anthropological investigation examined 350 bones and fragments found in two larnakes, or caskets, of the tomb. It uncovered pathologies, activity markers and trauma that helped identify the tomb's occupants. Along with the cremated remains of Philip II, the burial, commonly known as Tomb II, also contained the bones of a woman warrior, possibly the daughter of the Skythian King...
  • stormy day in greek island - loading passenger ship

    10/11/2014 2:17:18 AM PDT · by SWAMPSNIPER · 10 replies
    youtube ^ | 10/11/2014 | e - Nautilia
    All this lacks is music and wine!
  • Stunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreck [Antikythera]

    10/10/2014 12:12:50 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/09/2014 | Provided by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    A Greek and international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved stunning new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago off the remote island of Antikythera. The rescued antiquities include tableware, ship components, and a giant bronze spear that would have belonged to a life-sized warrior statue. The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 by sponge divers who were blown off course by a storm. They subsequently recovered a spectacular haul of ancient treasure including bronze and marble statues, jewellery, furniture, luxury glassware, and the surprisingly complex Antikythera Mechanism. But they were forced...
  • Have they found Alexander the Great's tomb? Or maybe his mother's?

    10/03/2014 3:06:14 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 19 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 10-3-14 | Sarah Griffiths
    Speculation about who the mysterious ancient tomb recently unearthed in Greece belongs to continues, with one academic now suggesting Alexander the Great’s mother was buried there. A number of scholars believe that the presence of female figures, known as caryatids, show that the tomb in the Amphipolis region of Serres belongs to a female. However, one expert has gone as far as to state that he believes that archaeologists could eventually discover the remains of Alexander the Great's parent, Olympias, inside. Writer Andrew Chugg, who has published a book on the search for the legendary leader's tomb, as well as...
  • Woman is heard screaming from her coffin after being ‘buried alive’

    09/27/2014 3:13:36 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 69 replies
    Metro UK ^ | September 27, 2014
    A cemetery worker got the fright of his life when he heard a woman screaming from inside her buried coffin. The man told police he could hear muffled shouts and banging coming from the plot of a 49-year-old woman who had been pronounced dead and buried that day. Workers and cemetery visitors frantically dug up the coffin and smashed it open, however they were too late and the woman had died. Police visited the Peraia cemetery near Thessaloniki in Greece, however a doctor who examined her body at the scene claimed she had been dead for hours and could not...
  • Turkey, Azerbaijan break ground for Trans-Anatolian Gas Pipeline

    09/20/2014 11:43:41 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 3 replies
    Turkey's energy minister has declared a gas pipeline a "peace corridor" linking the Caucasus with the Balkans. "We open the project as a peace corridor that is the result of 15 years hard work by Turkey and Azerbaijan. Through the South Caucasus pipeline and its backbone, the Trans-Anatolia pipeline, we connect the Caucasus with the Balkans. I wish every country could understand the true value of these projects and contribute with us," Taner Yıldız said while speaking at the groundbreaking ceremony of the South Caucasus pipeline in Baku on Sept. 20. The minister said energy security "ranks as one of...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • Fever mounts as stunning statues found at ancient Greek tomb (Amphipolis)

    09/07/2014 5:44:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 19 replies
    AFP via Yahoo ^ | September 7, 2014
    Athens (AFP) - Two stunning caryatid statues have been unearthed holding up the entrance to the biggest ancient tomb ever found in Greece, archaeologists said. The two female figures in long-sleeved tunics were found standing guard at the opening to the mysterious Alexander The Great-era tomb near Amphipolis in the Macedonia region of northern Greece.
  • France and Friends: Merkel Increasingly Isolated on Austerity

    09/06/2014 4:20:58 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | September 03, 2014 – 04:41 PM | Nikolaus Blome, Ralf Neukirch, Christian Reiermann, Mathieu von Rohr and Christoph Schult
    The debate over Germany’s insistence on eurozone austerity has flared anew as an ailing France continues to demand economic stimulus. The European Central Bank may now be siding with Paris, leaving Merkel looking increasingly alone. […] Berlin is particularly alarmed by the stance taken by ECB head Mario Draghi. At the annual conference of top central bankers from around the world at Jackson Hole, Wyoming in August, Draghi surprised those present by saying “there is leeway to achieve a more growth-friendly composition of fiscal policies.” It was a comment that came close to the kind of debt-fueled growth stimulus measures...
  • Deep Frieze Meaning: What is the Parthenon telling us?

    09/02/2014 11:54:52 AM PDT · by mojito · 20 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | 9/8/2014 | A. E. STALLINGS
    The Parthenon represents, for many, a golden age in human achievement: the 5th-century b.c. Greek flowering of democracy, sciences, and the arts. But what if its chief ornament, the Parthenon frieze, turned out to be not an embodiment of reason and proportion—of stillness at the heart of motion, quiet piety, and enlightened civic responsibility—but (or, rather, also) something darker, more primitive: a representation of the critical moment in an ancient story of a king at war, a human sacrifice, and a goddess’s demand for virgin blood? That’s the argument at the heart of The Parthenon Engima. The plot involves not...
  • Ancient Tablet Found: Oldest Readable Writing in Europe

    03/31/2011 10:38:39 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | Published March 30, 2011 | Ker Than
    Found at a site tied to myth, Greek tablet survived only by accident, experts say. Marks on a clay tablet fragment found in Greece are the oldest known decipherable text in Europe, a new study says. Considered "magical or mysterious" in its time, the writing survives only because a trash heap caught fire some 3,500 years ago, according to researchers. Found in an olive grove in what's now the village of Iklaina (map), the tablet was created by a Greek-speaking Mycenaean scribe between 1450 and 1350 B.C., archaeologists say. The Mycenaeans—made legendary in part by Homer's Iliad, which fictionalizes their...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • A Surge from the Sea [immigrants flooding Europe]

    08/18/2014 9:42:50 PM PDT · by firebrand · 13 replies
    The Economist ^ | August 16, 2014 | The Economist
    ANOTHER weekend, another two thousand-odd immigrants rescued by Italian sailors and coastguards in the Mediterranean. On August 11th the San Giusto, an amphibious transport vessel, landed 1,698 people in Reggio Calabria, a city in southern Italy. The day before, a naval patrol vessel and a frigate disembarked 364 people at ports in eastern Sicily. The number of people arriving in Italy by sea this year may already exceed 100,000. By the end of July approximately 93,000 migrants had been rescued. The previous record for an entire year was set in 2011 when around 60,000 people reached Italian shores at the...
  • Will Erdogan's Presidency End NATO As We Know It?

    08/11/2014 5:17:33 PM PDT · by jazusamo · 34 replies
    Investors.com ^ | August 11, 2014 | IBD Editorial
    Allies: With all the disconcerting things going on in the Mideast, you could be forgiven for missing an event critically important to America's long-term interests: Recep Erdogan's election as president of Turkey. Erdogan's 52% victory over the weekend in a stage-managed election, making him the nation's first directly elected president, heralds a new era of conflict in the Mideast and perhaps the end of NATO as we know it. Turkey has for decades been a key ally to the U.S. and NATO in the Mideast, an anchor in the Cold War against the USSR and friendly toward Israel as the...
  • Greek tomb at Amphipolis is 'important discovery'

    08/13/2014 10:23:09 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13th August 2014 | BBC News
    'Archaeologists unearthing a burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have made an "extremely important find", says Greek PM Antonis Samaras. Experts believe the tomb belonged to an important figure dating back to the last quarter of the Fourth Century BC. A large mound complex has been unearthed at the Kasta hill site in the past two years. Lead archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said it certainly dated from after the death of Alexander the Great.'
  • The new ruins of Athens: Rusting and decaying 10 years on, how Greece's Olympics turned into a

    08/14/2014 5:47:47 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | August 13, 2014 | Sophie Jane Evans
    Built as part of a £7billion project, they played host to millions of spectators, athletes and officials during the 2004 Summer Olympics in Greece. But now, ten years on, the state-of-the-art sports venues in the Olympics' spiritual home of Athens lie empty, completely unused and decaying. The Games, which cost almost twice their projected budget and used permanent instead of collapsible venues, were deemed a success at the time. However, Greece was shortly hit by the global financial crisis and, with no real post-games plan, the prestigious venues were abandoned.
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Wine cup used by Pericles found in grave north of Athens

    07/31/2014 5:12:42 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 34 replies
    ekathimerini.com ^ | Wednesday Jul 30, 2014 (14:14)
    The cup was likely used in a wine symposium when Pericles was in his twenties, and the six men who drank from it scrawled their names as a memento, experts say. A cup believed to have been used by Classical Greek statesman Pericles has been found in a pauper's grave in north Athens, according to local reports Wednesday. The ceramic wine cup, smashed in 12 pieces, was found during building construction in the northern Athens suburb of Kifissia, Ta Nea daily said. After piecing it together, archaeologists were astounded to find the name "Pericles" scratched under one of its handles,...
  • DNA Sheds Light On Minoans

    04/04/2008 8:02:26 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 1,101+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-4-2008
    DNA sheds light on Minoans Crete’s fabled Minoan civilization was built by people from Anatolia, according to a new study by Greek and foreign scientists that disputes an earlier theory that said the Minoans’ forefathers had come from Africa. The new study – a collaboration by experts in Greece, the USA, Canada, Russia and Turkey – drew its conclusions from the DNA analysis of 193 men from Crete and another 171 from former neolithic colonies in central and northern Greece. The results show that the country’s neolithic population came to Greece by sea from Anatolia – modern-day Iran, Iraq and...
  • EU states promote settler boycott amid Israel crisis

    07/04/2014 6:16:59 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 14 replies
    EU Observer ^ | 07/04/2014 @ 09:27 | Andrew Rettman
    Twelve EU countries have warned investors not to do business with Israeli settler entities, amid a security crisis in Israel and Palestine. The group includes: Austria; Belgium; Croatia; Denmark; Finland; Greece; Ireland; Luxembourg; Malta; Portugal; Slovakia; and Slovenia. Portugal published its statement on Wednesday (2 July) and the others came out on Thursday. France, Italy, and Spain put out similar communiques earlier this week. Germany and the UK already did it months ago. Poland is expected to publish a warning shortly. The Irish foreign ministry said the action “has been coordinated at EU level”. …
  • Bulgaria hosts NATO manoeuvres in Black Sea

    07/05/2014 6:13:00 PM PDT · by Tailgunner Joe · 2 replies
    reuters.com ^ | July 4, 2014
    SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria launched naval manoeuvres in the Black Sea on Friday with six other NATO countries including the United States, in the latest demonstration of the alliance's resolve to support its eastern European members in light of the Ukraine crisis. Bulgaria's defence ministry said the 10-day war games, dubbed BREEZE 2014, were designed to boost NATO solidarity and regional readiness, though it added they had been scheduled before Russia annexed Ukraine's Black Sea region of Crimea in March. Vessels from Bulgaria and its Black Sea neighbours Romania and Turkey and also from Greece, Italy, Britain and the United...
  • On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

    06/29/2014 10:29:19 AM PDT · by Conservative Beacon · 7 replies
    The Conservative Beacon ^ | June 28, 2014 | Ellis Washington
    Prologue: Biography Plutarch, (born c. 46 ad, Boeotia [Greece]—died c. 120), biographer, historian, essayist and moralist whose works strongly influenced the development of the essay, the biography, and historical writing in Europe from the 16th to the 19th century. Plutarch has been called as one of the most important writers who ever lived. Among his roughly 227 works, the most significant are the Parallel Lives (Bioi parall?loi), in which he chronicles the noble acts and characters of Greek and Roman soldiers, legislators, orators, and statesmen, and the Moralia, or Ethica, a sequence of over 60 essays on ethical, religious, physical,...
  • Everything You Need to Know about Greece…Plus Remarkably Bad Poll Numbers for Obama

    07/04/2014 10:37:37 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 18 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 4, 2014 | Daniel J. Mitchell
    We’re going to touch on two topics today. I realize that not that many readers care about Greek economic policy, but sometimes other nations can teach us very important lessons. For better or worse. And in the case of Greece, the lesson is that government intervention and bureaucracy is an enemy of entrepreneurship. Probably the most amazing – and weird – example is that the Greek government wanted stool samples from entrepreneurs seeking to set up an online company (and, just to be clear, I’m not talking about furniture). We now have another example, but it’s seems more tragic than...
  • Moody's pushes Puerto Rico debt deep into junk status

    07/01/2014 2:58:11 PM PDT · by george76 · 13 replies
    AFP ^ | 01 July 2014
    Ratings company Moody's on Tuesday slashed Puerto Rico's debt rating by three notches into even deeper junk status after the US territory passed a debt-restructuring law. Moody's Investors Service cut the rating to "B2" from "Ba2" and said the outlook was negative, indicating further downgrades were possible. Now dubbed the "Greece of the Caribbean," the archipelago is, like Greece, reeling under massive debt. Over the past decade, the commonwealth's debt has doubled to nearly $70 billion and investors are growing increasingly worried the government is running out of cash. In a bid for debt relief, the Puerto Rican authorities recently...
  • U.S. and European diplomats join gay “pride” march in Greece, ignore plight of Syrian Christians

    06/21/2014 8:36:57 PM PDT · by juliosevero · 11 replies
    Last Days Watchman ^ | Julio Severo
    U.S. and European diplomats join gay “pride” march in Greece, ignore plight of Syrian Christians By Julio Severo, with information of AP. Consuls of the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland and Portugal took part in the third gay “pride” parade of Greece’s second largest city, Thessaloniki. Reportedly, the event drew some 6,000 people. Gay activists taking part in gay parade in Thessaloniki, Saturday, June 21, 2014 U.S. Consul Robert P. Sanders carried a banner that read “Diplomats for Thessaloniki Pride.” Diplomats joined this year because, according to AP, they “support diversity and freedom of...
  • Greece sues for 7 billion euros over German submarines that have never sailed

    06/18/2014 4:41:47 PM PDT · by Renfield · 7 replies
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 6-12-2014 | Holly Watt
    Greece has launched a multi-billion euro claim against one of Germany’s biggest defence firms who sold the financially-beleaguered country four submarines in a complicated deal which has become symbolic of the country’s economic woes. The controversial deal has threatened Greece’s position in Nato, according to well-placed sources, led to the criminal prosecution of the country’s defence minister and the resignation of a senior Naval figure. The Telegraph today publishes photographs of the four submarines, which are still unfinished in a Greek shipyard almost 15 years after they were first ordered. It can now be disclosed that the Greek Government has...
  • Ancient Love Inscriptions in Astypalea

    06/14/2014 6:21:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | June 4, 2014 | Evdokia Fourkioti
    According to Ethnos, ancient love inscriptions dating back to the early 6th and the late 5th centuries B.C., were recently discovered in Astypalea. Spirals, shapes of ships, tools in triangular shapes were mostly drawn by the Neolithic inhabitants of Astypalea. One of the first findings of the Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Andreas Vlachopoulos, was rock paintings located in Vathi at the Pirgos Peninsula and date back to 4th-3rd millennium B.C. In 2013, more unexpected findings were discovered, which present an aspect of privacy of the ancient Greek inhabitants in the early 6th and late 5th centuries B.C. The Secretary General...
  • Kerry Chats w/Terrorist Leader in TWA Flight 847 Hijacking

    06/09/2014 8:59:23 PM PDT · by Nachum · 21 replies
    Front Page Mag ^ | 6/6/14 | Daniel Greenfield
    Here’s John Kerry having a good time with Nabih Berri, the head of the Amal Movement, and speaker of the Hezbollah dominated Lebanese parliament. What better way to follow up the Taliban deal than to meet with another terrorist hijacker. Back in 1985, Amal and Hezbollah terrorists used the hijacking of TWA Flight 847 to demand the release of imprisoned terrorists. A TWA airliner, Flight 847 en route from Athens to Rome, was hijacked by Shia terrorists of the Hizballah organization who demanded the release of Shia prisoners held in Kuwait, Israel, and Spain. The airliner was forced to fly...
  • Archaeologists Excavate Lower City of Mycenae

    06/06/2014 5:53:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 2, 2014 | unattributed
    Mycenae -- the ancient city of the legendary King Agamemnon, best known from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and its iconic Lion Gate and cyclopean defensive walls, has long fascinated scholars and site visitors alike with the epic proportions of its imposing citadel remains... But there is another Mycenae -- one known for centuries from ancient historical documents -- which has nevertheless eluded the eyes of archaeologists, historians, and tourists. One might call it "Greater Mycenae", the Lower Town. It is invisible because most of it still lies undetected, unexcavated, below the surface. In its heyday it was a second millenium...
  • Wearable submarine to hunt for 2000-year-old computer

    06/06/2014 10:06:22 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    newscientist.com ^ | 04 June 2014 by | Mark Harris
    Like an underwater Iron Man, a diver will fly around the wreck of an ancient Greek ship later this year, looking to shed light on the Antikythera mechanism THE world's most advanced robotic diving suit is getting ready to help search for one of the world's oldest computers. Called Exosuit, the suit has a rigid metal humanoid form with Iron Man-like thrusters that enable divers to operate safely down to depths of 300 metres (see photo). Though designed for diving in the bowels of New York City's water treatment plants, earlier this month it underwent its first trials in seawater...
  • Bruised and confused: why Greeks voted against the gods of Europe

    06/02/2014 4:45:18 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 2 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | 31 May 2014 | Elena Panaritis
    In last month's elections a majority of Greeks – now routinely depicted by the gods of Europe as lousy managers and born tax-evaders – reacted by shunning the pro-EU parties. They made the anti-European and populist left and far-right parties the rising stars at the polls. Even Syriza, the radical (though not so radical any more) leftwing party that secured 26.6% of the votes did not do as well as expected. Once very anti-austerity and ready to go up against Brussels, it has since watered down its tactics. Analysing the results via ideological labels is perhaps less important than seeing...
  • Cyprus’ first gay pride parade a hit

    06/01/2014 5:55:22 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | June 1, 2014
    NICOSIA, Cyprus – Several thousand people turned out for Cyprus’ first gay pride parade on Saturday, exceeding the expectations of organizers who said the event’s popularity shows that Cypriots are shedding their conservative attitudes.
  • Greece sells 110 of its best beaches in the name of “development”

    05/26/2014 8:48:07 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 8 replies
    Keep Talkin Greece ^ | 21 May 2014
    One hundred and ten of Greece’s best beaches are on sale by Greece’s privatization agency, the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund (TAIPED) in the name of supposed “development” and “utilization of public assets”. In fact a sale off of Greece best beaches for cash so that the debt-ridden country can pay back its lenders. The beaches plots are to be on sale with “50 years of utilization by the new owners.” In the list of TAIPED are featured among others Myrto Beach in Kato Achaia, Vasiliki Beach in Lefkada, Kalmitsi beach in Chalkidiki and – what a shame – two...
  • Archaeologists Excavate for Archaic Greek City of Tenea

    05/25/2014 12:03:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thu, May 22, 2014 | unattributed
    Excavations could reveal much about a little-explored archaic Greek settlement. It was in July 1984 when rescue excavations conducted by Dr. Elena Korka, now Director of the Ephorate of Private Archaeological Collections and Antiquity Shops, turned up an ancient sarcophagus of the Greek early archaic period near the town of Chiliomodi in Greece. The sarcophagus contained a female skeleton along with offerings. The interior of the sarcophagus slab was adorned with a composition consisting of two lions of monumental character. It was a remarkable find. But this was not altogether surprising, as archaeologists and historians believed that somewhere in the...
  • Magnitude 6.4 Earthquake Strikes Off Coast of Greece & Turkey)

    05/24/2014 4:40:05 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    Reuters ^ | 5/24/2014
    An earthquake of 6.4 magnitude struck off the coast of northern Greece on Saturday and was felt as far away as neighboring Turkey and Bulgaria but there were no reports of serious casualties or destruction, police and fire brigade officials said. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) said the quake occurred some 77 km (48 miles) south-southwest of Alexandroupolis, between the islands of Lemnos and Samothrace, at a depth of 10 km (6 miles). Greek police said the quake had caused minor damage to shops and houses on the two islands.
  • SCOTUS: Town of Greece v. Galloway (Prayer at town meetings)

    05/05/2014 7:38:59 AM PDT · by BuckeyeTexan · 31 replies
    U.S. Supreme Court ^ | 5/5/2014 | Justice Kennedy
    Since 1999, the monthly town board meetings in Greece, New York, have opened with a roll call, a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, and a prayer given by clergy selected from the congregations listed in a local directory. While the prayer program is open to all creeds, nearly all of the local congregations are Christian; thus, nearly all of the participating prayer givers have been too. Respondents, citizens who attend meetings to speak on local issues, filed suit, alleging that the town violated the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause by preferring Christians over other prayer givers and by sponsoring sectarian...
  • Socccer fan Dumped Anchovies on Team’s Bench Before a Game Described as ‘Disgrace to Greek Football’

    05/03/2014 6:42:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    Socccer fan arrested for dumping several kilograms of anchovies on team’s bench before a game described as a ‘disgrace to Greek football’Police in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki arrested a PAOK fan accused of dumping a crate of fish on the visiting Olympiakos bench, in a stunt that delayed a tense Greek Cup semi-final for more than an hour. Another six PAOK supporters were arrested during clashes with police before and after Wednesday’s match, which PAOK won 1-0 to advance.
  • Egypt Archaeologists May Have Found Alexander the Great’s Tomb

    05/03/2014 5:08:39 AM PDT · by blam · 52 replies
    Greek Worls Reporter ^ | Nikoleta Kalmouki
    Egypt Archaeologists May Have Found Alexander the Great’s Tomb Nikoleta Kalmouki April 30, 2014 In Egypt, a team of archaeologists and historians from the Polish Center of Archaeology have revealed a mausoleum made of marble and gold that might be the tomb of Alexander the Great. The site is situated in an area known as Kom el-Dikka in the heart of downtown Alexandria, only 60 meters away from the Mosque of Nebi Daniel. The monument was apparently sealed off and hidden in the 3rd or 4th century AD, to protect it from the Christian repression and destruction of pagan monuments...
  • Arrest of Adams is 'an act against democracy'

    05/02/2014 5:50:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EU Observer ^ | May 2, 2014 | unattributed
    The European Left's candidate for the European Commission presidency, Alexis Tsipras, Friday called for the immediate release of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams who is been held for questioning in connection with the 1972 murder of Jean McConville. Tsipras called the arrest a "politically inflammatory act against democracy".
  • Christopher Swindell: Gun safety debate is B.S.

    06/02/2013 11:32:00 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 50 replies
    The Charleston Gazette (WV) ^ | 5-30-2013 | Christopher Swindell
    Watching the celebration at the NRA convention over the defeat of background checks was the most nauseating experience of the day. I am not a New York gun control liberal, either. I support a shotgun for home defense, a handgun for limited conceal/carry, and an assortment of hunting rifles to balance West Virginia's exploding deer population (as evidenced by hourly collisions with cars). So, I am hardly out of the mainstream. But, the gun safety debate is B.S. This foaming at the mouth, Obamar is coming for the guns, Nanny Bloomberg is a bad billionaire, and most despicable of all,...
  • Meet the journalism professor who says NRA members are treasonous, should be executed

    06/03/2013 6:23:27 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 44 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 6-3-2013 | Eric Owens
    In a bizarre op-ed in The Charleston Gazette last week, journalism professor Christopher Swindell argued that the National Rifle Association “advocates armed rebellion against the duly elected government of the United States of America.” Stirring words, to be sure, but Swindell was hardly done — not even close. He also said that the NRA is guilty of “treason” “worthy of the firing squad.” “To support the new NRA president’s agenda of arming the populace for confrontation with the government is bloody treason,” Swindell charged in his wacky essay. After briefly playing the race card and alluding to the Civil War,...
  • 10 Secret Societies That Created The Modern World

    04/24/2014 7:48:25 AM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    List Verse ^ | 06 April 2014 | Alan Boyle
    Many believe the world is run by a secret organization like the Illuminati, and the people we think are in power are nothing but stooges. It sounds implausible, but is it really a crazy idea? Yes. Yes, it is. And yet there have been secret organizations that created the world as we know it. 10The Carbonari After Napoleon’s defeat in 1814, the European powers had to decide what to do with the territory that he’d ruled as part of the First French Empire. The borders of Europe were redrawn at the Congress of Vienna, mainly decided by Great Britain, Russia,...
  • Greek Goddess Statue Found At Illegal Excavation in Turkey

    04/21/2014 10:17:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | April 17, 2014 | Iro-Anna Mamakouka
    A statue, believed to be the ancient Greek goddess Demeter, has been unearthed at an illegal excavation in Simav, western Turkey. The statue, weighing in at 610kg and standing 2.8 meters tall, was discovered by two Turks, Ramazan C. And Ismail G, 26 and 62 years old respectively, who are alleged to have been conducting illegal excavations in the wider area where the statue was found. The two men were taken into custody by the Turkish police and sent to court. The head of the statue and the altar, missing during the raid, were later found in a house in...
  • Greek Archaeologists Discover Rare Example Of 2,700-Year-Old Weaving

    05/09/2007 2:42:53 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 2,101+ views
    IHT ^ | 5-9-2007 | AP
    Greek archaeologists discover rare example of 2,700-year-old weaving The Associated PressPublished: May 9, 2007 ATHENS, Greece: Archaeologists in Greece have recovered a rare section of 2,700-year old fabric from a burial imitating heroes' funerals described by the poet Homer, officials said Wednesday. The yellowed, brittle material was found in a copper urn during a rescue excavation in the southern town of Argos, a Culture Ministry announcement said. "This is an extremely rare find, as fabric is an organic material which decomposes very easily," said archaeologist Alkistis Papadimitriou, who headed the dig. She said only a handful of such artifacts have...
  • Historic Sinai monastery criticized as threat to Egypt’s security

    04/03/2014 6:52:40 PM PDT · by markomalley · 16 replies
    CWN ^ | 4/2/2014
    A retired Egyptian general has accused a historic monastery of being a threat to national security, and a Salafist weekly newspaper alleged that the monastery collaborates with Israeli intelligence officials, according to the Egyptian weekly Watani and the Fides news agency. Saint Catherine’s Monastery, now Eastern Orthodox, was built by the Emperor Justinian in the sixth century and is located at the foot of Mount Sinai. It stands accused of being a beachhead of Greece and the European Union on Egyptian territory. “It is weird that our monks, and there are no more than 37 of us, would be accused...