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Keyword: greece

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  • Greek leftists Syriza aim for landmark election win

    01/25/2015 5:25:50 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 10 replies
    Reuters ^ | January 25, 2015 | BY ANGELIKI KOUTANTOU AND JAMES MACKENZIE
    Greeks began voting on Sunday in an election expected to bring to power the radical leftist Syriza party, which has pledged to take on international lenders and roll back painful austerity measures imposed during years of economic crisis. Barring a huge upset, victory for Syriza, which has led opinion polls for months, would produce the first euro zone government openly committed to cancelling the austerity terms of its EU and IMF-backed bailout programme. After its most severe crisis since the fall of the military junta in 1974, Greece's economy has shrunk by some 25 percent, thousands of businesses have closed,...
  • Greece Arrests over Belgian 'Jihadist Terror Plot'

    01/17/2015 12:55:59 PM PST · by kristinn · 6 replies
    The BBC ^ | Saturday, January 17, 2015
    Greek police have arrested several people over alleged links to a suspected terror plot in Belgium. One of the men is alleged to have been in contact with the cell in Verviers, Belgium, where a shootout with police left two suspects dead on Thursday. Europe is on high alert after Islamist gunmen killed 17 people in Paris. More than 20 people have been arrested in Belgium, France and Germany. SNIP Earlier on Saturday, Belgian media said authorities were seeking Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a 27-year-old Brussels resident of Moroccan origin suspected of being the ringleader of the jihadi cell, and in hiding...
  • Russia may lift food import ban from Greece if it quits EU - Russian agriculture minister

    01/17/2015 7:25:48 AM PST · by dynachrome · 10 replies
    itar-tass.com ^ | 1-17-15 | itar-tass
    Russia may lift its ban on food imports from Greece in the event it quits the European Union, Russian Minister of Agriculture Nikolai Fyodorov told a news conference in Berlin on Friday. Fyodorov is leading an official Russian delegation to the International Green Week public exhibition for the food, agriculture, and gardening industry. “If Greece has to leave the European Union, we will build our own relations with it, the food ban will not be applicable to it,” he said. He said that European Union countries, which felt discomfort from the slump in proceeds from exports of foods to Russia,...
  • [Six+ years old story] Europe plunged into energy crisis as Russia cuts off gas supply via Ukraine

    01/14/2015 11:51:40 PM PST · by tcrlaf · 130 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | circa 2009 or before | Robert Lea
    Russia cut gas exports to Europe by 60 per cent today, plunging the continent into an energy crisis 'within hours' as a dispute with Ukraine escalated. This morning, gas companies in Ukraine said that Russia had completely cut off their supply. Six countries reported a complete shut-off of Russian gas shipped via Ukraine today, in a sharp escalation of a struggle over energy that threatens Europe as winter sets in. Bulgaria, Greece, Macedonia, Romania, Croatia and Turkey all reported a halt in gas shipments from Russia through Ukraine. Croatia said it was temporarily reducing supplies to industrial customers while Bulgaria...
  • First indication for embalming in Roman Greece

    07/31/2008 8:42:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 175+ views
    AlphaGalileo ^ | Wednesday, July 30, 2008 | unattributed
    A Swiss-Greek research team co-lead by Dr. Frank Rühli from the Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, found indication for embalming in Roman Greek times. By means of physico-chemical and histological methods, it was possible to show that various resins, oils and spices were used during embalming of a ca. 55 year old female in Northern Greece. This is the first ever multidisciplinary-based indication for artificial mummification in Greece at 300 AD. The remains of a ca. 55-year old female (ca. 300 AD, most likely of high-social status; actual location: Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki, Greece) shows the preservation of various...
  • Top food was olives in time of the ancient mariner

    08/15/2010 10:35:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    al-Reuters ^ | Thursday, August 12, 2010 | Michele Kambas (ed by Paul Casciato)
    A huge quantity of olive stones on an ancient shipwreck more than 2,000 years old has provided valuable insight into the diet of sailors in the ancient world, researchers in Cyprus said Thursday. The shipwreck, dating from around 400 B.C. and laden mainly with wine amphorae from the Aegean island of Chios and other north Aegean islands, was discovered deep under the sea off Cyprus's southern coast. Excavation on the site, which started in November 2007, has determined that the ship was a merchant vessel of the late classical period. "An interesting piece of evidence that gives us information on...
  • Famed Roman Shipwreck Could Be Two

    02/09/2013 4:57:18 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 5, 2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    A dive to the undersea cliff where a famous Roman shipwreck rests has turned up either evidence that the wreck is enormous -- or a suggestion that, not one, but two sunken ships are resting off the Greek island of Antikythera... The Antikythera wreck is famed for the massive number of artifacts pulled from the site over the past century. First discovered in the early 1900s by local sponge divers, the wreck is most famous for the Antikythera mechanism, a complex bronze gear device used to calculate astronomical positions (and perhaps the timing of the Olympic games). Numerous bronze and...
  • Lego Antikythera Mechanism

    12/10/2010 9:22:04 AM PST · by Ro_Thunder · 56 replies · 1+ views
    YouTube ^ | 09 Dec 2010 | NatureVideoChannel
    Cool video of the Antikythera Mechanism rebuilt in Lego, and how it works.
  • Shining a light on the past

    03/31/2010 4:52:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 422+ views
    The Economist ^ | Mar 25th 2010 | unattributed
    Look at an ancient coin under ordinary light and the chances are that its features, worn down by its passage from hand to hand, will be hard to make out. Point a spotlight at it, though, so that the face of the coin is illuminated from an acute angle, and the resulting shadows will emphasise any minor details. This is the basic principle behind a novel technique that is helping archaeologists reveal previously invisible clues hidden in the worn or damaged surfaces of any objects they uncover. From wall paintings in Herculaneum to Scandinavian stone tools to rock art...
  • Coast-2-Coast AM Saturday Sept 26th -Mysterious Artifact (Antikythera mechanism)

    09/25/2009 4:12:01 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 42 replies · 1,467+ views
    Science journalist and author Jo Marchant will discuss the century-long quest to understand the purpose of a mysterious Greek artifact buried beneath the sea for 2,000 years.
  • Shocking Discovery: a PC in B.C.? (Antikythera Mechanism)

    05/02/2009 6:23:53 PM PDT · by Maelstorm · 50 replies · 2,778+ views
    http://www.kitsapsun.com ^ | April, 30,2009 | By Roger Koskela
    A little more than a century ago, in the year 1900, some Aegean sponge divers stopped on the barren Greek islet of Antikythera, between Crete and Greece, to seek shelter from a fierce storm. After things had calmed, they continued diving in the relatively shallow waters nearby and happened upon an ancient Roman shipwreck that contained confiscated Greek treasures of bronze and marble statues, jewelry, glassware and even a bronze throne. Also among the artifacts was what appeared to be a corroded lump of rock that, for some unknown reason, was dumped into a crate during the 10-month salvage recovery...
  • Archimedes and the 2000-year-old computer

    12/13/2008 2:52:02 PM PST · by decimon · 22 replies · 940+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Dec. 12, 2008 | Jo Marchant
    MARCELLUS and his men blockaded Syracuse, in Sicily, for two years. The Roman general expected to conquer the Greek city state easily, but the ingenious siege towers and catapults designed by Archimedes helped to keep his troops at bay. Then, in 212 BC, the Syracusans neglected their defences during a festival to the goddess Artemis, and the Romans finally breached the city walls. Marcellus wanted Archimedes alive, but it wasn't to be. According to ancient historians, Archimedes was killed in the chaos; by one account a soldier ran him through with a sword as he was in the middle of...
  • Secrets of Antikythera Mechanism, world's oldest calculating machine, revealed

    07/31/2008 8:14:49 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 9 replies · 147+ views
    The Times ^ | 7/30/2008
    The secrets of the worlds oldest calculating machine are revealed today, showing that it had dials to mark the timing of eclipses and the Olympic games. Ever since the spectacular bronze device was salvaged from a shipwreck after its discovery in 1900 many have speculated about the uses of the mechanical calculator which was constructed long before the birth of Christ and was one of the wonders of the ancient world. The dictionary sized crumbly lump containing corroded fragments of what is now known to be a marvellous hand cranked machine is known as the 'Antikythera Mechanism' because it was...
  • Discovering How Greeks Computed in 100 B.C.

    07/31/2008 8:35:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 162+ views
    New York Times ^ | Thursday, July 31, 2008 | John Noble Wilford
    The Antikythera Mechanism, sometimes called the first analog computer, was recovered more than a century ago in the wreckage of a ship that sank off the tiny island of Antikythera, north of Crete. Earlier research showed that the device was probably built between 140 and 100 B.C. Only now, applying high-resolution imaging systems and three-dimensional X-ray tomography, have experts been able to decipher inscriptions and reconstruct functions of the bronze gears on the mechanism. The latest research has revealed details of dials on the instrument's back side, including the names of all 12 months of an ancient calendar. In the...
  • Medieval Calculator Up For Grabs

    04/03/2008 5:16:39 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 92+ views
    Nature ^ | 4-3-2008 | Philip Ball
    Medieval calculator up for grabsUK museum seeks cash to keep a rare astrolabe in public hands. Philip Ball The British Museum needs £350,000 to secure this astrolabe. The fate of a fourteenth-century pocket calculator is hanging in the balance between museum ownership and private sale. The device is a brass astrolabe quadrant that opens a new window on the mathematical and astronomical literacy of the Middle Ages, experts say. It can tell the time from the position of the Sun, calculate the heights of tall objects, and work out the date of Easter. Found in 2005, the instrument has captivated...
  • OOPARTS (Out of Place Artifacts)

    08/01/2007 3:28:51 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies · 3,495+ views
    What If? ^ | Unknown
    Ooparts ? What are Ooparts? That stands for Out of Place Artifacts. Things that show up where they shouldn't, a piece of gold chain found in a coal seam, what appears to be a sparkplug embedded in rock that is thousands of years old and what appears to be a bullet hole in the skull of a mastodon. These things are ooparts. A Gold Thread Workmen quarrying stone near the River Tweed below Rutherford, Scotland in 1844, found a piece of gold thread embedded in the rock of the quarry eight feet below ground level. A small piece of the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the day

    12/05/2006 3:55:20 AM PST · by sig226 · 12 replies · 512+ views
    NASA ^ | 12/5/06 | Wikipedia
    The Antikythera Mechanism Credit & Copyright: Wikipedia Explanation: What is it? It was found at the bottom of the sea aboard an ancient Greek ship. Its seeming complexity has prompted decades of study, although many of its functions remained unknown. Recent X-rays of the device have now confirmed the nature of the Antikythera mechanism, and discovered several surprising functions. The Antikythera mechanism has been discovered to be a mechanical computer of an accuracy thought impossible in 80 BC, when the ship that carried it sunk. Such sophisticated technology was not thought to be developed by humanity for another 1,000...
  • Enigma of ancient world's computer is cracked at last

    11/29/2006 8:07:20 PM PST · by ConservativeMind · 9 replies · 506+ views
    Physorg.com ^ | Nov, 29, 2006 | AFP
    A 2,100-year-old clockwork machine whose remains were retrieved from a shipwreck more than a century ago has turned out to be the celestial super-computer of the ancient world. Using 21st-century technology to peer beneath the surface of the encrusted gearwheels, stunned scientists say the so-called Antikythera Mechanism could predict the ballet of the Sun and Moon over decades and calculate a lunar anomaly that would bedevil Isaac Newton himself. Built in Greece around 150-100 BC and possibly linked to the astronomer and mathematician Hipparchos, its complexity was probably unrivalled for at least a thousand years, they say. "It's beautifully designed....
  • In search of lost time (Antikythera Mechanism)

    11/29/2006 6:54:37 PM PST · by neverdem · 15 replies · 921+ views
    Nature ^ | 29 November 2006 | Jo Marchant
    The ancient Antikythera Mechanism doesn't just challenge our assumptions about technology transfer over the ages — it gives us fresh insights into history itself.
  • Scientists Unravel Mystery of Ancient Greek Machine

    11/29/2006 3:44:39 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 42 replies · 1,934+ views
    Live Science ^ | Wed Nov 29, 1:25 PM ET | Ker Than
    Scientists have finally demystified the incredible workings of a 2,000-year-old astronomical calculator built by ancient Greeks. A new analysis of the Antikythera Mechanism [image], a clock-like machine consisting of more than 30 precise, hand-cut bronze gears, show it to be more advanced than previously thought—so much so that nothing comparable was built for another thousand years. "This device is just extraordinary, the only thing of its kind," said study leader Mike Edmunds of Cardiff University in the UK. "The design is beautiful, the astronomy is exactly right…In terms of historical and scarcity value, I have to regard this mechanism as...
  • An Ancient Computer Surprises Scientists (2200yo Roman computer!)

    11/29/2006 11:41:47 AM PST · by Alter Kaker · 103 replies · 3,225+ views
    New York Times ^ | November 29, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    A computer in antiquity would seem to be an anachronism, like Athena ordering takeout on her cellphone. But a century ago, pieces of a strange mechanism with bronze gears and dials were recovered from an ancient shipwreck off the coast of Greece. Historians of science concluded that this was an instrument that calculated and illustrated astronomical information, particularly phases of the Moon and planetary motions, in the second century B.C. The Antikythera Mechanism, sometimes called the world’s first computer, has now been examined with the latest in high-resolution imaging systems and three-dimensional X-ray tomography. A team of British, Greek and...
  • Ancient calculator was 1,000 yrs ahead of its time

    11/29/2006 11:17:09 AM PST · by freedom44 · 72 replies · 2,258+ views
    Reuters ^ | 11/28/06 | Reuters
    LONDON (Reuters) - An ancient astronomical calculator made at the end of the 2nd century BC was amazingly accurate and more complex than any instrument for the next 1,000 years, scientists said on Wednesday. The Antikythera Mechanism is the earliest known device to contain an intricate set of gear wheels. It was retrieved from a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera in 1901 but until now what it was used for has been a mystery. Although the remains are fragmented in 82 brass pieces, scientists from Britain, Greece and the United States have reconstructed a model of it using...
  • Were Greeks 1,400 years ahead of their time?

    06/07/2006 3:58:41 PM PDT · by aculeus · 89 replies · 2,191+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | June 7, 2006 | EBEN HARRELL
    FOR decades, researchers have been baffled by the intricate bronze mechanism of wheels and dials created 80 years before the birth of Christ. The "Antikythera Mechanism" was discovered damaged and fragmented on the wreck of a cargo ship off the tiny Greek island of Antikythera in 1900. Advert for The Scotsman Digital Archive Now, a joint British-Greek research team has found a hidden ancient Greek inscription on the device, which it thinks could unlock the mystery. The team believes the Antikythera Mechanism may be the world's oldest computer, used by the Greeks to predict the motion of the planets. The...
  • The Antikythera Mechanism (Computer - 56BC)

    04/30/2006 7:21:04 PM PDT · by blam · 34 replies · 1,447+ views
    Economist ^ | 9-19-2002
    The Antikythera mechanism The clockwork computer Sep 19th 2002 From The Economist print edition An ancient piece of clockwork shows the deep roots of modern technology WHEN a Greek sponge diver called Elias Stadiatos discovered the wreck of a cargo ship off the tiny island of Antikythera in 1900, it was the statues lying on the seabed that made the greatest impression on him. He returned to the surface, removed his helmet, and gabbled that he had found a heap of dead, naked women. The ship's cargo of luxury goods also included jewellery, pottery, fine furniture, wine and bronzes dating...
  • Kurzweil featured on new syndicated radio show "Science Fantastic" hosted by Michio Kaku

    04/14/2006 6:50:53 AM PDT · by Neville72 · 25 replies · 821+ views
    KurzweilAI.net | 4/14/2006 | Staff
    Ray Kurzweil will be the first guest on theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku's new ("Science Fantastic") radio show, which debuts on about 90 commercial radio stations nationwide Saturday April 15 at 5:00 - 8:00 p.m., Eastern, 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Pacific. The show is syndicated on Talk Radio Network. Kaku, the co-founder of string field theory, holds the Henry Semat Chair in Theoretical Physics at the City Univ. of New York and is the author of two international best-sellers, Hyperspace and Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the 21st Century, and Parallel Worlds. The interview covers the Singularity, merger with intelligent...
  • Unearthing the Treasures of the Mediterranean

    07/09/2005 2:56:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 634+ views
    Skin Diver ^ | February 2000 | Isabelle Croizeau
  • The Antikythera Mechanism: Physical and Intellectual Salvage from the 1st Century B.C.

    08/14/2004 3:01:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies · 1,380+ views
    The Antikythera mechanism was an arrangement of calibrated differential gears inscribed and configured to produce solar and lunar positions in synchronization with the calendar year. By rotating a shaft protruding from its now-disintegrated wooden case, its owner could read on its front and back dials the progressions of the lunar and synodic months over four-year cycles. He could predict the movement of heavenly bodies regardless of his local government's erratic calendar. From the accumulated inscriptions and the position of the gears and year-ring, Price deduced that the device was linked closely to Geminus of Rhodes, and had been built on...
  • Secret Handshake

    03/06/2004 12:43:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 226 replies · 5,295+ views
    FreeRepublic ^ | Saturday, March 6, 2004 A.D. | SunkenCiv
    I'd been here a couple of months, and had begun to worry about handling all the threads. Sooooo, today I grabbed all of the pages by source, grabbed the tables of links to posts to and from me, and sorted them (the easy way, well, as easy as it gets) alpha instead of chrono. Please, don't tell me that there's a way to do that automatically, or my brain will hurt.
  • Strange stories, weird facts

    01/17/2004 5:37:13 PM PST · by djf · 75 replies · 62,315+ views
    Yahoo groups ^ | 1999 | John Braungart
    Over the years, I have tried to collect info about odds and ends that don't fit into the standard ideas and theories about how things came to be. Doing some googling this morning, I bumped into this set of data and thought I'd post it for other Freepers amusement and comments. My own personal research related to possible pole shifts ("The HAB Theory", Alan Eckert, 1976, based on the work of Hugh Auchincloss Brown), has uncovered alot of facts that even if they do not end up supporting a pole shift dynamic, show that things are very much different from...
  • Scientist tackles mystery of ancient astronomical device

    01/11/2015 1:41:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Phys.org, Science X network ^ | January 6, 2015 | Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times
    "The amazing thing is the mechanical engineering aspect," says James Evans, a physicist and science historian at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash. He is part of an international group working to crack the puzzle of the device's origins and purpose. Evans recently added a new twist with an analysis that suggests it dates to 205 B.C. -- as much as a century earlier than previously believed. If he's right, it is more likely that the Antikythera Mechanism was inspired by the work of the legendary Greek mathematician Archimedes. It would also mean the device was built at...
  • Greek Radical Left on the March

    01/09/2015 8:37:51 AM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 2 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | Arnold Ahlert
    Syriza: The Coalition of the Radical Left, is poised to assume the reins of power Greece is once again at the center of the European Union storm. Following the failure of the Athens parliament to elect a president in late December, Syriza, aka The Coalition of the Radical Left, is poised to assume the reins of power. “The future has already begun,” party leader Alexis Tsipras, the man most likely to become Greece’s Prime Minister, told reporters as the nation prepared for the early elections constitutionally required when presidential polls fail. “You should be optimistic and happy.” The presidency is...
  • In Greek tragedy, entrepreneurs triumph

    01/06/2015 5:27:42 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 16 replies
    The Washingtont Times ^ | January 5, 2015 | Polyxeni Athanasoulia and Nikolia Apostolou
    ATHENS, Greece — In these disastrous economic times, opening a store on tony Voukourestiou Street next to global luxury brands such as Dior and Prada is a goal many Greek fashion designers can only dream about. But despite the crippling financial crisis that has been plaguing Greece for the past six years, 35-year-old Penny Vomva opened a storefront for her designer clothing and accessories company, RIEN, on the boutique-lined thoroughfare last month. Ms. Vomva is delighted, but she also is concerned about the shifting fortunes of the Greek economy. “My line of handmade leather bags costs 180 euros to 450...
  • EU calls euro membership ‘irrevocable’ but renegotiable

    01/05/2015 7:28:29 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jan 5, 2015 10:25 AM EST | Raf Casert
    The European Union’s executive Commission said Monday that membership in the euro bloc is “irrevocable” but left it open to what extent Greece could renegotiate the terms after elections on Jan. 25. Greece’s left-wing Syriza party leads the polls ahead of the elections and is in favor of changing the conditions of the country’s international bailout deal. That would likely anger the rest of the eurozone, which has given Athens the bulk of the rescue loans. […] EU spokeswoman Annika Breidthardt said Monday that if the Greek elections call for a need to reconsider the conditions of Athens’ membership within...
  • The 2015 Greek euro drama

    01/05/2015 7:02:09 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | January 5, 2015 | Gavin Hewitt
    It did not take long. The game is very much in play. Greek voters are being bombarded with warnings about what is at stake when they go to the polls on 25 January. There is little that is coded in these messages. When a country has been bailed out to the tune of €240bn (£187bn; $286bn) there is no such thing as non-interference in Greece's internal politics. Most of the European political establishment does not want Greece to elect the radical left party Syriza led by Alexis Tsipras. The party is currently narrowly ahead in the polls. Mr Tsipras is...
  • Merkel ready to let Greece exit eurozone: report

    01/05/2015 12:33:17 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 25 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 04 Jan 2015 10:16 GMT+01:00 | (AFP)
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel is prepared to let Greece leave the eurozone if Greeks elect a government that jettisons the country’s current austerity course, according to German media reports. The report in the Der Spiegel daily, which cited sources close to the German government, comes as polls show a radical leftist party leading the field three weeks ahead of a snap election in Greece. The Syriza party of Alexis Tsipras has pledged to reverse reforms imposed by Greece’s international creditors and renegotiate its bailout deal. …
  • Greek Exit Disaster...or Not

    01/04/2015 12:15:44 PM PST · by Kaslin · 39 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 4, 2015 | Mike Shedlock
    There's an amusing pair of headlines back-to-back today on what a Greek exit from the Eurozone might mean. One view is catastrophic, the others is along the lines of no problem. Let's start with the catastrophe. Economic historian Barry Eichengreen says Greek Euro Exit Would be ‘Lehman Brothers Squared. A decision by a new Greek government to leave the eurozone would set off devastating turmoil in financial markets even worse than the collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008, a leading international economist warned Saturday. A Greek exit would likely spark runs on Greek banks and the country’s stock market and...
  • The great Victor Davis Hanson now has a blog

    03/09/2004 8:17:13 AM PST · by dennisw · 25 replies · 260+ views
    victorhanson ^ | march 2004 | victorhanson
    <p>In a recent review of Donald Kagan’s The Peloponnesian War, and my Autumn of War, ("Theatres of War:  Why the battles over ancient Athens still rage”  New Yorker Magazine, [January 12, 2004]), the classicist Daniel Mendelsohn  says that I believe that it is immoral to suggest defeat can be seen as victory: "The play asks the very question that Victor Davis Hanson considers "immoral": whether abject defeat can yet somehow be a victory."</p>
  • Greece Heading to Early Elections After Presidential Vote Fails

    12/29/2014 1:41:46 PM PST · by C19fan · 2 replies
    NY Times ^ | December 29, 2014 | Niki Kitsantonis and Alan Cowell
    Governments and investors across Europe braced for renewed economic upheaval on Monday after the Parliament in Greece failed to avert an early general election, reviving the toxic debate over austerity as the way to cure the continent’s economic woes. The election, expected on Jan. 25, is likely to be won by Syriza, a leftist party that opposes the deep budget cuts Greece has implemented in recent years. The austerity measures were imposed as a condition of the huge financial bailouts Greece has received.
  • Greece Scrambles To Prevent Deposit Run Goldman Warned About In Its "Worst Case"

    12/29/2014 8:21:15 AM PST · by GilGil · 10 replies
    Zerohedge ^ | 12/29/2014 | Tyler Durden
    Stripping all the political correctness, what Goldman said is that unless Greece quickly folds back in line and does as unelected Brussels eurocrats demand, there may well be a Cyprus-style bank closure coupled with preemptied bank runs. Oops. Because if that was the doubled-down bluff, then Greece just called it, and the "downside scenario" is now in play. Which means Greece now has to scramble to avoid precisely what Goldman warned would happen if the Greeks dared to put their (meagre) savings at risk. And, case in point, here is the Greek finance minister rushing to squash the next steps,...
  • How Turkey Went Bad

    12/24/2014 11:36:17 AM PST · by Jan_Sobieski · 16 replies
    Middle East Forum ^ | 12/13/2014 | Daniel Pipes
    Only twelve years ago, the Republic of Turkey was correctly seen as a stalwart NATO ally, the model of a pro-Western Muslim state, and a bridge between Europe and the Middle East. A strong military bond with the Pentagon undergirded broader economic and cultural ties with Americans. For those of us who work on the Middle East, time in Istanbul, Ankara, and other Turkish cities was a refreshing oasis from the turmoil of the region. And then, starting with the still-astonishing election of 2002, the country dramatically changed course. Slowly at first and then with increasing velocity since mid-2011, the...
  • Greece’s radical left could kill off austerity in the EU

    12/22/2014 10:08:31 AM PST · by Lorianne · 12 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | 22 December 2014 | Owen Jones
    nother war looms in Europe: waged not with guns and tanks, but with financial markets and EU diktats. Austerity-ravaged Greece may well be on the verge of a general election that could bring to power a government unequivocally opposed to austerity. Momentous stuff: that has not happened in the six years of cuts and falling living standards that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers. But if the radical leftist party Syriza does indeed triumph in a possible snap poll in the new year, there will undoubtedly be a concerted attempt to choke the experiment at birth. That matters not just...
  • Putin Is Infiltrating European Politics With Shocking Effectiveness

    12/14/2014 12:26:28 PM PST · by elhombrelibre · 27 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 14 Dec 14 | Jeremy Bender
    Putin has become shockingly effective at influencing European politics through a host of far-right parties. The following chart from the Center for Eurasian Strategic Intelligence (CESI) shows Russia's growing influence within six different European Union countries. The parties, located in the UK, France, Germany, Greece, Bulgaria, and Hungary, are increasingly popular—and staunchly against giving more power to the EU. Each of the parties has also fostered a closer relationship with Russia, and has protested against sanctions on Moscow following its annexation of Ukraine.
  • Turkey's Erdogan lashes out as lira tumbles

    12/13/2014 6:10:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Whirled Nut Daily ^ | December 12, 2014 | Daniel Dombey
    ...its lowest levels against the dollar for almost a year, amid investor nervousness about emerging markets. By evening trade in Istanbul the currency had fallen beyond TL2.30 to the US dollar, more than 1 per cent down on the day and the weakest level since January, when the Turkish central bank moved to increase interest rates -- a dramatic shift in policy that at the time halted a precipitous drop in its value. ...Turkey is far from alone in being affected by strong US economic data that has heightened expectations of a US Federal Reserve interest rate rise and so...
  • Juncker: Greece should avoid ‘wrong outcome’ in elections

    12/12/2014 5:05:36 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    EU Observer ^ | 12/11/14 @ 21:24 | Valentina Pop
    EU commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker has warned Greece against electing “extreme forces” into power and said he would prefer “known faces”—so far the strongest intervention of the EU top brass in the Greek campaign. “I think that the Greeks—who have a very difficult life—know very well what a wrong election result would mean for Greece and the eurozone,” Juncker said during an Austrian public TV debate with EUobserver and several other Brussels-based journalists. He steered clear of explicit political advice ahead of presidential elections in Greece next week, but said: “I wouldn’t like extreme forces to come to power.” The...
  • Shots fired at Israeli embassy in Athens

    12/11/2014 8:26:42 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 3 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec 11, 2014 11:13 PM EST
    Greek authorities are investigating a pre-dawn, drive-by gunfire attack on the Israeli embassy in Athens, which caused no injuries or damage. […] There was no claim of responsibility for the attack. …
  • Putin, in Defeat, Diverts Pipeline

    12/01/2014 7:35:35 PM PST · by Theoria · 76 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 01 Dec 2014 | ANDREW ROTH
    President Vladimir V. Putin said Monday that he would scrap Russia’s South Stream gas pipeline, a grandiose project that was once intended to establish the country’s dominance in southeastern Europe but instead fell victim to Russia’s increasingly toxic relationship with the West. It was a rare diplomatic defeat for Mr. Putin, who said Russia would redirect the pipeline to Turkey. He painted the failure to build the pipeline as a loss for Europe and blamed Brussels for its intransigence. The decision also seemed to be a rare victory for the European Union and the Obama administration, which have appeared largely...
  • Turks Want to See a Mosque in Athens Before Reopening a Seminary in Istanbul

    11/30/2014 9:27:34 AM PST · by marshmallow · 9 replies
    Aleteia ^ | 11/29/14
    Vatican's chief ecumenical officer speaks about implications of this weekend's papal visitPope Francis and Ecumencial Patriarch Bartholomew will sign a joint declaration Sunday, confirming the growing relationship between the long-separated Churches of Rome and Constantinople. The Pope's visit comes just six months after he and Bartholomew met in Jerusalem and singed a Joint Declaration about their commitment to the search for Christian unity. Accompanying Pope Francis on the journey to Turkey is the head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Cardinal Kurt Koch, who said in a Vatican Radio interview this week that first of all ithe papal...
  • Mycenean artifacts found in Bodrum [Halicarnassus]

    11/15/2014 4:54:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Hürriyet Daily ^ | Saturday, November 15 2014 | Mugla -- Anadolu Agency
    New artifacts have been found during excavations in Bodrum’s Ortakent and Gümüşlük neighborhoods. The artifacts will shed light on the history of Bodrum Peninsula, according to officials. The Bodrum Underwater Archaeology Museum Director Emel Özkan said that they had discovered 49 artifacts from the Mycenean era. “The number of Mycenean artifacts increased to 248 with these ones. This made our museum the richest one in terms of Mycenean artifacts among the Turkish museums,” she said. Özkan said that the artifacts, which date back to 3,500 years ago, were very important for Anatolian history, adding, “The amphora and gifts found in...
  • Muslim Brotherhood To Commemorate Genocidal Jihad At DC’s National Cathedral [graphic image at site]

    11/13/2014 5:11:31 PM PST · by huldah1776 · 15 replies
    Richard Viguerie's Conservative HQ ^ | November 12, 2014 | George Rasley
    On Friday, November 14 the Washington, DC’s National Cathedral will host a Muslim prayer service organized by the Council on Islamic Relations (CAIR), The Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), The Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC) and the All-Dulles Area Muslims Society (ADAMS) Center. The leaders of the National Cathedral told The Washington Post that they hope Friday’s service at the historic cathedral will foster more understanding and acceptance between Christians and Muslims around the world. However, there is ample evidence to suggest that the Muslim participants have a different motive for choosing November 14 to hold their prayers in...
  • Amphipolis skeleton from Alexander's time found in Greece

    11/12/2014 10:41:24 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/12/2014 | By Giorgos Christides
    Archaeologists in northern Greece have found a skeleton inside a tomb from the time of Alexander the Great, during a dig that has enthralled the public. The burial site at Amphipolis is the largest ever discovered in Greece. The culture ministry said the almost intact skeleton belonged to a "distinguished public figure", given the tomb's dimensions and lavishness. Chief archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said "the tomb in all probability belongs to a male and a general". The excavation has fascinated Greeks ever since Prime Minister Antonis Samaras visited the site in August 2014 and announced it amounted to "an exceptionally important...