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  • Brit scientists develop genetically modified virus kills cancer

    11/20/2018 6:16:00 PM PST · by Candor7 · 14 replies
    The Sun ^ | 19th November 2018, 12:15 am | Andrea Downey, Digital Health Reporter
    A GENETICALLY modified virus that kills cancer cells and destroys their hiding places has been developed by British scientists. It targets both cancer cells and healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system. Fibroblasts, the most common type of cell in connective tissues, are vital in the body's healing process, but they can get hijacked by cancer-associated fibroblasts or CAFs. These then help tumours grow, spread and evade therapy. The new treatment, a form of immunotherapy developed by Oxford University scientists, attacks carcinomas - the most ­common type of cancer. Currently, any therapy that kills...
  • Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing

    11/15/2018 2:18:23 PM PST · by ETL · 32 replies
    OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its technology in the livestock industry. But first, it needs to convince regulators that gene-edited animals are no different than conventionally bred ones. To make the technology appealing and to ease any fears that it may be creating Franken-animals, Recombinetics isn't starting with productivity. Instead, it's introducing gene-edited traits as a way to ease...
  • 115,000-Year-Old Bones Found In Poland Reveal Neanderthal Child Eaten By Gigantic Prehistoric Bird

    11/12/2018 8:17:05 AM PST · by Gamecock · 26 replies
    Hasan Jasmin ^ | 11/9/2018
    A few years ago, a team of researchers in Poland came across a pair of Neanderthal bones that held a grisly secret: Their owner had been eaten by a giant bird. The two finger bones belonged to a Neanderthal child who had died roughly 115,000 years before, making those bones the oldest known human remains from Poland, according to Science In Poland. Once the bones were analyzed, the scientists concluded that the hand bones were porous because they had passed through the digestive system of a large bird. It is unclear if the bird killed the child and then ate...
  • Genealogy Websites Were Key to Big Break in Golden State Killer Case

    04/26/2018 4:04:33 PM PDT · by Blue House Sue · 74 replies
    New York Times ^ | 4/26/18 | THOMAS FULLER
    SACRAMENTO — The Golden State Killer raped and murdered victims all across the state of California in an era before Google searches and social media, a time when the police relied on shoe leather, not cellphone records or big data. But it was technology that got him. The suspect, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, was arrested by the police on Tuesday. Investigators accuse him of committing more than 50 rapes and 12 murders. Investigators used DNA from crime scenes and plugged that genetic profile into a commercial online genealogy database. They found distant relatives of Mr. DeAngelo’s and traced their DNA...
  • Elizabeth Warren's story of racist grandparents disputed by Cherokee genealogist (mad squaw alert)

    03/13/2018 11:00:31 PM PDT · by Zakeet · 48 replies
    Washington Times ^ | March 11, 2018 | Valerie Richardson
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren sought Sunday to bolster her shaky claims of Cherokee ancestry with the story of how her racist grandparents drove her parents to elope. But Cherokee genealogist Twila Barnes says that account has its own credibility issues. Ms. Barnes, who said her research into Ms. Warren's family found "no evidence" of Native American ancestry, has challenged key elements of the senator's tale of how her parents, Pauline Reed and Donald Herring, defied his parents by running off to marry. [Snip] After Ms. Warren said in the Globe that her mother told her "nobody came to her wedding at...
  • Genealogy and DNA: Odd things discovered

    10/08/2017 1:10:31 PM PDT · by madison10 · 162 replies
    Self | 10/8/2017 | madison10
    I happen to be a member of one of the genealogical sites. Currently my DNA profile is 78% Western European and a typical native Western European is 48%. Which means 30% more of MY DNA came from the region than that of a native. Thank God I am not in Europe welcoming the Muslim hordes.
  • Privacy Concerns Over DNA Tests That Help Discover Your Roots

    06/17/2017 5:35:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 37 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | Jun 16, 2017
    For generations, cross-referencing tombstones at the cemetery and vital records was required to unlock your lineage. But now, you can easily uncover some of the mystery of your family tree with DNA. Consumers like Larry Guernsey are giving the service as gifts. "I thought it would be a good Christmas present," Guernsey said. The $99 DNA test uses a saliva sample to trace family history. Here's how one company that provides the service, Ancestry, says it works: "A simple test can reveal an estimate of your ethnic mix… like if you're Irish or Scandinavian, or both." For Guernsey his curiosity...
  • Family Tree Website Triggers Privacy Concerns

    01/14/2017 4:46:19 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    KOMO ^ | Connie Thompson
    FamilyTreeNow.com aggregates information obtained from public records such as marriage licenses, divorce filings, birth and death records and property tax records....accuracy is not guaranteed. The site also outlines legal restrictions against using the information for harassment, fraud, or illegal purposes. Some say it's no big deal, since many of us freely disclose personal, private information on a regular basis. We're the ones who put it out there. Others see how it could help find relatives with whom you've lost touch over the years. If you're bothered by the concept, you can opt out and have your name removed. In my...
  • Golden Opportunity: Don't Lose Your History to the Grave

    05/27/2016 7:08:50 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 12 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 27, 2016 | Marvin Olasky
    The weeks between Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are also the time for high-school and college graduations, which often involve visits from grandparents. That makes this a time for generations to get together so they don’t make the mistake I made. Here’s my error: From the time I turned an arrogant 13, my father and I didn’t talk much. Looking back now, it seems unbelievable that when I flew from Texas to Massachusetts in 1984 to visit my parents for a week as he was dying of cancer, we didn’t talk for more than minutes about anything important, and I...
  • Cold Case Squad Resolves 47-Year-Old Missing Person Report in Jefferson County

    01/30/2016 9:30:33 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    ptleader.com ^ | Jan 29, 2016 | Patrick J. Sullivan
    Camper went into the mountains in 1968, body found in 1975, remains identified in 2015 By Patrick J. Sullivan of the Leader Jan 29, 2016 0 Camper went missing in Olympic Mountains in 1968 A forensic artist in 2000 made a sketch from the skull found in the Olympic Mountains in 1975. In 2015, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office’s Cold Case Squad confirmed that the remains belonged to a camper who went missing in 1968. Images courtesy Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office cold case squad has resolved a 47-year-old mystery of a Tacoma man who went missing...
  • If anyone has any knowledge dna results and background percentages, I have a question.

    11/10/2018 2:45:18 PM PST · by GeorgiaDawg32 · 72 replies
    Me | 11/10/2018 | GeorgiaDawg32
    Growing up, my dad always told me we (the kids) were Scots-Irish and Slovak (Eastern European). My older brother did some research and can't find anyone from Scotland or Ireland. Mostly from Wales and England. Well, he got his test results back (mine are in the works) and it turns out he's 32% Scots-Irish. My thinking is I have a grandma somewhere in the past who died with a secret that is only now becoming clear. My question is, how many generations back would one have to go to be 32% (of any background) today? I'm thinking no more than...
  • American Indians Wary Of DNA Tests

    01/29/2003 6:22:37 PM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 289+ views
    The Salt Lake Tribune ^ | 1-27-2003 | Tim Sullivan
    American Indians Wary of DNA Tests BY TIM SULLIVAN THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE Ever since the arrival of white colonists, American Indians have been tapped for their resources -- most recently their genes. And with an eye toward past abuses, some of them are growing wary of geneticists and anthropologists taking their blood, hair or ancestors' bones for research purposes. In Utah, tribes don't have as much experience with these exchanges as in other parts of the Americas, but officials with the Skull Valley Band of Goshutes and the Northwest Band of the Shoshone feel they should be prepared. On...
  • Three New DNA Studies Are Shaking Up the History of Humans in the Americas

    11/08/2018 1:53:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    gizmodo ^ | George Dvorsky
    By sequencing and analyzing 15 ancient genomes found throughout the Americas—six of which were older than 10,000 years—these researchers determined that, around 8,000 years ago, the ancestors of Native Americans were still on the move, migrating away from Mesoamerica (what is today Mexico and Central America) toward both North and South America. These groups moved rapidly and unevenly, sometimes interbreeding with local populations, complicating the genetic—and historical—picture even further. The close genetic similarity observed between some of the groups studied suggests rapid migratory speed through North and South America. The Meltzer and Willerslev team, which included dozens of researchers from...
  • Frequent inbreeding may have caused skeletal abnormalities in early humans

    11/06/2018 12:24:18 PM PST · by ETL · 64 replies
    ScienceMag.org ^ | Nov 5, 2018 | Michael Price
    Early humans faced countless challenges as they fanned out of Africa: icy conditions, saber-tooth cats, and, according to a new study of ancient skeletons, an unusually high number of birth defects, both debilitating and relatively inconsequential. It’s unclear why such abnormalities seem to be so common, but scientists say one strong possibility is rampant inbreeding among small hunter-gatherer groups. “This paper represents a valuable compilation,” says Vincenzo Formicola, an anthropologist at the University of Pisa in Italy who wasn’t involved in the new work. “Many cases reported in the list were unknown to me and, I assume, to many people...
  • World’s oldest chocolate was made 5300 years ago—in a South American rainforest

    11/04/2018 12:35:57 PM PST · by ETL · 40 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Oct 29, 2018 | Colin Barras
    Our love affair with chocolate is much older than we thought, and newly discovered traces of cocoa on ancient pots suggest it started in the rainforests of what is now Ecuador some 5300 years ago. That’s nearly 1500 years older than earlier evidence, and it shifts the nexus of cocoa production from Central America to the upper Amazon. “This is an incredibly strong demonstration,” says Rosemary Joyce, an archaeologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the new study. “It puts to rest any lingering claims that the use of [cocoa] pods … was an invention...
  • The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5,300 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:06:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 30, 2018 | presse@cirad.fr
    Traces of cocoa dating back 5300 years have been found in ancient pots in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This is the oldest proof of cocoa use ever found. It predates the domestication of cocoa by the Olmec and the Maya in Central America by some 1500 years. This evidence was collected in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, at the Santa Ana La Florida (SALF) archaeological site near Palanda, discovered 16 years ago by the archaeologist Francisco Valdez and his Franco-Ecuadorian team (IRD/INPC) (2). The Mayo Chinchipe, the oldest known Amerindian civilization in the upper Amazon, had consumed cocoa almost continuously from at...
  • Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:30:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 31, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals -cattle, sheep, and goat - made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more than four millennia ago... in many of the most important channels of the Silk Road itself, including Kyrgyzstan's Alay Valley (a large mountain corridor linking northwest China with the oases cities of Bukhara and Samarkand), very little is...
  • The Body on Somerton Beach

    08/14/2011 11:10:02 AM PDT · by Palter · 32 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | 12 Aug 2011 | Mike Dash
    Most murders aren’t that difficult to solve. The husband did it. The wife did it. The boyfriend did it, or the ex-boyfriend did. The crimes fit a pattern, the motives are generally clear.Of course, there are always a handful of cases that don’t fit the template, where the killer is a stranger or the reason for the killing is bizarre. It’s fair to say, however, that nowadays the authorities usually have something to go on. Thanks in part to advances such as DNA technology, the police are seldom baffled anymore.Mortuary photo of the unknown man found dead on Somerton Beach,...
  • Fungi that live in cockroaches, oil paintings, and other bizarre places come to light in new report

    09/12/2018 6:58:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | Sep. 11, 2018 , 7:01 PM | Erik Stokstad
    Those pale button mushrooms in your supermarket hardly do justice to the diversity of fungi. The world hosts an incredible array of these important organisms—and mycologists are discovering more than 2000 new species a year, including ones that live on driftwood, bat guano, and even an oil painting. That’s according to a new report, titled State of the World’s Fungi, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical research institution in Richmond, U.K. The lavishly illustrated overview covers the usefulness of fungi (think beer, bread, and penicillin, for starters) as well as the serious threats that some fungi pose to...
  • 'Man the Hunter' theory is debunked in new book

    02/03/2005 2:27:13 PM PST · by aculeus · 202 replies · 2,790+ views
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | February 2, 2005 | By Neil Schoenherr
    Feb. 2, 2005 — You wouldn't know it by current world events, but humans actually evolved to be peaceful, cooperative and social animals. In a new book, an anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis goes against the prevailing view and argues that primates, including early humans, evolved not as hunters but as prey of many predators, including wild dogs and cats, hyenas, eagles and crocodiles. Despite popular theories posed in research papers and popular literature, early man was not an aggressive killer, argues Robert W. Sussman, Ph.D., professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences. Sussman's book, "Man the Hunted:...