HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Carson  Cruz  Bush  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Working on the last $7k! Let's get 'er done! Thank you very much for your loyal support, Jim Robinson

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $80,547
Woo hoo!! And now less than $7.5k to go!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: helixmakemineadouble

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Israel Aims to Recreate Wine That Jesus and King David Drank

    11/30/2015 6:28:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 39 replies
    NY Times ^ | NOV. 29, 2015 | JODI RUDOREN
    HEFER VALLEY, Israel — The new crisp, acidic and mineral white from a high-end Israeli winery was aged for eight months — or, depending on how you look at it, at least 1,800 years. The wine, called marawi and released last month by Recanati Winery, is the first commercially produced by Israel’s growing modern industry from indigenous grapes. It grew out of a groundbreaking project at Ariel University in the occupied West Bank that aims to use DNA testing to identify — and recreate — ancient wines drunk by the likes of King David and Jesus Christ. Eliyashiv Drori, the...
  • Carthaginian temples found -- Azores

    07/10/2011 6:57:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Portuguese American Journal ^ | Saturday, July 9, 2011 | paj.cm
    Archaeologists from the Portuguese Association of Archeological Research (APIA) believe to have found in the Azores a significant number of Carthaginian temples, from the fourth century BC, dedicated to the goddess Tanit. The new archaeological sites were found in Monte Brasil, Angra Heroismo, Terceira island. According to APIA archaeologists Nuno Ribeiro and Anabela Joaquinito, "More than five hypogea type monuments (tombs excavated in rocks) and at least three 'sanctuaries' proto-historic, carved into the rock, were found." A monument located at "Monte do Facho" shows inbuilt sink shaped carvings linked to water conduits for libations. "There are 'chairs' carved into the...
  • Phoenicians: Ancient Mariners

    10/12/2004 10:45:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 446+ views
    National Geographic ^ | October 2004 | Rick Gore
    Although they're mentioned frequently in ancient texts as vigorous traders and sailors, we know relatively little about these puzzling people. Historians refer to them as Canaanites when talking about the culture before 1200 B.C.The Greeks called them the phoinikes, which means the "red people"a name that became Phoeniciansafter their word for a prized reddish purple cloth the Phoenicians exported. But they would never have called themselves Phoenicians. Rather, they were citizens of the ports from which they set sail, walled cities such as Byblos, Sidon, and Tyre.
  • Phoenician Temple Found In Sicily

    02/28/2006 11:37:16 AM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 1,191+ views
    ANSA ^ | 2-28-2006
    Phoenician temple found in SicilySite believed to be 'unique', archaeologists say (ANSA) - Palermo, February 28 - An ancient Phoenician temple unearthed in Sicily is "unique" in the West, the head of the Italian dig team claims. "You have to go all the way to Amrit in Syria to find a similar one," said Lorenzo Nigro of the Rome University team. The temple came to light last year after a portion of a lagoon surrounding the Phoenician city of Motya (present-day Mozia) was drained. The pool began to fill up again and a fresh-water spring was found - a fact...
  • Phoenician Tombs Found In Sicily

    08/23/2006 6:12:18 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 827+ views
    ANSA ^ | 8-23-2006
    Phoenician tombs found in Sicily 40 sarcophagi unearthed at necropolis near ancient colony (ANSA) - Marsala (Trapani), August 23 - Archaeologists have unearthed 40 sarcophagi in what was once the sacred Phoenician burial grounds of Birgi, near the ancient colony of Motya . The tombs were discovered by chance by a group of construction workers excavating the foundations of a house close to the westernmost tip of Sicily near Marsala, culture officials said . Archaeologists said the sarcophagi were made of simple stone slabs and resembled those found on display outside the museum on the neighbouring island of Motya (present-day...
  • Phoenician City Not Destroyed

    03/15/2006 11:40:56 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 600+ views
    Ansa ^ | 3-15-2006
    Phoenician city not destroyedLife after supposed death for Motya near Trapani (ANSA) - Palermo, March 14 - An ancient Phoenician city unearthed in Sicily was inhabited after its supposed destruction, the head of an Italian dig team claims . "Our finds, including cooking pans, Phoenecian-style vases, small altars and pieces of looms, show Motya had a thriving population long after it is commonly believed to have been destroyed by the Ancient Greeks," said Maria Pamela Toti . The continued life of Motya had been put forward by various archaeologists over the years but until now no proof had been found...
  • So How Far Did The Phoenicians Really Go In The Region?

    02/23/2004 8:55:51 AM PST · by blam · 109 replies · 1,380+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 2-23-2004 | Peter Speetjens
    So how far did the Phoenicians really go in the region?In one of the early adventures of Asterix and Obelix, a Phoenician trade ship takes the worlds funniest Celtic warriors from the Gauls last village free from Roman rule to Queen Cleopatra in the land of the Nile. Now, of course this is but an image in a comic book, but still, is it possible that the Phoenicians, generally known as the greatest seafarers of antiquity, actually reached Brittany, or even further? Theres no doubt that Phoenicians were well established all over the Mediterranean. Archeological remains prove they lived in...
  • Research On Ancient Writing Linked With Modern Mideast Conflict

    11/14/2005 1:25:30 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies · 1,424+ views
    The State ^ | 11-14-2005 | Ron Grossman
    Posted on Sun, Nov. 13, 2005 Research on ancient writing linked with modern Mideast conflict BY RON GROSSMAN CHICAGO - Professorial colleagues think Ron Tappy has made a landmark breakthrough in our understanding of the world of the Bible. He himself is waiting for the other shoe to drop. This week, Tappy will formally unveil his discovery at the meetings of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Normally a presentation titled "The 2005 Excavation Season at Tel Zayit, with Special Attention to the Tenth Century BCE" would hardly be noticed beyond the scholars who will gather at the Hyatt Penn's...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Maltas Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • Lebanese are Phoenicians After All; And so Are Many of the Rest of US

    12/27/2008 6:02:57 AM PST · by decimon · 20 replies · 705+ views
    Informed Comment ^ | Dec. 23, 2008 | Juan Cole
    A team of biologists at Lebanese American University estimates that 1 in 17 persons around the Mediterranean carries genetic markers distinctive to the ancient Phoenician people who resided in what is now Lebanon. The Phoenicians spread out in a trade diaspora two millennia ago, establishing colonies from Spain to Cyprus. The team also found that one third of Lebanese have the markers for Phoenician descent, and that these are spread evenly through the population, among both Christians and Muslims. In fact, all Lebanese have broadly similar sets of genetic markers. The lead researcher commented, "Whether you take a Christian village...
  • 'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold

    11/29/2015 7:27:04 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 47 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | November 28, 2015
    'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold By The Siberian Times reporter 28 November 2015 Fast track evolution as great Siberian symbol is surprisingly unmasked as an immigrant breed. Researchers say these horses, which seem so well attuned to the harsh cold with thick, dense winter coats, their armour against temperatures of minus 70C (minus 94F), are incomers that only arrived in these parts within the last 800 years.Picture:Maria Vasilyeva The resilient Yakutian horses are one of the great native sights of the Sakha Republic - or Yakutia. In their way as much a part of...
  • Iberia, Not Siberia

    12/21/2003 9:48:22 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 3,482+ views
    Team Atlantis ^ | 12-6-2000 | Michael A Arbuthnot
    IBERIA, NOT SIBERIA?A Look at the Evidence Supporting a Late Pleistocene Migration to the New World from Europe Michael A. Arbuthnot ANT 5152 Paleoindian Archaeology Dr. Michael Faught December 6th, 2000 Perhaps the most provocative question facing North American paleo-archaeologists is the origin of the Clovis complex. Traditional models have placed Clovis origins in Asia, though one controversial theory contends that Clovis progenitors may have migrated from Iberia (Spain, France, and Portugal). This theory suggests that the descendants of an Upper Pleistocene culture known as Solutrean were the first unquestionable inhabitants of the New World. The recent revitalization of a...
  • Immigrants From The Other Side (Clovis Is Solutrean?)

    11/02/2003 4:11:21 PM PST · by blam · 55 replies · 16,673+ views
    CSFA ^ | 11-3-2003 | Dennis Sanford
    Immigrants from the Other Side? According to the Clovis-First theory, for decades the gospel preached by authorities on the peopling of the Americas, the first Americans walked across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia about 12,000 years ago, and after finding a corridor through the Cordilleran Ice Sheet--admittedly it wasn't an easy trip and the timing was tricky--descended into temperate North America. We know them by their classic fluted points, unlike any others in the world, they left at campsites on their journey south to populate Central and South America. [~ 45:l ~] There have been variations of the basic...
  • Rediscovering America. (The New World May Be 20,000 Years Older Than Experts Thought)

    12/10/2003 1:30:57 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 2,783+ views
    Blue Corn Comics (?) ^ | Charles W, Petit
    Rediscovering AmericaThe New World may be 20,000 years older than experts thought BY CHARLES W. PETIT Late in the afternoon last May 17, a tired archaeological team neared the end of a 14-hour day winching muck to the deck of a Canadian Coast Guard vessel. It was in water 170 feet deep in Juan Perez Sound, half a mile offshore among British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands. For four days, team members had fruitlessly sieved undersea mud and gravel. Then, in the slanting light of sunset, a deckhand drew from the goop a triangular blade of dark basalt. Its sharp edge...
  • Affinities Of The Paleoindians

    06/13/2006 2:20:25 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 599+ views
    Antiquity Of Man ^ | Mikey Brass
    Affinities of the Paleoindians by Mikey Brass I would like to make it clear from the start that my knowledge of the early occupation of the Americas is very limited. It is a peripheral interest of mine. I don't feel competent enough to make many pronouncements on the late Pleistocene timing of the migration(s) from north-east Asia into the Americas. Instead I focus primarily here on showing, contrary to reports eminating from both pseudoscientific and unfortunately some portions of mainstream archaeology, that the origins of the Paleoindians lay in mainland Asia. Christy Turner has identified what he terms the "Mongoloid...
  • Evidence Found for Canals That Watered Ancient Peru

    01/03/2006 3:43:00 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 23 replies · 823+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 3, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Photograph courtesy of Tom D. DillehayRUNNING WATER The sites of ancient irrigation canals. People in Peru's Zaa Valley dug the canals as early as 6,700 years ago to divert river water to their crops. In the Andean foothills of Peru, not far from the Pacific coast, archaeologists have found what they say is evidence for the earliest known irrigated agriculture in the Americas. An analysis of four derelict canals, filled with silt and buried deep under sediments, showed that they were used to water cultivated fields 5,400 years ago, in one case possibly as early as 6,700 years ago,...
  • Ancient Canals Reveal Underpinnings of Early Andean Civilization

    05/12/2007 6:38:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 444+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, November 29, 2005 | Vanderbilt University
    The discovery by Vanderbilt University anthropologist Tom Dillehay and his colleagues, Herbert Eling, Instituto Naciona de Anthropolotica e Historia in Coahulila, Mexico, and Jack Rossen, Ithaca College, was reported in the Nov. 22 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The anthropologists discovered the canals in Peru's upper middle Zana Valley, approximately 60 kilometers east of the Pacific coast. Preliminary results indicate one of the canals is over 6,700 years old, while another has been confirmed to be over 5,400 years old. They are the oldest such canals yet discovered in South America... Dillehay and his team...
  • Andean Crops Cultivated Almost 10,000 Years Ago

    01/17/2008 3:55:35 PM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 83+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 1-15-2008 | Michael Abrams
    Andean Crops Cultivated Almost 10,000 Years Ago by Michael Abrams Archaeologists have long thought that people in the Old World were planting, watering, weeding, and harvesting for a good 5,000 years before anyone in the New World did such things. But fresh evidence, in the form of Peruvian squash seeds, indicates that farming in the New and Old Worlds was nearly concurrent. In a paper the journal Science published last June, Tom Dillehay, an anthropological archaeologist at Vanderbilt University, revealed that the squash seeds he found in the ruins of what may have been ancient storage bins on the lower...
  • Trying To Fathom Farming's Origins

    08/15/2007 10:42:04 AM PDT · by blam · 60 replies · 929+ views
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | 8-14-2007 | Bradley T Lepper
    Trying to fathom farming's origins Tuesday, August 14, 2007 3:22 AM By Bradley T. Lepper Tom Dillehay, an archaeologist with Vanderbilt University, and several colleagues announced last month in the journal Science that they had recovered remarkably early evidence for agriculture in South America. Working at several sites in the Nanchoc Valley of northern Peru, they found squash seeds that were more than 9,000 years old. This is nearly twice as old as previously reported farming evidence in the region. Dillehay and his co-authors point out that one of the most important aspects of this discovery is that "horticulture and...
  • Complex grammar of the genomic language

    11/18/2015 9:52:55 AM PST · by Heartlander · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 9, 2015 | From Karolinska Institutet
    A new study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet shows that the 'grammar' of the human genetic code is more complex than that of even the most intricately constructed spoken languages in the world. The findings, published in the journal Nature, explain why the human genome is so difficult to decipher -- and contribute to the further understanding of how genetic differences affect the risk of developing diseases on an individual level....The sequencing of the human genome in the year 2000 revealed how the 3 billion letters of A, C, G and T, that the human genome consists of, are ordered. However,...
  • Prehistoric tooth reveals surprising details about long-lost human 'cousins'

    11/18/2015 7:11:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 17, 2015 | James Rogers
    A piece of Denisovan finger bone and another tooth discovered in the same cave, respectively, in 2010 and 2000, had been dated to between 50,000 and 70,000 years ago. "The new tooth is 50,000 years older than the others -- this is really interesting, it shows us these guys were around for a long time," Bence Viola, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto's Department of Anthropology, told FoxNews.com. The finger bone and the earlier tooth were from individuals that lived within a timespan of about 1,000 years each other, according to Viola. The anthropologist, who worked on the...
  • 'Fourth strand' of European ancestry originated with hunter-gatherers isolated by Ice Age

    11/16/2015 1:14:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Monday, November 16, 2015 | University of Cambridge, Nature
    The first sequencing of ancient genomes extracted from human remains that date back to the Late Upper Palaeolithic period over 13,000 years ago has revealed a previously unknown "fourth strand" of ancient European ancestry. This new lineage stems from populations of hunter-gatherers that split from western hunter-gatherers shortly after the 'out of Africa' expansion some 45,000 years ago and went on to settle in the Caucasus region, where southern Russia meets Georgia today. Here these hunter-gatherers largely remained for millennia, becoming increasingly isolated as the Ice Age culminated in the last 'Glacial Maximum' some 25,000 years ago, which they weathered...
  • Queen Victoria illegitimate, biographer says

    09/01/2002 6:27:36 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 34 replies · 594+ views
    London A book to be published this week says that Britain's Queen Victoria may have been illegitimate, possibly undermining the whole Royal Family's legitimacy, the Sunday Times reported. In his book The Victorians, acclaimed biographer A.N. Wilson alleges that Victoria's mother, Princess Victoire of Leiningen, had a lengthy affair with her Irish-born secretary Sir John Conroy and that he, rather than Prince Edward, the Duke of Kent, was Victoria's real father. Buckingham Palace said it would not comment on the allegation. Mr. Wilson based his argument partly on medical data, the newspaper said. Records show that the illness porphyria...
  • Moscow Patriarchate Says it Has Key Info on Czar's Remains Buried in St. Petersburg

    07/26/2012 6:32:22 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 22 replies
    Interfax ^ | 7/26/12
    Kiev, July 26, Interfax - The Moscow Patriarchate might reconsider its attitude toward what is widely believed to be the remains of Russia's last Emperor Nicholas II and members of his family and entourage, which were found at the site of their shooting near Yekaterinburg and were buried at the Imperial Burial Vault at the Cathedral of the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg in 1998. "I would like to announce very important information we have received from New York, which is related to the circumstances of the royal family's death. I believe these circumstances will help us determine...
  • Russia's last tsar rehabilitated [ Nicholas II and his family ]

    12/07/2008 2:36:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies · 2,165+ views
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, October 1, 2008 | James Rodgers et al
    Russia's Supreme Court has ruled that the last Tsar, Nicholas II, and his family were victims of political repression and should be rehabilitated... Nicholas, his wife Alexandra, their five children, doctor and three servants were shot dead by Bolshevik revolutionaries in July, 1918. Lower courts had previously refused to reclassify the killings, which had been categorised as simply murder... The Romanovs were shot by a firing squad without a trial, in the Urals city of Yekaterinburg. The Supreme Court "declared as groundless the repression of Tsar Nicholas II and his family and ordered their rehabilitation", the judge's decision said on...
  • DNA confirms Tsars family remains (Tsar Nicholas II and family executed by Bolsheviks)

    07/17/2008 8:47:18 AM PDT · by Stoat · 16 replies · 961+ views
    Russia Today ^ | July 17, 2008
    News   July 17, 2008, 4:55DNA confirms Tsar’s family remainsDNA results have confirmed that remains found near Ekaterinburg a year ago belong to Prince Aleksey and Grand Duchess Maria Nikolayevna of the Romanov family. The announcement comes on the 90th anniversary of the execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family by Bolsheviks.On Wednesday, church services are being held across Russia to remember the tragic event. The last Tsar of Russia and his family were shot in the early hours of July 17 1918, less than two years after the abdication of Nicholas II, in the Urals city of...
  • DNA confirms IDs of czar's children, ending mystery

    04/30/2008 2:01:14 PM PDT · by Jet Jaguar · 12 replies · 66+ views
    AP via brietbart ^ | apr 30, 2008 | MIKE ECKEL
    MOSCOW (AP) - For nine decades after Bolshevik executioners gunned down Czar Nicholas II and his family, there were no traces of the remains of Crown Prince Alexei, the hemophiliac heir to Russia's throne. Some said the delicate 13-year-old had somehow survived and escaped; others believed his bones were lost in Russia's vastness, buried in secret amid fear and chaos as the country lurched into civil war. Now an official says DNA tests have solved the mystery by identifying bone shards found in a forest as those of Alexei and his sister, Grand Duchess Maria. The remains of their parentsNicholas...
  • DNA confirms IDs of czar's children

    04/30/2008 8:34:25 AM PDT · by Borges · 23 replies · 49+ views
    Yahoo - AP ^ | 04/30/08 | MIKE ECKEL
    MOSCOW - DNA tests carried out by a U.S. laboratory prove that bone fragments exhumed last year belong to two children of Czar Nicholas II, putting to rest questions about what happened to Russia's last royal family, a regional governor said Wednesday. Bone fragments dug up near the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg are indeed those of Crown Prince Alexei and his sister, Maria, whose remains had been missing since the family was murdered in 1918 as Russia descended into civil war, said Eduard Rossel, governor of the Sverdlovsk region. "We have now found the entire family," he told reporters...
  • Amateurs Unravel Russia's Last Royal Mystery

    11/24/2007 2:57:27 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 909+ views
    NY Times ^ | 11-25-2007 | Clifford J Levy
    Amateurs Unravel Russias Last Royal Mystery Agence France PresseCzar Nicholas II of Russia, his wife, Alexandra, wearing crown, and their children in 1914, four years before they were killed. By CLIFFORD J. LEVY Published: November 25, 2007 YEKATERINBURG, Russia On the outskirts of this burly industrial center, off a road like any other, on a nowhere scrap of land here unfolded the final act of one of the last centurys most momentous events. Excavations were done near Yekaterinburg in September. An archaeologist oversaw the search. A short way through a clearing, toward a cluster of birch trees, the...
  • Remains of last Russian czar's heir may have been found

    08/24/2007 9:05:53 AM PDT · by 3AngelaD · 22 replies · 1,303+ views
    MOSCOW: Prosecutors announced Friday that they have reopened an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of the last Russian czar and his family nearly 90 years ago after an archaeologist said the remains of the czar's son and heir to the throne at last may have been found. The announcement of the reopened investigation, while a routine matter, signaled that government may be taking the claims announced Thursday by Yekaterinburg researcher Sergei Pogorelov seriously. In comments broadcast on NTV, Pogorelov said bones found in a burned area of ground near Yekaterinburg belong to a boy and a...
  • Descendant of last czar pushes Russia to admit mistake

    01/09/2006 10:44:33 AM PST · by lizol · 14 replies · 861+ views
    Globe and Mail ^ | Monday, January 9, 2006 | GRAEME SMITH
    Descendant of last czar pushes Russia to admit mistake. Relative seeks formal admission that Nicholas II was unjustly killed By GRAEME SMITH Monday, January 9, 2006 YEKATERINBURG, RUSSIA -- On the face of it, Maria Romanova's legal application to Russian prosecutors might seem straightforward. As the self-described head of the surviving family of Nicholas II, Russia's last czar, Ms. Romanova wants rehabilitation for her ancestors, according to her lawyer. Under Russian law, this would mean a formal admission that Nicholas II was unjustly killed along with his wife, children and attendants after revolution swept away Russia's monarchy. Boris Yeltsin went...
  • Alexei and Maria Romanov: I Possibly Know Where Bones Are in Russia

    12/25/2005 2:58:41 PM PST · by GermanBusiness · 82 replies · 7,072+ views
    I've been dating a woman in St. Petersburg, Russia for over a year whose grandfather was apparently given a lethal injection by the communists when he went in for a routine physical in the late 1940s. His name: Fyedor Korablyev, born 16 February 1907 Even before the apparent murder, the family has been afraid to talk about any relation to the Romanov Family but an older family member has just told me that Alexei Romanov died as a monk in Siberia in 1960. The world is aware that Alexei's bones were never found. He was not executed with this family...
  • Scientist: DNA Disputes Russian Tsar Remains

    07/14/2004 9:04:34 AM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 2,528+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 7-14-2004
    Scientist: DNA Disputes Russian Tsar Remains July 14, 2004 An American scientific team has disputed what was thought to be the definitive identification of the remains of the Russian royal family, executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918, London's Daily Telegraph said Monday. The Russian government in 1998 identified bones found in a common grave in Yekaterinburg, formerly Sverdlovsk, as belonging to Tsar Nicholas, Tsarina Alexandra and three of their daughters. Tsar Nicholis And Family Calling us names, as Dr. Gill has done, will not help their fatally flawed position." The Russian authorities said then that the identification...
  • Leading Harvard physicist has a radical new theory for why humans exist

    11/15/2015 7:47:38 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 57 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/15/2015 | Jessica Orwig
    Where do we come from? There are many right answers to this question, and the one you get depends on who you ask. For example, an astrophysicist might say that the chemical components of our bodies were first forged in the nuclear fires of stars. On the other hand, an evolutionary biologist might look at the similarities between our DNA and that of other primates' and conclude we evolved from apes. Lisa Randall, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, has a different, and novel answer, which she describes in her latest book, "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs." Randall has written...
  • Volcanic Soils Offer New Clues About The Emergence Of Powerful Chiefdoms In Hawaii

    06/11/2004 4:26:36 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 263+ views
    Eureka Alert/Stanford University ^ | 6-11-2004 | Mark Shwartz
    Contact: Mark Shwartz mshwartz@stanford.edu 650-723-9296 Stanford University Volcanic soils yield new clues about the emergence of powerful chiefdoms in Hawaii When the first Europeans arrived in the Hawaiian Islands in 1778, they found a thriving, complex society organized into chiefdoms whose economies were based primarily on farming. On the islands of Kauai, O'ahu and Molokai, the principal crop was taro a starchy plant grown in irrigated wetlands where the supply of water was usually abundant. But on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii, the main staple was the sweet potato a more labor-intensive crop planted in relatively...
  • 'Ancient' boat expedition hits trouble

    09/09/2005 8:28:22 AM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 25 replies · 1,179+ views
    The Sydney Morning Herald ^ | September 8, 2005 - 5:25PM | SMH
    A bid by an Australian archaeologist and other sailors to recreate an ancient voyage in a traditional reed boat has struck trouble in the Arabian Sea. Nautical archaeologist Dr Tom Vosmer and seven other sailors had set off from Oman for a two-week voyage in the Magan, a 12-metre-long sailing boat made of reeds, rope and wood, but capsized within hours. "Water leaked into the Magan causing it to capsize, but a support ship from the Omani royal navy accompanying the boat intervened and rescued the sailors," a source from Oman's culture and national heritage ministry which organised the trip...
  • Deep history of coconuts decoded (Colonization of the Americas?)

    06/24/2011 2:06:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | June 24, 2011 | Diana Lutz
    Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the AmericasThe coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. Whats more, until it is needed for some other purpose it serves as a handy flotation device. No wonder people from ancient Austronesians to Captain Bligh pitched a few coconuts aboard before setting...
  • Ancient British tree undergoing 'sex-change'

    11/02/2015 11:36:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 87 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 2, 2015 | Staff
    A British tree thought to be up to 5,000 years old has started to change sex, a "rare and unusual" phenomenon not fully understood by scientists, a botanist said Monday. The Fortingall Yew, in Perthshire, central Scotland has for hundreds of years been recorded as male, but has recently begun sprouting berries, suggesting that at least part of the tree is changing gender. "It's a rare occurence ... rare and unusual and not fully understood," said Max Coleman of Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, who spotted the berries. "It's thought that there's a shift in the balance of hormone-like compounds that...
  • 2,500-year-old Female Siberian Warrior Is Beheaded By Excavator

    10/31/2015 8:11:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | October 29, 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    The excavator smashed the prehistoric ceremonial burial chamber in the Altai Mountains, wrecking the grave of a suspected the grave of a suspected 16 to 20 year old combatant from the colourful Pazyryk culture. Local culture heritage official Dr Vasily Oinoshev said: 'Only the human head and upper part of the horse remained intact in the burial ground.Unfortunately, the rest was destroyed by heavy machinery. 'Apparently, this was a young woman, judging by the teeth. All of them are intact and in good condition. We attribute her to Pazyryk culture, and we have preliminarily dated the burial as being 2,500...
  • Chickens are evolving 15 TIMES faster than expected:

    10/27/2015 7:41:08 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 121 replies
    Dailymail.co.uk ^ | 27 October 2015 | By Sarah Griffiths for MailOnline
    Scientists discover the birds have developed two mutations in just 50 years Genes of White Plymouth Rock chickens mutated twice in 50 years Scientists previously thought rate of change in mitochondrial genomes was never faster than about two per cent per million years Mutations suggest rate of evolution in the chickens is 15 times faster Study goes against theory evolution can only be seen over long periods
  • 10,000-Year-Old Extinct Lion Cubs Discovered In Near-Perfect Condition In Siberian Permafrost

    10/27/2015 11:42:03 AM PDT · by zeestephen · 21 replies
    MSN.com ^ | 27 October 2015 | Jeva Lange
    Cave lions lived during the Middle to Late Pleistocene eras in Eurasia, the British Isles, to the far east of Russia, and into Alaska and northwestern Canada. Their extinction remains something of a mystery because they had few predators and, due to their smaller size, they wouldn't get trapped in bogs like woolly mammoths and rhinos.
  • Analysis: Some hot dog brands contain human DNA

    10/26/2015 9:37:39 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 52 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 26, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    MENLO PARK, Calif., - A California startup analyzing food on a molecular level announced some hard news about one of the most beloved foods in the United States: 2 percent of hot dogs contain human DNA. Clear Food, the consumer guide wing of Menlo Park startup Clear Labs, said it analysed 345 hot dogs and sausages from 75 brands sold at 10 different retailers and discovered 14.4 percent of the products included ingredients that were not listed on the label. The startup said several of the tested brands had "hygienic" issues. "Hygienic issues occur when some sort of non-harmful contaminant...
  • Hazelnut shells found at Skye Mesolithic site

    10/25/2015 12:19:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | October 22, 2015 | Steven McKenzie
    The remains of hazelnuts eaten by some of Skye's earliest inhabitants were found at a dig on the island, archaeologists have revealed. Hazelnuts were a favourite snack of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, according to archaeologists at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI). The shells found at an excavation above Staffin Bay could be 8,000-years-old. UHI carried out the dig along with Staffin Community Trust, school children and volunteers. Dan Lee, lifelong learning and outreach archaeologist at UHI, said: "We have found lots of fragments of charred hazelnut shells in the lower soil samples. "They are the ideal thing to date...
  • Study of ancient and modern plagues finds common features

    11/21/2008 9:01:03 PM PST · by neverdem · 24 replies · 1,190+ views
    biologynews.net ^ | November 21, 2008 | NA
    In 430 B.C., a new and deadly diseaseits cause remains a mysteryswept into Athens. The walled Greek city-state was teeming with citizens, soldiers and refugees of the war then raging between Athens and Sparta. As streets filled with corpses, social order broke down. Over the next three years, the illness returned twice and Athens lost a third of its population. It lost the war too. The Plague of Athens marked the beginning of the end of the Golden Age of Greece. The Plague of Athens is one of 10 historically notable outbreaks described in an article in The Lancet Infectious...
  • Clues to Black Plagues Fury in 650-Year-Old Skeletons

    01/28/2008 10:00:36 PM PST · by forkinsocket · 32 replies · 182+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 29, 2008 | NICHOLAS BAKALAR
    Many historians have assumed that Europes deadliest plague, the Black Death of 1347 to 1351, killed indiscriminately, young and old, hardy and frail, healthy and sick alike. But two anthropologists were not so sure. They decided to take a closer look at the skeletons of people buried more than 650 years ago. Their findings, published on Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that the plague selectively took the already ill, while many of the otherwise healthy survived the infection. Although it may not be surprising that healthy people would be more likely to survive an...
  • Lost documents shed light on Black Death

    06/01/2007 6:38:06 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 59 replies · 1,117+ views
    The Times ^ | June 1, 2007 | Simon de Bruxelles
    For centuries, rats and fleas have been fingered as the culprits responsible for the Black Death, the medieval plague that killed as many as two thirds of Europes population. But historians studying 14th-century court records from Dorset believe they may have uncovered evidence that exonerates them. The parchment records, contained in a recently-discovered archive, reveal that an estimated 50 per cent of the 2,000 people living in Gillingham died within four months of the Black Death reaching the town in October 1348. The deaths are recorded in land transfers lodged with the manorial court which unusually for the period...
  • Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV

    03/10/2005 3:11:16 PM PST · by Pyro7480 · 47 replies · 1,885+ views
    Yahoo! News (Reuters) ^ | 3/10/2005 | n/a
    Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV LONDON (Agence de Presse Medicale) - The persistent epidemics of hemorrhagic fever that struck Europe during the Middle Ages provided the selection pressures that have made 10 percent of Europeans resistant to HIV infection, according to a UK study. A mutation called delta-32 in the cellular receptor dubbed CCR5 protects against HIV infection, and is found more often in Europeans than other populations. Scientists have previously suggested that the genetic mutation became common because it protected people against the Black Death or smallpox epidemics, while those with normal CCR5 were wiped out. But...
  • The viruses are out there, and they are out to get us

    02/27/2003 6:26:28 PM PST · by Wallaby · 16 replies · 1,270+ views
    The Canberra Times | 28 February 2003
    Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion. The viruses are out there, and they are out to get us It is possible that the Black Death is not dead and that a new 'bird flu' is another potential mass killer The Canberra Times Section A; Pg 17 February 27, 2003 Thursday Final Edition LATE last month an eight-year-old girl from Hong Kong visiting relatives in southern China fell ill with influenza and was admitted to hospital. A week later she died, and since then her father has died of the...
  • Medieval Black Death Was Probably Not Bubonic Plague

    04/15/2002 11:36:11 AM PDT · by Gladwin · 71 replies · 1,378+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Posted 4/15/2002 | Penn State
    The Black Death of the 1300s was probably not the modern disease known as bubonic plague, according to a team of anthropologists studying on these 14th century epidemics. Although on the surface, seem to have been similar, we are not convinced that the epidemic in the 14th century and the present day bubonic plague are the same, says Dr. James Wood, professor of anthropology and demography at Penn State. Old descriptions of disease symptoms are usually too non-specific to be a reliable basis for diagnosis. The researchers note that it was the symptom of lymphatic swelling that led 19th century...
  • The Next Pandemic

    09/02/2014 3:42:11 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies
    The Week Magazine ^ | 9-2-2014 | The Week Staff
    By The Week Staff August 30, 2014Think Ebola is alarming? Scientists expect a much deadlier virus to emerge in the not-distant future. How likely is a pandemic? Epidemiologists believe we're statistically overdue for a global viral outbreak, which occurs every generation or so. This year's Ebola crisis is probably just a dress rehearsal: Though the virus has killed at least 1,420 people in Africa in the last five months, Ebola is transmitted only through intimate contact with bodily fluids and doesn't have the global reach of a true pandemic, such as Spanish influenza in 1918. Humanity had no prior exposure...