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  • Cats Are Finally Getting Geneticists' Attention

    01/24/2015 3:27:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    January 15, 2015 ^ | January 15, 2015 | Carl Engelking
    Consumer doggie DNA testing is old hat at this point, having been around since 2007. But cat-lovers who wish to decipher their pet's breed are out of luck -- no such tests exist for felines. That fact reflects the state of the underlying science. Since the first full dog genome was sequenced ten years ago, geneticists have identified hundreds of genes behind canine diseases and physical traits. By comparison, just a handful of such genes have been identified in cats. But a group of geneticists is working to close this gap by sequencing 99 domestic cats. This week the researchers...
  • Tuberculosis genomes track human history

    01/21/2015 6:34:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Nature ^ | 19 January 2015 Corrected: 20 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Although M. tuberculosis probably first emerged some 40,000 years ago in Africa, the disease did not take hold until humans took to farming... A previous analysis by his team had shown that the common ancestor of all the M. bacterium strains circulating today began spreading around 10,000 years ago in the ancient Fertile Crescent, a region stretching from Mesopotamia to the Nile Delta that was a cradle of agriculture... 4,987 samples of the Beijing lineage from 99 countries... the information to date the expansion of the lineage and show how the strains are related... the Beijing lineage did indeed emerge...
  • First DNA tests say Kennewick Man was Native American

    01/18/2015 9:27:17 PM PST · by Theoria · 41 replies
    The Seattle Times ^ | 17 Jan 2015 | Sandi Doughton
    Nearly two decades after the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man was discovered on the banks of the Columbia River, the mystery of his origins appears to be nearing resolution. Genetic analysis is still under way in Denmark, but documents obtained through the federal Freedom of Information Act say preliminary results point to a Native-American heritage.The researchers performing the DNA analysis “feel that Kennewick has normal, standard Native-American genetics,” according to a 2013 email to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for the care and management of the bones. “At present there is no indication he has a...
  • 'Junk' DNA Mystery Solved: It's Not Needed

    05/12/2013 6:18:58 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    livescience.com ^ | 12 May 2013 Time: 01:00 PM ET
    ... So-called junk DNA, the vast majority of the genome that doesn't code for proteins, really isn't needed for a healthy organism, according to new research. "At least for a plant, junk DNA really is just junk — it's not required," said study co-author Victor Albert, a molecular evolutionary biologist at the University of Buffalo in New York. ... Albert and his colleagues sequenced the genome of the carnivorous bladderwort plant, Utricularia gibba, which lives in wet soil or fresh water throughout the world and sucks swimming microorganisms into its tiny, 1-milimeter-long bladders. The genome had just 80 million base...
  • Christian Professor Claims Genetics Disproves Historical Adam

    08/27/2011 10:07:19 AM PDT · by fishtank · 142 replies · 1+ views
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 8-26-11 | Brian Thomas
    National Public Radio recently interviewed Trinity Western University biologist Dennis Venema, who stated his belief that humans did not descend from Adam and Eve.1 Venema, an evangelical evolutionist, claimed that genetics studies show "there is no way we can be traced back to a single couple."2 Do the data really contradict the biblical account of human history? "Given the genetic variation of people today, [Venema] says scientists can't get that [starting] population size below 10,000 people at any time in our evolutionary history," NPR reported.2 But this claim fails for three reasons. First, it relies on the presumption of "evolutionary...
  • Indian DNA Links To 6 'Founding Mothers'

    03/13/2008 2:04:39 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies · 1,801+ views
    Yahoo News/AP ^ | 3-13-2008 | Malcom Ritter
    Indian DNA links to 6 'founding mothers' By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer NEW YORK - Nearly all of today's Native Americans in North, Central and South America can trace part of their ancestry to six women whose descendants immigrated around 20,000 years ago, a DNA study suggests. Those women left a particular DNA legacy that persists to today in about 95 percent of Native Americans, researchers said. The finding does not mean that only these six women gave rise to the migrants who crossed into North America from Asia in the initial populating of the continent, said study co-author...
  • Modern Humans in India Earlier Than Previously Thought?

    09/15/2013 4:57:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sat, Sep 14, 2013 | editors
    "We found the very first evidence for archaeological assemblages in association with the Toba ash", says Petraglia. "We found Middle Palaeolithic assemblages below and above the ash indicating the technologies being used at the time of the event. When the stone tool assemblages were analyzed from contexts above and below the ash, we found that they were very similar........We therefore concluded that the Middle Palaeolithic hominins survived the eruption and there was population continuity. This is not what would have been expected based on general theories that the Toba super-eruption decimated populations." Moreover, similar findings published by Christine Lane, et...
  • Toba super-volcano catastrophe idea 'dismissed'

    05/02/2013 7:34:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Jonathan Amos
    The idea that humans nearly became extinct 75,000 ago because of a super-volcano eruption is not supported by new data from Africa, scientists say. In the past, it has been proposed that the so-called Toba event plunged the world into a volcanic winter, killing animal and plant life and squeezing our species to a few thousand individuals. An Oxford University-led team examined ancient sediments in Lake Malawi for traces of this climate catastrophe. It could find none... Researchers estimate some 2,000-3,000 cubic kilometres of rock and ash were thrown from the volcano when it blew its top on what is...
  • Ancient Supervolcano Affected the Ends of the Earth

    11/08/2012 6:20:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | November 5, 2012 | Staff
    About 74,000 years ago, the Toba volcano on the Indonesian island of Sumatra erupted with catastrophic force. Estimated to be 5,000 times larger than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, it is believed to be the largest volcanic event on Earth in the last 2 million years. Toba spewed enough lava to build two Mount Everests, it produced huge clouds of ash that blocked sunlight for years, and it the left behind a crater 31 miles (50 kilometers) across. The volcano even sent enough sulphuric acid into the atmosphere to create acid rain downpours in the Earth's polar regions,...
  • 'Pompeii-Like' Excavations Tell Us More About Toba Super-Eruption

    03/04/2010 7:13:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 666+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 3, 2010 | University of Oxford
    Newly discovered archaeological sites in southern and northern India have revealed how people lived before and after the colossal Toba volcanic eruption 74,000 years ago... The seven-year project examines the environment that humans lived in, their stone tools, as well as the plants and animal bones of the time. The team has concluded that many forms of life survived the super-eruption, contrary to other research which has suggested significant animal extinctions and genetic bottlenecks. According to the team, a potentially ground-breaking implication of the new work is that the species responsible for making the stone tools in India was Homo...
  • Ancient Volcano's Devastating Effects Confirmed (Toba eruption and the following Ice Age)

    12/04/2009 3:08:19 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 30 replies · 1,018+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 12/4/09 | LiveScience Staff
    A massive volcanic eruption that occurred in the distant past killed off much of central India's forests and may have pushed humans to the brink of extinction, according to a new study that adds evidence to a controversial topic. The Toba eruption, which took place on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia about 73,000 years ago, released an estimated 800 cubic kilometers of ash into the atmosphere that blanketed the skies and blocked out sunlight for six years. In the aftermath, global temperatures dropped by as much as 16 degrees centigrade (28 degrees Fahrenheit) and life on Earth plunged deeper...
  • Supervolcano eruption -- in Sumatra -- deforested India 73,000 years ago

    11/23/2009 12:23:04 PM PST · by decimon · 25 replies · 1,390+ views
    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A new study provides "incontrovertible evidence" that the volcanic super-eruption of Toba on the island of Sumatra about 73,000 years ago deforested much of central India, some 3,000 miles from the epicenter, researchers report. The volcano ejected an estimated 800 cubic kilometers of ash into the atmosphere, leaving a crater (now the world's largest volcanic lake) that is 100 kilometers long and 35 kilometers wide. Ash from the event has been found in India, the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea. The bright ash reflected sunlight off the landscape, and volcanic sulfur...
  • Ancient Supervolcano's Eruption Caused Decade Of Severe Winters

    07/03/2009 5:39:20 AM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies · 619+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 2, 2009 | Unknown
    Previous studies have suggested that Indonesia's Toba supervolcano, when it erupted about 74,000 years ago, triggered a 1,000-year episode of ice sheet advance, and also may have produced a short-lived "volcanic winter," which drastically reduced the human population at the time.
  • Study: Humans Almost Went Extinct 70,000 Years Ago

    04/24/2008 12:07:36 PM PDT · by Sopater · 67 replies · 754+ views
    Fox News ^ | Thursday, April 24, 2008 | AP
    WASHINGTON — Human beings may have had a brush with extinction 70,000 years ago, an extensive genetic study suggests. The human population at that time was reduced to small isolated groups in Africa, apparently because of drought, according to an analysis released Thursday. The report notes that a separate study by researchers at Stanford University estimated the number of early humans may have shrunk as low as 2,000 before numbers began to expand again in the early Stone Age.
  • Super-Eruption: No Problem (Toba)

    07/06/2007 9:02:21 AM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,327+ views
    Nature ^ | 7-6-2007 | Katherine Sanderson
    Super-eruption: no problem?Tools found before and after a massive eruption hint at a hardy population. Katharine Sanderson Massive eruptions make it tough for life living under the ash cloud. A stash of ancient tools in India hints that life carried on as usual for humans living in the fall-out of a massive volcanic eruption 74,000 years ago. Michael Petraglia, from the University of Cambridge, UK, and his colleagues found the stone tools at a site called Jwalapuram, in Andhra Pradesh, southern India, above and below a thick layer of ash from the eruption of the Toba volcano in Indonesia —...
  • Why (Super-Volcano) Toba Matters

    04/18/2007 3:15:14 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 1,216+ views
    Nova ^ | Nova
    Why Toba Matters What can a volcanic eruption that occurred almost 75,000 years ago teach us about today's world of air pollution, global warming, and climate change? Heaps, says Dr. Drew Shindell, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York. For starters, knowing what the massive upheaval of Indonesia's Toba supervolcano did to the planet's climate (it might have cooled global temperatures enough to kill vegetation for years on end and perhaps hasten an ice age) offers sobering insight into what pumping billions of tons of chemicals into the atmosphere as we're now doing could result...
  • Toba in Sumatra a candidate for super volcano ???

    01/14/2007 3:28:48 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 55 replies · 1,916+ views
    India Daily ^ | Jan 6 2007 | India Daily Technology Team
    The devastating Tusnami was precursor to what is coming in 2012. Toba in Sumatra can explode 100 times more violently than what happened 74,000 years back. The last supervolcano to erupt was Toba 74,000 years ago in Sumatra. Ten thousand times bigger than Mt St Helens, it created a global catastrophe dramatically affecting life on Earth. Scientists now find through extrapolation cycle study that the 74,000 years back super volcano in Toba, Sumatra was the warm up for what may be coming in 2012. Around Toba, increasing harmonic tremors have started after the Tsunami two years back. It would devastate...
  • JOURNEY OF MANKIND (The Peopling Of The World)

    04/25/2005 5:11:40 PM PDT · by blam · 41 replies · 1,838+ views
    The Bradshaw Foundation ^ | Unknown | Stephen Oppenheimer
    This is the result of a DNA study done by Professor Stephen Oppenheimer and funded by The Bradshaw Foundation. As you go on the journey, here are some things I would like you to make note of and I would appreciate your comments:1. 135-115,000 years ago, notice that the first human excursion out of Africa failed/Died out.2. 74,000 years ago Toba exploded and reduced the worldwide human population to 2-10,000. Note the (about) 10,000 year absence of humans in India, Pakistan and parts of SE Asia. Also, there are two populations of 'out of Africa' humans that are seperated from...
  • Global Warming and the Rise of the Mongolian Empire

    03/12/2014 6:56:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    National Review ^ | 03/12/2014 | Alec Torres
    Humanity’s greatest land empire was made possible by non-human climate change. Many phenomena, real and imagined, have been attributed to global warming. From rising ocean levels to increased agricultural yields to tornadoes to polar vortices to droughts to rapes to car thefts, global warming now stands as the cause of just about anything. And because of current political dogma, man is ultimately blamed for all these evils (and occasional goods). Now a recent study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that there is a correlation between increasing global temperatures and the rise of the Mongolian empire. According...
  • How Climate Change Drove the Rise of Genghis Khan

    03/10/2014 5:24:10 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 32 replies
    TIME ^ | March 10, 2014 | by Bryan Walsh
    The Mongol warlord built the world's largest land-based empire. But he couldn't have done it without a change in climate. The difference was Genghis Khan, the warlord who united the tribes and launched them on their wave of unstoppable conquest. But the Mongol Empire wasn’t solely the product of Genghis’s will. As a fascinating new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) demonstrates, the rise of the Mongols may have owed just as much to beneficial changes in the climate that made the grasslands of the Mongol steppes green and verdant, fueling the horses that were...
  • Yurts: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask

    06/21/2013 9:56:58 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies
    MNN ^ | Mon, Jun 17 2013
    Here's your 101 guide on the structure that helped Genghis Khan conquer Eurasia — from how they're made to where you can stay in one or where you can buy one.A yurt is a round cylindrical dwelling capped with a conic roof that's been in use for at least the past few thousand years. Originating in Central Asia (Genghis Khan and his horde used them), the yurt was valued by its native progenitors for its portability, durability and structural soundness. Yurts are easy to put up and take down (requiring just a couple hours of work) and could be transported...
  • Genghis Khan the GREEN: Invader killed so many people that carbon levels plummeted

    04/20/2013 12:16:46 PM PDT · by plain talk · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | January 25, 2011 | Daily Mail reporter
    Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest. The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th centuries, helped remove nearly 700million tons of carbon from the atmosphere, claims a new study. The deaths of 40 million people meant that large areas of cultivated land grew thick once again with trees, which absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
  • Genghis Khan the GREEN: Invader killed so many people that carbon levels plummeted

    01/15/2013 9:54:45 AM PST · by Winged Hussar · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 1/25/11
    Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest. The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th centuries, helped remove nearly 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere, claims a new study.
  • The Hunt for Genghis Khan’s Tomb

    12/04/2012 11:51:09 AM PST · by Theoria · 32 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | 03 Dec 2012 | Oliver Steeds
    For centuries historians and treasure seekers have searched for the burial site of history's most famous conqueror. New findings offer compelling evidence that it's been found. In the eight hundred years since his death, people have sought in vain for the grave of Genhis Khan, the 13th-century conqueror and imperial ruler who, at the time of his death, occupied the largest contiguous empire, stretching from the Caspian Sea to the Pacific. In capturing most of central Asia and China, his armies killed and pillaged but also forged new links between East and West. One of history’s most brilliant and ruthless...
  • Genghis Kahn's Unintended Green Legacy

    02/23/2011 11:40:32 AM PST · by Olympiad Fisherman · 28 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 1/24/2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card? The reality may be a bit difficult for today's environmentalists to stomach, but Khan...
  • Carnegie Institution Study: Genocide Reduces Global Warming (All hail to Genghis Khan!)

    01/28/2011 7:10:57 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/28/2011 | Andrew Walden
    A study touting Genghis Khan's environmental record is being cheered by the team which produced Al Gore's movie, An Inconvenient Truth.  Genghis Khan's great accomplishment for the green cause?  Killing off 40 million humans so their un-tilled fields would be overtaken by forests.  While some may find genocide morally repugnant, environmentalists had a different concern:  Would reforestation be enough to overcome the greenhouse gases released by all those decaying bodies?  Julia Pongratz, who headed the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology research project from the Institution's Stanford University campus offices, provides the answer in a January 20 news release: We found that during the short...
  • Genghis Khan--environmentalist (Mass slaughter appears to be an environmental plus)

    01/26/2011 7:17:45 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/26/2011 | Ethel C. Fenig
    Environmentalists have a new role model--Genghis Khan. According to this report in England's Daily Mail , Khan was a real greenie whose actions during his long career ultimately improved the atmosphere and reforested the land. But...but...some might sputter, he was an incredibly cruel, murdering invader--not an environmentalist! Uh, well yes on all counts; that's how he improved the environment. Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest.The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th...
  • Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror? (Mongol invasion scrubbed 700 million tons of carbon)

    01/25/2011 9:08:45 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 01/25/2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card? The reality may be a bit difficult for today's environmentalists to stomach, but Khan...
  • Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror?

    01/24/2011 3:54:27 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 77 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 24 January 2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Earn Points What's this? Comments (21) Email Facebook Twitter Stumble Digg Share Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion actually cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how exactly did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card?...
  • Vatican reveals Secret Archives (including letter from Genghis Khan's grandson)

    01/02/2010 4:42:07 AM PST · by NYer · 61 replies · 2,075+ views
    Telegraph ^ | January 1, 2010 | Nick Squires
    The Holy See’s archives contain scrolls, parchments and leather-bound volumes with correspondence dating back more than 1,000 years. High-quality reproductions of 105 documents, 19 of which have never been seen before in public, have now been published in a book. The Vatican Secret Archives features a papal letter to Hitler, an entreaty to Rome written on birch bark by a tribe of North American Indians, and a plea from Mary Queen of Scots. The book documents the Roman Catholic Church’s often hostile dealings with the world of science and the arts, including documents from the heresy trial against Galileo and...
  • Beneath the ruins of Genghis Khan's capital city in Central Asia, archaeologists discovered artif...

    04/10/2009 5:49:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1,323+ views
    Smithsonian ^ | March 25, 2009 | Abigail Tucker
    Of all the wonders in The Palace of the Great Khan, the silver fountain most captivated the visiting monk. It took the shape of "a great silver tree, and at its roots are four lions of silver, each with a conduit through it, and all belching forth white milk of mares," wrote William of Rubruck, a Franciscan friar who toured the Mongol capital, Khara Khorum, in 1254. When a silver angel at the top of the tree trumpeted, still more beverages spouted out of the pipes: wine, clarified mare's milk, a honey drink, rice mead -- take your pick... in...
  • Restoring Order: Conquering Iraq in the 13th and 21st Centuries. Could Genghis Khan teach the US?

    03/26/2009 1:11:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies · 1,024+ views
    Japan Focus ^ | ‎Mar 20, 2009‎ | Jack Weatherford
    In his final televised speech to the Iraqi people in 2003, Saddam Hussein denounced the invading Americans as "the Mongols of this age," a reference to the last time infidels had conquered his country, in 1258. But the comparison isn't very apt — unlike the Mongols, the Americans don't have the organizational genius of Genghis Khan. In the 13th century, Temujin — better known by his title, Genghis Khan ("world leader") — headed a tribal nation smaller than the workforce of Wal-Mart, yet he conquered and ruled more people than anyone in history. After Genghis Khan's death, his grandson, Hulegu,...
  • Recently Uncovered Skeleton Offers Clues on Chinggis Khaan Era

    12/15/2008 7:22:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 850+ views
    Mongolian News ^ | Thursday, December 11, 2008 | William Kennedy
    An ancient female skeleton discovered along the Tuul River, some 55 kilometers outside Ulaanbaatar, may be more remarkable for when she lived rather than who she was. After examining earrings and rings discovered amongst the remains, Kh. Lkhagvasuren, an archaeologist who heads the Mongolian Historical and Cultural Heritage Center, said this week that the woman was likely a contemporary of Chinggis Khaan... While an examination of the skeleton -- specifically the skull and waist -- revealed that it belonged to a teenage female, not much else is known about the young woman's life. The body was buried in a wooden...
  • Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan banned gay sex, experts say

    09/01/2007 5:21:19 PM PDT · by GeorgeKant · 43 replies · 1,365+ views
    AP ^ | 2007-08-30
    BEIJING, Aug 30 (AP) -- Gay sex was punishable by death under Genghis Khan's rule. That was among the findings of Chinese researchers who spent more than a year compiling the legendary Mongolian conqueror's code of laws, the official Xinhua News Agency said Thursday. His early 13th century empire stretched across Asia all the way to central Europe. Article 48 of the code said men who "committed sodomy shall be put to death," according to experts at a research institute in the Chinese region of Inner Mongolia. The experts at the Research Institute of Ancient Mongolian Laws and Sociology said...
  • China claims Genghis Khan as its own

    12/29/2006 4:04:22 PM PST · by maui_hawaii · 49 replies · 3,762+ views
    From outcast nomad to tribal warlord and finally founder of the world's greatest land empire, Genghis Khan went through a lot of changes in a tumultuous life spanning the end of the 12th century and the beginning of the 13th. But perhaps the strangest transformation ever undergone by the Mongolian military genius has come in modern times: his reinvention as a Chinese hero. “Genghis Khan was certainly Chinese,” says Guo Wurong, general manager of the Genghis Khan Mausoleum Tourist District in China's Inner Mongolia region. “We currently define him as a hero of the Mongolian nationality, a great man of...
  • Gengis Khan Basecamp Found In China

    12/28/2006 5:22:34 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 855+ views
    Physorg/Xinhua ^ | 12-26-2006
    Gengis Khan basecamp found in China Chinese scholars have found a series of ancient wells they believe provided water for Genghis Khan's legendary hordes during their campaign in Western Xia. The find led them to conclude Genghis Khan did indeed march through the city of Ordos on his expedition into Western Xia. China's Xinhua news service said Monday more than 80 wells spaced 10 meters (33 feet) apart that were apparently used by the expedition's thousands of soldiers and horses. The wells are believed to be part of the "100 Wells" cited in the ancient classic history, "The Untold Story...
  • Mural Of Genghis Khan's Funeral Found

    12/27/2006 5:27:07 PM PST · by blam · 67 replies · 2,621+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 12-26-2006
    Mural of Genghis Khan's funeral found Dec. 26, 2006 at 12:09PM A painting of a Mongolian funeral ceremony in the Arjai caves in North China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region might depict Genghis Khan's funeral. The mural in one of the caves at the Arjai Grotto is about 20 inches long and 14 inches wide, the Xinhua News Agency reported Tuesday. The painting depicts a Mongolian funeral where a man is held above a funeral pit by white cranes, said Pan Zhaodong, a researcher from the Social Science Academy of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. One well-dressed onlooker could very well...
  • Genghis misunderstood

    10/03/2006 11:15:52 AM PDT · by JZelle · 90 replies · 1,532+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 10-3-06 | Matthew Barakat
    He's one of the most famous names of the last millennium, and he's the father of his country, which turns 800 years old this year. That's why the D.C. region's Mongolian community would like to see a statue erected of Genghis Khan, the George Washington of Mongolia.
  • China says Genghis Khan catalyst for Renaissance

    07/22/2006 12:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 463+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Saturday, July 22, 2006 | Reuters
    "Genghis Khan introduced papermaking and printing technologies to Europe and pioneered cultural exchanges between Asia and Europe," it quoted Zhu Yaoting, a specialist on Mongolian history at Beijing Union University, as saying. "He brought cultural progress that helped liberate the Europeans from the bondage of theology -- in this sense, his expeditions served as a catalyst for the Renaissance," he said. Genghis Khan's expeditions to Europe also reopened the Silk Road and laid the path for Marco Polo's historic trip to China. "The expedition revived the ancient trade link and made economic and cultural exchanges possible again between the isolated...
  • Sons of Genghis Khan roll out the red carpet for Bush

    11/21/2005 5:31:27 PM PST · by freedom44 · 28 replies · 1,035+ views
    Times Online UK ^ | 11/21/05 | Jane Macartney
    DESCENDANTS of Genghis Khan, the man who conquered half the world in the 13th century, rolled out the red carpet yesterday for the most powerful man of the 21st century. George Bush stood to attention in the biting cold before an honour guard of Mongolian soldiers in blue and red uniforms and with sabres at the ready as the United States national anthem played to welcome the first serving American President to set foot in Ulan Bator. Mr Bush chose to wrap up a four-nation Asian trip in this young democracy, where fewer than three million people, mostly nomads, live...
  • Has Genghis' Tomb Been Found?

    11/26/2004 12:11:59 PM PST · by blam · 57 replies · 2,640+ views
    China.Org ^ | 11-26-2004 | Shao Da
    Has Genghis' Tomb Been Found? After four years' work, a joint team of Japanese and Mongolian archaeologists announced on October 4 that they had found what they believe to be the true mausoleum of Genghis Khan (1162-1227). The ruins, dated to between the 13th and 15th century, were found at Avraga, around 250 kilometers east of Ulan Bator, the capital of the People's Republic of Mongolia. Team members said that they expect the discovery to provide clues to the whereabouts of the khan's actual burial site, which they believe may be within 12 kilometers of the mausoleum. There is a...
  • Archeologists Unearth Remains of Genghis Khan's Palace on Mongolian Steppe

    10/06/2004 6:04:21 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 55 replies · 2,104+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 6, 2004 | Audrey McAvoy
    TOKYO (AP) - Archaeologists have unearthed the site of Genghis Khan's palace and believe the long-sought grave of the 13th century Mongolian warrior is somewhere nearby, the head of the excavation team said Wednesday. A Japanese and Mongolian research team found the complex on a grassy steppe 150 miles east of the Mongolian capital of Ulan Bator, said Shinpei Kato, professor emeritus at Tokyo's Kokugakuin University. Genghis Khan (c. 1162-1227) united warring tribes to become leader of the Mongols in 1206. After his death, his descendants expanded his empire until it stretched from China to Hungary. Genghis Khan built the...
  • Genghis Khan's Pen As Mighty As His Sword

    08/23/2004 6:46:57 AM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 1,109+ views
    IOL ^ | 8-23-2004
    Genghis Khan's pen as mighty as his sword? August 23 2004 at 11:45AM Beijing - A Chinese historian says he has evidence that ruthless conqueror and master of the Mongol horde Genghis Khan was as masterful with the pen as he was with the sword. Historians have long assumed the ancient Mongolian ruler was illiterate, primarily because the Mongolian written language was created in the early 13th century, when Genghis Khan would have been in his 40s and not have had time to learn, the official Xinhua news agency said. However, Tengus Bayaryn, a professor at China's Inner Mongolia University,...
  • In war on terror, Genghis Khan's rules apply

    05/31/2004 7:15:48 AM PDT · by knighthawk · 24 replies · 317+ views
    NY Daily News ^ | May 31 2004 | Bill O'Reilly
    Genghis Khan was perhaps the most successful warrior the world has ever known. During the 13th century, he conquered most of civilization with an army of fewer than 100,000 Mongol horsemen. According to Genghis' biographer, Jack Weatherford, the warlord's philosophy went this way: "Warfare was not a sporting contest or a mere match between rivals; it was a total commitment of one people against another. Victory did not come to the one who played by the rules; it came to one who made the rules and imposed them on his enemy." Osama Bin Laden is unquestionably one of history's greatest...
  • History rehabilitates the tyrants of old in Central Asia

    10/26/2003 1:22:46 PM PST · by nwrep · 26 replies · 327+ views
    Boston.com ^ | October 24, 2003 | H.D.S. Greenway
    By H.D.S. Greenway, 10/24/2003 UNTIL THE TYRANTS of the 20th century came along, they were the most efficient, cold-blooded, feared, and destructive conquerors the world had ever known. They were the Mongol horsemen from the steppes of Central Asia, whose hordes under the leadership of Genghis Khan built a 13th-century empire by mass slaughter -- burning cities and terrifying half a dozen civilizations from Russia to the East China Sea. Genghis Khan's grandson, Hulagu, leveled Baghdad, and Iraqis have invoked his name ever since to brand their enemies, including the Americans. It is said that you could smell their stench...
  • The Last Great Mystery: The Hunt for Genghis Khan

    05/28/2003 10:40:05 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 3 replies · 338+ views
    BBC ^ | May 27, 2003 | Michael Kohn
    After years of suppression by Mongolia's former communist rulers, the great Mongol warlord Ghengis Khan is back at the top of the national agenda, almost 800 years after his death. His wizened image appears on everything from vodka bottles to money. Much of Genghis Khan's life remains a mystery Scientists too are rediscovering Ghengis' history. The American-funded Ghengis Khan Geo-Historical expedition has spent three years exploring sites associated with the kahn's life. Yet one mystery remains, the site of his burial. John Woods of the University of Chicago is the expedition's team leader, and he thinks it might be at...
  • Study of ancient dogs in the Americas yields insights into human, dog migration

    01/08/2015 3:52:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    University of Illinois ^ | 1/7/2015 | Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study suggests that dogs may have first successfully migrated to the Americas only about 10,000 years ago, thousands of years after the first human migrants crossed a land bridge from Siberia to North America. The study, which looked at the genetic characteristics of 84 individual dogs from more than a dozen sites in North and South America, is the largest analysis so far of ancient dogs in the Americas. The findings appear in the Journal of Human Evolution. Unlike their wild wolf predecessors, ancient dogs learned to tolerate human company and generally benefitted from the association: They gained...
  • Three cheers for the onion

    01/04/2015 1:26:00 AM PST · by moose07 · 73 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 January 2015 | BBC
    Onions are eaten and grown in more countries than any other vegetable but rarely seem to receive much acclaim. It's time to stop taking the tangy, tear-inducing bulb for granted and give it a round of applause, writes the BBC's Marek Pruszewicz. Deep in the archives of Yale University's Babylonian Collection lie three small clay tablets with a particular claim to fame - they are the oldest known cookery books. Covered in minute cuneiform writing, they did not give-up their secrets until 1985, nearly 4,000 years after they were written. The French Assyriologist and gourmet cook Jean Bottero - a...
  • Eggs of intestinal parasites identified in Late Iron Age site

    01/02/2015 2:26:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 30, 2014 | from Journal of Archaeological Science
    The settlement was inhabited around 100 B.C. and is one of the most significant Late La Tene sites in Central Europe. The team found the durable eggs of roundworms (Ascaris sp.), whipworms, (Trichuris sp.) and liver flukes (Fasciola sp.). The eggs of these intestinal parasites were discovered in the backfill of 2000 year-old storage and cellar pits from the Iron Age. The presence of the parasite eggs was not, as is usually the case, established by wet sieving of the soil samples. Instead, a novel geoarchaeology-based method was applied using micromorphological thin sections, which enable the parasite eggs to be...
  • Matter: Gene Linked to Obesity Hasn’t Always Been a Problem, Study Finds

    01/01/2015 9:28:04 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    But the gene doesn’t seem to have always been a problem. If scientists had studied FTO just a few decades ago, they would have found no link to weight whatsoever. A new study shows that FTO became a risk only in people born after World War II. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, raises questions that extend far beyond obesity. Genes clearly influence our health in many ways, but so does our environment; often, it is the interplay between them that makes the difference in whether we develop obesity or cancer or...