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  • Love in the time of climate change: Grizzlies and polar bears are now mating

    05/23/2016 9:07:16 AM PDT · by PROCON · 85 replies
    WAPO ^ | May 23, 2016 | Adam Popescu
    BARROW, Alaska — Most Alaskans and Canadians have a bear story — tales of fearsome grizzlies, even polar bears. But a mix of the two? They’re known as pizzlies or grolars, and they’re a fusion of the Arctic white bear and their brown cousins. It’s a blend that’s been turning up more and more in parts of Alaska and Western Canada. Last week, a strange-looking bear was shot by a hunter in Nunavut, a remote territory that curves around Canada’s Hudson Bay. Its head was large, like a grizzly’s, but its fur was white. The bear’s genetics were not...
  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • Why Home Doesn't Matter

    09/29/2007 9:53:22 AM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 173+ views
    Prospect ^ | May 2007 | Judith Rich Harris
    Why home doesn't matterMay 2007Judith Rich Harris The BBC series "Child of Our Time" assumes that studying children with their parents will help us understand how their personalities develop. But this is a mistake: parents influence their children mainly by passing on their genes. The biggest environmental influences on personality are those that occur outside the home During much of the 20th century, it was considered impolite and unscientific to say that genes play any role in determining people's personalities, talents or intelligence. But we're in the 21st century now, the era of the genome. So when Robert Winston informs...
  • Genetic Testing Proves Bene Israel Community in India Has Jewish Roots

    05/11/2016 2:05:21 PM PDT · by Theoria · 8 replies
    American Friends of Tel Aviv University ^ | 10 May 2016 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    TAU–Cornell collaboration provides insight into unique community whose history is largely unknown A new study from Tel Aviv University, Cornell University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine reveals genetic proof of the Jewish roots of the Bene Israel community in the western part of India. They have always considered themselves Jewish. "Almost nothing is known about the Bene Israel community before the 18th century, when Cochin Jews and later Christian missionaries first came into contact with it," says first author Yedael Waldman of both TAU's Department of Molecular Microbiology and Cornell's Department of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology. "Beyond...
  • Johor to Test if Human-Looking Goat Is Offspring of Human and Animal

    05/10/2016 10:59:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 40 replies
    It will take around two weeks to a month to finalise the investigations on the carcass of a kid in Kota Tinggi that was said to resemble a human infant (pic). Johor state Agriculture and Agro-based Industry committee chairman Ismail Moha­med said then they would be able to find out the possibility of an offspring produced by a human and an animal. "For now we cannot confirm or deny anything as we have never received such a case before. "We will have to wait for the results and findings to be finalised and that takes somewhere between two weeks and...
  • Chinese archaeologists discover 8,000-year-old paddy

    05/10/2016 12:32:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    China Daily ^ | May 6, 2016 | Xinhua
    Chinese archaeologists said they have found a paddy dating back more than 8,000 years, which could be the earliest wet rice farming site in the world. The field, covering less than 100 square meters, was discovered at the neolithic ruins of Hanjing in Sihong county in East China's Jiangsu province in November 2015, according to a spokesman with the archeology institute of Nanjing Museum. At a seminar held in late April to discuss findings at the Hanjing ruins, more than 70 scholars from universities, archeology institutes and museums across the country concluded that the wet rice field was the oldest...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • 1,700 years ago, the mismanagement of a migrant crisis cost Rome its empire

    05/08/2016 2:46:27 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 48 replies
    Source material cannot be posted to FR | 07 May 2016 | Annalisa Merelli
    see link below
  • Stem-cell plan aims to bring rhino back from brink of extinction

    05/07/2016 11:29:02 AM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 10 replies
    Nature (UK) ^ | 05.03.2016 | Ewen Callaway
    In a last-gasp effort, researchers this week unveiled the details of an audacious plan to save the northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni)
  • Fat? Maybe you can’t blame your genes after all

    05/02/2016 9:14:49 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 05/02/16 | Patrick Hahn
    An impressive array of brainpower —“Fat? Blame your genes, say doctors” —“Overweight? Maybe you really can blame your genes” —“Blame your genes for obesity” Headlines such as these have become a staple of science and health journalism. Are they right? Are obese people really helpless victims of their genes? Let us begin by distinguishing between “monogenic” obesity and what scientists call “common” obesity. Monogenic obesity, as the name implies, is caused by a mutation in a single gene, which is inherited in a Mendelian fashion, just as conditions such as sickle-cell anemia and cystic fibrosis are. In the case of...
  • Bright flash of light marks incredible moment life begins when sperm meets egg

    04/26/2016 11:47:31 AM PDT · by jennychase · 9 replies
    telegraph ^ | 4/26/2016 | Sarah Knaptong
    Human life begins in bright flash of light as a sperm meets an egg, scientists have shown for the first time, after capturing the astonishing ‘fireworks’ on film. An explosion of tiny sparks erupts from the egg at the exact moment of conception. Scientists had seen the phenomenon occur in other animals but it is the first time is has been also shown to happen in humans.
  • Bright flash of light marks incredible moment life begins when sperm meets egg

    04/26/2016 10:06:18 PM PDT · by aquila48 · 46 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 26 APRIL 2016 | Sarah Knapton
    Human life begins in bright flash of light as a sperm meets an egg, scientists have shown for the first time, after capturing the astonishing ‘fireworks’ on film. An explosion of tiny sparks erupts from the egg at the exact moment of conception. Scientists had seen the phenomenon occur in other animals but it is the first time is has been also shown to happen in humans. Not only is it an incredible spectacle, highlighting the very moment that a new life begins, the size of the flash can be used to determine the quality of the fertilised egg. Researchers...
  • Radiant zinc fireworks reveal human egg quality

    04/30/2016 2:45:49 PM PDT · by fella · 6 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 26 April 2016 | Northwestern University
    A stunning explosion of zinc fireworks occurs when a human egg is activated by a sperm enzyme, and the size of these "sparks" is a direct measure of the quality of the egg and its ability to develop into an embryo, according to new research from Northwestern Medicine. The discovery has potential to help doctors choose the best eggs to transfer during in vitro fertilization (IVF), the scientists said. This is the first time the zinc sparks have been documented in a human egg. "This means if you can look at the zinc spark at the time of fertilization, you...
  • Half Of Western European Men Descended From One Bronze Age 'King'

    04/30/2016 2:15:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 81 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | April 25, 2016 | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    Half of Western European men are descended from one Bronze Age 'king' who sired a dynasty of elite nobles which spread throughout Europe, a new study has shown. The monarch, who lived around 4,000 years ago, is likely to have been one of the earliest chieftains to take power in the continent... It is likely his power stemmed from advances in technology such as metal working and wheeled transport which enabled organised warfare for the first time. Although it is not known who he was, or where he lived, scientists say he must have existed because of genetic variation in...
  • Bond between man and dog is closer than you thought — how canines hearts are in sync with ours

    04/28/2016 7:28:11 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 53 replies
    News Corp Australia Network ^ | April 27, 2016 | Sue Dunlevy
    THE bond between man and dog is so close their hearts actually beat in sync when they are together an astounding new study shows. The heart rates of owners and their dogs become lower when they are in close proximity an experiment that saw heart monitors strapped to dogs and their owners found. The discovery shows dogs have a fundamental role to play in lowering stress says sports scientist Dr Craig Duncan. And canine scientist Mia Cobb says owning a dog can do more than just lower your heart rate. They even recover more quickly from a heart attack, she...
  • Modern DNA Reveals Ancient Male Population Explosions Linked To Migration And Technology

    04/26/2016 11:36:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 25, 2016 | Mark Thomson, Sanger Institute
    The largest ever study of global genetic variation in the human Y chromosome has uncovered the hidden history of men. Research published today (25 April) in Nature Genetics reveals explosions in male population numbers in five continents, occurring at times between 55 thousand and four thousand years ago... analysed sequence differences between the Y chromosomes of more than 1200 men from 26 populations around the world using data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project... involved 42 scientists from four continents... Analysing the Y chromosomes of modern men can tell us about the lives of our ancestors. The Y chromosome is...
  • OU anthropologists reconstruct mitogenomes from prehistoric dental calculus

    04/17/2016 2:17:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | March 28, 2016 | U of Oklahoma
    ...In recent years, dental calculus has emerged as an unexpected, but valuable, long-term reservoir of ancient DNA from dietary and microbial sources... Very little dental calculus was required for analysis--fewer than 25 milligrams per individual. This makes it possible to obtain high quality genetic ancestry information from very little starting material, an important consideration for archaeological remains... Although dental calculus preserves alongside skeletal remains, it is not actually a human tissue. Dental calculus, also known as tartar, is a calcified form of dental plaque that acquires human DNA and proteins passively, primarily through the saliva and other host secretions. Once...
  • Cross-cultural estimation of the human generation interval...

    04/03/2005 9:14:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 515+ views
    American Journal of Physical Anthropology (via Wiley InterScience) ^ | Received: 28 March 2004; Accepted: 25 August 2004 | Jack N. Fenner
    ...for use in genetics-based population divergence studies. Abstract: The length of the human generation interval is a key parameter when using genetics to date population divergence events. However, no consensus exists regarding the generation interval length, and a wide variety of interval lengths have been used in recent studies. This makes comparison between studies difficult, and questions the accuracy of divergence date estimations. Recent genealogy-based research suggests that the male generation interval is substantially longer than the female interval, and that both are greater than the values commonly used in genetics studies. This study evaluates each of these hypotheses in...
  • Study of Orangutans Yields New Ideas about Human Evolution

    12/16/2011 6:41:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, December 13, 2011 | unattributed
    Results from research conducted by a team of scholars and scientists on the dietary lives of orangutans in tropical Borneo have given possible clues to how very early human ancestors may have adapted, survived and changed millions of years ago. In addition, the results may help scientists better understand eating disorders and obesity in human populations today. Led by evolutionary anthropologist Erin Vogel of Rutgers University (pictured below, right), the research team analyzed samples of compounds and byproducts in Orangutan urine over a 5-year period to determine the effects of protein recycling in their dietary, or eating behavior. What they...
  • Evidence for the Orangutan Relationship

    04/03/2005 9:23:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,929+ views
    Buffalo Museum of Science ^ | circa 2003 | Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz (et al)
    Evidence for the orangutan being the closest living relative of modern humans is based on at least 35 known characters that appear to be either exclusive to humans and orangutans or largely absent in outgroups.
  • Niah Ceramics To Shed Light On Borneo's History

    06/12/2005 11:32:52 AM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 500+ views
    Bernama ^ | 6-12-2005 | Carol Ann Jackson
    Niah Ceramics To Shed Light On Borneo's History By Caroline Ann Jackson KUCHING, June 12 (Bernama) -- A team of world-renowned scientists led by British-based archaeologist Dr Patrick Daly is working to determine the nature of human activity in Southeast Asia as far back as 40,000 years ago. Daly, of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research of the University of Cambridge, and his team expect to have the answers documented and published in a book comprising two monographs in 18 months under the Niah Caves Project of the Sarawak Museum. But first the scientists have to put together and study...
  • Ancient DNA shows European wipe-out of early Americans

    04/02/2016 10:27:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 1, 2016 | University of Adelaide
    The first largescale study of ancient DNA from early American people has confirmed the devastating impact of European colonisation on the Indigenous American populations of the time. Led by the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), the researchers have reconstructed a genetic history of Indigenous American populations by looking directly into the DNA of 92 pre-Columbian mummies and skeletons, between 500 and 8600 years old. Published today in Science Advances, the study reveals a striking absence of the pre-Columbian genetic lineages in modern Indigenous Americans; showing extinction of these lineages with the arrival of the Spaniards. "Surprisingly,...
  • Neanderthal Bone Fragment Identified in Denisova Cave

    04/02/2016 2:37:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | editors
    Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester have used a new technique, "Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry," or ZooMS, to identify more than 2,000 bone fragments recovered from Russia's Denisova Cave. ZooMS analyzes the collagen peptide sequences in bone, which can then be used to identify its species. Among the remains of mammoths, woolly rhino, wolf, and reindeer, the researchers found one Neanderthal bone. "When the ZooMS results showed that there was a human fingerprint among the bones I was extremely excited. ...The bone itself is not exceptional in any way and would otherwise be missed by...
  • Lawsuit against Genetically Engineered Salmon

    04/01/2016 6:41:39 AM PDT · by w1n1 · 27 replies
    Cal Sportsman ^ | 4/1/2016 | C Cocoles
    The Golden Gate Salmon Association is among several litigants in a lawsuit challenging the Food and Drug Administration’s plans to develop genetically engineered salmon. Here's some info on the lawsuit: A broad coalition of environmental, consumer, and commercial and recreational fishing organizations today sued the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approving the first-ever genetically engineered (GE) food animal, an Atlantic salmon engineered to grow quickly. The man-made salmon was created by AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. with DNA from three fish: Atlantic salmon, Pacific king salmon, and Arctic ocean eelpout. This marks the first time any government in the world...
  • Gene Reveals Mammoth Coat Colour

    07/06/2006 12:43:11 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 1,370+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-6-2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Gene reveals mammoth coat colour By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News Woolly mammoths had both dark and light coats The coat colour of mammoths that roamed the Earth thousands of years ago has been determined by scientists. Some of the curly tusked animals would have sported dark brown coats, while others had pale ginger or blond hair. The information was extracted from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth bone from Siberia using the latest genetic techniques. Writing in the journal Science, the researchers said a gene called Mc1r was controlling the beasts' coat colours. This gene is responsible for hair-colour in...
  • Ice Age puppies found preserved in Russian permafrost - were they caveman’s best friends?

    03/29/2016 9:22:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.scmp.com ^ | UPDATED : Monday, 28 March, 2016, 2:25pm | Staff
    The hunters searching for mammoth tusks were drawn to the steep riverbank by a deposit of ancient bones. To their astonishment, they discovered an Ice Age puppy’s snout peeking out from the permafrost. Five years later, a pair of puppies perfectly preserved in Russia’s far northeast region of Yakutia and dating back 12,460 years has mobilised scientists across the world. “To find a carnivorous mammal intact with skin, fur and internal organs - this has never happened before in history,” said Sergei Fyodorov, head of exhibitions at the Mammoth Museum of the North-Eastern Federal University in the regional capital of...
  • Insect Attack May Have Finished Off Dinosaurs

    01/03/2008 5:16:53 PM PST · by blam · 49 replies · 115+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 1-3-2008 | Oregon State University.
    Insect Attack May Have Finished Off Dinosaurs ScienceDaily (Jan. 4, 2008) — Asteroid impacts or massive volcanic flows might have occurred around the time dinosaurs became extinct, but a new argument is that the mightiest creatures the world has ever known may have been brought down by a tiny, much less dramatic force -- biting, disease-carrying insects.Tick found in Burmese amber. (Credit: Image courtesy of Oregon State University) An important contributor to the demise of the dinosaurs, experts say, could have been the rise and evolution of insects, especially the slow-but-overwhelming threat posed by new disease carriers. And the evidence...
  • DNA studies show a frail King Tut succumbed to malaria and a broken leg

    02/16/2010 7:56:30 AM PST · by cajuncow · 28 replies · 735+ views
    Cox News ^ | 2-16-10 | Paul Schemm, Assoc. Press
    Egypt's famed King Tutankhamun suffered from a cleft palate and club foot, likely forcing him to walk with a cane, and died from complications from a broken leg exacerbated by malaria, according to the most extensive study ever of his mummy. The findings were from two years of DNA testing and CT scans on 16 mummies, including those of Tutankhamun and his family, the team that carried out the study said in an article to be published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • More Ancient Viruses Lurk In Our DNA Than We Thought

    03/28/2016 6:19:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | March 22, 2016 | Kara Gavin
    One whole endogenous retrovirus genome -- and bits of 17 others -- were spotted in a study of 2,500 human genomes... Nineteen new pieces of DNA -- left by viruses that first infected our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago -- have just been found, lurking between our own genes. And one stretch of newfound DNA, found in about 50 of the 2,500 people studied, contains an intact, full genetic recipe for an entire virus, say the scientists who published their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Whether or not it can replicate, or...
  • A golden age of ancient DNA science begins

    03/25/2016 5:05:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | March 22, 2016 | Darren Curnoe, UNSW Australia
    ...following some remarkable technical developments in that time, including next generation sequencing, ancient DNA research is beginning to come of age... Here are three big issues which I think geneticists are making headway on, following decades of stalled progress by fossil specialists. 1. There's been a shift from merely documenting the occurrence of interbreeding between modern humans and archaic groups, like the Neanderthals and Denisovans, to a focus on the circumstances surrounding it and its consequences for living people... Around 2 per cent of the genome of non-African people was inherited from Neanderthals, with slightly more DNA in Indigenous Oceanic...
  • Mystery invaders conquered Europe at the end of last ice age

    03/23/2016 6:35:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    New Scientist ^ | February 4, 2016 | Colin Barras
    Europe went through a major population upheaval about 14,500 years ago, at the end of the last ice age, according to DNA from the bones of hunter-gatherers. Ancient DNA studies published in the last five years have transformed what we know about the early peopling of Europe. The picture they paint is one in which successive waves of immigration wash over the continent, bringing in new people, new genes and new technologies. These studies helped confirm that Europe's early hunter-gatherers - who arrived about 40,000 years ago - were largely replaced by farmers arriving from the Middle East about 8000...
  • A man’s discovery of bones under his pub could forever change what we know about the Irish

    03/21/2016 8:45:16 AM PDT · by Theoria · 46 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 17 March 2016 | Peter Whoriskey
    Ten years ago, an Irish pub owner was clearing land for a driveway when his digging exposed an unusually large flat stone. The stone obscured a dark gap underneath. He grabbed a flashlight to peer in. "I shot the torch in and saw the gentleman, well, his skull and bones," Bertie Currie, the pub owner, said this week. The remains of three humans, in fact, were found behind McCuaig’s Bar in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. And though police were called, it was not, as it turned out, a crime scene. Instead, what Currie had stumbled over was an ancient burial...
  • Sex is Etched in Our DNA, But Race Is All in Our Heads

    03/21/2016 6:32:34 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 94 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | March 21, 2016 | Jeff Jacoby
    At Milton Academy, the tony Massachusetts prep school, the longstanding "one boy, one girl" rule requiring equal representation on the student council has been scrapped. The student government voted this month to move beyond what the council's cochairman refers to as the "archaic norms" of male and female, and instead "accept the world and the people within it the way they are now."To which I say: Out of the mouth of babes.To be sure, there is nothing archaic about the labeling of human beings as either male or female. The distinction between the sexes is objective and fixed, and written into the...
  • First successful extraction of ancient DNA from a southern African mummy

    03/20/2016 5:16:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 16, 2016 | University of the Witwatersrand
    Researchers have presented one of the first computerised tomography (CT) scans of a mummified individual from southern Africa, and also completed the first successful aDNA (ancient DNA) extraction from such remains. The mummy is estimated to have been about 300 years old. Professor Maryna Steyn, Head of the School of Anatomical Sciences, together with researchers from the University of Zurich (Switzerland), University of Pretoria and University of Botswana have published these findings in a paper, Radiological and genetic analysis of a Late Iron Age mummy from the Tuli Block, Botswana, in the South African Journal of Science. Mummified human remains...
  • 400,000-year-old fossils from Spain provide earliest genetic evidence of Neandertals

    03/20/2016 2:54:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Max Planck Gesselschaft ^ | March 14, 2016 | SJ, SP, MM/HR
    Previous analyses of the hominins from Sima de los Huesos in 2013 showed that their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA was distantly related to Denisovans, extinct relatives of Neandertals in Asia. This was unexpected since their skeletal remains carry Neandertal-derived features. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have since worked on sequencing nuclear DNA from fossils from the cave, a challenging task as the extremely old DNA is degraded to very short fragments. The results now show that the Sima de los Huesos hominins were indeed early Neandertals. Neandertals may have acquired different mitochondrial genomes...
  • Ancient Denisovan DNA excavated in modern Pacific Islanders

    03/20/2016 2:51:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 17, 2016 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine
    Many recent studies have tried to understand when and where archaic hominins and our modern ancestors co-existed and interbred. Most of this research has been intent on cataloging Neanderthal gene sequences remaining in the genomes people of European or Asian descent. According to Vernot, "Different populations of people have slightly different levels of Neanderthal ancestry, which likely means that humans repeatedly ran into Neanderthals as they spread across Europe." Where the ancestors of modern humans might have had physical contact with Denisovans is debatable. The best guess, Akey said, is that Denisovans may have had a broad geographic range that...
  • Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Thought, Study Finds

    08/20/2014 2:50:07 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 55 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 20 August 2014 | GAUTAM NAIK
    A new study concludes that modern humans arrived in Europe much earlier than previously believed, and clarifies more specifically the long time period they overlapped with Neanderthals. The significant overlap bolsters a theory that the two species met, bred and possibly exchanged or copied vital toolmaking techniques. It represents another twist in an enduring puzzle about human origins: why we triumphed while the better adapted and similarly intelligent Neanderthals died out. The study was published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Neanderthals are our closest known extinct relatives, with about 99.5% of DNA in common with humans. They had a brain...
  • Scans of King Tut's Tomb Reveal Hidden Rooms, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry Says

    03/17/2016 10:05:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    NBC News ^ | Mar 17 2016, 8:03 am ET | by Charlene Gubash, Cassandra Vinograd and F. Brinley Bruton
    CAIRO — Radar scans of King Tut's tomb have revealed two spaces on the north and east chambers of the pharaonic mausoleum that could contain the "discovery of the century," Egypt's antiquities ministry said Thursday. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty told a press conference that metal and organic masses were revealed by the scans, signaling that the rooms could possibly contain funerary objects. "It could be the discovery of the century. It's very important for Egyptian history and the history of the world," he said, adding that the chambers may well have belonged to a king or queen. Further tests will...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...
  • Was Viking ruler Rollo Danish or Norwegian?

    03/03/2016 8:11:39 AM PST · by Eurotwit · 73 replies
    The Local ^ | Published: 02 Mar 2016 11:49 GMT+01:00 | The Local
    Norwegian researches opened a tomb containing the remains of descendants of Viking leader Rollo in Normandy, France on Monday with the aim of putting an end to a centuries-long debate: was Rollo Danish or Norwegian? Norwegian researchers opened a tomb containing the remains of descendants of Viking leader Rollo in Normandy, France on Monday with the aim of putting an end to a centuries-long debate: was Rollo Danish or Norwegian? “We have worked on investigating this for about seven years, so to finally obtain material that we can test for DNA is huge,” historian Sturla Ellingvåg told NTB. Rollo was...
  • Why did ancient Europeans just disappear 14,500 Years Ago?

    03/03/2016 9:40:50 AM PST · by sparklite2 · 36 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 03, 2016 | Tia Ghose
    Some of Europe's earliest inhabitants mysteriously vanished toward the end of the last ice age and were largely replaced by others, a new genetic analysis finds. The genetic turnover was likely the result of a rapidly changing climate, which the earlier inhabitants of Europe couldn't adapt to quickly enough, said the study's co-author, Cosimo Posth, an archaeogenetics doctoral candidate at the University of Tübingen in Germany. The temperature change around that time was "enormous compared to the climactic changes that are happening in our century," Posth told Live Science. "You have to imagine that also the environment changed pretty drastically."...
  • Ancient Grave of Teenage Girl May Reveal Secrets of Southwest’s Earliest Farmers

    02/27/2016 4:44:56 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Archaeologists working in the borderlands of northern Mexico have uncovered a camp used by ancient hunters as much as 10,500 years ago, revealing insights into some of the earliest human history in the Greater Southwest. On a ranch near the Santa Maria River in northern Chihuahua, researchers have unearthed more than 18,000 artifacts, including thousands of stone flakes, cores, and hammers, along with 370 projectile points, and a dozen stone ovens. But the most surprising find has been the grave of a teenage girl, who was interred among the rocks, alone and unadorned, some 3,200 years ago.
  • Genetics reveal 50,000 years of independent history of aboriginal Australian people

    02/27/2016 1:37:19 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, February 25, 2016 | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    Scientists worked with aboriginal Australian communities to explore heritage... Modern humans arrived in Australia about 50 thousand years ago, forming the ancestors of present-day Aboriginal Australians. They were amongst the earliest settlers outside Africa. They arrived in an ancient continent made up of today's Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea, called Sahul, probably thousands of years before modern humans arrived in Europe. Five thousand years ago, dingos, the native dogs, somehow arrived in Australia, and changes in stone tool use and language around the same time raised the question of whether there were also associated genetic changes in the Australian Aboriginal...
  • How Mammoths Lost The Extinction Lottery

    11/04/2011 7:25:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Nature ^ | November 2, 2011 | Ewen Callaway
    Woolly mammoths, woolly rhinos and other large animals driven to extinction since the last ice age each succumbed to a different lethal mix of circumstances... Researchers who studied the fate of six species of 'megafauna' over the past 50,000 years found that climate change and habitat loss were involved in many of the extinctions, with humans playing a part in some cases but not others. But there was no clear pattern to explain why the animals died off, and it proved impossible to predict from habitat or genetic diversity which species would go extinct and which would survive. "It almost...
  • Just 2.5% of DNA turns mice into men

    06/02/2002 5:01:26 PM PDT · by scripter · 30 replies · 634+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | May 30, 2002 | Andy Coghlan
    Mice and men share about 97.5 per cent of their working DNA, just one per cent less than chimps and humans. The new estimate is based on the comparison of mouse chromosome 16 with human DNA. Previous estimates had suggested mouse-human differences as high as 15 per cent. The new work suggests that neither genome has changed much since we shared a common ancestor 100 million years ago. "The differences are going to be few rather than many," says Richard Mural of Celera Genomics, the Maryland company that compared the mouse chromosome with human DNA. "Perhaps 100 million years separating...
  • Neanderthals and modern humans mated 50,000 years earlier than we thought, scientists say.

    02/21/2016 5:06:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 108 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 02/20/2016 | By Eva Botkin-Kowacki,
    Ever since geneticists sequenced the first Neanderthal genome in 2010, researchers have been reporting just how related humans are to their ancient, extinct cousins. Since then, there's been more research. And more. And more. As it turns out, non-African modern humans have Neanderthals to thank for 1 to 4 percent of their DNA. The two species were thought to have interbred around 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, based on the Neanderthal DNA found in anatomically modern human specimens and people living today. But scientists had yet to find a signature of such mating interactions in Neanderthal DNA, until now. "Instead...
  • Madagascar marvel: Divers find fossils of extinct giant lemurs

    03/23/2015 10:27:01 AM PDT · by McGruff · 11 replies
    CNN ^ | March 23, 2015 | Daisy Carrington
    Around 5,000 years ago, the island of Madagascar would have resembled a Sci-Fi novel. Strange, prickly forests, gorilla-sized lemurs, pygmy hippopotamuses, horned crocodile and elephant birds whose eggs were 180 times the size of what you'd find in your fridge today, all called the African island home -- that was until the humans arrived.
  • The Roots Of Civilization Trace Back To ... Roots

    09/19/2005 3:25:13 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 775+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 9-19-2005 | Mark Cassutt
    Contact: Mark Cassutt cassu003@umn.edu 612-624-8038 University of Minnesota The roots of civilization trace back to ... roots MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL- About five to seven million years ago, when the lineage of humans and chimpanzees split, edible root plants similar to rutabagas and turnips may have been one of the reasons. According to research by anthropologists Greg Laden of the University of Minnesota and Richard Wrangham of Harvard University, the presence of fleshy underground storage organs like roots and tubers must have sustained our ancestors who left the rain forest to colonize the savannah. They have published their research in...
  • Clues about human migration to Imperial Rome uncovered in 2,000-year-old cemetery

    02/16/2016 9:47:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | PLOS
    Isotope analysis of 2000-year-old skeletons buried in Imperial Rome reveal some were migrants from the Alps or North Africa, according to a study published February 10, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kristina Killgrove from University of West Florida, USA, and Janet Montgomery from Durham University, UK. Previous work has focused on the overall human migration patterns within the Roman Empire. To understand human migration on a more granular level, the authors of this study examined 105 skeletons buried at two Roman cemeteries during the 1st through 3rd centuries AD. They analyzed the oxygen, strontium, and carbon isotope...
  • Remains of earliest known massacre victims uncovered in Kenya

    01/21/2016 2:13:42 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 21, 2016 | Fox News
    Scientists say they have uncovered the remains of the earliest known massacre victims, dating from approximately 10,000 years ago. Archaeologists believe the victims were members of an extended family group of hunter-gatherers who were slaughtered by a rival group.