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  • New analysis shows three human migrations out of Africa, Replacement theory 'demolished'

    02/10/2006 2:54:05 AM PST · by PatrickHenry · 139 replies · 3,528+ views
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | 02 February 2006 | Tony Fitzpatrick
    A new, more robust analysis of recently derived human gene trees by Alan R. Templeton, Ph.D, of Washington University in St Louis, shows three distinct major waves of human migration out of Africa instead of just two, and statistically refutes — strongly — the 'Out of Africa' replacement theory. That theory holds that populations of Homo sapiens left Africa 100,000 years ago and wiped out existing populations of humans. Templeton has shown that the African populations interbred with the Eurasian populations — thus, making love, not war. "The 'Out of Africa' replacement theory has always been a big controversy," Templeton...
  • Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago

    01/29/2014 3:14:52 PM PST · by blam · 64 replies
    BI ^ | 1-29-2014 | Dina Spector
    Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago Dina Spector Jan. 29, 2014, 1:49 PM     Neanderthal REUTERS/Nikola Solic Hyperrealistic face of a neanderthal male is displayed in a cave in the new Neanderthal Museum in the northern Croatian town of Krapina February 25, 2010 By comparing the Neanderthal genome to modern human DNA, the authors of two new studies, both published on Wednesday, show how DNA that humans have inherited from breeding with Neanderthals has shaped us. Modern humans, Neanderthals, and their sister lineage, Denisovans, descended from a common ancestor. The...
  • Neanderthals 'Hardly Differed at All' from Modern Humans

    05/13/2010 5:53:26 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 113 replies · 2,015+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 05/11/2010
    How much do we, who are alive today, differ from our most recent evolutionary ancestors, the cave-dwelling Neanderthals, hominids who lived in Europe and parts of Asia and went extinct about 30,000 years ago? And how much do Neanderthals, in turn, have in common with the ape-ancestors from which we are both descended, the chimpanzees? Although we are both hominids, the fossil record told us long ago that we differ physically from Neanderthals, in various ways. But at the level of genes and the proteins that they encode, new research published online May 6 in the journal Science reveals that...
  • A Good Neanderthal Was Hard to Find

    02/26/2006 3:25:01 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 251 replies · 4,010+ views
    NY Times:Week in Review ^ | February 26, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Maybe they just didn't have time to get to know each other. The question of what Neanderthals and Homo sapiens might have done on cold nights in their caves, if they happened to get together and the fire burned down to embers, has intrigued scientists since the 19th century, when the existence of Neanderthals was discovered. A correction in the way prehistoric time is measured using radiocarbon dating, described last week in the journal Nature, doesn't answer the enduring question, but it might at least help explain why no DNA evidence of interbreeding has been found: the two species spent...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs a breed twice the size of bulls predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • Neanderthal bones show signs of cannibalism

    07/07/2016 1:18:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    The remains that were found were radiocarbon-dated to be about 40,500 to 45,500 years old, and it was determined that Neanderthals butchered and used the bones of their peers as tools, according to a press release from the Eberhard Karls University of Tbingen. The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports. The team identified 99 "uncertain" bone fragments as belonging to Neanderthals, which would make this the greatest trove of Neanderthal remains ever found north of the Alps. The findings also shed light on the genetics of this lost human species, adding to previously collected data on Neanderthal genes....
  • Meet Lyuba

    06/27/2016 6:27:06 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/27/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    Just hope that the current interglacial period will last for a few more decades to come. Anything else would spell disaster for much of mankind! Lyuba, of course, is the name bestowed upon the baby mammoth that was found a few years ago in the western Siberian tundra. The baby woolly mammoth is thought to be around 40,000 years old (by now) and is thought to have died by drowning at the age of two months. Whats so remarkable is Lyubas state of preservation, almost life-like, with skin and (sparse) hair fully intact. That kind of find is most uncommon.
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • For Peaceable Humans, Dont Look to Prehistory

    07/01/2016 9:22:43 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 37 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 06/30/2016 | MELVIN KONNER
    Along a river in northern Germany, thousands of men lined up for a pitched battle. Some had come great distances, determined to seize or hold this modest waterway. They went at it mercilessly, leaving hundreds dead, many shot in the back while fleeing. Victory was decisive. [1250 BC]
  • Unexpected and Gruesome Battle of 1250 BC Involved 4,000 Men from Across Northern Europe

    03/25/2016 5:30:29 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 77 replies
    .ancient-origins.net/ ^ | 24 March, 2016 | Mark Miller
    A battlefield of 3,250 years ago in Germany is yielding remains of wounded warriors, wooden clubs, spear points, flint and bronze arrowheads and bronze knives and swords. The gruesome scene, frozen in time by peat, is unlike anything else from the Bronze Age in Northern Europe, where, researchers thought, large-scale warfare didnt begin until later. Analysis of the remains of the 130 men, most between ages 20 and 30, found so far shows some may have been from hundreds of kilometers awayPoland, Holland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe. The hand-to-hand combat of the battle, which may have involved thousands of people...
  • Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank

    05/22/2011 6:31:53 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | May 22, 2011 | Neil Bowdler
    Fractured human remains found on a German river bank could provide the first compelling evidence of a major Bronze Age battle.Archaeological excavations of the Tollense Valley in northern Germany unearthed fractured skulls, wooden clubs and horse remains dating from around 1200 BC. The injuries to the skulls suggest face-to-face combat in a battle perhaps fought between warring tribes, say the researchers. > The archaeologists also found remains of two wooden clubs, one the shape of a baseball bat and made of ash, the second the shape of a croquet mallet and made of sloe wood. Dr Harald Lubke of the...
  • "Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank"

    05/22/2011 6:37:56 AM PDT · by Covenantor · 39 replies
    BBC ^ | 22 May 11 02:38 ET | Neil Bowdler
    Early Bronze Age battle site found on German river bank 22 May 11 02:38 ET ? By Neil Bowdler Science reporter, BBC News Fractured human remains found on a German river bank could provide the first compelling evidence of a major Bronze Age battle. Archaeological excavations of the Tollense Valley in northern Germany unearthed fractured skulls, wooden clubs and horse remains dating from around 1200 BC. The injuries to the skulls suggest face-to-face combat in a battle perhaps fought between warring tribes, say the researchers. The paper, published in the journal Antiquity, is based primarily on an investigation begun in...
  • Archaeologists find bones from prehistoric war in Germany

    10/11/2008 11:17:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 468+ views
    EarthTimes ^ | Thursday, October 9, 2008 | DPA
    Archaeologists have discovered the bones of at least 50 prehistoric people killed in an armed attack in Germany around 1300 BC. The signs of battle from around 1300 BC were found near Demmin, north of Berlin. They are the first proof of any war north of the Alps during the Bronze Age, said state archaeologist Detlef Jantzen on Thursday. One of the skulls had a coin-sized hole in it, indicating the 20- to 30-year-old man had received a mortal blow. A neurologist said he was probably hit with a wooden club and died within hours. Scientists plan DNA tests on...
  • Date For First Australians

    02/18/2003 3:58:38 PM PST · by blam · 7 replies · 319+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-18-2003
    Tuesday, 18 February, 2003, 16:57 GMT Date for first Australians The Mungo burials have cast doubt on "Out of Africa" A new analysis of Australia's oldest human remains suggests humans arrived on the continent about 50,000 years ago. The evidence is based on a re-examination of the so-called Mungo Man skeleton, unearthed in New South Wales (NSW) in 1974. Scientists say the individual was probably buried about 40,000 years ago, when humans had been living in the area for some 10,000 years. We find no evidence to support claims for human occupation or burials near 60 kyr ago James Bowler...
  • Ancient Seafarers' Tool Sites, Up to 12,000 Years Old, Discovered on California Island

    06/19/2016 5:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Western Digs ^ | June 2, 2016 | Blake de Pastino
    On a rugged island just offshore from Ventura County, archaeologists have turned up evidence of some of the oldest human activity in coastal Southern California. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the Channel Islands, researchers have found three sites scattered with ancient tool-making debris and the shells of harvested shellfish. The youngest of the three sites has been dated to 6,600 BCE, but based on the types of tools found at the other two, archaeologists say they may be as much as 11,000 to 12,000 years old. The artifacts are traces of what's known as the Island Paleocoastal culture,...
  • Australian Aborigines 'world's first astronomers'

    09/18/2010 1:58:35 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 18 replies · 2+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | Fri Sep 17, 5:39 am ET | U/A
    SYDNEY (AFP) An Australian study has uncovered signs that the country's ancient Aborigines may have been the world's first stargazers, pre-dating Stonehenge and Egypt's pyramids by thousands of years. Professor Ray Norris said widespread and detailed knowledge of the stars had been passed down through the generations by Aborigines, whose history dates back tens of millennia, in traditional songs and stories. "We know there's lots of stories about the sky: songs, legends, myths," said Norris, an astronomer for Australia's science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organization (CSIRO). "We wondered how much further does it go than that. It...
  • Australia's Aborigines to suffer most from climate change: experts

    01/14/2009 2:36:21 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 29 replies · 618+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 1/14/09 | AFP
    SYDNEY (AFP) Australia's outback Aborigines will be among the worst affected by climate change as soaring temperatures likely cause more disease and spur distress about the changing landscape, a new report shows. The expert report, published in the latest edition of the Medical Journal of Australia, argues that the country's remote indigenous communities are the most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. "Their vulnerability to climate change is intensified by the social and economic disadvantage they already experience -- the result of factors that include decades of inadequate housing and public services, and culturally inappropriate medical services," the journal said...
  • From DNA Analysis, Clues to a Single Australian Migration

    05/10/2007 10:35:40 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies · 739+ views
    NY Times ^ | May 8, 2007 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Geneticists re-examining the first settlement of Australia and Papua-New Guinea by modern humans have concluded that the two islands were reached some 50,000 years ago by a single group of people who remained in substantial or total isolation until recent times. The finding, if upheld, would undermine assumptions that there have been subsequent waves of migration into Australia. Analyzing old and new samples of Aborigine DNA, which are hard to obtain because of governmental restrictions, the geneticists developed a detailed picture of the aborigines ancestry, as reflected in their Y chromosomes, found just in men, and their mitochondrial DNA, a...
  • Evidence of pre-Aboriginal Australians?

    08/01/2006 12:39:42 PM PDT · by chichilarue · 29 replies · 313+ views
    The Times Online ^ | July 26, 2006
    The suggestion that the artists who painted the Bradshaws were not the ancestors of the current aboriginal owners of the land has sparked consternation among the latter...Many aboriginal people also dislike the pictures, some referring to them as rubbish art, and for generations many have made efforts to paint over them or to obliterate them... This is a treasure of which Australia should be very proud, yet when I went there this year I found people surprisingly reluctant to talk about it, almost as though they were ashamed. This may be understandable coming from the aborigines, who may be concerned...
  • Bus Stop An Execution Site...1500 Years Ago

    11/25/2005 4:07:31 PM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 1,036+ views
    The Sydney Morning Herald ^ | 11-26-2005 | Richard Macey
    Bus stop an execution site 1500 years ago By Richard Macey November 26, 2005 Allen Madden and Dr Denise Donion of the University of Sydney with Octavia Man. Photo: Edwina Pickles HIS crime will probably never be known. But "he sure trod on someone's toes", said Allen Madden, cultural and heritage officer for the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council. In January, when EnergyAustralia workers laying cables in Ocean Street, Narrabeen, found human bones beneath a bus stop, they called police. The remains have since been identified as those of an Aborigine who died up to 1500 years ago. Next...
  • 'First Americans Were Australian'

    06/15/2003 9:18:19 PM PDT · by blam · 148 replies · 7,453+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-15-2003
    'First Americans were Australian' This is the face of the first known American, Lucia The first Americans were descended from Australian aborigines, according to evidence in a new BBC documentary. The skulls suggest faces like those of Australian aborigines The programme, Ancient Voices, shows that the dimensions of prehistoric skulls found in Brazil match those of the aboriginal peoples of Australia and Melanesia. Other evidence suggests that these first Americans were later massacred by invaders from Asia. Until now, native Americans were believed to have descended from Asian ancestors who arrived over a land bridge between Siberia and Alaska and...
  • Did Australian Aborigines reach America first?

    09/30/2010 2:04:50 PM PDT · by Palter · 41 replies
    Cosmo Online ^ | 30 Sep 2010 | Jacqui Hayes
    Cranial features distinctive to Australian Aborigines are present in hundreds of skulls that have been uncovered in Central and South America, some dating back to over 11,000 years ago. Evolutionary biologist Walter Neves of the University of So Paulo, whose findings are reported in a cover story in the latest issue of Cosmos magazine, has examined these skeletons and recovered others, and argues that there is now a mass of evidence indicating that at least two different populations colonised the Americas.He and colleagues in the United States, Germany and Chile argue that first population was closely related to the Australian...
  • Genetics reveal 50,000 years of independent history of aboriginal Australian people

    02/27/2016 10:52:59 AM PST · by JimSEA · 2 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 25, 2016 | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    The first complete sequences of the Y chromosomes of Aboriginal Australian men have revealed a deep indigenous genetic history tracing all the way back to the initial settlement of the continent 50 thousand years ago, according to a study published in the journal Current Biology today (25th February 2016). The study by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and collaborators at La Trobe University in Melbourne and several other Australian institutes, challenges a previous theory that suggested an influx of people from India into Australia around 4-5 thousand years ago. This new DNA sequencing study focused on the Y...
  • PHOTOS: Unusual Rock Art Trove Found in Australia

    10/23/2008 5:24:32 PM PDT · by Goonch · 57 replies · 1,498+ views
    October 22, 2008--Paintings of sailboats, ocean liners, and biplanes adorn newfound rock shelters in the remote Aboriginal territory of Arnhem Land in northern Australia. Researchers working with Aboriginal elder Ronald Lamilami discovered thousands of the paintings--including the largest rock-art site in Australia--during an expedition in August and September 2008. (See full story.) "It is the most important rock art in the whole world" that shows contact with other cultures, said lead researcher Paul Tacon of Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.
  • Arid Australian Interior Linked To Lanscape Burning By Ancient Humans

    01/26/2005 12:28:52 PM PST · by blam · 52 replies · 1,327+ views
    University Of Colorado-Boulder ^ | 1-26-2005 | Gifford Miller/Jim Scott
    Contact: Gifford Miller gmiller@colorado.edu 303-492-6962 Jim Scott 303-492-3114 University of Colorado at Boulder Arid Australian interior linked to landscape burning by ancient humans The image of a controlled burn in the interior of Australia today, featured on the cover of the January 2005 issue of Geology, illustrates how Australia might have looked 50,000 years ago. Photo courtesy Gifford Miller, University of Colorado at Boulder Click here for a high resolution photograph. Landscape burning by ancient hunters and gatherers may have triggered the failure of the annual Australian Monsoon some 12,000 years ago, resulting in the desertification of the country's interior...
  • Prehistoric giant animals killed by man, not climate: study (Tasmania)

    08/12/2008 4:53:23 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 114+ views
    AFP ^ | Aug 12, 2008 | Madeleine Coorey
    SYDNEY (AFP) - The chance discovery of the remains of a prehistoric giant kangaroo has cast doubts on the long-held view that climate change drove it and other mega-fauna to extinction, a new study reveals. < > He said that it was likely that hunting killed off Tasmania's mega-fauna -- including the long-muzzled, 120 kilogram (264 pound) giant kangaroo, a rhinoceros-sized wombat and marsupial 'lions' which resembled leopards. < > The finding of the latest study has already been contested, with Judith Field of the University of Sydney saying the idea that humans killed the giant creatures was "in the...
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • Bizarre, Long-Headed Woman from Ancient Kingdom Revealed

    06/22/2016 7:15:27 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    livescience.com ^ | June 21, 2016 08:14am ET | Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    | The grave of a woman with a bizarre, long-headed skull has been unearthed in Korea. The woman was part of the ancient Silla culture, which ruled much of the Korean peninsula for nearly a millennium. Unlike some of the deformed, pointy skulls that have been found throughout the world in other ancient t graves, however, it is unlikely that this woman had her head deliberately flattened, the researchers said. The ancient Silla Kingdom reigned over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935, making it one of the longest-ruling royal dynasties. Many of Korea's modern-day cultural...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Egyptians hope to find Cleopatra's tomb

    04/15/2009 7:51:41 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 10 replies · 570+ views
    timesonline.co.uk ^ | April 16, 2009 | Sheera Frenkel
    Cleopatra and Mark Antony were immortalised as two of historys greatest lovers, but their final resting place has always been a mystery. Now archaeologists in Egypt are about to start excavating a site that they believe could conceal their tombs. Zahi Hawass, director of Egypts Superior Council for Antiquities, said yesterday that there was evidence to suggest that Cleopatra and Mark Antony were buried together in the complex tunnel system underlying the Tabusiris Magna temple, 17 miles from the city of Alexandria. The dig, which begins next week, could reveal answers to the many myths surrounding the pair including...
  • Snake unlikely to have killed Cleopatra

    10/21/2015 1:16:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 21, 2015 | Mike Addelman
    Academics at The University of Manchester have dismissed the long-held argument that the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra was killed by a snake bite. Andrew Gray, curator of herpetology at Manchester Museum, says venomous snakes in Egypt -- cobras or vipers -- would have been too large to get unseen into the queen's palace. He was speaking to Egyptologist Dr Joyce Tyldesley in a new video which is part of a new online course introducing ancient Egyptian history, using six items from the Museum's collection. According to Dr Tyldesley, the ancient accounts say a snake hid in a basket of figs...
  • Cleopatra Killed by Drug Cocktail?

    07/02/2010 6:04:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Cleopatra, the last queen of Egypt, died from swallowing a lethal drug cocktail and not from a snake bite, a new study claims. According to Christoph Schfer, a German historian and professor at the University of Trier, the legendary beauty queen was unlikely to have committed suicide by letting an asp -- an Egyptian cobra -- sink into her flesh... "The Roman historian Cassius Dio, writing about 200 years after Cleopatra's demise, stated that she died a quiet and pain-free death, which is not compatible with a cobra bite. Indeed, the snake's venom would have caused a painful and disfiguring...
  • Tomb of the century [Anthony and Cleopatra]

    04/29/2009 4:03:39 PM PDT · by SJackson · 19 replies · 1,099+ views
    Al Ahram ^ | 4-29-09
    Archaeological traces found at Taposiris Magna west of Alexandria may indicate the tomb of one of the most famous couples in history, Queen Cleopatra and Mark Anthony, reports Nevine El-Aref A joint Egyptian and Dominican Republic archaeological mission working at Taposiris Magna, an area of great archaeological importance on the Mediterranean coast west of Alexandria and site of a temple dedicated to the god of prosperity, Osiris, and a number of Graeco- Roman catacombs, has discovered several Ptolemaic objects dating back to the reign of the famous Queen Cleopatra. The team was searching the site in the hope of locating...
  • Dig 'may reveal' Cleopatra's tomb

    04/15/2009 6:43:13 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 11 replies · 1,146+ views
    BBC ^ | April 15, 2009 | BBC
    Archaeologists are to search three sites in Egypt that they say may contain the tomb of doomed lovers Anthony and Cleopatra. Excavation at the sites, which are near a temple west of the coastal city of Alexandria, is due to begin next week. Teams working in the area said the recent discovery of tombs containing 10 mummies suggested that Anthony and Cleopatra might be buried close by.
  • 'Indiana Jones'-Like Archeologist Says He's Found Cleopatra's Tomb

    05/25/2008 1:02:47 PM PDT · by AngieGal · 30 replies · 2,544+ views
    Fox News ^ | May 25, 2008 | The Sunday Times
    A flamboyant archeologist known worldwide for his trademark Indiana Jones hat believes he has identified the site where Cleopatra is buried. Now, with a team of 12 archeologists and 70 excavators, Zahi Hawass, 60, the head of Egypts Supreme Council of Antiquities, has begun the search for her tomb. In addition, after a breakthrough two weeks ago, Hawass hopes to find Cleopatra's lover, the Roman general Mark Antony, sharing her last resting place at the site of a temple, the Taposiris Magna, 28 miles west of Alexandria.
  • Egypt: Tomb Of Cleopatra And Lover To Be Uncovered

    04/25/2008 7:44:34 PM PDT · by blam · 82 replies · 8,437+ views
    Adnkronos ^ | 4-24-2008
    Egypt: Tomb of Cleopatra and lover to be uncovered Cairo, 24 April(AKI) - Archaeologists have revealed plans to uncover the 2000 year-old tomb of ancient Egypt's most famous lovers, Cleopatra and the Roman general Mark Antony later this year. Zahi Hawass, prominent archaeologist and director of Egypt's superior council for antiquities announced a proposal to test the theory that the couple were buried together. He discussed the project in Cairo at a media conference about the ancient pharaohs. Hawass said that the remains of the legendary Egyptian queen and her Roman lover, Mark Antony, were inside a temple called Tabusiris...
  • Cleopatra seduced the Romans with her irresistible . . . mind

    03/15/2005 8:10:16 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 110 replies · 2,420+ views
    The Times (U.K.) ^ | March 14, 2005 | Ben Hoyle
    LONG before Shakespeare portrayed her as historys most exotic femme fatale, Cleopatra was revered throughout the Arab world for her brain. Medieval Arab scholars never referred to the Egyptian queens appearance, and they made no mention of the dangerous sensuality which supposedly corrupted Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Instead they marvelled at her intellectual accomplishments: from alchemy and medicine to philosophy, mathematics and town planning, a new book has claimed. Even Elizabeth Taylor, who famously played the title role in the 1963 epic Cleopatra, would have struggled to inject sex appeal into this queen. Arab writers depict Cleopatras court...
  • Hollywood producer attacks Angelina Jolie as 'spoiled brat with rampaging ego'

    12/12/2014 8:15:40 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 44 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 10 Dec 2014 | Nick Allen
    Hollywood producer attacks Angelina Jolie as 'spoiled brat with rampaging ego' In embarrassing emails leaked by Sony hackers Scott Rudin, producer of The Social Network and The Queen, claims the star's planned remake of Cleopatra will be an "ego bath" By Nick Allen, Los Angeles 8:14PM GMT 10 Dec 2014 An Oscar-winning Hollywood producer reportedly attacked Angelina Jolie as a "spoiled brat with a rampaging ego" in leaked emails. Scott Rudin, who produced films including The Social Network, Notes on a Scandal, Moneyball, and The Queen, made the comments in what appear to be a series of angry exchanges with...
  • Rupert Murdoch Defends Moses Movie Casting: Since When Are Egyptians Not White?

    11/29/2014 10:56:58 AM PST · by CharlesOConnell · 82 replies
    Showbiz411 ^ | November 28, 2014 | Roger Friedman
    Rupert Murdoch took to Twitter tonight to defend 20th Century Fox's new movie "Exodus" that casts Christian Bale as Moses, and a variety of white actors as Egyptians. Theres been scuffle on Twitter ever since Murdoch made his observations. And a lot of this stems from a quote director Ridley Scott gave Variety about why he didnt use Egyptian or Arab actors for the film. He said: "I cant mount a film of this budget, where I have to rely on tax rebates in Spain, and say that my lead actor is Mohammad so-and-so from such-and-such," Scott says. "I'm just...
  • The Bombshell: Our Cleopatra Moment [ review of "Cleopatra: A Life" ]

    12/08/2010 6:31:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Bookslut ^ | December 2010 | Jenny McPhee
    We are in a Cleopatra moment. Three books featuring the notorious Egyptian queen have been published in the past few months of which Cleopatra: A Life by Pulitzer-Prize winning biographer Stacy Schiff is generating bombshell-size buzz. Michiko Kakutani gave Schiff's book a rave in The New York Times, the biography was fodder for Maureen Dowd's op-ed column (NYT), on NPR Tina Brown declared Schiff's book a "must-read" on the subject of women and power, Judith Thurman's round-up (The New Yorker) of the goddess' most recent chroniclers conferred upon Schiff's opus alone the honorific "a work of literature." But the mega-buzz...
  • Angelina Jolie draws criticism for being 'too white' to play Cleopatra in upcoming Scott Rudin film

    06/21/2010 7:43:10 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 109 replies · 3+ views
    Daily News ^ | June 19, 2010 | Meena Hartenstein
    Angelina Jolie is one of the most beautiful women in the world, but her "perfect" looks have some critics complaining she's all wrong for her latest role. Earlier this month producer Scott Rudin got the Internet buzzing with his announcement that he was developing a Cleopatra biopic "for and with Jolie" based on Stacy Schiff's book "Cleopatra: A Life." Schiff raved about the choice, telling USA Today, "Physically, she's the perfect look." But some members of the African American community beg to differ -- they are outraged by the casting decision and say Jolie is "too white" to play the...
  • Angelina Jolie Race Row

    She hasn't even been officially confirmed as having the role, but Angelina Jolie is already receiving criticism over her possible portrayal of the legendary Queen of the Nile. Jolie, who turned 35 last week, is caught up in a racially charged debate over whether the role should have been played by a black woman Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1287505/Race-row-erupts-casting-Angelina-Jolie-Cleopatra.html#ixzz0rDMI1hT4
  • Race row erupts over casting of Angelina Jolie as Cleopatra

    06/18/2010 4:13:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 77 replies · 1,504+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | June 17, 2010 | Sophie Forbes
    She hasn't even been officially confirmed as having the role, but Angelina Jolie is already receiving criticism over her possible portrayal of the legendary Queen of the Nile. Jolie, who turned 35 last week, is caught up in a racially charged debate over whether the role should of been played by a black woman. The Egyptian royal was most famously portrayed Elizabeth Taylor in 1963. The new film's producer, Scott Rudin, previously told USA Today the role is being developed with Angelina in mind as she has 'the perfect look'. But this statement has angered members of the African American...
  • Race row erupts over casting of Angelina Jolie as Cleopatra

    06/17/2010 8:16:48 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 158 replies · 3,003+ views
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | June 17, 2010 | Sophie Forbes
    She hasn't even been officially confirmed as having the role, but Angelina Jolie is already receiving criticism over her possible portrayal of the legendary Queen of the Nile. Jolie, who turned 35 last week, is caught up in a racially charged debate over whether the role should of been played by a black woman. The Egyptian royal was most famously portrayed Elizabeth Taylor in 1963. The new film's producer, Scott Rudin, previously told USA Today the role is being developed with Angelina in mind as she has 'the perfect look'. But this statement has angered members of the African American...
  • Cleopatra Not First Female Pharoah of Her Line: Queen Arsinoe II, an Olympian medalist...

    12/12/2010 8:29:43 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, December 2, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Cleopatra may not have been ancient Egypt's only female pharaoh of the Ptolemaic dynasty -- Queen Arsino II, a woman who competed in and won Olympic events, came first, some 200 years earlier, according to a new study into a unique Egyptian crown. After analyzing details and symbols of the crown worn by Arsino and reinterpreting Egyptian reliefs, Swedish researchers... suggest that Queen Arsino II (316-270 B.C.) was the first female pharaoh belonging to Ptolemy's family -- the dynasty that ruled Egypt for some 300 years until the Roman conquest of 30 B.C. While researchers largely agree on Arsino's prominence...
  • Is this Cleopatra's skull? The thrilling finds at the dig to discover Egypt's lost queen

    04/20/2009 7:47:04 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 57 replies · 1,179+ views
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | April 20, 2009 | James White
    Archaeologists searching for the lost bodies of doomed lovers Cleopatra and Mark Antony have made a number of important discoveries. In what could be the most thrilling finds since the tomb of Tutankhamun was unearthed in 1922, leading Egyptologists believe they are edging ever closer to the country's most fabled queen. The female skull was found during a radar survey of a temple close to Alexandria, Egypt, and workers are hopeful they will also find the remains of the celebrated Roman general. Egypt's top archaeologist Zahi Hawass was optimistic of making a significant find when the dig began last month....
  • Found: the Sister Cleopatra Killed

    03/15/2009 11:07:14 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies · 1,596+ views
    The Times (London) ^ | March 15, 2009 | Daniel Foggo
    ARCHEOLOGISTS and forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of Cleopatras younger sister, murdered more than 2,000 years ago on the orders of the Egyptian queen. The remains of Princess Arsine, put to death in 41BC on the orders of Cleopatra and her Roman lover Mark Antony to eliminate her as a rival, are the first relics of the Ptolemaic dynasty to be identified. The breakthrough, by an Austrian team, has provided pointers to Cleopatras true ethnicity. Scholars have long debated whether she was Greek or Macedonian like her ancestor the original Ptolemy, a Macedonian general who was made...
  • Skeleton of Cleopatra's Murdered Sister Identified

    03/15/2009 3:13:37 PM PDT · by RDTF · 16 replies · 693+ views
    Fox ^ | March 15, 2009
    Archeologists and forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of Cleopatras younger sister, murdered more than 2,000 years ago on the orders of the Egyptian queen. The remains of Princess Arsine, put to death in 41BC on the orders of Cleopatra and her Roman lover Mark Antony to eliminate her as a rival, are the first relics of the Ptolemaic dynasty to be identified. -snip-