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Keyword: herodotus

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  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 37 replies · 1,040+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...
  • Yurts Through the Ages: From Nomadic Tribes to Modern Glampers

    02/16/2016 11:14:45 AM PST · by ToeCharmer · 9 replies
    One of the most iconic living quarters in the history of mankind, the yurt is most closely associated with the nomadic peoples of central Asia. Herodotus, the father of history himself, was the first to describe yurts in the written word. According to him, yurts were the primary domiciles of the Scythians, who rode horses and lived in a nomadic fashion near the Black Sea from 600BC-300AD. The Ger Nomadic Mongolian families called their homes “gers.” Their dwellings were made up of same-sized orange mesh-like walls that curved around the center of the tent. Each yurt had 3-5 walls and...
  • The Truth Behind '300' [Persian view]

    03/18/2007 9:32:41 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 147 replies · 5,009+ views
    Spenta Productions ^ | 3/18/07 | Cyrus Kar
    The Battle of Thermopylae was of course written by the classical Greek author, Herodotus, who lived in the Persian city of Halicarnassus. His book, 'The Histories' became part of Western folklore only recently. It was not until about 1850 that America embraced Herodotus as the leading authority on Persian history. Before 1850, however, the West had a very favorable impression of the Persian Empire. That's because the West's main source for Persian history was the Bible and the 'Cyropaedia,' written by another Greek author named Xenophon. But the Cyropaedia glorified the monarchy of Cyrus The Great, and in the wake...
  • Analysis: Islam vs. West: An ongoing clash of civilizations

    01/10/2015 6:06:29 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 12 replies
    i24 News, Tel Aviv ^ | January 9, 2015 | by SEVER PLOCKER
    It would be a big mistake to see the terror attack in Paris as an attack on the freedom of the press. Such a statement puts the massacre in the French capital in line with attacks against journalists by members of a Colombian drug cartel or the Chechen mafia. That's not the case. The goal of the attack on the office of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo was not to frighten newspaper editors so that they would not publish one cartoon or another. The goal was to show and prove who controls the streets and consciousness of the French Republic: The...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary In Ancient Spain

    10/22/2003 11:30:20 AM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 1,568+ views
    Archaeological Odyessy ^ | 10-22-2003 | AO
    Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians. The two cultures soon fused. The hybrid culture produced by this fusion of peoples is evident in a mysterious structure at Cancho Roano, deep in the heart of south-central Spain. The structure at Cancho Roano is sometimes called a “palace-sanctuary” because of its monumentality. But it was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which...
  • Herodotus -- Historia, "The Histories"

    11/14/2015 9:52:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    The Internet Classics Archive ^ | 5th century BC | Daniel C. Stevenson, Web Atomics
    The Internet Classics Archive | General Help May I reproduce works found on this site?Yes! To the best of our knowledge all works on the site are in the public domain. You are free to reproduce and distribute them at no cost. Why are there more Greek than Latin authors?The first batch of works in the Internet Classics Archive came from the Eric Project at Virginia Tech ( see sources help), and were about evenly mixed between Greek and Latin texts. The second set of works, roughly the same size as the first, came from the Perseus Project, and consisted...
  • Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Experts Says

    10/18/2001 1:46:50 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,309+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 10-17-2001 | Hillary Mayall
    Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Expert Says By Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News October 17, 2001 Two cities that lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, Herakleion and Eastern Canopus, disappeared suddenly, swallowed by the sea. Now, an international team of scientists may have figured out the mystery of why it happened. The researchers have concluded that the two cities collapsed when the land they were built on suddenly liquefied. The cities of Herakleion and Eastern Canopus lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, but disappeared suddenly when ...
  • Amazon Warrior Women

    08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 5,400+ views
    PBS ^ | Current | PBS
    Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
  • Mystery Surrounding Lost Army of Persian King Cambyses II May Have Been Solved

    06/21/2014 7:05:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Sci-News ^ | June 19, 2014 | Enrico de Lazaro
    According to the Greek historian Herodotus, Cambyses II, the oldest son of Cyrus the Great, sent his army to destroy the Oracle of Amun at Siwa Oasis. 50,000 warriors entered the Egypt’s western desert near Luxor. Somewhere in the middle of the desert the army was overwhelmed by a sandstorm and destroyed. Although many scientists regard the story as a myth, amateur as well as professional archaeologists have searched for the remains of the Persian soldiers for many decades. Prof Kaper never believed this story. “Some expect to find an entire army, fully equipped. However, experience has long shown that...
  • Adventurer crosses sands that conquered a king

    01/27/2006 11:33:56 PM PST · by Tyche · 25 replies · 888+ views
    The Times Online ^ | Jan 28, 2006 | Martin Penner
    INSPIRED by the legend of a Persian king and his lost army, Stefano Miglietti, an Italian adventurer, completed a 340-mile hike through the most isolated and arid part of the western Sahara yesterday. The route that Signor Miglietti followed through the so-called Great Sand Sea — from the Farafra oasis in southern Egypt to the Siwa oasis in the north — has always been considered impossible for a man carrying his own food and water. According to legend, Cambyses II, the Persian king, foolishly tried to take the same route in 523 BC, setting off with a 50,000-strong army. Herodotus,...
  • Tourists To Look for Ancient Persian Army

    02/16/2004 2:37:05 PM PST · by freedom44 · 17 replies · 288+ views
    Discovery Channel | 2/16/04 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Feb. 12, 2004 — Tourists traversing Egypt's desert may solve a mystery that has puzzled archaeologists for centuries: what happened to the 50,000-man Persian army of King Cambyses. Set up by tourist operator Aqua Sun Desert, the Cambyses project will comb the desert sands using four-wheel-drive vehicles packed with paying tourists eager to find the remains of the lost army swallowed in a sandstorm in 524 B.C., according to the account of the ancient Greek historian Herodotus. "The project is approved by the Ministry of Tourism after the agreement of Ministry of Antiquities. Any evidence will have to be reported...
  • Themistocles decree -- 480 B.C.

    12/25/2013 4:36:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Ancient Greek Battles ^ | unknown | unattributed
    Gods.Resolved by the Boule and the People.Themistocles son of Neocles of Phrearrhioi made the motion. The city shall be entrusted to Athena, Athens' protectress, and to the other gods, all of them, for protection and defense against the Barbarian on behalf of the country. The Athenians in their entirety and the aliens who live in Athens shall place their children and their women in Troezen, [to be entrusted to Theseus ?] the founder of the land. The elderly and movable property shall for safety be deposited at Salamis. The treasurers and the priestesses are to remain on the Acropolis and...
  • An Ancient City Is Discovered Underwater. What They Found Will Change History Forever

    12/07/2013 12:44:04 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 58 replies
    Sunken Skyz blog ^ | December 1, 2013
    The city of Heracleion was engulfed underwater 1500 years ago. This grand city had been mentioned by the Greek writer Herodotus, the 5th-century BC historian. He had told a wonderful tale of Helen of Troy, who traveled to Heracleion, then a port of 'great wealth', with her Trojan lover, Paris. When French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio stumbled upon some relics, it led them to one of the greatest finds of the 21st century; a city underwater. The discovery took place when Goddio had been in search of Napoleon’s warships from the 1798 Battle of the Nile, when he had been...
  • Hawara, Egypt

    07/13/2013 9:59:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Robert Schoch dot com ^ | circa 2012 | Robert M. Schoch, PhD
    I had the pleasure of joining an NBC expedition to Hawara on the edge of the Faiyum Oasis, Egypt. Researching a documentary about 2012, they wanted my comments on the fabled labyrinth located there... Herodotus (fifth century B.C.) and other Greek and Roman writers described a magnificent labyrinth in Egypt, containing three thousand rooms on two levels. Pliny the Elder (first century A.D.) related that the Egyptian labyrinth was already 3600 years old in his time. Since the nineteenth century, the Egyptian labyrinth has been identified with an area on the southern side of the Middle Kingdom pyramid of Amenemhet...
  • Have Lost Pyramids of Herodotus Been Found in Egypt with Google Earth?

    06/13/2013 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    YouTube via Indiegogo ^ | Tuesday, June 11, 2013 | Angela Micol
    After 10 years of satellite archaeology research I decided in August of 2012 to seek help for my work from the public with a press release. The goal of this public outreach was to get help ground proofing two sites I had found in Egypt via Google Earth, to see if they were possible pyramid complexes that had remained undiscovered. The Discovery News website was the first news outlet to pick up the press release and publish the full, intact story on August 10th of 2012.
  • The Hanging Gardens of ... Nineveh?

    06/01/2013 1:05:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Friday, May 31, 2013 | Elizabeth Snodgrass
    The legendary Hanging Gardens of Babylon are exactly that: legendary. And they may not have been located in Babylon. The gardens, famous as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, were, according to Stephanie Dalley, an Oxford University Assyriologist, located some 340 miles north of ancient Babylon in Nineveh, on the Tigris River by Mosul in modern Iraq. Dalley, whose book The Mystery of the Hanging Garden of Babylon will be published later this summer, writes that earlier sources were translated incorrectly, leading to the confusion. The misinterpretation also explains why years of excavations never yielded any credible...
  • Killer Swarms (It wasn't the Russian winter that stopped Napoleon.)

    11/26/2012 11:08:01 PM PST · by cunning_fish · 14 replies
    The Foreign Policy ^ | November 26, 2012 | John Arquilla
    Today marks the bicentennial of the culminating catastrophe that befell the Grande Armée as it retreated from Russia. This past weekend one of the French Emperor's descendants, Charles Napoleon, traveled to Minsk in Belarus to attend ceremonies commemorating the disaster at the nearby Beresina River crossing, where thousands died -- many by drowning -- in a final, panicked rout in freezing weather. Bonaparte had marched deep into Russia with nearly half a million soldiers; he returned with less than 25,000. Given that Napoleon was the great captain of his time -- perhaps of all time -- and that his armies...
  • 'Cult Fiction' Traced to Ancient Egypt Priest

    09/25/2012 7:12:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 24 September 2012 | Owen Jarus
    A recently deciphered Egyptian papyrus from around 1,900 years ago tells a fictional story that includes drinking, singing, feasting and ritual sex, all in the name of the goddess Mut. Researchers believe that a priest wrote the blush-worthy tale, as a way to discuss controversial ritual sex acts with other priests... the Egyptians were known to discuss other controversial matters using fictional stories. Containing writing in a form of ancient Egyptian known as Demotic, the papyrus is likely to have originated in the Fayum village of Tebtunis at a time when the Romans controlled Egypt... Researchers know the story is...
  • Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

    05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 19, 2012 | Nan Broadbent
    In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...