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Keyword: herodotus

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  • Themistocles decree -- 480 B.C.

    12/25/2013 4:36:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Ancient Greek Battles ^ | unknown | unattributed
    Gods.Resolved by the Boule and the People.Themistocles son of Neocles of Phrearrhioi made the motion. The city shall be entrusted to Athena, Athens' protectress, and to the other gods, all of them, for protection and defense against the Barbarian on behalf of the country. The Athenians in their entirety and the aliens who live in Athens shall place their children and their women in Troezen, [to be entrusted to Theseus ?] the founder of the land. The elderly and movable property shall for safety be deposited at Salamis. The treasurers and the priestesses are to remain on the Acropolis and...
  • An Ancient City Is Discovered Underwater. What They Found Will Change History Forever

    12/07/2013 12:44:04 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 58 replies
    Sunken Skyz blog ^ | December 1, 2013
    The city of Heracleion was engulfed underwater 1500 years ago. This grand city had been mentioned by the Greek writer Herodotus, the 5th-century BC historian. He had told a wonderful tale of Helen of Troy, who traveled to Heracleion, then a port of 'great wealth', with her Trojan lover, Paris. When French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio stumbled upon some relics, it led them to one of the greatest finds of the 21st century; a city underwater. The discovery took place when Goddio had been in search of Napoleon’s warships from the 1798 Battle of the Nile, when he had been...
  • Hawara, Egypt

    07/13/2013 9:59:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Robert Schoch dot com ^ | circa 2012 | Robert M. Schoch, PhD
    I had the pleasure of joining an NBC expedition to Hawara on the edge of the Faiyum Oasis, Egypt. Researching a documentary about 2012, they wanted my comments on the fabled labyrinth located there... Herodotus (fifth century B.C.) and other Greek and Roman writers described a magnificent labyrinth in Egypt, containing three thousand rooms on two levels. Pliny the Elder (first century A.D.) related that the Egyptian labyrinth was already 3600 years old in his time. Since the nineteenth century, the Egyptian labyrinth has been identified with an area on the southern side of the Middle Kingdom pyramid of Amenemhet...
  • Have Lost Pyramids of Herodotus Been Found in Egypt with Google Earth?

    06/13/2013 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    YouTube via Indiegogo ^ | Tuesday, June 11, 2013 | Angela Micol
    After 10 years of satellite archaeology research I decided in August of 2012 to seek help for my work from the public with a press release. The goal of this public outreach was to get help ground proofing two sites I had found in Egypt via Google Earth, to see if they were possible pyramid complexes that had remained undiscovered. The Discovery News website was the first news outlet to pick up the press release and publish the full, intact story on August 10th of 2012.
  • The Hanging Gardens of ... Nineveh?

    06/01/2013 1:05:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Friday, May 31, 2013 | Elizabeth Snodgrass
    The legendary Hanging Gardens of Babylon are exactly that: legendary. And they may not have been located in Babylon. The gardens, famous as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, were, according to Stephanie Dalley, an Oxford University Assyriologist, located some 340 miles north of ancient Babylon in Nineveh, on the Tigris River by Mosul in modern Iraq. Dalley, whose book The Mystery of the Hanging Garden of Babylon will be published later this summer, writes that earlier sources were translated incorrectly, leading to the confusion. The misinterpretation also explains why years of excavations never yielded any credible...
  • Killer Swarms (It wasn't the Russian winter that stopped Napoleon.)

    11/26/2012 11:08:01 PM PST · by cunning_fish · 14 replies
    The Foreign Policy ^ | November 26, 2012 | John Arquilla
    Today marks the bicentennial of the culminating catastrophe that befell the Grande Armée as it retreated from Russia. This past weekend one of the French Emperor's descendants, Charles Napoleon, traveled to Minsk in Belarus to attend ceremonies commemorating the disaster at the nearby Beresina River crossing, where thousands died -- many by drowning -- in a final, panicked rout in freezing weather. Bonaparte had marched deep into Russia with nearly half a million soldiers; he returned with less than 25,000. Given that Napoleon was the great captain of his time -- perhaps of all time -- and that his armies...
  • 'Cult Fiction' Traced to Ancient Egypt Priest

    09/25/2012 7:12:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 24 September 2012 | Owen Jarus
    A recently deciphered Egyptian papyrus from around 1,900 years ago tells a fictional story that includes drinking, singing, feasting and ritual sex, all in the name of the goddess Mut. Researchers believe that a priest wrote the blush-worthy tale, as a way to discuss controversial ritual sex acts with other priests... the Egyptians were known to discuss other controversial matters using fictional stories. Containing writing in a form of ancient Egyptian known as Demotic, the papyrus is likely to have originated in the Fayum village of Tebtunis at a time when the Romans controlled Egypt... Researchers know the story is...
  • Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

    05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 19, 2012 | Nan Broadbent
    In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...
  • Rethinking the Thundering Hordes

    05/06/2012 7:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Archaeology, v65 n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Andrew Lawler
    Vast stretches of Central Asia feel eerily uninhabited. Fly at 30,000 feet over... Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan -- and there are long moments when no town or road or field is visible from your window. Wandering bands and tribes roamed this immense area for 5,000 years, herding goat, sheep, cattle, and horses across immense steppes, through narrow valleys, and over high snowy passes. They left occasional tombs that survived the ages, and on rare occasions settled down and built towns or even cities. But for the most part, these peoples left behind few physical traces of their origins, beliefs, or ways...
  • The Classical Education of the Founding Fathers

    02/21/2010 10:56:00 AM PST · by Lorianne · 25 replies · 655+ views
    Memoria Press ^ | Spring 2007
    “Americans view the Founding Fathers in vacuo, isolated from the soil that nurtured them,” says Traci Lee Simmons in his book, Climbing Parnassus: A New Apologia for Greek and Latin. For the Founders, says Simmons, these virtues came principally from two places: “the pulpit and the schoolroom.” We are already fairly familiar with the explicitly Biblical influences on America’s founding, but we are far less familiar with the classical influences on the Founders—and how these two influences worked in concert to mold their education and their thinking. It is a well-known fact that literacy was prevalent in colonial times. “A...
  • THE HISTORY OF HERODOTUS

    09/22/2003 12:29:49 PM PDT · by restornu · 10 replies · 195+ views
    Ancient History Page ^ | 440 BC | by Herodotus trans. by George Rawlinson
    The First Book, Entitled CLIO THESE are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, which he publishes, in the hope of thereby preserving from decay the remembrance of what men have done, and of preventing the great and wonderful actions of the Greeks and the Barbarians from losing their due meed of glory; and withal to put on record what were their grounds of feuds. According to the Persians best informed in history, the Phoenicians began to quarrel. This people, who had formerly dwelt on the shores of the Erythraean Sea, having migrated to the Mediterranean and settled in the parts...
  • Herodotus' History

    09/09/2004 10:31:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 704+ views
    The History: Thalia, the Internet Classics Archive ^ | 440 B.C. | Herodotus, tr by George Rawlinson
    There is a great river in Arabia, called the Corys, which empties itself into the Erythraean sea. The Arabian king, they say, made a pipe of the skins of oxen and other beasts, reaching from this river all the way to the desert, and so brought the water to certain cisterns which he had dug in the desert to receive it. It is a twelve days' journey from the river to this desert tract. And the water, they say, was brought through three different pipes to three separate places.
  • Fall of Gaddafi opens a new era for the Sahara's lost civilisation [ Garamantes ]

    11/06/2011 4:30:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Saturday, November 5, 2011 | Peter Beaumont
    researchers into the Garamantes -- a "lost" Saharan civilisation that flourished long before the Islamic era -- are hoping that Libya's new government can restore the warrior culture, mentioned by Herodotus in his Histories, to its rightful place in Libya's history. For while the impressive Roman ruins at Sabratha and Leptis Magna -- both world heritage sites -- are rightly famous, Libya's other cultural heritage, one that coexisted with its Roman settlers, has been largely forgotten. It has been prompted by new research -- including through the use of satellite imaging -- which suggests that the Garamantes built more extensively...
  • Vast and Deadly Fleets May Yield Secrets at Last (Freedom Over Tyranny Alert)

    04/20/2004 8:06:37 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 34 replies · 489+ views
    New York Times ^ | April 20, 2004 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    The Persian Wars may be famed in history, but few artifacts and material remains have emerged to shed light on how the ancient Greeks defeated the Asian invaders and saved Europe in what scholars call one of the first great victories of freedom over tyranny. It is well known that a deadly warship of antiquity, the trireme, a fast galley powered by three banks of rowers pulling up to 200 oars, played a crucial role in the fierce battles. Its bronze ram could smash enemy ships, and armed soldiers could leap aboard a foe's vessel in hand-to-hand combat with swords...
  • Fish Swam the Sahara, Bolstering Out of Africa Theory

    12/29/2010 11:42:33 AM PST · by decimon · 30 replies · 4+ views
    Live Science ^ | December 29, 2010 | Charles Q. Choi
    Fish may have once swum across the Sahara, a finding that could shed light on how humanity made its way out of Africa, researchers said. The cradle of humanity lies south of the Sahara, which begs the question as to how our species made its way past it. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, and would seem a major barrier for any humans striving to migrate off the continent. Scientists have often focused on the Nile Valley as the corridor by which humans left Africa. However, considerable research efforts have failed to uncover evidence for its...
  • How Earth's orbital shift shaped the Sahara

    12/21/2010 10:03:52 AM PST · by LucyT · 36 replies · 4+ views
    Physorg Earth Sciences ^ | December 21, 2010 | Anuradha K. Herath
    The Sahara, the world's largest desert, was once fertile grassland. This fact has been common knowledge in the scientific community for some time, but scientists are still grappling with historic data to determine whether that transition took place abruptly or gradually. At the European Geosciences Union General Assembly held in Vienna, Austria earlier this year, researchers presented new evidence showing that the eastern region of the Sahara desert, particularly the area near Lake Yoa in Chad, dried up slowly and progressively since the mid-Holocene period.
  • The Fate of the Library of Alexandria

    05/02/2010 3:17:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 81 replies · 3,039+ views
    American Thinker ^ | May 02, 2010 | John O'Neill
    The great Library of Alexandria, established by Ptolemy II (circa 280 BC), has come to symbolize the receptacle of knowledge of Classical civilization. This great repository was barbarously razed in the Middle Ages. At its height, the Library contained an estimated forty thousand volumes on a wide variety of topics. It held works on astronomy, mathematics, physics, medicine, and philosophy -- many of which were copied from the hieroglyphic and cuneiform texts of the Egyptians and Babylonians. It also stored histories of all the countries of the known world: histories of Egypt, of Babylonia, of Persia, of the lands of...
  • In the footsteps of the Bronze Men [ the Carians in Egypt ]

    04/06/2010 6:03:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 317+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | Issue No. 992, April 1-7, 2010 | Nevine El-Aref
    When Herodotus toured the known world during the fifth century BC to compile his international history, he did not forget his hometown Caria, now Bodrum in Turkey. Caria (the name means "the steep country") stood in the western part of Anatolia, whose coast, according to the ancient world map, stretched from mid-Ionia to Lycia and east to Phrygia. Mountains and valleys were the main features of the country's scenery, and it was poor in agriculture in comparison with its counterparts at the time: Egypt and Babylonia. Its hilltops were fortified, while villages were scattered in valleys and it was hard...
  • Two-and-a-Half Millennia Don’t Change Much

    01/29/2010 7:25:04 AM PST · by mattstat · 10 replies · 365+ views
    Herodotus begins his history by telling us that some Phoenician traders came to Argos, Greece and, on a whim, abducted the king’s daughter Io and took her to Egypt. Later, to show that two could play at that game, the Greeks slid over to Phoenicia and stole their king’s daughter, Europa. (Bad pun: and how these ladies ended up with Jupiter, nobody knows.) “So far,” Herodotus, checking his sums, said, “the scores were even.” But then the Greeks, into the game, decided to do a one-up. The went back to another Phoenician stronghold and kidnapped that king’s daughter, Medea. The...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found Remains of Lost Persian Army

    11/12/2009 11:19:30 AM PST · by FromLori · 15 replies · 1,279+ views
    Boing Boing ^ | 11/10/09
    2,500 years ago, an army of 50,000 men left an oasis in western Egypt and were never heard from again. Now, archaeologists think they may have uncovered the missing troops, who were probably killed in a sandstorm. ...the team decided to investigate Bedouin stories about thousands of white bones that would have emerged decades ago during particular wind conditions in a nearby area. Indeed, they found a mass grave with hundreds of bleached bones and skulls. "We learned that the remains had been exposed by tomb robbers and that a beautiful sword which was found among the bones was sold...
  • Is this the legendary lost Persian army

    11/09/2009 8:05:43 PM PST · by Charlespg · 14 replies · 1,134+ views
    Daily mail ^ | 10th November 2009 | Cher Thornhill
    The legend of the lost Persian army has survived over two and a half millennia - despite a blatant lack of hard evidence. But now two Italian experts believe they have found its remains. Twin brothers Angelo and Alfredo Castiglioni uncovered hundreds of human bones, weapons and jewelery in the Sahara desert, west Egypt, that they believe belonged to the 50,000-strong army.
  • Legendary Lost Persian Army Found in Sahara

    11/09/2009 5:18:05 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 57 replies · 2,721+ views
    FOXNews ^ | 11/9/09 | Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni
    Herodotus wrote of a 50,000-man strong army that set out on foot into the Egyptian desert in 525 B.C. and was never heard from again ... until today.A pair of Italian archaeologists have uncovered bronze weapons, a silver bracelet, an earring and hundreds of human bones in the vast desolate wilderness of the Sahara desert. Twin brothers Angelo and Alfredo Castiglioni are hopeful that they've finally found the lost army of Persian King Cambyses II. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, Cambyses II and his armied were buried by a cataclysmic sandstorm in 525 B.C. He wrote, "a wind...
  • Politics and “Conspiracy Theories”: It’s Not What You are Seeing

    05/09/2009 12:00:48 AM PDT · by The Conservative Yogini · 6 replies · 505+ views
    The Gadfly ^ | The Gadfly
    In the beginning of Book I of his Histories, Herodotus, the first Greek historian, tells us the story of how King Gyges became ruler of Lydia. The function of the story in the context of Herodotus’ history is to offer the reader an insight into the nature of political knowledge as Herodotus saw it. Political knowledge is not like any other kind of knowledge available to mankind and that is because political knowledge somehow involves having a certain kind of wisdom and comprehension of human nature, both the external and obvious characteristics, as well as the more subterranean and concealed...
  • Ancient Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia (Turkey)

    06/17/2007 4:55:52 PM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,903+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 6-17-2007 | Mary Rice
    Contact: Mary Rice mary@mrcommunication.org European Society of Human Genetics Ancient Etruscans were immigrants from Anatolia, or what is now TurkeyGeneticists find the final piece in the puzzle Nice, France: The long-running controversy about the origins of the Etruscan people appears to be very close to being settled once and for all, a geneticist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. Professor Alberto Piazza, from the University of Turin, Italy, will say that there is overwhelming evidence that the Etruscans, whose brilliant civilisation flourished 3000 years ago in what is now Tuscany, were settlers from...
  • Greek sculpture 'from throne of Midas' [2002]

    04/24/2007 8:51:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 502+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, January 4, 2002 | unattributed
    A sculpture found in Greece in 1939 may have been part of King Midas' lost throne, an archaeologist has said. The 23cm-tall ivory sculpture, known to scholars as The Lion Tamer, has puzzled historians of classical Greece since its discovery... Keith DeVries, of the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, said there are signs that it once adorned Midas' royal throne... Mr DeVries said the sculpture appears to be Phrygian and to have been produced around the time that Midas was alive... According to Mr DeVries, Midas donated his throne as a gift to Delphi, where it was...
  • DNA Boosts Herodotus’ Account of Etruscans as Migrants to Italy

    04/03/2007 9:27:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 58 replies · 1,641+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 3, 2007 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Geneticists have added an edge to a 2,500-year-old debate over the origin of the Etruscans, a people whose brilliant and mysterious civilization dominated northwestern Italy for centuries until the rise of the Roman republic in 510 B.C. Several new findings support a view held by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus — but unpopular among archaeologists — that the Etruscans originally migrated to Italy from the Near East. Though Roman historians played down their debt to the Etruscans, Etruscan culture permeated Roman art, architecture and religion. The Etruscans were master metallurgists and skillful seafarers who for a time dominated much of...
  • Herodutus Life Situation Affected his History

    10/02/2005 1:59:19 AM PDT · by F14 Pilot · 10 replies · 2,583+ views
    How the life Herodotus lived affected his history writing is a subject of dispute among many experts The question of how social conditions affecting Herodotus’s personal life affected his writing history may raise many disputes among historians. “The state where Herodotus was born in was under Persian Empire at that time; it was governed by Lygdamis, who put to death the poet Panyasis, a relative of Herodotus, for opposition and riots against Persia. Following this event, Herodotus had to leave his native city and went to Samos Island in Athena, and ever since he inhabited in Greek lands. But since...
  • Research To Investigate Links Between Ancient Greeks And Modern Science Fiction

    06/08/2005 11:28:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies · 737+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2005-06-08
    New research into the Ancient Greeks shows their knowledge of travel inspired early forms of fantasy and science fiction writing.There is a long tradition of fantasy in Greek literature that begins with Odysseus' fantastic travels in Homer's Odyssey. Dr Karen Ni-Mheallaigh, at the University of Liverpool's School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, is exploring fantasy in ancient literature, examining theories of modern science fiction writing and how these can be applied to texts from the ancient world. Dr Ni-Mheallaigh is looking at the work of 2nd century AD writer, Lucian of Samosata, who wrote True Histories, a travel narrative that...
  • Constitutional Convention (Ca. 520 B.C.)

    04/24/2005 4:38:02 PM PDT · by mrsmith · 3 replies · 358+ views
    Histories ^ | 440 B.C. | herodotus
    "According to a story in Herodotus, the nature of monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy, and the advantages and inconveniences of each, were as well understood at the time of the neighing of the horse of Darius, as they are at this hour." John Adams: A DEFENCE OF THE CONSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. [3.80] ... Otanes recommended that the management of public affairs should be entrusted to the whole nation. [democracy] "To me," he said, "it seems advisable, that we should no longer have a single man to rule over us - the rule of one is...
  • Swallowed by the Sands

    08/21/2004 8:26:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 1,152+ views
    Discovering Archaeology (Wayback Machine) ^ | August 2000 | Michael A. Stowe
    "The Persians set forth from [an] oasis across the sand," Herodotus wrote. "As they were at their midday meal, a wind arose from the south, strong and deadly, bringing with it vast columns of whirling sand, which entirely covered up the troops and caused them wholly to disappear." Recently, however, human remains, daggers, metal arrowheads, and other objects likely associated with just such an army were accidentally discovered by a group of geologists working in the northwestern desert. Now a multidisciplinary team of archaeologists, geologists, and surveyors has been dispatched to determine whether this remote site is the graveyard...
  • Straights Answers: Why Do Priests Use Incense?

    07/21/2004 7:51:24 PM PDT · by NYer · 37 replies · 4,363+ views
    Catholic Herald ^ | Fr. William Saunders
    Why do priests use incense at Mass? — A reader in AlexandriaIncense is an aromatic substance which is the resin from certain trees. When burned over charcoal, the incense produces a sweet smelling aroma. To make the smoke thicker and to enhance the fragrance, sometimes other perfumes are blended with the incense.The use of incense in the ancient world was common, especially in religious rites where it was used to keep demons away. Herodotus, the Greek historian, recorded that it was popular among the Assyrians, Babylonians and Egyptians. In Judaism, incense was included in the thanksgiving offerings of oil, grain,...
  • Xenophon's Retreat

    08/04/2004 12:51:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 434+ views
    Archaeology ^ | April 7, 1997 | Norman Hammond
    British scholar Timothy Mitford believes he has found the spot from which a Greek army first sighted the Black Sea during its flight from the forces of the Persian king Artaxerxes II in 401 B.C. Earlier that year Artaxerxes had defeated his brother Cyrus at Cunaxa on the Euphrates, crushing the latter's bid for the throne. Among Cyrus' forces was a contingent of Greek mercenaries known as the Ten Thousand, led by the Athenian general and historian Xenophon, who recounts the event in his Anabasis. After the battle Xenophon led his troops through the Tigris and upper Euphrates valleys,...
  • 50 Ancient Tombs Uncovered (1400BC, Crete)

    07/18/2004 1:17:56 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 2,126+ views
    The Australian ^ | 7-18-2004
    50 ancient tombs uncovered From correspondents in Athens July 18, 2004 ARCHEOLOGISTS have discovered 50 tombs dating back to the late Minoan period, around 1400 BC, and containing a number of artifacts on the Greek island of Crete, ANA news agency reported today. The tombs were part of the once powerful ancient city of Kydonia, which was destroyed at the time but later rebuilt. The oldest among them contained bronze weapons, jewellery and vases and are similar to the tombs of fallen soldiers of the Mycenaean type from mainland Greece, said the head of the excavations, Maria Vlazaki. The more...
  • Astronomers Revise Date of Ancient Greek-Persian Battle

    07/22/2004 11:48:19 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 12 replies · 1,387+ views
    Iranian Cultural Heritage ^ | 7/22/04 | Iranian Cultural Heritage
    A team of astronomer gumshoes has pinned down the date of an ancient Greek-Persian battle at Marathon that led to a long-distance run and the sport that survives today in its honor. Analysis of lunar records show the 490 B.C. battle occurred not on the long accepted date of September 12, but a full month earlier, researchers said. How important is a month for a professional runner more than 2,000 years ago? Apparently it's a matter of life and death. According the Greek historian Herodotus, Plutarch and others, after the Greek army routed their Persian attackers at Marathon the long-distance...
  • Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery

    02/14/2003 1:30:45 PM PST · by vannrox · 20 replies · 773+ views
    www.novinite.com ^ | 2003-02-13 | Novinite editorial Staff
     Subscribe for free at www.novinite.com Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery2003-02-13Bulgarian archaeologists discovered an oval ritual hall fitting the description that ancient historians gave to the Dionysus Temple in the Rhodope range famous for its splendor and mysteriousness in antique times and for the many failed attempts to determine its exact location in modernity. During an expedition in 2002, the team of archeologist Nikolay Ovcharov unearthed the hall inside of an ancient Thracian palace, some 250km southeast of Bulgaria's capital Sofia. The temple-palace is part of the dead city of Perpericon in Bulgaria's Eastern Rhodope Mountain that...
  • When is Christmas? (It's about time.)

    12/01/2002 9:37:41 AM PST · by WaterDragon · 24 replies · 547+ views
    Oregon Magazine ^ | December 1, 2002 | Larry Leonard
    There seems to be some dispute about the date of the first Christmas. Part of that has to do with the Gregorian calendar, which is the one we use. At one time, Greek months had three ten day weeks. This forced them to add a month or two now and then. The ancient Hebrews, who alternated 29 and 30 day months, had the same problem. Our hour and minute divisions go all the way back to Mesopotamia. Our 24 hour day comes from pharaonic Egypt. The names we use for days and months come to us from the classical Greek,...