Keyword: megaliths

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunrise Solstice over Stonehenge

    06/20/2016 3:35:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, June 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today the Sun reaches its northernmost point in planet Earth's sky. Called a solstice, the date traditionally marks a change of seasons -- from spring to summer in Earth's Northern Hemisphere and from fall to winter in Earth's Southern Hemisphere. The featured image was taken during the week of the 2008 summer solstice at Stonehenge in United Kingdom, and captures a picturesque sunrise involving fog, trees, clouds, stones placed about 4,500 years ago, and a 4.5 billion year old large glowing orb. Even given the precession of the Earth's rotational axis over the millennia, the Sun continues to rise...
  • The Stone Pages are BACK!

    04/11/2006 11:32:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 414+ views
    Stone Pages ^ | Last updated: 3 April 2006 | Paola Arosio & Diego Meozzi
    Over the last 14 years we have personally visited and photographed all 529 archæological sites you will find in these pages (117 in the six national sections and 412 in our Tours section), creating the first Web guide to European megaliths and other prehistoric sites, online since February 1996
  • Stonehenge May Not Have Been So Difficult To Build After All, Archaeologists Have Found

    05/31/2016 4:33:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | May 24, 2016 | Sarah Knapton
    The Preseli stones from Stonehenge are approximately double the weight as the experimental block, but it is possible that one huge stone could have been brought by a group of just 20 people. The community living in the area during the Neolithic would have numbered several thousand so the absence of just a few dozen people was unlikely to cause any hardship. Doctoral student Barney Harris, who conducted the trial in Gordon Square, London, a stone's throw from UCL's Institute of Archaeology, said he was surprised that so few people had been required to move the block. "We were expecting...
  • Ara Pacis Illuminated: 3D models shed light on shadowy theory [update]

    04/25/2016 9:54:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Using NASA data and 3D modeling, Indiana University Bloomington professor Bernard Frischer and his research team have dispelled a long-held theory regarding the relationship between two famous monuments in ancient Rome. The Ara Pacis Augustae, or Altar of Augustan Peace, was built in 9 B.C.E. in ancient Rome's Campus Martius. The marble altar stood as a propagandistic celebration of the peace and prosperity ushered into the new empire by Rome's first emperor, Augustus. Near the Ara Pacis sat a 71-foot-high granite obelisk brought from Egypt by Augustus, which served as the gnomon, or pointer, of a meridian line. Following a...
  • Scientists Study Anasazi Calendar

    03/27/2005 2:32:14 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 1,832+ views
    KSL-TV ^ | 3-21-2005 | Ed Yeates
    Scientists Study Anasazi Calender Mar. 21, 2005 Ed Yeates reporting Don Smith, College of Eastern Utah, San Juan branch: "I think we're becoming more aware that those people were far more familiar with astronomy, science and possibly math than we give them credit for." In a secluded ravine near Blanding, scientists and researchers gather to watch mysterious images forming right before their eyes. Although the rite of Spring, at least on our calendar, slipped in here yesterday almost unnoticed, it's literally in your face in this strange little canyon. We arrived weeks before spring equinox because people studying this place...
  • "By the Dawn's Early Light"

    02/25/2005 3:34:55 PM PST · by Congressman Billybob · 21 replies · 1,266+ views
    Special to FreeRepublic ^ | 26 February 2005 | John Armor (Congressman Billybob)
    No, this isn’t about the Star-Spangled Banner, neither the flag nor the anthem. It’s about dawn itself. The promise of a new beginning. Civilization began, thousands of years before recorded history, when men discovered how to cultivate crops. That meant communities and social organization. It also meant the beginnings of astronomy, studying the movement of the sun. Early evidence of this includes the “solar observatories” built by the Incas in South America, by the Anasazi in North America, and most famously, by Druids and others at Stonehenge in Britain. All these identified the solar equinoxes, especially in the spring. Coupled...
  • Archaeologists uncover monumental prehistoric structure on island of Menorca

    04/02/2016 3:10:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016
    Archaeologists have recently begun revealing the features of an ancient prehistoric stone structure on the Mediterranean island of Menorca in the Balearic Islands, an archipelago near the eastern coast of Spain. Beginning in 2015, under the direction of archaeologists Montserrat Anglada, Irene Riudavets, and Cristina Bravo, an archaeological team began excavating a newly opened structure at the site, known as Sa Cudia Cremada, a site that is composed of distinctive Iron Age (part of Spain's prehistoric period) stone structures such as talayots -- truncated tower-shaped constructions. The builders were members of the mysterious Talayotic culture, a people who left no...
  • Bronze Age burial near Stonehenge discovered by badger

    02/13/2016 12:59:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | February 9, 2016 | unattributed
    <p>A Bronze Age cremation burial has been discovered near Stonehenge after being accidentally dug up by a badger.</p>
  • Once a 'majestic roundhouse' - architect Sarah Ewbank believes she's solved Stonehenge's...

    01/30/2016 10:32:53 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    Sarah Ewbank spent the last year researching the ancient monument and applying her architectural background to the site to determine what its purpose and form once might have been. She has concluded, based on the layout of the stones, that they were used as support structures for a massive wooden frame that featured a second story for the site as well as an enormous round roof. Ewbank argues that a roof at the monument would allow for it to have been used throughout the year which, she believes, makes more sense that it simply being a religious site used on...
  • Ingleborough Archaeology Group witnesses the rising of the mid-winter sun

    01/05/2016 12:23:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Craven Herald ^ | Monday, January 4, 2015 | Lindsey Moore, Deputy Editor
    Members of the Ingleborough Archaeology Group gathered on a neolithic burial cairn at Low Hard Rigg on the slopes of Whernside to witness the rising of the mid-winter sun above the summit of Ingleborough. It is a practice that would probably have been carried out by our prehistoric antecedents 5,000 years ago. The alignment of the cairn with the winter solstice is thought to be highly significant. Yvonne Luke, of Historic England, said: "I shall never forget those last dramatic moments, ever!" More photos and a link to Yvonne's publication, The Neolithic Long Mounds of the Yorkshire Dales, can be...
  • Great Riddles in Archaeology

    02/26/2012 2:37:08 PM PST · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Penn Museum ^ | Penn Museum
    Great Riddles in ArchaeologyWednesday Evenings, October 2011 through June 2012 From the knights of King Arthur’s roundtable to the deepest depths of Atlantis, some of the world’s greatest archaeological riddles have eluded us for centuries. Discover and explore these mind-boggling riddles in the next season of the Penn Museum’s popular monthly lecture series presented by current archaeologists and scholars. Mark your calendars for Great Riddles in Archaeology, offered the first Wednesday of every month, October 2011 through June 2012. General Admission is $5 per event in advance or $10 at the door. Subscriptions to all nine events are available for...
  • New glacier theory on Stonehenge

    06/13/2006 7:27:54 AM PDT · by billorites · 79 replies · 1,406+ views
    BBC News ^ | June 13, 2006
    A geology team has contradicted claims that bluestones were dug by Bronze Age man from a west Wales quarry and carried 240 miles to build Stonehenge. In a new twist, Open University geologists say the stones were in fact moved to Salisbury Plain by glaciers. Last year archaeologists said the stones came from the Preseli Hills. Recent research in the Oxford Journal of Archaeology suggests the stones were ripped from the ground and moved by glaciers during the Ice Age. Geologists from the Open University first claimed in 1991 that the bluestones at one of Britain's best-known historic landmarks had...
  • Solstice sun beams into chamber [ Bryn Celli Ddu on Anglesey ]

    06/22/2006 8:28:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 346+ views
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, 21 June 2006 | unattributed
    Archaeologist Steve Burrow made the discovery after reading a book by Sir Norman Lockyear published almost 100 years ago... Sir Norman - the man who discovered helium - had travelled to the site, otherwise known as the Hill of Black Grove, and measured the alignment of the sun at Easter... "I came across this reference in a book dating back to 1908 but nobody had checked it, nobody had gone and verified it in person," he said... Mr Burrow, a curator of Neolithic archaeology at the National Museum of Wales, delayed his book by a year to test the theory....
  • Stonehenge Was A Site For Sore Eyes In 2300BC

    11/26/2006 10:51:42 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 1,231+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 11-27-2006 | Nic Fleming
    Stonehenge was a site for sore eyes in 2300BC By Nic Fleming, Science Correspondent Last Updated: 2:48am GMT 27/11/2006 Stonehenge was the Lourdes of its day, to which diseased and injured ancient Britons flocked seeking cures for their ailments, according to a new theory. For most of the 20th century archaeologists have debated what motivated primitive humans to go to the immense effort of transporting giant stones 240 miles from south Wales to erect Britain's most significant prehistoric monument. Druids gather at Stonehenge for sunrise on the summer solstice. A new book suggests the gathering should take place in December...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso’s research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois – were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise — Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 36 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • Welsh people could be most ancient in UK, DNA suggests

    06/20/2012 5:01:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    BBC ^ | Tuesday, June 19, 2012 | unattributed
    Professor Peter Donnelly, of Oxford University, said the Welsh carry DNA which could be traced back to the last Ice Age, 10,000 years ago. The project surveyed 2,000 people in rural areas across Britain. Participants, as well as their parents and grandparents, had to be born in those areas to be included in the study. Prof Donnelly, a professor of statistical science at Oxford University and director of the Wellcome Trust centre for human genetics, said DNA samples were analysed at about 500,000 different points. After comparing statistics, a map was compiled which showed Wales and Cornwall stood out. Prof...
  • Ohio's Stonehenge

    12/12/2006 4:26:26 PM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 1,206+ views
    Ohio.com ^ | 12-12-2006 | Bob Downing
    Ohio's StonehengeFort Ancient is largest, best preserved earthwork of its kind in America. Its purpose is not known By Bob Downing Beacon Journal staff writer A sign identifies one of the prehistoric earthworks at Fort Ancient State Memorial. Ohio law forbids walking off trail or on any mound or earthwork.OREGONIA - Fort Ancient remains a mystery. The extensive earthen mounds and walls in southwest Ohio are unlikely a fortress, although they might have been used for social gatherings and religious ceremonies and astronomical viewings. The site, atop a wooded bluff 235 feet above the Little Miami River in Warren County,...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Axe Head Found On Stonehenge World Heritage Site

    09/21/2003 3:03:25 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 1,496+ views
    24 Hour Museum ^ | 9-19-2003 | David Prudames
    5000-YEAR-OLD AXE HEAD FOUND ON STONEHENGE WORLD HERITAGE SITE By David Prudames 19/09/2003 Photo: field walkers from Wessex Archaeology covered a 90-hectare area in three weeks in search of ancient artefacts. Photo: Elaine Wakefield. © Wessex Archaeology. Archaeologists have discovered a 5000-year-old polished stone axe head during an investigation of an area that forms part of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. Dating back to the Neolithic Age - 3000 to 2500 BC - the axe head was found, along with a leaf-shaped arrowhead, during a three-week field walk of farmland by Wessex Archaeology. Covering a 90-hectare area, the farmland is...
  • Stonehenge Didn't Stand Alone, Excavations Show

    01/13/2007 3:00:37 PM PST · by blam · 70 replies · 1,859+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 1-12-2007 | James Owen
    Stonehenge Didn't Stand Alone, Excavations Show James Owen for National Geographic News January 12, 2007 Recent excavations of Salisbury Plain in southern England have revealed at least two other large stone formations close by the world-famous prehistoric monument. One of the megalithic finds is a sandstone formation that marked a ritual burial mound; the other, a group of stones at the site of an ancient timber circle. The new discoveries suggest that many similar monuments may have been erected in the shadow of Stonehenge, possibly forming part of a much larger complex, experts say. The findings were part of the...
  • Stonehenge First Built in Wales, Study Claims

    12/07/2015 1:02:37 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    The study, published in the current issue of the journal Antiquity, indicates that two quarries in the Preseli Hills of Pembrokeshire, in southwest Wales, are the source of Stonehenge’s bluestones. Carbon dating revealed such stones were dug out at least 500 years before Stonehenge was built — suggesting they were first used in a local monument that was later dismantled and dragged off to England. The very large standing stones at Stonehenge are sarsen, a local sandstone. The smaller ones, known as bluestones, consist of volcanic and igneous rocks, the most common of which are called dolerite and rhyolite. Geologists...
  • NASA Adds to Evidence of Mysterious Ancient Earthworks

    10/30/2015 9:49:40 AM PDT · by Theoria · 30 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 30 Oct 2015 | Ralph Blumenthal
    High in the skies over Kazakhstan, space-age technology has revealed an ancient mystery on the ground. Satellite pictures of a remote and treeless northern steppe reveal colossal earthworks — geometric figures of squares, crosses, lines and rings the size of several football fields, recognizable only from the air and the oldest estimated at 8,000 years old. The largest, near a Neolithic settlement, is a giant square of 101 raised mounds, its opposite corners connected by a diagonal cross, covering more terrain than the Great Pyramid of Cheops. Another is a kind of three-limbed swastika, its arms ending in zigzags bent...
  • America's Stonehenge: New Hampshire rocks history or hoax?

    09/25/2015 9:01:11 AM PDT · by bob_denard · 12 replies
    kentucky.com ^ | September 20, 2015 | BY RIK STEVENS Associated Press
    SALEM, N.H. — Using the astronomical chart on a table in the covered tower, visitors aim their gaze along worn arrows to huge, upright stones hundreds of feet away. Beyond each slab of granite, clearings stretch the eye to the horizon on a dazzling day in late summer New Hampshire. On Wednesday's autumnal equinox, people will flock to the woods near the Massachusetts state line, watch the sun rise or fall over the massive chunks of granite and decide for themselves whether they're standing amid relics of ancient history or pure hooey.
  • Discovery Of Oldest Known Art And Agriculture Calendar In New World

    05/11/2006 2:17:48 PM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 701+ views
    Newswise ^ | 5-11-2006
    Discovery of Oldest Known Art and Agriculture Calendar in New World MU Researcher Unearths Earliest Known Western Sculptures and Astronomical Alignments in Peru's Temple of the Fox. Andeans Used Myth and Astronomical Markers to Determine Agricultural Calendar. Project Buena Vista unearths a personified disk flanked by foxes at the Temple of the Fox in Peru. Newswise — In one of the most significant archaeological and anthropological finds in recent history, Robert Benfer, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Missouri-Columbia, has discovered the earliest astronomical alignments and sculptures in the round, which is a sculpture designed to be viewed...
  • Stonehenge II is found! Radar search reveals giant line of standing stones from 4,500 years ago

    09/07/2015 8:19:35 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 54 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Published: 18:01 EST, 6 September 2015 | Colin Fernandez
    <p>For centuries Stonehenge has mystified and enraptured archaeologists and visitors.</p> <p>So maybe it is not surprising that another monumental wonder from prehistory has been overlooked for so long – even though it is just a mile away.</p> <p>Experts have discovered an 'extraordinary' line of giant stones that dates back more than 4,500 years.</p>
  • Bungling builders destroy 6,000-year-old Neolithic tomb - and replace it with concrete PICNIC TABLE

    08/28/2015 5:06:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Mirror (UK) ^ | Friday, August 28, 2015 | Sam Webb
    The tomb was a relic of the first settlers in the Spanish Cristovo de Cea region and was originally built some 4000 years before the birth of Christ. Every builder, tradesman and DIY enthusiast knows the embarrassment of making a howler on the job, whether it's taps installed the wrong way round or a wonky shelf. But few will know the sheer panic these Spanish workmen probably felt when they discovered they had smashed up a 6,000-year-old Neolithic tomb and replaced it with a concrete picnic table. The tomb was a relic of the first settlers in the Cristovo de...
  • Enormous monolith, carved 9350 years ago, found under Mediterranean Sea

    08/08/2015 11:37:46 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 50 replies
    A 12-METRE monolith, hacked out of limestone by stone-age humans some nine thousand years ago, has been found at the bottom of the Mediterranean. The enormous stone totem, now split in two and sitting in the Sicilian Channel between Tunisia and Sicily, was hewed from a rocky outcrop some 300m away when the Mediterranean Sea was still a dry basin. It’s now under 40m of water. The new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, says the area was submerged about 9350 years ago (give or take 200 years) when the last Ice Age retreated. Before that time the...
  • Ancient Irish were first to record an eclipse -- 5,355 years ago

    08/03/2015 10:20:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    IrishCentral ^ | Friday, July 31,2015 | Cathy Hayes
    Our ancient Irish ancestors carved images of an ancient eclipse into giant stones over 5,000 years ago, on November 30, 3340 BC to be exact. This is the oldest known recorded solar eclipse in history. The illustrations are found on the Stone Age "Cairn L," on Carbane West, at Loughcrew, outside Kells, in County Meath. The landscape of rolling hills is littered with Neolithic monuments. Some say that originally there were at least 40 to 50 monuments, but others say the figure was more like 100... Martin Brennan and Jack Roberts discovered that the sun illuminates this chamber on the...
  • New Theory On Stonehenge Mystery

    12/03/2004 4:00:41 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 1,678+ views
    BBC ^ | 12-3-2004
    New theory on Stonehenge mystery Experts believe the stones may have been levered into place A fresh theory on how Stonehenge was built has been tested out by a group of experts and enthusiasts. Gordon Pipes, of the Stonehengineers group of scientists and archaeologists, has suggested that levers may have been used to move the giant stones. They have tested his "stone-rowing" theory which involves a 45-tonne stone being levered on a track of logs. "It's akin to rowing a boat, weights can be picked up with levers using body mass and balance," said Mr Pipes. Mr Pipes, from Derby,...
  • University of Reading archaeologists to excavate the biggest henge in the country (Marden Henge)

    06/29/2015 10:03:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Trinity Mirror Southern - UK ^ | June 20, 2015 | Linda Fort
    Archaeologists from the University of Reading will start a three-year excavation on land between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avenbury this summer. Exploring the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire is expected to reveal more about the lives of the people who worshipped at Stonehenge. The work will be done in collaboration with Historic England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wiltshire Museum. The site is a barely explored archaeological region of huge international importance. The project will investigate Marden Henge. Built around 2400 BC Marden is the largest henge or Neolithic earthwork in the country and one of...
  • Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

    06/23/2015 11:48:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 19, 2015 | Wiltshire Museum
    Rare Bronze Age gold artifact found in burial mound in Wiltshire, U.K. For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year's summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun. The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over...
  • Archaeologists return to prehistoric sanctuaries on island of Menorca, Spain

    06/05/2015 1:33:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tue, Jun 02, 2015 | editors
    After nearly 30 years, a team of archaeologists will be returning once again to the site of So na Cacana on the island of Menorca, Balearic Islands, Spain, to renew investigations of a prehistoric sanctuary complex that archaeologists believe represented the remains of the Talaiotic Culture , a prehistoric culture that flourished, particularly on the islands of Majorca and Menorca, during the 1st Millenium BCE... The ancient settlement remains are located about six km away from the municipality of Alaior. The site features a tower-like monument resembling a large rectangular talaiot (Bronze Age megalithic structure) at the highest point of...
  • A piece of research challenges the view that Neolithic societies were egalitarian

    05/01/2015 1:33:33 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | May 1, 2015 | Heritage Daily
    The data obtained by Teresa Fernández-Crespo in seven megalithic graves in La Rioja and Araba-Álava suggest that certain individuals were excluded from burial on the basis of age and sex. The research Demographic evidence of selective burial in megalithic graves of northern Spain by Teresa Fernández-Crespo and Concepción de la Rúa of the Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country challenges the widely-held view that societies were egalitarian during the late Neolithic and Chalcolithic ages. This work, published in the leading Journal of Archaeological Science, comes from Fernández-Crespo’s PhD thesis entitled Antropología...
  • John Switzer commentary: Serpent Mound continues to confound

    04/08/2015 10:00:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Columbus Dispatch ^ | Sunday April 5, 2015 | John Switzer
    There’s something new about the very old Great Serpent Mound, the earthen snake effigy that stretches a quarter of a mile along the terrain in Adams County in southern Ohio... What is new about Serpent Mound is that it might be far more ancient than currently thought. Some archaeologists have recently discovered evidence that it was constructed around 300 B.C. by the Adena culture. That contrasts with the prevailing school of thought that it is about 920 years old and was built by the Fort Ancient culture... For instance, the massive head of the snake effigy points to where the...
  • Coral Pyramids in Micronesia Date Back to Middle Ages

    03/25/2015 11:41:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 13, 2015 | Megan Gannon
    On a remote Pacific island not much bigger than Manhattan, there are ancient pyramids built out of living coral. New evidence reveals that these tombs could be up to 700 years old — much older than experts had previously thought. The royal tombs are tucked away in an artificially built ancient city called Leluh just off the mainland of Kosrae, a Micronesian island. Leluh was home to Kosraean high chiefs (as well as some lower chiefs and commoners, too) from about 1250 until the mid-1800s, when foreign whalers, traders and missionaries started to arrive on the island. With impressive canals...
  • Forgotten monuments of Northern Sweden

    03/24/2015 7:15:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 22, 2015 | Carl L. Thunberg
    The vast majority of the cairns appear to have been built as monuments to the dead, mainly during the southern Scandinavian Bronze Age; circa 1800-500 BC. They occupy prominent positions overlooking the surrounding area, and some researchers speculate that they had a function as tribal markers for family group territories... Unlike the cairns from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age which appear to contain cremation burials, the Early Bronze Age examples like one of the Spir Mountain cairns (RAÄ Grundsunda 109:1), have internal burial chambers with cists containing skeletal remains, accompanied by various grave goods. In some cases...
  • Stonehenge "King" was from central Europe

    02/10/2003 9:48:39 PM PST · by spetznaz · 19 replies · 458+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Mon, Feb 10, 2003
    LONDON (Reuters) - The construction of one of the country's most famous ancient landmarks, the towering megaliths at Stonehenge in southern England, might have been supervised by the Swiss, or maybe even the Germans. Archaeologists studying the remains of a wealthy archer found in a 4,000-year-old grave exhumed near Stonehenge last year said on Monday he was originally from the Alps region, probably modern-day Switzerland, Austria or Germany. "He would have been a very important person in the Stonehenge area and it is fascinating to think that someone from abroad -- probably modern-day Switzerland -- could have played an important...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • Archaeologists start Stonehenge dig

    03/31/2008 10:37:19 PM PDT · by bamahead · 19 replies · 374+ views
    AP/Yahoo! ^ | March 31, 2008 | GREGORY KATZ
    LONDON - Some of England's most sacred soil was disturbed Monday for the first time in more than four decades as archaeologists worked to solve the enduring riddle of Stonehenge: When and why was the prehistoric monument built? The excavation project, set to last until April 11, is designed to unearth materials that can be used to establish a firm date for when the first mysterious set of bluestones was put in place at Stonehenge, one of Britain's best known and least understood landmarks. The World Heritage site, a favorite with visitors the world over, has become popular with Druids,...
  • History's Largest Megalith

    02/24/2015 2:16:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, February 09, 2015 | Eric A. Powell
    A team of archaeologists at a 2,000-year-old limestone quarry in Lebanon’s Bekka Valley recently excavated around a megalith weighing approximately 1,000 tons and dubbed Hajjar al-Hibla, or “stone of the pregnant woman.” It was intended for the Temple of Jupiter, which sits on three limestone blocks of similar size at the nearby site of Baalbek. To the team’s shock, they unearthed yet another block, this one weighing an estimated 1,650 tons, making it the largest known megalith. The German Archaeological Institute’s Margarete van Esse says excavation was suspended when the trench became dangerously deep. “Hopefully in a following campaign we...
  • Ancient Stonehenge Houses Unearthed

    10/14/2006 12:29:58 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,583+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | 10-13-2006 | Jennifer Viegas
    Ancient Stonehenge Houses Unearthed Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Oct. 13, 2006 —Nine Neolithic-era buildings have been excavated in the Stonehenge world heritage site, according to a report in the journal British Archaeology. The structures, which appear to have been homes, date to 2,600-2,500 B.C. and were contemporary with the earliest stone settings at the site's famous megalith. They are the first house-like structures discovered there. Julian Thomas, who worked on the project and is chair of the archaeology department at Manchester University in England, said Stonehenge could have been a key gathering place at the Neolithic era's version of a...
  • Cahokia's Woodhenge: a supprising implication [sic]

    11/29/2010 8:19:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Examiner.com ^ | Friday, November 26th, 2010 | Richard Thornton
    Today we travel to southern Illinois, where just across the Mississippi River is located the Cahokia Archaeological Zone. Cahokia was the largest known Native American city north of Mexico. At its peak population around 1250 AD, it was larger that London, England. Of course, Cahokia was not its real name. No one knows its real name. Unlike the ancient towns in the Southeast, where direct descendants of the original occupants still live, no one even knows yet what happened to the population of Cahokia, after it was abandoned. There was an indigenous village in the vicinity of Cahokia as early...
  • Stonehenge Builders' Village Found

    06/15/2010 2:16:33 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 19 replies · 526+ views
    National Geographic ^ | June 15 2010 | National Geographic
    A prehistoric village has been discovered in southern England that was likely home to the builders of Stonehenge, archaeologists announced on January 30, 2007 (read the full story). The village, located 1.75 miles (2.8 kilometers) from the famous stone circle, includes eight wooden houses dated back to around 2500 B.C. The remains of a cluster of homes include the outlines of floors, beds, and cupboards. Tools, jewelry, pottery, and human and animal bones were also found. The excavated houses formed part of a much bigger settlement dating back to the Late Stone Age, according to project leader Mike Parker Pearson...
  • Archaeologists to explore feasting habits of ancient builders of Stonehenge

    12/23/2009 6:29:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 408+ views
    Culture24 ^ | Monday, December 21, 2009 | Culture24 Staff
    The team who worked on the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2009 are to return to their findings to explain the eating habits of the people who built and worshipped at the stone circle over four thousand years ago... the new 'Feeding Stonehenge' project will analyse a range of materials including cattle bones and plant residue... Initial research suggests the animals were brought considerable distances to the ceremonial site.. The original Stonehenge Riverside project, which strengthened the idea that nearby Durrington Walls was part of the Stonehenge complex, yielded a surprisingly wide range of material ranging from ancient tools to animal...
  • Stone-age pilgrims trekked hundreds of miles to attend feast [ Stonehenge ]

    09/15/2008 9:08:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 202+ views
    Guardian ^ | September 11, 2008 | James Randerson
    Stone age people drove animals hundreds of miles to a site close to Stonehenge to be slaughtered for ritual feasts, according to scientists who have examined the chemical signatures of animal remains buried there... Durrington Walls is a stone-age village containing the remains of numerous cattle and pigs which are thought to have been buried there after successive ritual feasts. The site is two miles north east of Stonehenge and dates from around 3000 BC, 500 years before the first stones were erected... The evidence points to groups of people driving animals from as far away as Wales for the...
  • Stonehenge Could Have Been Resting Place For Royalty

    05/29/2008 6:43:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies · 163+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 30, 2008 | ScienceDaily
    Archaeologists at the University of Sheffield have revealed new radiocarbon dates of human cremation burials at Stonehenge, which indicate that the monument was used as a cemetery from its inception just after 3000 B.C. until well after the large stones went up around 2500 B.C. The Sheffield archaeologists, Professor Mike Parker-Pearson and Professor Andrew Chamberlain, believe that the cremation burials could represent the natural deaths of a single elite family and its descendants, perhaps a ruling dynasty. One clue to this is the small number of burials in Stonehenge´s earliest phase, a number that grows larger in subsequent centuries, as...
  • Stonehenge's huge support settlement

    11/05/2007 9:19:47 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies · 66+ views
    BBC News ^ | 11-05-07 | Sian Price
    Archaeologists working near Stonehenge have uncovered what they believe is the largest Neolithic settlement ever discovered in Northern Europe. Remains of an estimated 300 houses are thought to survive under earthworks 3km (2 miles) from the famous stone rings, and 10 have been excavated so far. But there could have been double that total according to the archaeologist leading the work. "What is really exciting is realising just how big the village for the Stonehenge builders was," says Professor Mike Parker Pearson of Sheffield University. Allowing four per house, he estimates there could have been room for more than 2,000...
  • Message In The Stones

    11/01/2007 1:50:09 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 200+ views
    Message in the Stones Why transport 82 two-tonne megaliths across more than 250 miles of mountain, river and sea to build a stone circle at Stonehenge? This is one of the greatest mysteries of Britain’s best-known, but least understood, prehistoric monument. Now Tim Darvill thinks he has the answer: the famous bluestones had healing powers, and the builders of Stonehenge were creating a prehistoric Lourdes. The latest issue of CA tells all. Despite centuries of study, we seem no nearer to answering such basic questions as what is Stonehenge, who built it and why. The publication in 1965 of Stonehenge...
  • Stonehenge Builders' Houses Found

    01/30/2007 8:13:43 AM PST · by blam · 39 replies · 1,233+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-30-2007
    Stonehenge builders' houses found The village would have housed hundreds of people (Image: National Geographic) Archaeologists say they have found a huge ancient settlement used by the people who built Stonehenge. Excavations at Durrington Walls, near the legendary Salisbury Plain monument, uncovered remains of ancient houses. People seem to have occupied the sites seasonally, using them for ritual feasting and funeral ceremonies. In ancient times, this settlement would have housed hundreds of people, making it the largest Neolithic village ever found in Britain. The dwellings date back to 2,600-2,500 BC, the same period that Stonehenge was built. "In what were...
  • Ancient Caribou hunting site found underneath Lake Huron

    04/29/2014 7:43:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    An elaborate array of linear stone lanes and V-shaped structures has been discovered on an underwater ridge in Lake Huron, marking what is thought to be the most complex set of ancient hunting structures ever found beneath the Great Lakes, according to a new report. Researchers based at the University of Michigan think the roughly 9,000-year-old-structure helped natives corral caribou herds migrating across what was then an exposed land-corridor the so-called Alpena-Amberley Ridge connecting northeast Michigan to southern Ontario. The area is now covered by 120 feet of water, but at the time, was exposed due to dry conditions of...