Keyword: modernhistory

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Vintage Mugshot PHOTO … Circa 1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog”

    09/21/2014 2:37:41 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 38 replies
    Eastern State Penitentiary ^ | circa 1924 | Eastern State Penitentiary
    1924: Pep, “The Cat-Murdering Dog” Pep "The Cat-Murdering Dog" was a black Labrador Retriever admitted to Eastern State Penitentiary on August 12, 1924. Prison folklore tells us that Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot used his executive powers to sentence Pep to Life Without Parole for killing his wife’s cherished cat. Prison records support this story: Pep’s inmate number (C-2559) is skipped in prison intake logs and inmate records. The Governor told a different story. He said Pep had been sent to Eastern to act as a mascot for the prisoners. He and the Warden, Herbert “Hard-Boiled” Smith, were friends. Pep was...
  • I, Robot … Was This The First Robot Ever Arrested?

    09/20/2014 1:04:15 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 11 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 02/18/2014 | Annalee Newitz, Matt Novak
    Was This The First Robot Ever Arrested? On August 18, 1982 the Beverly Hills Police Department took a rather unusual perp into custody: a robot called DC-2. The crime? Illegally distributing business cards and generally causing a commotion on North Beverly Drive. It was probably the first time a robot had ever been arrested. When BHPD approached DC-2, the person operating it via remote control refused to identify himself to police. Officers searched the immediate area, but whoever was behind the thing was nowhere to be found. The bot's mysterious operator wasn't afraid of a little joking around though, despite...
  • (Those Were The Days!) PHOTO: Late 1960s: Economy Class Seating on a Pan-Am 747

    08/21/2014 7:19:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 106 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Circa 1960's | Retronaut
    Late 1960s: Economy Class Seating on a Pan-Am 747 The 1960's were barely done when Pan Am again set a standard the rest of the world was forced to follow. Pan American's Boeing B-747 Jumbo Jets brought down the cost of long distance air travel once again. Source: Pan Am Historical Foundation
  • World War I Claims Two More Casualties ... in 2014

    03/20/2014 7:23:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | 19 March 2014 | Luke Garratt
    First World War bomb kills two construction site workers 100 years after it was fired at Belgian battlefield • Armament was disturbed and exploded evacuation works at the site • Killed two and injured two, all construction workers working in the area • This area of Belgium is rife with unexploded bombs from the Great War • It is the former Flanders battleground where many shells were fired A First World War bomb killed two construction site workers when it exploded 100 years after being fired at a Belgian battlefield. The bomb had laid dormant for a century at an...
  • (MUST SEE) Vintage 1939 PHOTO: US Lawmen Dragging Fugitve Across US-Mexico Border; El Paso, Texas

    12/14/2013 12:10:34 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1939 | Luis Marden / National Geographic
    circa 1939: Dragging a fugitive across the border, near El Paso, Texas, USA Picture by Luis Marden / National Geographic.
  • PHOTOS: Cigarettes Save Life! - WWI Cravan "A" Cigarette Tin With The Shot It Stopped Still Inside

    10/17/2013 6:53:44 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Retronaut ^ | circa WWI | Retronaut
    “Arthur Mann joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1914. His daughter-in-law says he was shot down by the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen – Arthur’s parachute caught in a tree. He also fought in the trenches – when Arthur was shot, the bullet bounced off this tin and saved his life. He also survived gassing, but this experience badly affected his long-term health. He died in 1953″ Explore Europeana 1914 – 1918
  • circa 1941 - Photograph of a 'Time-Traveler' at South Forks Bridge, Gold Bridge, Canada

    10/09/2013 7:35:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 83 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1941 | Retronaut
    1941: Photograph of a 'time traveler' ... Young man (right side, third up) with sunglasses and contemporary-like clothing in this 1940s photograph. - From Wikipedia:  “A photograph from 1941 of the re-opening of the South Forks Bridge in Gold Bridge, Canada, was alleged to show a time traveler. It was claimed that his clothing and sunglasses were modern and not of the styles worn in the 1940s. “The modern appearance of the man may not have been so modern. The style of sunglasses first appeared in the 1920s. The sweater with a sewn-on emblem, is the kind of clothing...
  • Vintage Photo 1899 ... Armoured Quadricycle

    09/17/2013 7:15:02 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 26 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1899 | Retronaut
    1899: Armoured quadricycle
  • Photo: When Freedom Existed in America ... Moving House Passing the White House; circa 1924

    08/19/2013 7:28:13 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 24 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1924 | Retronaut
    Workmen transporting a house next to the White House. (President Calvin Coolidge apparently had no concern about this.)
  • Historical World War I PHOTO: Harley Davidson Motorcycle with Mounted Machine-Gun

    08/04/2013 12:33:23 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 47 replies
    Retronaut ^ | (est. 1917) World War I | Retronaut
    In 1917, the United States entered World War I and the military demanded motorcycles for the war effort. Harleys had already been used by the military in the Pancho Villa Expedition, but World War I was the first time the motorcycle had been adopted for combat service. Harley-Davidson provided about 15,000 machines to the military forces during World War I. - Wikipedia
  • Old Timey Photos - Early 20th Century ... 4th of July Pageant in Jerusalem

    07/04/2013 4:43:39 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 11 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Early 20th Century | Retronaut
    Early 20th Century: 4th July pageant, Jerusalem
  • The Old West: When Men Were Men and Women Knew Their Place

    06/26/2013 7:25:55 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 57 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | Wednesday, June 26, 2013 | Paul Mountjoy
    The Old West: When men were men and women knew their place How many times have we heard men declare of the days of the old West, ‘men were men and women stayed at home and knew their place’? This is a common refrain after folks watch a movie based on the period. A peek behind the myths reveals difficult and trying lifestyle most modern men would never concede to and when a seeming minor health issue that would be easily cured today would take lives by the thousands. The ‘cool’ concept of a man that stands tall for all...
  • Vintage Photo, Early 1900's - U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Pig Cafeteria"

    06/24/2013 7:35:41 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 10 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Early 20th Century | Retronaut
    “The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.
  • Vintage U.S. Navy Photo: "Beauty and the Beast" - Panama City, 6th November 1945

    06/24/2013 7:05:32 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Retronaut ^ | November 1945 | Retronaut
    “Jada were a popular night club act at Club Lido in Panama City. Not surprisingly, her routine was entitled “Beauty and the Beast”. She is shown here performing for the sailors of the US Task Force 11, while they were on leave. The troops were on their way to New York City to participate in Navy Day celebrations, but made a stop before passing through the Panama Canal.”
  • PHOTO - 1917: Soldier in Black and White Camouflage

    06/10/2013 7:42:34 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 53 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1917 | Retronaut
    “Soldier in black and white uniform to conceal him while climbing trees. He stands in front of a house camouflaged to represent a fence and trees. Company F, 24th Engineers. American University, D.C. Army Engineer Corps..”
  • PHOTOS: Sweden 1967 ... Traffic Flow Switched From Left Side Driving To Right Side Driving

    06/06/2013 7:22:11 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 47 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 3rd September 1967 | Retronaut
    3rd September 1967: Traffic in Sweden switched from driving on the left to driving on the right “Dagen H (H day) was the day on which traffic in Sweden switched from driving on the left-hand side of the road to the right. The change was widely unpopular, The campaign included displaying the Dagen H logo on various commemorative items, including milk cartons, men’s shorts and women’s underwear. Swedish television held a contest for songs about the change; the winning entry was Håll dig till höger, Svensson (‘Keep to the right, Svensson’) by Rock-Boris.”
  • Photographs - GIANT Shotguns (Punt Guns), circa 1900

    02/16/2013 7:29:35 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 40 replies
    Retronaut ^ | circa 1900 | Retronaut
    A punt gun is a type of extremely large shotgun used in the 19th and early 20th centuries. A single shot could kill over 50 waterfowl resting on the water’s surface. The hunter would maneuver the entire boat in order to aim the gun. In the United States, this practice depleted stocks of wild waterfowl and by the 1860s most states had banned the practice. “Since Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897 there has been a punt gun salute every Coronation and Jubilee in Cowbit, Lincolnshire, England” - Wikipedia
  • War Elephant - Photograph of Elephant with Mounted Machine Gun, circa 1914 - 1918

    02/15/2013 8:38:17 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 73 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1914 - 1918 | Retronaut
    The gun is John Moses Browning’s M1895 Colt-Browning machine gun, aka ... Potato Digger.
  • PHOTO with Article of Police Robot (RoboCop) May, 1924

    01/27/2013 10:11:10 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    Robocop c. 1924
  • PHOTOS - World War II Army Nurses Wearing Gas Masks

    01/22/2013 6:50:43 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 16 replies
    Retronaut & Adventures in Genealogy | Retronaut & Adventures in Genealogy
    Members of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps advance through a cloud of smoke during a gas mask drill, 1942. U.S. Army Nurse Corps members in formation. World War II Army Nurses onning their gas masks. Mary Brown, Nurse and Soldier
  • World War I era ammunition frozen in a glacier for nearly a century has been found in N. Italy

    09/02/2012 7:17:19 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 28 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 2, 2012 | Alex Gore
    First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts WWI ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry. The once-perennial glacier began partially melted during a recent heat wave, allowing the Finance Police Alpine rescue...
  • A Los Alamos Story Worthy of Stephen King (The Plutonium 239 Demon Core)

    07/26/2012 8:37:22 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    IO9 ^ | Jul 26, 2012 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    A Los Alamos Story Worthy of Stephen King Ever heard of The Demon Core? It was named by Los Alamos scientists — who are generally not a superstitious lot — after it claimed multiple lives, in a series of strange and horrible accidents. Discover a legend of science... that's worthy of a horror movie. When I was reading Stephen King stories, I was constantly amazed at the things he made scary. It was like reading the legend of the monkey's paw over and over again, with increasingly weird objects. His most famous evil objects are the hotel in The Shining...
  • Anti-Prostitution Posters, World War II

    07/08/2012 2:29:58 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 32 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Retronaut
    Anti-Prostitution Posters, World War II Emphasizing the relationship between patriotism, morality, health preservation, and disease prevention, images of the infected soldier and disease-carrying prostitute in posters during the First and Second World Wars came to symbolize both moral failure and social decay. The following posters use images of "loose" women, patriotic iconography, and frightening symbols to grab the attention of the viewer and inspire behavior modification. These images not only reflected attitudes, values, and beliefs about the causes and consequences of venereal disease but also affected responses to the problem. (Note: Most these photos link back to Retronaut; added are...
  • For Summer 2012 - U.S. Bikini Laws ... Circa 1920s - 1930s

    07/05/2012 8:20:00 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 16 replies
    Retronaunt ^ | Retronaunt
    For Summer 2012 - U.S. Bikini Laws ... Circa 1920s - 1930s Bathing Suit Arrests, Chicago, 1922 “Women being arrested in Chicago for defying a ban on wearing brief swimsuits in public. Women were meant to cover-up when not in the water” - Australian National Maritime Museum US Bikini Laws, 1922 ‘June 30, 1922. Washington policeman Bill Norton measuring the distance between knee and suit at the Tidal Basin bathing beach after Col. Sherrell, Superintendent of Public Buildings and Grounds, issued an order that suits not be over six inches above the knee.’ - National Photo Co. US Bikini Laws,...
  • Back in the day, Mickey Mouse attempted suicide and fought opium smugglers

    07/02/2012 2:01:02 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | June 22, 2012 | Cyriaque Lamar
    Back in the day, Mickey Mouse attempted suicide and fought opium smugglers Intrepid readers will remember that one time Mickey Mouse and Goofy espoused the salubrious effects of amphetamine-laced soft drinks. The truth is, that helium-voiced cartoon rodent weathered many a dubiously family-friendly moment during his early years. Let's look at those occasions Mickey tried to kill himself and extolled the virtues of gigolos. Perhaps the most bizarrely bleak Mickey adventure was the story arc that ran from October 8 to October 20, 1930. According to cartoonist Floyd Gottfredson, Walt Disney was inspired by the 1920 Harold Lloyd comedy Haunted...
  • Portland Tomb Opened Only 90 Minutes a Year

    06/01/2012 8:55:20 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 5 replies
    KGW ^ | Tuesday, May 29, 2012 | Pat Dooris
    Portland tomb opened only 90 minutes a year PORTLAND -- An unusual Portland tradition lets the public tour a tomb each year for just 90 minutes on Memorial day. With the sad sounds of bagpipes playing nearby, hundreds gathered at the Wilhelm Portland Memorial funeral home in Westmoreland on Memorial Day. Some were there to remember family. Many were there to see the private Rea tomb. “If you haven’t been inside, it’s really different," author Roy Widing said. He’s been fascinated by the tomb and its occupants for years and recently wrote a book about it called “Whispers from the...
  • (For Memorial Day 2012) Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos

    05/26/2012 12:24:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    LIFE ^ | Frank Scherschel
    Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos It’s no mystery why images of unremitting violence spring to mind when one hears the deceptively simple term, “D-Day.” We’ve all seen — in photos, movies, old news reels — what happened on the beaches of Normandy (codenamed Omaha, Utah, Juno, Gold and Sword) as the Allies unleashed an historic assault against German defenses on June 6, 1944. But in color photos taken before and after the invasion, LIFE’s Frank Scherschel captured countless other, lesser-known scenes from the run-up to the onslaught and the heady weeks after: American troops training in small English...
  • After 50 Years, Fire Still Burns Under Pennsylvania Town (Centralia, PA - Ghost Town)

    05/26/2012 9:18:07 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 33 replies
    Fort Wayne Journal Gazette ^ | May 25, 2012 | Michael Rubinkam
    After 50 years, fire still burns under Pa. town (A motorist in 2004 drives among the smoldering remains of land near Route 61 in Centralia, Pa. AP file photo) Fifty years ago Sunday, a fire at the town dump ignited an exposed coal seam, setting off a chain of events that eventually led to the demolition of nearly every building in Centralia — a whole community of 1,400 simply gone. All these decades later, the Centralia fire still burns. It also maintains its grip on the popular imagination, drawing visitors from around the world who come to gawk at twisted,...
  • A 73-Year-Old Man Tried to Assassinate (President-Elect) JFK with a Buick Full of Dynamite

    05/15/2012 7:49:32 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    IO9 ^ | May 15, 2012 | Keith Veronese
    A 73-Year-Old Man Tried to Assassinate JFK with a Buick Full of Dynamite Weeks after John Fitzgerald Kennedy beat Richard Nixon in the 1960 United States presidential election, an elderly man nearly killed the President-Elect. Richard Pavlick, a disturbed man with anti-Catholic sentiments, packed his car and traveled from New Hampshire to Florida with one goal in mind - the death of President-Elect Kennedy. Pavlick's brute force plan would likely have succeeded, but a moment of compassion stopped Pavlick in his tracks and allowed for the era of Camelot to begin. Retired postal worker Richard Pavlick often voiced anti-Catholic sentiments...
  • Behold, an X-ray of Hitler’s head

    04/03/2012 8:31:48 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 16 replies
    IO9 ^ | April 3, 2012 | Robert T. Gonzalez
    Behold, an X-ray of Hitler’s head You're looking at one of five known X-rays of Hitler's head. The radiograph is just one of 17-million rare, intriguing, and often-bizarre items housed in the the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library on Earth. We've got a gallery. This particular image is part of a larger medical dossier on Hitler that was assembled by U.S. military intelligence following World War II, and one of the 450 images featured in Hidden Treasure — a book published yesterday in observance of the National Library of Medicine's 175th anniversary. Hitler as Seen by...
  • Gallery: Familiar-Yet-Alien Soviet Arcade Games (Comrade Donkey Kong?)

    03/24/2012 5:37:21 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 5 replies · 1+ views
    DVICE ^ | March 23, 2012 | Eileen Marable
    Gallery: Familiar-yet-alien Soviet arcade games While playing Centipede (don't judge) at my local mall in the '80s, it never occurred to me that somewhere behind the soon-to-fall Iron Curtain there would be some punk playing the Soviet version of arcade games as well. Hell yeah they were! Now, thanks to two nostalgic Muscovites who remembered their days of playing "Sea Battle," there is an entire museum full of these Soviet-era games. The story of the Museum of Soviet Arcade Machines is so cool we couldn't make this up if we tried. Let's talk about the games first. Soviet classics Sea...
  • How an 1870s Marine Expedition Changed Oceanography and Drove Eight Sailors Insane

    03/21/2012 12:24:10 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    IO9 ^ | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    How an 1870s marine expedition changed oceanography and drove eight sailors insane When was the first voyage of the Challenger? No, not the Space Shuttle — the original Challenger, a sea ship that sailed in 1872. The HMS Challenger traversed the world's oceans for four years, drove some of its sailors completely insane, caused about a quarter of the crew to jump ship, and forever changed the face of ocean science. Is there a way to scroll past the nature channels without seeing one that describes the richness of the ocean and the life that teems in its depth? In...
  • In 1939, a robot dog was killed while chasing a car. Really.

    03/11/2012 10:57:41 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 26 replies · 1+ views
    IO9 ^ | Mar 10, 2012 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    In 1939, a robot dog was killed while chasing a car. Really. Sometimes you stumble across a piece of history that is too good not to follow up on. Sparko, the robot dog, is one such piece of history. Prepared for the World's Fair in 1939, he got out of his pen, chased a car, and was killed. No fooling. Androids may dream of electronic sheep, but people have dreamed, for decades, of electronic dogs. Robots, a threatening concept, became much less frightening when put in the form of man's best friend. This relationship turned out quite satisfying for people...
  • If the UN moves to Brussels, how should the US use its empty buildings?

    02/13/2003 4:31:00 AM PST · by syriacus · 22 replies · 141+ views
    2/13/2003 | syriacus
    I was thinking Brussels might make a good home for the UN. The US could remodel its UN buildings as Museums of Modern History. (MOMH) Dioramas about wars, genocides, dictators and heroic leaders would find plenty of room there. It would be somewhat like the Smithsonian, but perhaps show more about Pol Pot, Hitler, Stalin, Mao and their collaborators. What do you think the buildings should be used for? If we can think of a positive use for its current buildings, maybe the UN will be more likely to call the moving men.