Keyword: rome

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  • Steve Bannon drafting curriculum for right-wing Catholic institute in Italy

    09/23/2018 12:19:57 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 9 replies
    Reuters ^ | Sep 2018 | Mark Hosenbell
    Former Trump White House adviser Steve Bannon is helping to craft the curriculum for a leadership course at a right-wing Roman Catholic institute in Italy, stepping up his efforts to influence conservative thinking in the church. Benjamin Harnwell, director of the Dignitatis Humanae Institute based in a mountaintop monastery not far from Rome, told Reuters Bannon had been helping to build up the institute for about half of its eight-year life. Cardinal Raymond Burke, a leading Vatican conservative who is president of the Institute’s board of advisers, said Bannon would be playing a leading role there. Burke told Reuters he...
  • Hollywood grande dame Carole Cook goes after Trump: 'Where's John Wilkes Booth when you need him?'

    09/10/2018 2:10:58 PM PDT · by familyop · 94 replies
    Fox News ^ | September 10, 2018 | Brian Flood
    Broadway legend Carole Cook implied she wants to see President Trump get assassinated, asking “Where's John Wilkes Booth when you need him?" when approached by a TMZ cameraman in Los Angeles on Sunday night. The 94-year-old Cook’s comment delighted her husband, who quickly reminded viewers that John Wilkes Booth killed a president, who was obviously Abraham Lincoln.
  • In mint condition! Millions of pounds-worth of pristine 5th-century gold coins are found buried [tr]

    09/10/2018 6:19:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 57 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 9, 2018 | Charlie Moore
    A stash of fifth-century gold coins worth millions has been found buried in a pot under an Italian theatre. Builders demolishing the former Cressoni theatre in Como were stunned to discover the cache last Wednesday. The Roman coins will be examined and dated before ending up in a museum, officials said.
  • The Maltese Phantom of Russiagate

    05/30/2018 12:07:33 PM PDT · by publana · 14 replies
    Real Clear Investigations ^ | May 30, 2018 | Lee Smith
    In the shifting narratives of the Trump-Russia probe, a Maltese academic named Joseph Mifsud has remained a linchpin regarding claims of collusion. He is the professor who allegedly told Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos that the Russians had emails related to the Clinton campaign. The FBI says it opened its investigation in late July 2016 after Papadopoulos relayed that information to Australian diplomat Alexander Downer, and the Australians tipped off U.S. authorities. While some news accounts describe Mifsud as an accomplice to Russian clandestine operations or a “cut-out” (intermediary), others contend he is a full-fledged Russian spy. In an official...
  • Roman mega-villa bigger than the Taj Mahal is found in Oxfordshire packed with trophies including..

    08/27/2018 7:54:51 AM PDT · by bitt · 76 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 8/24/2018 | Phoebe Weston
    FULL TITLE: Roman mega-villa bigger than the Taj Mahal is found in Oxfordshire packed with trophies including coins and boar tusks alongside the sarcophagus of a woman The historic Roman structure is the second largest ever discovered in the UK The foundations measure 85m by 85m (278ft x 278ft) and date back to 99 AD It lies beneath a crop in a field near Broughton Castle near Banbury, Oxfordshire The land is owned by the third cousin of actor Ralph Fiennes Archaeologists discovered a sarcophagus inside the villa with the skeletal remains of an unknown woman
  • 'Spectacular' ancient public library discovered in Germany

    08/01/2018 11:08:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Tue 31 Jul 2018 Last modified on Wed 1 Aug 2018 | Alison Flood
    The remains of the oldest public library in Germany, a building erected almost two millennia ago that may have housed up to 20,000 scrolls, have been discovered in the middle of Cologne. The walls were first uncovered in 2017, during an excavation on the grounds of a Protestant church in the centre of the city. Archaeologists knew they were of Roman origins, with Cologne being one of Germany's oldest cities, founded by the Romans in 50 AD under the name Colonia. But the discovery of niches in the walls, measuring approximately 80cm by 50cm, was, initially, mystifying... "But what they...
  • Bone trove in Denmark tells story of 'Barbarian' battle

    06/02/2018 8:38:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | Tuesday, May 22, 2018 | AFP
    Thousands of bones from boys and men likely killed in a ferocious battle 2,000 years ago have been unearthed from a bog in Denmark, researchers said Monday. Without local written records to explain, or a battlefield to scour for evidence, experts are nevertheless piecing together a story... Four pelvic bones strung on a stick were among the remains of at least 82 people found during archaeological excavations at Alken Enge in Jutland... The more than 2,300 human bones were contained in peat and lake sediments over 185 acres (75 hectares) of wetland meadows. Radiocarbon-dating put them between 2 BC and...
  • Archaeologist: We have evidence of the presence of Roman legionaries in Poland

    05/28/2018 11:41:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | Wednesday, May 9, 2018 | Szymon Zdziebiowski / ekr/ kap/ tr. RL
    Roman soldiers were present in the area of Kujawy 2 thousand years ago. This is evidenced by discovered fragments of equestrian gear and legionnaire outfits. Many of them were discovered for the first time outside the borders of the Roman Empire, says Dr. Bartosz Kontny. "Among the many donated metal objects there were also numerous fittings made of copper alloy, which turned out to be decorations for equestrian gear and Roman legionaries` clothing, many of them unique in this part of Europe" -- says Dr. Bartosz Kontny from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, who identified the objects... "This...
  • This Golden Head Adds a Twist to Ancient Roman History [Waldgirmes, Germany]

    08/23/2018 11:36:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Nat Geog ^ | August 17, 2018 | Andrew Curry
    The settlement covered nearly 20 acres and had a defensive wall but no military buildings. Its existence shows that the Romans were living next to and trading with German "barbarians" peacefully for years, right up until the Teutoburg defeat, according to lead researcher Gabriele Rasbach of the German Archaeological Institute. Most of the settlement’s buildings were made of wood, and based on tree-ring data, archaeologists say the town was built from scratch beginning in 4 B.C. Behind 10-foot-tall timber walls, Waldgirmes had pottery and woodworking workshops, Roman-style residences, and even traces of lead plumbing. A multistory administrative building sat at...
  • Light in the Dark Ages: The Church and the saints shined bright during medieval times

    08/15/2018 12:42:13 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 5 replies
    Our Sunday Visitor ^ | 2016 | Robert P. Lockwood
    “At the first glance as you entered Clairvaux ... you could see that it was a temple of God; and the still, silent valley, in the modest simplicity of its buildings, spoke of the sincere humility of Christ’s poor. Moreover, in this valley full of men, where no one was permitted to be idle, where one and all were occupied with their allotted tasks, a silence as deep as that of night prevailed. The sounds of labor, or the chanting of the brethren in the choral service, were the only exceptions …. As I watch them singing without fatigue from...
  • What is an Eastern rite church?

    07/31/2018 11:54:50 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 11 replies
    Arlington Catholic Herald ^ | 7/24/18 | Zoey Maraist
    In the ancient world, four major cities became centers of Christianity: Rome, Constantinople, Antioch and Jerusalem. Though Rome was initially most prominent, Constantinople, now Istanbul, Turkey, rose in stature after it was named the capital of the Roman Empire by Emperor Constantine in 330. “For almost a thousand years the Patriarch of Constantinople presided over the church in the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire and its missionary activity brought the Christian faith in its Byzantine form to many people north of the imperial border,” said Paulist Father Ronald Roberson in his book The Eastern Christian Churches: A Brief Survey. However, over...
  • Religion is the Salt that Preserves the State

    07/18/2018 11:59:46 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 1 replies
    The American Conservative ^ | Jun 2018 | Casey Chalk
    The megalomania of the 1st-century Roman emperors, epitomized in the lunacy of Caligula and the lechery of Nero, evinces “tormenting the cat” on a global scale. It is little wonder so many eagerly converted to the Christian faith, which promised a king who truly loved and provided for his subjects. Jesus tells his disciples that heaven rejoices at the repentance of a single sinner. Subjects of his kingdom are to be concerned with the most marginalized, honored even for giving them a “cup of cold water.” Jesus elsewhere declares “the last will be first, and the first last”: indeed, the...
  • Researchers Solve Mystery of 1,800-Year-Old Basel Papyrus

    07/13/2018 4:18:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Sci-news ^ | 7/13/18 | Enrico de Lazaro
    A team of scientists at the University of Basel, Switzerland, has discovered that a 1,800-year-old papyrus from the Basel Papyrus Collection is an ancient medical text from late antiquity and that it was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen. The University Library in Basel possesses a collection of 65 papyri, mostly in Greek and several in Coptic, Hieratic and Latin. Less than half of this collection was published by Ernst Rabel in 1917 in Papyrusurkunden der Öffentlichen Bibliothek der Universität zu Basel. With mirror writing on both sides, one of the Basel papyri — dubbed P.Basel 1A —...
  • Pliny the Elder wasn't crazy after all. There were whales in the Mediterranean

    07/12/2018 5:51:09 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 11, 2018 | Kimberly Hickok
    Scientists have questioned the credibility of Pliny the Elder's now 2,000-year-old account of orcas hunting whale calves near the Strait of Gibraltar, since those marine mammals aren't known to visit that area. Now, archaeological evidence suggests Pliny knew exactly what he was talking about. Researchers discovered whale bones from the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) and the Atlantic gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) within the ruins of an ancient Roman fish-processing facility located along the Strait of Gibraltar. The discovery was published today (July 10) in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
  • REVEALED: CHRISTOPHER STEELE VISITED STATE DEPARTMENT SHORTLY BEFORE 2016 ELECTION

    06/20/2018 9:18:21 PM PDT · by bitt · 27 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 6/20/2018 | chuck ross
    Former British spy Christopher Steele visited the State Department in October 2016 and briefed officials there about his work on the infamous anti-Trump dossier, it was revealed on Wednesday. “Based upon our review of the visitor logs at the State Department, Mr. Steele visited the State Department, briefing officials on the dossier in October 2016,” Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr said during a hearing held to review the U.S. government’s response to Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Steele’s visit to Foggy Bottom in Washington, D.C., prior to the election has not been previously reported. Burr revealed...
  • Roman Tomb Unearthed; to Everyone’s Surprise, It’s Intact [4th c BC]

    06/11/2018 12:57:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2018 | Elisabetta Povoledo
    Sometimes the most extraordinary finds occur by sheer luck. At least that was the case of a fourth century B.C. chamber tomb that came to light five weeks ago during the construction of an aqueduct in a Rome suburb, when an earthmover accidentally opened a hole in the side of the chamber... The tomb contained the remains of four occupants -- three men and a woman -- and funerary wares. Archaeologists are calling it "the Tomb of the Athlete" because of the presence of two bronze strigils, the instrument used by ancient Greek and Roman athletes to scrape sweat from...
  • #Impeachment Trends on Italian Twitter over Anti-Populist ‘Coup’

    05/28/2018 7:29:23 AM PDT · by davikkm · 24 replies
    breitbart ^ | THOMAS D. WILLIAMS
    ROME, Italy: Italians were in uproar Monday over the decision by President Sergio Mattarella to reject the newly elected populist government in deference to European Union concerns, calling for his resignation or impeachment. This was the first time in the history of the Italian republic that a president had thrown out the proposal for a government from elected parties, and even critics of the populist victors have acknowledged that the Italian people will take the move as a slap to Italian voters and the entire democratic process. The bone of contention, Mattarella said in his rejection speech, was the candidate...
  • Chris Cuomo Tells Netanyahu: Israel Needs to “Come Clean” and be “Honest” about its Nukes

    05/01/2018 4:37:21 AM PDT · by governsleastgovernsbest · 60 replies
    FinkelBlog ^ | Mark Finkelstein
    If Chris Cuomo had been around during WWII, would he have been telling FDR and Churchill that they needed to disclose their D-Day plans? Maybe so, judging by Cuomo’s absurd questioning of Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu on CNN this morning. Cuomo suggested to Netanyahu that Israel needs to “come clean” and be “honest” about its nuclear weapons capabilities if it expects Iran to do the same. [snip] But the bigger point is that Israel is effectively at war with Iran and other countries in the Middle East. It is a tiny nation surrounded by hostile powers. Why would Israel, why...
  • Let Alfie Evans Go to Rome!

    04/26/2018 8:01:02 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    National Review ^ | 04/26/2018 | The Editors
    Alfie Evans, 23 months old, is hospitalized with a rare neurodegenerative disorder. Against his parents’ wishes, his doctors at Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool removed him from life support on Monday evening, maintaining that further treatment would be futile. Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital in Rome has offered to treat him and arranged for his medical transport, which is on standby. The Italian government has granted him citizenship, clearing legal and administrative hurdles in advance. Doctors in Liverpool forbid the child to be removed from their watch, however, and British courts have backed them up, holding out the possibility that at...
  • When Rome Fell, the Chief Culprits Were Climate and Disease. Sound Familiar?

    03/19/2018 5:36:17 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Undark ^ | March 16, 2018 | Madeline Ostrander
    ‘ARE WE ROME?” asked the author Cullen Murphy a decade ago, in a provocatively titled book that compared the 21st-century United States with the final days of the Roman Empire. Lately there’s been no shortage of Cassandras who emphatically answer yes. “The speed with which we’re recapitulating the decline and fall of Rome is impressive,” opined the conservative commentator Bill Kristol, in a tweet this past July, taking issue with President Trump’s treatment of the press. “What took Rome centuries we’re achieving in months.” And the Cornell historian Barry Strauss bemoaned the parallels between alleged American failings and those of...