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Keyword: topper

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  • Impossibly Old America?

    04/18/2006 12:24:02 PM PDT · by blam · 52 replies · 1,802+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | 4-18-2006 | Mike Toner
    Impossibly Old America? Volume 59 Number 3, May/June 2006 by Mike Toner New sites and controversial theories fuel the debate over the origins of America's first people. Archaeologist Al Goodyear believes people were at South Carolina's Topper site 50,000 years ago. (Mike Toner) Al Goodyear's renowned barbecued pig is roasting on the grill a mile away, but the 200 professional and amateur archaeologists peering into the steep-walled pit where he's standing have other things on their minds. Goodyear, director of the University of South Carolina's Allendale Paleoindian Expedition, is explaining why he thinks people were here--on the banks of the...
  • Teams digging into history of the earliest people

    07/25/2015 4:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    San Antonio Express-News ^ | Saturday, July 25, 2015 | John MacCormack
    In a grassy meadow where eons ago some of America's first settlers camped and chipped stone tools, a precisely dug dirt pit, four yards square, is sinking steadily into the dark soil. And as it descends at a rate of an inch or two a day, the remote excavation northwest of Austin is also traveling backward through the millennia toward the continent's first native people... If all goes well, perhaps quite soon, primitive stone tools, similar to those discovered here a few years ago, will again be unearthed, reinforcing an emerging, if once controversial theory, about when the first humans...
  • Who Were the First Americans?

    01/13/2002 7:51:38 AM PST · by sarcasm · 10 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | September 2000 | Sasha Nemecek
    Images: Pamela Patrick MAMMOTH HUNTER OR FISH CATCHER? Archaeologists had concluded that the first inhabitants of the New World were fur-clad big-game hunters who swept across the Bering land bridge in pursuit of their prey. But recent evidence suggests that the first settlers may have been just as likely to hunt small game, catch fish or gather plants as they moved through more temperate environments. The leaf-shaped spearpoint I'm holding is surprisingly dainty--for a deadly weapon. I let my mind wander, trying to imagine life some 14,700 years ago in the marshes of southern Chile, where this relic was ...
  • Scientists want to study Bulls Scarp, ocean-bottom archaeological site that was Ice Age coast

    07/15/2013 3:53:59 PM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Charleston Post & Courier (SC) ^ | 7-7-2013 | Bo Pertesen
    Bulls Scarp could be the most fascinating and important archaeological site waiting to be surveyed in the region. There’s just one little problem: That Ice Age rock ledge is under about 140 feet of seawater.But a team of scientists recently studied and mapped it from the ocean surface. Now the team is looking for partners to go back.“We haven’t been on the bottom to look for artifacts and that’s what we’re trying to do. We feel very strongly this area would have held populations of people,” said Scott Harris, College of Charleston geology professor.“I think it’s fantastic. I can just...
  • (South Carolina) Fire Pit Dated To Over 50,000 Years Old (More)

    11/19/2004 8:07:26 AM PST · by blam · 63 replies · 3,788+ views
    AP ^ | 11-18-2004 | Amy Geier Edgar
    Fire Pit Dated to Be Over 50,000 Years Old Thu Nov 18,10:10 AM ET Top Stories - AP By AMY GEIER EDGAR, Associated Press Writer COLUMBIA, S.C. - In the growing debate about when people first appeared on this continent, a leading archaeologist said Wednesday he has discovered what could be sooty evidence of human occupation in North America tens of thousands of years earlier than is commonly believed.University of South Carolina archaeologist Al Goodyear said he has uncovered a layer of charcoal from a possible hearth or fire pit at a site near the Savannah River. Samples from the...
  • 'First Americans' May Be Johnnies-Come-Lately (Topper Site)

    08/22/2004 8:17:24 AM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 2,036+ views
    Atlanta Journal Constitution ^ | 8-20-2004 | Mike Toner
    'First Americans' may be Johnnies-come-lately By MIKE TONER The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Published on: 08/20/04 Human history is being written and rewritten a shovelful at a time on a shaded hillside along the Savannah River. Each summer Al Goodyear's team of archaeologists digs deeper into the riverbank in South Carolina's Allendale County. Each summer the story of the first Americans, the primitive hunters who first populated the continent, grows longer. And more complex. And more controversial. David Tulis/AJC (ENLARGE) Archaeologist Al Goodyear holds a hand-made 'microblade,' one of the hundreds of artifacts unearthed during his team's seven years of excavations...
  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Ancient Stone Tools Found In South Carolina (Topper)

    06/19/2008 10:25:55 AM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 761+ views
    Atlanta Journal Consitiution ^ | 6-17-2008 | LIZ MITCHELL
    Ancient stone tools discovered in South Carolina Finds at Savannah River site could rewrite America's history By LIZ MITCHELL McClatchy NewspapersPublished on: 06/17/08 HILTON HEAD, S.C. A local man has unearthed two ancient stone tools in an archaeological dig in Allendale County, S.C., a rare find that could provide more information about how early Americans lived. And if more evidence proves the artifact is a new type of tool and one archaeologists haven't found before, it could be named after Matthew Carey of Hilton Head Island. The 22-year-old University of South Carolina anthropology major volunteered at the Topper Site...
  • Will Work At Allendale County Archaeological Dig (Topper) Rewrite Human History?

    06/08/2008 5:18:39 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 360+ views
    Island Packet ^ | 6-8-2008 | Liz Mitchell
    Will work at Allendale County archaeological dig rewrite human history? By LIZ MITCHELL Published Sunday, June 8, 2008 Photo: Cynthia Curry of Charlotte holds up a piece of quartz she discovered at Topper on Wednesday. Jay Karr/The Island Packet More than 13,000 years ago, South Carolina was a wild kingdom alive with all sorts of beasts: saber-tooth tigers, beavers the size of Great Danes, camels, elephants and mastodons. Until recently, these animals were believed to have vanished before the first Americans -- called the Clovis people -- arrived about 13,000 years ago from Asia via the Bering Sea land bridge....
  • Site Provides Evidence For Ancient Comet Explosion (Topper - SC)

    10/07/2007 10:07:52 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,601+ views
    The News Tribune ^ | 10-7-2007 | Joey Holleman
    Site provides evidence for ancient comet explosion JOEY HOLLEMAN; McClatchy Newspapers Published: October 7th, 2007 01:00 AM COLUMBIA, S.C. For the second time in less than a decade, a South Carolina river bluff holds evidence pointing to a theory with history-rewriting potential. Microscopic soil particles from the Topper site near Allendale might hold a tiny key to a big theory: that comet-caused explosions wiped out the mammoths and mastodons, prompted the last ice age and decimated the first human culture in North America about 12,900 years ago. The comet theory first began generating a buzz at an international meeting...
  • Comet Theory Collides With Clovis Research, May Explain Disappearance of Ancient People

    08/03/2007 11:29:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 122 replies · 4,803+ views
    June 28, 2007 Comet theory collides with Clovis research, may explain disappearance of ancient people A theory put forth by a group of 25 geo-scientists suggests that a massive comet exploded over Canada, possibly wiping out both beast and man around 12,900 years ago, and pushing the earth into another ice age. University of South Carolina archaeologist Dr. Albert Goodyear said the theory may not be such "out-of-this-world" thinking based on his study of ancient stone-tool artifacts he and his team have excavated from the Topper dig site in Allendale, as well as ones found in Georgia, North Carolina and...
  • Clovis Speakers Discuss Man's Origins In The United States

    10/28/2005 11:53:56 AM PDT · by blam · 70 replies · 1,571+ views
    The State/AP ^ | 10-27-2005 | Meg Kinnard
    Posted on Thu, Oct. 27, 2005 Clovis speakers discuss man's origins in the United States MEG KINNARD Associated Press COLUMBIA, S.C. - A University of Texas archaeologist opened the highly anticipated "Clovis in the Southeast" conference at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center Thursday by rejecting the premise on which many experts once based their theories on man's North American origins. At the meeting, sponsored in part by the University of South Carolina, Michael Collins called the idea that the first inhabitants traveled by way of a land bridge from Asia "primal racism." Instead, Collins said, they arrived by water, because...
  • Kenosha Dig Points to Europe as Origin of First Americans

    03/04/2002 12:05:29 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 91 replies · 5,281+ views
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ^ | 3-4-02 | John Fauber
    A contentious theory that the first Americans came here from Europe - not Asia - is challenging a century-old consensus among archaeologists, and a dig in Kenosha County is part of the evidence. The two leading proponents of the Europe theory admit that many scientists reject their contention, instead holding fast to the long-established belief that the first Americans arrived from Siberia via a now-submerged land bridge across the Bering Sea to Alaska. The first of the Europe-to-North America treks probably took place at the height of the last Ice Age more than 18,000 years ago, said Dennis Stanford, ...
  • Archeologist finds evidence of humans in North America 50,000 years ago

    11/17/2004 10:04:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 3,117+ views
    Canoe (Canada) ^ | November 17, 2004 | AP
    University of South Carolina archeologist Al Goodyear said he has uncovered a layer of charcoal from a possible hearth or fire pit at a site near the Savannah River. Samples from the layer have been laboratory-dated to more than 50,000 years old. Yet Goodyear stopped short of declaring it proof of the continent's earliest human occupation. "It does look like a hearth," he said, "and the material that was dated has been burned." ...Goodyear, who has worked the Topper site since 1981, discovered the charcoal layer in May.
  • Scientist: Comets Blasted Early Americans

    10/28/2005 6:33:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 48 replies · 1,824+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/28/05 | Meg Kinnard - ap
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - A supernova could be the "quick and dirty" explanation for what may have happened to an early North American culture, a nuclear scientist here said Thursday. Richard Firestone said at the "Clovis in the Southeast" conference that he thinks "impact regions" on mammoth tusks found in Gainey, Mich., were caused by magnetic particles rich in elements like titanium and uranium. This composition, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist said, resembles rocks that were discovered on the moon and have also been found in lunar meteorites that fell to Earth about 10,000 years ago. Firestone said that, based...
  • Kennewick Man, Meet Your Distant Cousins

    11/07/2005 3:24:22 PM PST · by blam · 60 replies · 5,718+ views
    Seattle Times ^ | 11-7-2005 | Kate Riley
    Kennewick Man, meet your distant cousins By Kate Riley Monday, November 7, 2005 - Page updated at 12:00 AM COLUMBIA, S.C. Discerning the story of America's prehistoric past is a bit like groping through an unfamiliar room in the dark. One learned scientist's tattooing tool is another's piece of rock. Ask them to agree how long it has been there and you're bound to set off an argument that makes Seattle's whether-to-monorail conflict seem like a tea party. So it goes with evolving thought in archaeology. We all know the prevailing theory. Our children's high-school textbooks talk about the...
  • Rediscovering America. (The New World May Be 20,000 Years Older Than Experts Thought)

    12/10/2003 1:30:57 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 2,783+ views
    Blue Corn Comics (?) ^ | Charles W, Petit
    Rediscovering AmericaThe New World may be 20,000 years older than experts thought BY CHARLES W. PETIT Late in the afternoon last May 17, a tired archaeological team neared the end of a 14-hour day winching muck to the deck of a Canadian Coast Guard vessel. It was in water 170 feet deep in Juan Perez Sound, half a mile offshore among British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands. For four days, team members had fruitlessly sieved undersea mud and gravel. Then, in the slanting light of sunset, a deckhand drew from the goop a triangular blade of dark basalt. Its sharp edge...
  • The Oldest Americans May Prove Even Older

    06/29/2004 4:20:56 PM PDT · by NukeMan · 31 replies · 1,657+ views
    New York Times ^ | 6/29/04 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    BARNWELL, S.C., June 24 - On a hillside by the Savannah River, under tall oaks bearded with Spanish moss, an archaeologist and a graduate student crouched in the humid depths of a trench. They had reason to think they were in the presence of a breathtaking discovery. Or at the least, they were on to something more than 20,000 years old that would throw American archaeology into further turmoil over its most contentious issue: when did people first reach America, and who were they?
  • 'Scientific American' Shines Spotlight On SC Dig (Topper Site - TV Tonight)

    07/20/2004 3:03:17 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 4,153+ views
    The State.com ^ | 7-20-2004 | Doug Nye
    Scientific American shines spotlight on S.C. dig By DOUG NYETelevision Editor Posted on Tue, Jul. 20, 2004 About 12,000 years ago, the first people to journey to the American continents did so by crossing the Bering land bridge from Asia. At least, thats what archaeologists have long believed. But tonights edition of Scientific American Frontiers examines five archaeological sites that could prove that humans walked this land much earlier. Among the digs spotlighted is USCs Topper excavation site in Allendale County, supervised by archaeologist Albert C. Goodyear, director of the Allendale Paleo-Indian Expedition of the S.C. Institute of Archaeology and...
  • Archaeologists To Return To Allendale Site In May (Topper - 50,000 YO)

    02/17/2007 10:59:54 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 773+ views
    Island Packet ^ | 2-17-2007 | Peter Frost
    Archaeologists to return to Allendale site in May By PETER FROST pfrost@islandpacket.com 843-706-8169 Published Saturday, February 17, 2007 It was on the banks of the Savannah River in Allendale County where Al Goodyear in 2004 found the clues of an ancient civilization that could rewrite the history books. The University of South Carolina archaeologist and a group of volunteers unearthed artifacts estimated to be 50,000 years old, implying humans lived on this continent before the last Ice Age, far earlier than previously believed. They uncovered what appeared to be cutting tools and stone chisels used by humans that existed an...
  • Archaeologist's Find Could Shake Up Science (Topper Site)

    01/08/2007 11:14:54 AM PST · by blam · 82 replies · 3,227+ views
    SP Times ^ | 1-7-2007 | Heather Urquides
    Archaeologist's find could shake up science By HEATHER URQUIDES Published January 7, 2007 Archaeologist Albert Goodyear is working on the find of his life. Based on radiocarbon tests and artifacts he's found along the Savannah River in South Carolina, Goodyear believes that humans existed in North America as many as 50,000 years ago, shattering the long-held notion that the earliest settlers arrived here about 13,000 years ago in Alaska via a lost land bridge. Not everyone is convinced, but Goodyear believes further excavation and testing at the South Carolina location, known as the Topper site, will confirm his findings. He's...