Keyword: worldwarone

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  • British accuse Australia of banning them from WWI Battle of Fromelles centenary commemoration

    02/05/2016 2:40:36 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 24 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 5th February 2016 | Sophie Aubrey
    THE relatives of slain British soldiers have accused the Department of Veterans' Affairs of banning them from attending centenary commemorations for a catastrophic WWI battle that killed thousands of Australian soldiers. The Battle of Fromelles is among Australia's bloodiest military encounters and the brutal loss has long been blamed on a disastrous incompetence of British military strategy. A special service to mark the battle's 100th anniversary is to take place on July 19 this year at the Pheasant Wood military cemetery in Fromelles, northern France. The slaughter is viewed by historians as the darkest 24 hours in the Australia's history...
  • Battle Without End: The casualties of Verdun

    03/04/2016 8:33:58 AM PST · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Weekly Standard ^ | March 14, 2016 | Geoffrey Norman
    There is something hard, cold, and brutal about the structure. It looks like a concrete airplane hangar and rising above it is what is called the “Lantern of the Dead." The shape suggests, appropriately, an artillery shell. When you walk around the outside of the building you find small windows, and when you look through them what you see are bones. Human bones and skulls. Piles of them. They are the remains of more than 130,000 men who were killed here and whose bodies could not be recovered or identified and so remained in the mud, blown apart again and...
  • Looking for a good book recommendation on WWI

    04/15/2014 4:18:24 PM PDT · by KosmicKitty · 104 replies
    4-15-2014 | Kosmickitty
    After listening to one of my favorite podcaster, Dan Carlin & his Hardcore History, about the beginning of World War I, I would love to find out more about this time in history. I know that Freepers are a well read bunch and I am asking for any recommendations you may care to make in a good book covering this time in history.
  • 100 Years Ago Today: Battle of Verdun starts

    02/21/2016 7:38:14 PM PST · by abishai · 41 replies
    Centenary News ^ | February 21, 2016
    A massive artillery bombardment on the morning of February 21st 1916 signalled the start of the German attack on Verdun, the longest single battle of the First World War. More than 1,200 guns opened fire before German troops began their assault on fortifications of major symbolic inportance to France. Even by the standards of the Great War, the Battle of Verdun was a particularly brutal campaign of attrition, fuelled by the determination of both sides not to give way as the struggle wore on. The battle was to last 300 days, almost until Christmas, on a narrow front stretching no...
  • Hitler had son with French teen

    02/17/2012 12:13:28 PM PST · by bkopto · 74 replies · 1+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | Feb 17, 2012 | Peter Allen
    Jean-Marie Loret, who died in 1985 aged 67, never met his father, but went on to fight Nazi forces during the Second World War. His extraordinary story has now been backed up by a range of compelling evidence, both in France and in Germany, which is published in the latest edition of Paris's Le Point magazine. Hitler is said to have had an affair with Mr Loret's mother, Charlotte Lobjoie, 16, as he took a break from the trenches in June 1917. Although he was fighting the French near Seboncourt, in the northern Picardy region, Hitler made his way to...
  • Did Hitler Have a Secret Son? Evidence Supports Alleged Son’s Claims

    02/21/2012 8:32:58 PM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies · 1+ views
    ABC News ^ | February 21, 2012 | Candace Smith
    Until his death in 1985, Jean-Marie Loret believed that he was the only son of Adolf Hitler. There is now renewed attention to evidence from France and Germany that apparently lends some credence to his claim. Loret collected information from two studies; one conducted by the University of Heidelberg in 1981 and another conducted by a handwriting analyst that showed Loret’s blood type and handwriting, respectively, were similar to the Nazi Germany dictator who died childless in 1945 at age 56. The evidence is inconclusive but Loret’s story itself was riveting enough to warrant some investigation. The French newspaper Le...
  • In Flanders Fields

    11/11/2015 8:53:37 AM PST · by Uncle Miltie · 28 replies
    Ubiquitous ^ | May 3, 1915 | Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.
  • Lone Pine battle marked at Gallipoli

    08/06/2015 2:37:50 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 3 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 7th August 2015
    THE Battle of Lone Pine was more a "vicious armed brawl" than an example of modern war, Governor-General Peter Cosgrove has told a centenary service to mark the bloody conflict. HUNDREDS of people endured sweltering heat on the Gallipoli Peninsula on Thursday to attend the service on a battleground where some 800 Australians died, 1500 were wounded and seven Victoria Crosses were won. In recognition of such gallantry VC winners Mark Donaldson, Daniel Keighran and Keith Payne took part in the service along with Doug Baird, the father of VC winner Corporal Cameron Baird who was killed in Afghanistan in...
  • Movement To Rename Schools Widens To Reach Progressive Woodrow Wilson

    07/05/2015 6:02:01 AM PDT · by Samurai_Jack · 32 replies
    The growing movement to find new appellations for buildings, landmarks and even bodies of water named after Confederate leaders has finally expanded to reach Woodrow Wilson, America’s 28th president, a model progressive Democrat and a world-class racist scumbag.
  • A Century After Armenian Genocide, Turkey’s Denial Only Deepens

    04/16/2015 8:03:17 PM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 7 replies
    The New York Slimes ^ | 2015-04-16 | TIM ARANGO
    Nearly 1.5 million Armenians died at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in 1915, during World War I. Turks by and large do not believe mass killings were planned. CUNGUS, Turkey — The crumbling stone monastery, built into the hillside, stands as a forlorn monument to an awful past. So, too, does the decaying church on the other side of this mountain village. Farther out, a crevice is sliced into the earth, so deep that peering into it, one sees only blackness. Haunting for its history, it was there that a century ago, an untold number of Armenians were tossed...
  • When Jerusalem Met Gallipoli 100 Years Ago; When Turks Met Jews on the Battlefield

    03/29/2015 3:42:59 AM PDT · by wtd · 7 replies
    Israel Picture a Day ^ | March 29, 2015 | Our Mission
    WW100: When Jerusalem Met Gallipoli 100 Years Ago; When Turks Met Jews on the Battlefield Ottoman Imperial Archives Image image/mapWorld War I began in Europe in the summer of 1914 with major battles between the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary versus the Triple Alliance of the United Kingdom, France and Russia. The Ottoman Empire (Turkey) joined with the Central Powers and attacked the British at the Suez Canal in January 1915. In an attempt to put pressure on Germany and Turkey, Britain sent warships to the Dardanelle Straits in April 1915, planning sail up the narrow, 60-mile-long waterway...
  • ‘I shall never forget it’: 100 years since WWI Christmas truce

    12/24/2014 4:34:35 PM PST · by Whenifhow · 14 replies
    Fox News ^ | Dec 24, 2014 | Unknown
    With British and German forces separated only by a no-man's land littered with fallen comrades, sounds of a German Christmas carol suddenly drifted across the frigid air. "It was a beautiful moonlit night, frost on the ground, white almost everywhere: and at about 7 or 8 in the evening there was a lot of commotion in the German trenches and there were these lights -- I don't know what they were. And then they sang, "Silent Night" – "Stille Nacht." I shall never forget it, it was one of the highlights of my life. I thought, what a beautiful tune,"...
  • World War I in Photos: A Century Later

    12/20/2014 8:40:23 AM PST · by NKP_Vet · 37 replies
    http://www.theatlantic.com ^ | June 29, 2014 | Alan Taylor
    Yesterday, June 28, 2014, marked the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Assassin Gavrilo Princip fired the first shot in what was to become a horrific years-long bloodbath. However, after the sound of gunfire was silenced on Armistice Day, the deaths continued to mount. Revolutions spawned in Russia and Germany, arbitrary redrawing of national borders set the stage for decades of conflict, harsh reparation demands inspired the rise of Nazi Germany and the onset of World War II. The first World War continues to kill to this day - just this past March, two Belgian construction workers...
  • The forgotten sneak attack on Britain that backfired on the Kaiser

    12/14/2014 6:32:50 AM PST · by the scotsman · 33 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 14th December 2014 | Tony Rennell
    'A bank of fog was sitting a couple of miles out at sea and a heavy mist lay over the East Coast resort of Scarborough as postman Alfred Beal climbed the wide front steps of Dunollie, a porticoed mansion high on the town’s South Cliff. He never reached the door that fateful morning on December 16, 1914, almost exactly a century ago. Three German warships had burst out of the fog bank and were now steaming past the headland, firing volley after volley of shells. One caught poor Beal and blasted his shattered body back down the drive. A second...
  • Immediate Cause of World War One

    08/01/2014 5:14:17 PM PDT · by Retain Mike · 14 replies
    33 CENTRIES OF ESPIONAGE | August 1, 2014 | Self
    "The magnates of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff and Foreign Ministry now had their Pan-Slavic provocation. In one of the many pigionholes of the Ballplatz there lay a document three years old. This was the notorious ultimatum, drawn up to be used against Serbia when occasion should arise....So consistent had been Vienna's Great-Serbian grievance that a few minor changes in the phrasing of the ultimatum would bring it up to date.... The illustrious Count Leopold Berchtold ordered the ultimatum to be presented in Belgrade at six o'clock in the evening of Thursday, July 23. The ultimatum required Serbia's submission within forty-eight...
  • The Hidden World of the Great War- The Lost Underground of World War I

    07/29/2014 9:19:39 AM PDT · by Theoria · 3 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | Aug 2014 | Evan Hadingham
    The entrance is a wet hole in the earth little bigger than an animal burrow, obscured by thorny brush in a secluded wood in northeastern France. I’m following Jeff Gusky, a photographer and physician from Texas who has explored dozens of underground spaces like this one. Together we slither through the muddy hole into the darkness below. Soon the passage opens up, and we crawl forward on hands and knees. The glow from our headlamps wavers along the dusty chalk walls of the century-old tunnel, which slopes away from us down into the shadows. After a few hundred feet the...
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • The Middle East That France and Britain Drew Is Finally Unravelling

    06/28/2014 7:33:29 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 10 replies
    The New Republic ^ | June 26, 2014 | John Judis
    The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) publishes a weekly webzine, The Islamic State Report. The latest issue is headlined “Smashing the Borders of the Tawaghit.” (“Tawaghit” are non-Muslim creations.) ISIS, citing the Sykes-Picot Treaty of 1916 between the British and French, boasts that it is destroying the “partitioning of Muslim lands by crusader powers.” That may seem like a quixotic task for a relatively small band of irregulars, but in trying to redraw the map of Iraq and Syria, ISIS has hit upon a weak link in the chain holding the nations of the Middle East together. It...
  • ANZAC’s lasting Middle East impact

    04/26/2014 7:00:20 AM PDT · by Former Fetus · 1 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | 4/25/2014 | Dave Sharma
    Ninety-nine years ago today, April 25, in the very early hours before dawn, some 1200 kilometers from Jerusalem, members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps – or ANZACs – landed on the western shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula, in modern-day Turkey, at a place we now call Anzac Cove. At roughly the same time, British forces landed at the southern tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, at Cape Helles, whilst French forces went ashore at Kum Kale, on the Turkish mainland just opposite Cape Helles. Indian and Canadian troops later joined the campaign. This multinational invasion force was to...
  • 100 years later, remembering the crucible called World War I

    06/28/2014 7:33:17 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 17 replies
    la times ^ | 6-28-14 | Henry Chu
    The shot that changed the world rang out on a sunny summer's morning in Southeastern Europe. No one knew then that the assassin's bullet would spell the death not just of an Austrian aristocrat but the entire global order, with four empires and millions of lives lost in a conflict on a scale never before seen.. Exactly 100 years ago Saturday, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and his wife, Sophie, were shot at close range by a young Serbian nationalist on the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination set off a chain reaction that, barely a...
  • Archduke Franz Ferdinand: The man whose assassination is blamed for triggering World War I

    06/28/2014 4:16:11 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 26 replies
    ABC (AUS) ^ | 06.28.14
    Archduke Franz Ferdinand is best known as the man whose assassination is widely believed to have led to the outbreak of World War I. But behind that figure lies a story of forbidden love, an obsession with hunting, and a near-miss that could have killed the archduke months before he was shot dead with his wife Sophie in Sarajevo 100 years ago.
  • World War One anniversary: what if Archduke Franz Ferdinand had lived?

    06/28/2014 9:07:15 AM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 53 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | june 27, 2014 | Tim Stanley and Olivia Bolton
    was like something from a film - what started as a farce ended as a tragedy. When Archduke Franz Ferdinand arrived in Sarajevo on June 28 1914, someone threw a bomb at him but it missed. Gavrilo Princip was meant to shoot him there and then but couldn’t get a clear shot. So he went to sulk in a café instead. It was only when Ferdinand’s car later went down the same street by the same café and got stuck in the road - that Princip took his chance and shot the Archduke dead. But what if Princip had missed?...
  • Vessel Believed to be Russian Tsarist Submarine Discovered in the Baltic

    06/26/2014 10:41:11 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    The Moscow Times ^ | Jun. 26 2014 21:00 | The Moscow Times
    Estonian divers have discovered a watercraft in the Baltic Sea that they believe to be one of Russia's first battle submarines, Estonian media reported. The Shark, which was first launched in 1911, disappeared in 1915 at the height of World War I. It was carrying a crew of 35 at the time, whose fate has since remained unknown.
  • Still paying for the Civil War

    05/09/2014 10:36:45 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    WSJ ^ | 09 May 2014 | Michael M. Phillips
    Veterans' Benefits Live On Long After Bullets Stop Each month, Irene Triplett collects $73.13 from the Department of Veterans Affairs, a pension payment for her father's military service—in the Civil War. More than 3 million men fought and 530,000 men died in the conflict between North and South. Pvt. Mose Triplett joined the rebels, deserted on the road to Gettysburg, defected to the Union and married so late in life to a woman so young that their daughter Irene is today 84 years old—and the last child of any Civil War veteran still on the VA benefits rolls. Ms. Triplett's...
  • WWI in color photos

    04/18/2014 8:52:59 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 29 replies
    Austrian Soldier, Eastern Europe, 1915 German troops in Berlin, 1914 Ambulances in Palestine, 1918 French trenches, 1916 Senegalese troops, France, 1917 Dead Italian soldiers, Italy, 1915
  • British plan ANZAC whitewash

    01/08/2014 2:13:41 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 28 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 9th January 2013
    A PC push by British politicians is threatening to downplay the role of Aussie diggers in WW1 in favour of developing nations. The ANZAC whitewash comes despite the 62,000 Australians who died in the Great War fighting for the British Empire and another 156,000 wounded, with no 100-year anniversary events planned by Britain recognising the sacrifice. ..... British government sources have confirmed internal briefings on WWI commemorations have not mentioned Australia or New Zealand once, instead staff from departments and cabinet offices have been briefed to concentrate on other British Empire contributions by soldiers from countries such as Nigeria and...
  • We don't remember the Great War fallen; yet we still mourn them

    11/09/2013 2:48:03 PM PST · by Dysart · 33 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 11-9-13 | Daniel Hannan
    I find Remembrance Sunday sadder each year. It’s partly that I’m becoming sentimental – I find it increasingly difficult to recite any poetry without a catch in my voice – but it’s mainly that the fallen are now closer in age to my children than to me. When I was a small boy, I was, as small boys are, uncomplicatedly pro-war. At around eleven or twelve, I started to read the First World War poets, but I was still mainly attracted by the heroic element in their writing: their endurance in monstrous circumstances. Later, as a teenager, I began to...
  • Wear a poppy don't burn it: Muslim leaders urge followers to show respect for Remembrance Sunday

    11/03/2013 11:29:15 AM PST · by the scotsman · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3rd November 2013 | Leon Watson
    'Mosques will take the unprecedented step of urging British Muslims to 'wear the poppy, rather than burn it' this week in a bid to counter claims of being unpatriotic. Poppy stalls will be set up at around the country leading up to Remembrance Sunday in a move backed by government ministers and the Royal British Legion. It follows high-profile protests in the past by Muslim extremists, including those linked to the hate preacher Anjem Choudary, and the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby outside Woolwich barracks in south-east London.'
  • World War One in Colour - Part 1 - Everyday Life During Wartime

    10/31/2013 6:58:45 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 13 replies
    CityNoise ^ | July 2, 2010 | Franny Wentzel
    Images collected from the French National Archives of soldiers and civilians on or near the Western Front. One must presume these were taken during a lull in the fighting due to the long exposure times required by colour film.
  • Bodies of WWI soldiers found in glacier [ww1]

    08/24/2004 5:12:58 AM PDT · by risk · 17 replies · 2,172+ views
    Bodies of WWI soldiers found in glacier ROME - The bodies of three Austrian soldiers killed in World War One have been found frozen and almost perfectly preserved in an Italian Alpine glacier. ADVERTISEMENT Mountain rescue worker Maurizio Vicenzi discovered the mummified bodies on Friday, encased upside down in ice at 11,940 feet altitude on San Matteo mountain near the Swiss and Austrian borders. ``Using binoculars, I saw what looked like a stain on the Forni glacier and went to look,'' Vicenzi, 46, from the northern Italian town of Peio told Reuters on Monday. ``When I got close I discovered...
  • Bodies of WWI soldiers found in Alpine glacier -

    08/22/2004 5:08:17 PM PDT · by UnklGene · 61 replies · 4,991+ views
    ABC News - Australia ^ | August 23, 2004
    Bodies of WWI soldiers found in Italian glacier - The preserved bodies of three Austrian soldiers killed in World War I have been found at the foot of an Italian glacier, 86 years after their deaths, a museum in northern Italy said on Sunday. They were found by Maurizio Vincenzi, the director of the military history museum at the small town of Peio in the Trentino region, member of a mountain rescue team and military history buff. The bodies were found 3,400 metres up a mountain called San Matteo and are said to be exceptionally well preserved. They had been...
  • Two unknown soldiers (discovered in the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps)

    10/19/2013 6:48:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Economist ^ | October 9, 2013
    THE BLACK stain on the ice was instantly recognisable. The technician checking a tarpaulin stretched over a section of the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps—an experimental attempt to slow the melting— quickly called in a rescue party. The block of ice was airlifted to the nearby city of Vicenza. Inside were two soldiers who had fallen at the Battle of Presena in May 1918 and were buried in a crevasse.Their uniforms and their location indicated that they could well have been Kaiserschützen, specialised mountain troops who fought on behalf of the Austro-Hungarian Empire to defend these mountains from...
  • Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918

    10/01/2013 6:29:09 PM PDT · by robowombat · 11 replies
    Army Heritage Education Center ^ | August 27, 2010 | Shane Reilly
    Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918 August 27, 2010 By Shane Reilly, Army Heritage Education Center The forest for the trees: Soldiers of the 28th Division are shown in hiding among trees during service in France in World War I(WWI Signal Corps Collection). Related Links A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: 28th Infantry Division A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: World War I- AEF Overview In the early morning hours of August 27, 1918, 230 Pennsylvanians of the 28th Division trudged across the Vesle River into their defensive positions in the rubble- strewn village of Fismette, France. Less than an...
  • Extraordinary chivalry of British PoW who returned to German prison after visiting dying mother

    09/03/2013 7:14:35 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 18 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4th September 2013 | Yahoo News
    'A British PoW captured by the Germans in World War I was freed to see his dying mother - but went back to the prison camp after giving the Kaiser 'his word' he would return. Capt Robert Campbell, aged 29, was gravely injured and captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp, the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II, begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time....
  • Revealed: Extraordinary story of British WWI captain released by Kaiser from German prison camp

    09/03/2013 3:56:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 3, 2013
    A British soldier was freed from a German POW camp during World War One to see his dying mother - and kept his promise to the Kaiser by returning, historians have discovered. Captain Robert Campbell, aged 29, was captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time. Incredibly the German leader granted the...
  • The Lion Hunter of Zion (an Irish man)

    07/12/2013 5:01:30 AM PDT · by dennisw · 19 replies
    In his youth, King David proved his heroism by slaying a lion. He went on to put his life on the line for the Jewish People and become a hero for all Israel. Three thousand years later, another lion-hearted lion-slayer also put his life on the line for the Jewish People and became a hero for all Israel. He wasn’t even Jewish, but he was one of the greatest friends and supporters that the Jewish People ever had - and his experiences with lions assisted in numerous ways.Colonel John Patterson was an Irish soldier and engineer assigned to Kenya by...
  • Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D'...

    07/07/2013 8:54:06 AM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 25 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | July 06 2013 | By JAMES DANIEL
    Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D' stereoscopic images found in an attic after decades A Toronto photography studio has stumbled across a stereoscopic camera, and its photographic slides, that captured scenes of World War I in 3D. The photographs were taken in the trenches, streets, and battlefields of World War I. The striking images, acquired using a handheld stereoscopic camera called the Verascope and were captured by soldiers in the French army. When the camera was acquired it was still in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. Each...
  • Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI

    07/07/2013 5:48:13 AM PDT · by NYer · 42 replies
    io9 ^ | July 5, 2013
    SWhile visiting an estate in Ontario's Niagara Falls two years ago, a film enthusiast stumbled upon a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. Here's what he found inside. The verascope camera, which was purchased by A Nerd's World's Chris Hughes, was found in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. The antique had been in the possession of an elderly man who was clearing out his camera collection in preparation for retirement. S"Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers...
  • World War I era ammunition frozen in a glacier for nearly a century has been found in N. Italy

    09/02/2012 7:17:19 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 28 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 2, 2012 | Alex Gore
    First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts WWI ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry. The once-perennial glacier began partially melted during a recent heat wave, allowing the Finance Police Alpine rescue...
  • On this Day a Tennessee Boy Killed 25 and Captured 132 Enemy

    10/08/2001 12:06:01 PM PDT · by the irate magistrate · 94 replies · 882+ views
    History Channel web page ^ | 10/08/2001 | staff
    ALVIN YORK KILLS 25 AND CAPTURES 132: During World War I, U.S. Corporal Alvin C. York is credited with single-handedly killing 25 German soldiers and capturing 132 in the Argonne Forest of France. The action saved York's small detachment from annihilation by a German machine-gun nest and won the reluctant warrior from backwater Tennessee the Congressional Medal of Honor. Born in a log cabin in rural Tennessee in 1887, Alvin Cullum York supplemented his family's subsistence farming by hunting and, like his father, was soon an expert marksman. He also earned a reputation as a hell-raiser, and few imagined he ...
  • Last veteran of World War One dies at 109 (Scotland)

    11/23/2005 12:24:08 PM PST · by SittinYonder · 53 replies · 2,168+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Tue 22 Nov 2005 | FRANK URQUHART
    SCOTLAND'S last surviving veteran of the First World War, and the country's oldest man, died peacefully at a nursing home yesterday aged 109 - severing the last tangible link between the nation and the 690,235 Scots who served in the Great War. Alfred Anderson was the last of the "Old Contemptibles" - the British expeditionary force which went to war in 1914 - and the last surviving witness of the historic Christmas truce when opposing troops declared a brief and unofficial ceasefire to play football and share drinks and cigarettes in the hell of no man's land. Mr Anderson served...
  • Amazingly Good Audio of Woodrow Wilson Speaking During 1912 Presidential Campaign

    09/04/2011 2:48:29 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 30 replies
    Self | September 4, 2011 | PJ-Comix
    Okay, I know that Glenn Beck really hates Woodrow Wilson but let us leave aside the politics to discuss this absolutely amazing AUDIO of Wilson speaking during the 1912 Presidential campaign. Three things really strike me about this audio: 1. Clarity. I can't believe how CLEAR this audio sounds keeping in mind when it was recorded which was 1912. 2. Wilson's speaking voice. I never realized that Wilson's voice was so clear. If he lived today, he could easily be a radio announcer. His voice is that good. 3. Wilson's accent. Although Woodrow Wilson spent his boyhood in the South...
  • WWI underground: Unearthing the hidden tunnel war (...killed an estimated 10,000 Germans.)

    06/10/2011 10:09:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | June 10, 2011 | Peter Jackson
    Archaeologists are beginning the most detailed ever study of a Western Front battlefield, an untouched site where 28 British tunnellers lie entombed after dying during brutal underground warfare. For WWI historians, it's the "holy grail".When military historian Jeremy Banning stepped on to a patch of rough scrubland in northern France four months ago, the hairs on the back of his neck stood up. The privately-owned land in the sleepy rural village of La Boisselle had been practically untouched since fighting ceased in 1918, remaining one of the most poignant sites of the Battle of the Somme. In his hand was...
  • Last World War I combat vet dies in Australia

    05/04/2011 8:20:10 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 4, 2011 | KRISTEN GELINEAU
    SYDNEY — Claude Stanley Choules, the last known combat veteran of World War I, died Thursday at a nursing home in the Western Australia city of Perth, his family said. He was 110. "We all loved him," his 84-year-old daughter Daphne Edinger told The Associated Press. "It's going to be sad to think of him not being here any longer, but that's the way things go."
  • Being T.E. Lawrence (Review of Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia by Michael Korda)

    04/11/2011 3:10:27 PM PDT · by mojito · 9 replies
    Hoover Institution's Policy Review ^ | 4/1/2011 | Joseph Bottum
    He was the best of England and the worst. A wastrel, in many ways, and a triumph, in others. A hero and a clown. A scholar and a soldier. A sophisticate and a naïf. A child and a grown-up. He was an adolescent, all in all: perhaps the greatest lifelong teenager the modern world has ever known, with every bit of the soaring self-confidence and crushing self-doubt the awkward years can bring. His name was Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence. Or T.E. Lawrence, as he signed his books, or John Hume Ross and T.E. Shaw, the military pseudonyms under which...
  • Last living U.S. World War I veteran dies

    02/27/2011 8:37:32 PM PST · by Mmogamer · 25 replies
    CNN ^ | 2/27/2011 | Paul Courson
    Washington (CNN) -- Frank Buckles, the last living U.S. World War I veteran, has died, a spokesman for his family said Sunday. He was 110.
  • Breakthrough as DNA identifies WW1 soldier

    09/15/2007 8:33:55 PM PDT · by DancesWithCats · 28 replies · 757+ views
    London Daily Telegraph ^ | Sept 16, 2007 | DancesWithCats
    By Jasper Copping Last Updated: 1:29am BST 16/09/2007 He was a young man, like so many others, who fell on the battlefield at Passchendaele. Aged just 29, Private Jack Hunter died in the arms of his younger brother, Jim, who buried him there, on the front line, in a shallow grave. Jack Hunter, who died at Passchendaele, with his brother Jim Jack Hunter, who died in the first world war, with his brother Jim Once the guns had fallen silent, Jim returned to look for his brother's body, but the ground had been chewed up by artillery and he could...
  • A Reminder of Who We Are

    01/02/2010 9:58:09 AM PST · by NJ_Tom · 3 replies · 404+ views
    Testament of Youth (a Memoir) | 1933 | Vera Brittain
    I have been reading Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain, a memoir of her service as a nurse in World War I, and would like to share an excerpt that I found particularly moving. This young lady, still in her early 20s by the end of the war, writes very eloquently of the horrors that she witnessed and personally experienced. I think it's fair to say that she did not have a "good war," since the war took from her, her fiancé, many close friends and her only brother. One of the most moving passages comes when she describes events...
  • Cross Village native among 'The Polar Bears' who fought for eight months in Russia inWWI

    05/21/2009 1:29:10 PM PDT · by Tailgunner Joe · 11 replies · 1,137+ views
    harborlightnews.com ^ | May 20, 2009 | Daniele Kapral
    In September 1918, though told they were headed to France, the soldiers in company M 339th Infantry were shipped from Camp Custer in Battle Creek, Michigan, to the bitter cold Archangel, Russia. The R.E.F (Russian Expeditionary Force), later referred to as “The Polar Bears,” went to battle in a desolate, frozen land. They were left to fight eight months after World War I had ended, and became one of the most highly decorated regiments in all the war. These men will be remembered in a documentary film, “Voices of a Never Ending Dawn,” which premieres this Memorial weekend in southern...
  • THOMAS MITCHELL: On bravery and heroism, then and now

    12/07/2008 5:37:57 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies · 494+ views
    Las Vegas Review-Journal ^ | Dec. 07, 2008 | Thomas Mitchell
    One of the purposes of education is to convey a society's mores, customs, morality, body of knowledge and traditions from one generation to the next. Public education alone is not going to get the job done. It takes knowledge of current events and their underlying causalities so we can understand how to repeat what is good and avoid what is unpleasant -- or even pure evil. That takes sophisticated communication, such as that provided by newspapers -- in print and online. Have the country's standards slipped? I began thinking about this after reading a column by Thomas Sowell, who appears...