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Keyword: worldwarone

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  • Immediate Cause of World War One

    08/01/2014 5:14:17 PM PDT · by Retain Mike · 14 replies
    33 CENTRIES OF ESPIONAGE | August 1, 2014 | Self
    "The magnates of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff and Foreign Ministry now had their Pan-Slavic provocation. In one of the many pigionholes of the Ballplatz there lay a document three years old. This was the notorious ultimatum, drawn up to be used against Serbia when occasion should arise....So consistent had been Vienna's Great-Serbian grievance that a few minor changes in the phrasing of the ultimatum would bring it up to date.... The illustrious Count Leopold Berchtold ordered the ultimatum to be presented in Belgrade at six o'clock in the evening of Thursday, July 23. The ultimatum required Serbia's submission within forty-eight...
  • The Hidden World of the Great War- The Lost Underground of World War I

    07/29/2014 9:19:39 AM PDT · by Theoria · 3 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | Aug 2014 | Evan Hadingham
    The entrance is a wet hole in the earth little bigger than an animal burrow, obscured by thorny brush in a secluded wood in northeastern France. I’m following Jeff Gusky, a photographer and physician from Texas who has explored dozens of underground spaces like this one. Together we slither through the muddy hole into the darkness below. Soon the passage opens up, and we crawl forward on hands and knees. The glow from our headlamps wavers along the dusty chalk walls of the century-old tunnel, which slopes away from us down into the shadows. After a few hundred feet the...
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • The Middle East That France and Britain Drew Is Finally Unravelling

    06/28/2014 7:33:29 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 10 replies
    The New Republic ^ | June 26, 2014 | John Judis
    The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) publishes a weekly webzine, The Islamic State Report. The latest issue is headlined “Smashing the Borders of the Tawaghit.” (“Tawaghit” are non-Muslim creations.) ISIS, citing the Sykes-Picot Treaty of 1916 between the British and French, boasts that it is destroying the “partitioning of Muslim lands by crusader powers.” That may seem like a quixotic task for a relatively small band of irregulars, but in trying to redraw the map of Iraq and Syria, ISIS has hit upon a weak link in the chain holding the nations of the Middle East together. It...
  • ANZAC’s lasting Middle East impact

    04/26/2014 7:00:20 AM PDT · by Former Fetus · 1 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | 4/25/2014 | Dave Sharma
    Ninety-nine years ago today, April 25, in the very early hours before dawn, some 1200 kilometers from Jerusalem, members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps – or ANZACs – landed on the western shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula, in modern-day Turkey, at a place we now call Anzac Cove. At roughly the same time, British forces landed at the southern tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, at Cape Helles, whilst French forces went ashore at Kum Kale, on the Turkish mainland just opposite Cape Helles. Indian and Canadian troops later joined the campaign. This multinational invasion force was to...
  • 100 years later, remembering the crucible called World War I

    06/28/2014 7:33:17 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 17 replies
    la times ^ | 6-28-14 | Henry Chu
    The shot that changed the world rang out on a sunny summer's morning in Southeastern Europe. No one knew then that the assassin's bullet would spell the death not just of an Austrian aristocrat but the entire global order, with four empires and millions of lives lost in a conflict on a scale never before seen.. Exactly 100 years ago Saturday, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and his wife, Sophie, were shot at close range by a young Serbian nationalist on the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination set off a chain reaction that, barely a...
  • Archduke Franz Ferdinand: The man whose assassination is blamed for triggering World War I

    06/28/2014 4:16:11 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 26 replies
    ABC (AUS) ^ | 06.28.14
    Archduke Franz Ferdinand is best known as the man whose assassination is widely believed to have led to the outbreak of World War I. But behind that figure lies a story of forbidden love, an obsession with hunting, and a near-miss that could have killed the archduke months before he was shot dead with his wife Sophie in Sarajevo 100 years ago.
  • World War One anniversary: what if Archduke Franz Ferdinand had lived?

    06/28/2014 9:07:15 AM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 53 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | june 27, 2014 | Tim Stanley and Olivia Bolton
    was like something from a film - what started as a farce ended as a tragedy. When Archduke Franz Ferdinand arrived in Sarajevo on June 28 1914, someone threw a bomb at him but it missed. Gavrilo Princip was meant to shoot him there and then but couldn’t get a clear shot. So he went to sulk in a café instead. It was only when Ferdinand’s car later went down the same street by the same café and got stuck in the road - that Princip took his chance and shot the Archduke dead. But what if Princip had missed?...
  • Vessel Believed to be Russian Tsarist Submarine Discovered in the Baltic

    06/26/2014 10:41:11 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    The Moscow Times ^ | Jun. 26 2014 21:00 | The Moscow Times
    Estonian divers have discovered a watercraft in the Baltic Sea that they believe to be one of Russia's first battle submarines, Estonian media reported. The Shark, which was first launched in 1911, disappeared in 1915 at the height of World War I. It was carrying a crew of 35 at the time, whose fate has since remained unknown.
  • Still paying for the Civil War

    05/09/2014 10:36:45 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    WSJ ^ | 09 May 2014 | Michael M. Phillips
    Veterans' Benefits Live On Long After Bullets Stop Each month, Irene Triplett collects $73.13 from the Department of Veterans Affairs, a pension payment for her father's military service—in the Civil War. More than 3 million men fought and 530,000 men died in the conflict between North and South. Pvt. Mose Triplett joined the rebels, deserted on the road to Gettysburg, defected to the Union and married so late in life to a woman so young that their daughter Irene is today 84 years old—and the last child of any Civil War veteran still on the VA benefits rolls. Ms. Triplett's...
  • WWI in color photos

    04/18/2014 8:52:59 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 29 replies
    Austrian Soldier, Eastern Europe, 1915 German troops in Berlin, 1914 Ambulances in Palestine, 1918 French trenches, 1916 Senegalese troops, France, 1917 Dead Italian soldiers, Italy, 1915
  • British plan ANZAC whitewash

    01/08/2014 2:13:41 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 28 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 9th January 2013
    A PC push by British politicians is threatening to downplay the role of Aussie diggers in WW1 in favour of developing nations. The ANZAC whitewash comes despite the 62,000 Australians who died in the Great War fighting for the British Empire and another 156,000 wounded, with no 100-year anniversary events planned by Britain recognising the sacrifice. ..... British government sources have confirmed internal briefings on WWI commemorations have not mentioned Australia or New Zealand once, instead staff from departments and cabinet offices have been briefed to concentrate on other British Empire contributions by soldiers from countries such as Nigeria and...
  • We don't remember the Great War fallen; yet we still mourn them

    11/09/2013 2:48:03 PM PST · by Dysart · 33 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 11-9-13 | Daniel Hannan
    I find Remembrance Sunday sadder each year. It’s partly that I’m becoming sentimental – I find it increasingly difficult to recite any poetry without a catch in my voice – but it’s mainly that the fallen are now closer in age to my children than to me. When I was a small boy, I was, as small boys are, uncomplicatedly pro-war. At around eleven or twelve, I started to read the First World War poets, but I was still mainly attracted by the heroic element in their writing: their endurance in monstrous circumstances. Later, as a teenager, I began to...
  • Wear a poppy don't burn it: Muslim leaders urge followers to show respect for Remembrance Sunday

    11/03/2013 11:29:15 AM PST · by the scotsman · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3rd November 2013 | Leon Watson
    'Mosques will take the unprecedented step of urging British Muslims to 'wear the poppy, rather than burn it' this week in a bid to counter claims of being unpatriotic. Poppy stalls will be set up at around the country leading up to Remembrance Sunday in a move backed by government ministers and the Royal British Legion. It follows high-profile protests in the past by Muslim extremists, including those linked to the hate preacher Anjem Choudary, and the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby outside Woolwich barracks in south-east London.'
  • World War One in Colour - Part 1 - Everyday Life During Wartime

    10/31/2013 6:58:45 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 13 replies
    CityNoise ^ | July 2, 2010 | Franny Wentzel
    Images collected from the French National Archives of soldiers and civilians on or near the Western Front. One must presume these were taken during a lull in the fighting due to the long exposure times required by colour film.
  • Bodies of WWI soldiers found in glacier [ww1]

    08/24/2004 5:12:58 AM PDT · by risk · 17 replies · 2,172+ views
    Bodies of WWI soldiers found in glacier ROME - The bodies of three Austrian soldiers killed in World War One have been found frozen and almost perfectly preserved in an Italian Alpine glacier. ADVERTISEMENT Mountain rescue worker Maurizio Vicenzi discovered the mummified bodies on Friday, encased upside down in ice at 11,940 feet altitude on San Matteo mountain near the Swiss and Austrian borders. ``Using binoculars, I saw what looked like a stain on the Forni glacier and went to look,'' Vicenzi, 46, from the northern Italian town of Peio told Reuters on Monday. ``When I got close I discovered...
  • Bodies of WWI soldiers found in Alpine glacier -

    08/22/2004 5:08:17 PM PDT · by UnklGene · 61 replies · 4,991+ views
    ABC News - Australia ^ | August 23, 2004
    Bodies of WWI soldiers found in Italian glacier - The preserved bodies of three Austrian soldiers killed in World War I have been found at the foot of an Italian glacier, 86 years after their deaths, a museum in northern Italy said on Sunday. They were found by Maurizio Vincenzi, the director of the military history museum at the small town of Peio in the Trentino region, member of a mountain rescue team and military history buff. The bodies were found 3,400 metres up a mountain called San Matteo and are said to be exceptionally well preserved. They had been...
  • Two unknown soldiers (discovered in the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps)

    10/19/2013 6:48:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Economist ^ | October 9, 2013
    THE BLACK stain on the ice was instantly recognisable. The technician checking a tarpaulin stretched over a section of the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps—an experimental attempt to slow the melting— quickly called in a rescue party. The block of ice was airlifted to the nearby city of Vicenza. Inside were two soldiers who had fallen at the Battle of Presena in May 1918 and were buried in a crevasse.Their uniforms and their location indicated that they could well have been Kaiserschützen, specialised mountain troops who fought on behalf of the Austro-Hungarian Empire to defend these mountains from...
  • Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918

    10/01/2013 6:29:09 PM PDT · by robowombat · 11 replies
    Army Heritage Education Center ^ | August 27, 2010 | Shane Reilly
    Schwerpunkt at Fismette, August 27, 1918 August 27, 2010 By Shane Reilly, Army Heritage Education Center The forest for the trees: Soldiers of the 28th Division are shown in hiding among trees during service in France in World War I(WWI Signal Corps Collection). Related Links A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: 28th Infantry Division A Working Bibliography of MHI Sources: World War I- AEF Overview In the early morning hours of August 27, 1918, 230 Pennsylvanians of the 28th Division trudged across the Vesle River into their defensive positions in the rubble- strewn village of Fismette, France. Less than an...
  • Extraordinary chivalry of British PoW who returned to German prison after visiting dying mother

    09/03/2013 7:14:35 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 18 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4th September 2013 | Yahoo News
    'A British PoW captured by the Germans in World War I was freed to see his dying mother - but went back to the prison camp after giving the Kaiser 'his word' he would return. Capt Robert Campbell, aged 29, was gravely injured and captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp, the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II, begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time....
  • Revealed: Extraordinary story of British WWI captain released by Kaiser from German prison camp

    09/03/2013 3:56:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 3, 2013
    A British soldier was freed from a German POW camp during World War One to see his dying mother - and kept his promise to the Kaiser by returning, historians have discovered. Captain Robert Campbell, aged 29, was captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time. Incredibly the German leader granted the...
  • The Lion Hunter of Zion (an Irish man)

    07/12/2013 5:01:30 AM PDT · by dennisw · 19 replies
    In his youth, King David proved his heroism by slaying a lion. He went on to put his life on the line for the Jewish People and become a hero for all Israel. Three thousand years later, another lion-hearted lion-slayer also put his life on the line for the Jewish People and became a hero for all Israel. He wasn’t even Jewish, but he was one of the greatest friends and supporters that the Jewish People ever had - and his experiences with lions assisted in numerous ways.Colonel John Patterson was an Irish soldier and engineer assigned to Kenya by...
  • Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D'...

    07/07/2013 8:54:06 AM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 25 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | July 06 2013 | By JAMES DANIEL
    Horror of the First World War revealed in amazing collection of '3D' stereoscopic images found in an attic after decades A Toronto photography studio has stumbled across a stereoscopic camera, and its photographic slides, that captured scenes of World War I in 3D. The photographs were taken in the trenches, streets, and battlefields of World War I. The striking images, acquired using a handheld stereoscopic camera called the Verascope and were captured by soldiers in the French army. When the camera was acquired it was still in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. Each...
  • Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI

    07/07/2013 5:48:13 AM PDT · by NYer · 42 replies
    io9 ^ | July 5, 2013
    SWhile visiting an estate in Ontario's Niagara Falls two years ago, a film enthusiast stumbled upon a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. Here's what he found inside. The verascope camera, which was purchased by A Nerd's World's Chris Hughes, was found in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. The antique had been in the possession of an elderly man who was clearing out his camera collection in preparation for retirement. S"Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers...
  • World War I era ammunition frozen in a glacier for nearly a century has been found in N. Italy

    09/02/2012 7:17:19 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 28 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 2, 2012 | Alex Gore
    First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts WWI ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry. The once-perennial glacier began partially melted during a recent heat wave, allowing the Finance Police Alpine rescue...
  • On this Day a Tennessee Boy Killed 25 and Captured 132 Enemy

    10/08/2001 12:06:01 PM PDT · by the irate magistrate · 94 replies · 882+ views
    History Channel web page ^ | 10/08/2001 | staff
    ALVIN YORK KILLS 25 AND CAPTURES 132: During World War I, U.S. Corporal Alvin C. York is credited with single-handedly killing 25 German soldiers and capturing 132 in the Argonne Forest of France. The action saved York's small detachment from annihilation by a German machine-gun nest and won the reluctant warrior from backwater Tennessee the Congressional Medal of Honor. Born in a log cabin in rural Tennessee in 1887, Alvin Cullum York supplemented his family's subsistence farming by hunting and, like his father, was soon an expert marksman. He also earned a reputation as a hell-raiser, and few imagined he ...
  • Last veteran of World War One dies at 109 (Scotland)

    11/23/2005 12:24:08 PM PST · by SittinYonder · 53 replies · 2,168+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Tue 22 Nov 2005 | FRANK URQUHART
    SCOTLAND'S last surviving veteran of the First World War, and the country's oldest man, died peacefully at a nursing home yesterday aged 109 - severing the last tangible link between the nation and the 690,235 Scots who served in the Great War. Alfred Anderson was the last of the "Old Contemptibles" - the British expeditionary force which went to war in 1914 - and the last surviving witness of the historic Christmas truce when opposing troops declared a brief and unofficial ceasefire to play football and share drinks and cigarettes in the hell of no man's land. Mr Anderson served...
  • Amazingly Good Audio of Woodrow Wilson Speaking During 1912 Presidential Campaign

    09/04/2011 2:48:29 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 30 replies
    Self | September 4, 2011 | PJ-Comix
    Okay, I know that Glenn Beck really hates Woodrow Wilson but let us leave aside the politics to discuss this absolutely amazing AUDIO of Wilson speaking during the 1912 Presidential campaign. Three things really strike me about this audio: 1. Clarity. I can't believe how CLEAR this audio sounds keeping in mind when it was recorded which was 1912. 2. Wilson's speaking voice. I never realized that Wilson's voice was so clear. If he lived today, he could easily be a radio announcer. His voice is that good. 3. Wilson's accent. Although Woodrow Wilson spent his boyhood in the South...
  • WWI underground: Unearthing the hidden tunnel war (...killed an estimated 10,000 Germans.)

    06/10/2011 10:09:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | June 10, 2011 | Peter Jackson
    Archaeologists are beginning the most detailed ever study of a Western Front battlefield, an untouched site where 28 British tunnellers lie entombed after dying during brutal underground warfare. For WWI historians, it's the "holy grail".When military historian Jeremy Banning stepped on to a patch of rough scrubland in northern France four months ago, the hairs on the back of his neck stood up. The privately-owned land in the sleepy rural village of La Boisselle had been practically untouched since fighting ceased in 1918, remaining one of the most poignant sites of the Battle of the Somme. In his hand was...
  • Last World War I combat vet dies in Australia

    05/04/2011 8:20:10 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 4, 2011 | KRISTEN GELINEAU
    SYDNEY — Claude Stanley Choules, the last known combat veteran of World War I, died Thursday at a nursing home in the Western Australia city of Perth, his family said. He was 110. "We all loved him," his 84-year-old daughter Daphne Edinger told The Associated Press. "It's going to be sad to think of him not being here any longer, but that's the way things go."
  • Being T.E. Lawrence (Review of Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia by Michael Korda)

    04/11/2011 3:10:27 PM PDT · by mojito · 9 replies
    Hoover Institution's Policy Review ^ | 4/1/2011 | Joseph Bottum
    He was the best of England and the worst. A wastrel, in many ways, and a triumph, in others. A hero and a clown. A scholar and a soldier. A sophisticate and a naïf. A child and a grown-up. He was an adolescent, all in all: perhaps the greatest lifelong teenager the modern world has ever known, with every bit of the soaring self-confidence and crushing self-doubt the awkward years can bring. His name was Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence. Or T.E. Lawrence, as he signed his books, or John Hume Ross and T.E. Shaw, the military pseudonyms under which...
  • Last living U.S. World War I veteran dies

    02/27/2011 8:37:32 PM PST · by Mmogamer · 25 replies
    CNN ^ | 2/27/2011 | Paul Courson
    Washington (CNN) -- Frank Buckles, the last living U.S. World War I veteran, has died, a spokesman for his family said Sunday. He was 110.
  • Breakthrough as DNA identifies WW1 soldier

    09/15/2007 8:33:55 PM PDT · by DancesWithCats · 28 replies · 757+ views
    London Daily Telegraph ^ | Sept 16, 2007 | DancesWithCats
    By Jasper Copping Last Updated: 1:29am BST 16/09/2007 He was a young man, like so many others, who fell on the battlefield at Passchendaele. Aged just 29, Private Jack Hunter died in the arms of his younger brother, Jim, who buried him there, on the front line, in a shallow grave. Jack Hunter, who died at Passchendaele, with his brother Jim Jack Hunter, who died in the first world war, with his brother Jim Once the guns had fallen silent, Jim returned to look for his brother's body, but the ground had been chewed up by artillery and he could...
  • A Reminder of Who We Are

    01/02/2010 9:58:09 AM PST · by NJ_Tom · 3 replies · 404+ views
    Testament of Youth (a Memoir) | 1933 | Vera Brittain
    I have been reading Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain, a memoir of her service as a nurse in World War I, and would like to share an excerpt that I found particularly moving. This young lady, still in her early 20s by the end of the war, writes very eloquently of the horrors that she witnessed and personally experienced. I think it's fair to say that she did not have a "good war," since the war took from her, her fiancé, many close friends and her only brother. One of the most moving passages comes when she describes events...
  • Cross Village native among 'The Polar Bears' who fought for eight months in Russia inWWI

    05/21/2009 1:29:10 PM PDT · by Tailgunner Joe · 11 replies · 1,137+ views
    harborlightnews.com ^ | May 20, 2009 | Daniele Kapral
    In September 1918, though told they were headed to France, the soldiers in company M 339th Infantry were shipped from Camp Custer in Battle Creek, Michigan, to the bitter cold Archangel, Russia. The R.E.F (Russian Expeditionary Force), later referred to as “The Polar Bears,” went to battle in a desolate, frozen land. They were left to fight eight months after World War I had ended, and became one of the most highly decorated regiments in all the war. These men will be remembered in a documentary film, “Voices of a Never Ending Dawn,” which premieres this Memorial weekend in southern...
  • THOMAS MITCHELL: On bravery and heroism, then and now

    12/07/2008 5:37:57 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies · 494+ views
    Las Vegas Review-Journal ^ | Dec. 07, 2008 | Thomas Mitchell
    One of the purposes of education is to convey a society's mores, customs, morality, body of knowledge and traditions from one generation to the next. Public education alone is not going to get the job done. It takes knowledge of current events and their underlying causalities so we can understand how to repeat what is good and avoid what is unpleasant -- or even pure evil. That takes sophisticated communication, such as that provided by newspapers -- in print and online. Have the country's standards slipped? I began thinking about this after reading a column by Thomas Sowell, who appears...
  • When "Ordinary" Just Isn't Appropriate (Our only surviving WWI Veteran & his story)

    05/25/2008 10:55:31 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies · 52+ views
    Townhall ^ | May 25, 2008 | George Will
    CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Numbers come precisely from the agile mind and nimble tongue of Frank Buckles, who seems bemused to say that 4,734,991 Americans served in the military during America's involvement in the First World War and 4,734,990 are gone. He is feeling fine, thank you for asking. The eyes of the last doughboy are still sharp enough for him to be a keen reader, and his voice is still deep and strong at age 107. He must have been a fine broth of a boy when, at 16, persistence paid off and he found, in Oklahoma City, an...
  • Inside the amazing cave city that housed 25,000 Allied troops under German noses in WWI

    03/15/2008 9:11:29 AM PDT · by Stoat · 39 replies · 3,668+ views
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | March 15, 2008 | ROBERT HARDMAN
    Inside the amazing cave city that housed 25,000 Allied troops under German noses in WWIBy ROBERT HARDMAN - More by this author » Last updated at 11:53am on 15th March 2008  The wax is still melted on to the chalk pillar which served as an Easter Sunday altar for the men of the Suffolk Regiment more than 90 years ago.   Old helmets are scattered around the floor. A heap of cans, including a tin of Turnwrights Toffee Delight, lies alongside a collection of old stone jars - flagons of rum, perhaps, to numb the fear of the battle ahead....
  • Passchendaele lost & found

    09/26/2007 4:12:42 AM PDT · by Clive · 8 replies · 187+ views
    National Post ^ | 2007-09-26 | Kevin Libin
    CALGARY -It's a sure bet that not many Canadians under 50 could tell you much about the Battle of Passchendaele. For a few of us, it might ring vaguely familiar -- a place once spotted in some long-ago textbook or overheard on a television documentary, likely recalled more for its odd sounding name than for its significance. It's a battle "lost to Canadian history" as Calgary-based historian Norman Leach puts it, obscured by the shadow of the fabled Vimy Ridge. But as defining accounts of Canadian military exceptionality go, it may be more compelling. Passchendaele has occupied Paul Gross's thoughts...
  • Opinion: Not much to be said for this war effort

    09/08/2007 4:25:52 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies · 608+ views
    Newsday ^ | September 6, 2007 | James P. Pinkerton
    Nearly six years after 9/11, what's striking is how little has changed in America - and in its war effort. And yet if we can't change ourselves, what are the chances that we can change others? When President George W. Bush declares that the Global War on Terror is "the concentrated work of generations," one has to wonder if he really means it. Certainly there's been little concentration on effective war mobilization, and other countries have noticed. As we look back to study wars that the United States has won - and why - the most obvious metric is the...
  • First World War Tunnels To Yield Their Secrets

    08/26/2007 1:21:27 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 1,825+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2007 | Jasper Copping
    First World War tunnels to yield their secrets By Jasper Copping, Sunday Telegraph Last Updated: 1:42am BST 26/08/2007 As battle raged across the fields of Flanders, British soldiers found brief respite from the horrors of the First World War in "underground towns" far below the mud and gore. Now, more than 90 years after the armies left and the extraordinary networks of tunnels were flooded, the task of finally revealing their secrets has begun. The Tunnels The prize, archaeologists and historians believe, is an unprecedented insight into the lives of British troops on the Western Front. They believe that, because...
  • Truth and the Armenian genocide

    08/23/2007 6:05:10 AM PDT · by theothercheek · 24 replies · 604+ views
    Jewish World Review ^ | August 23, 2007 | Jeff Jacoby
    Was there an Armenian genocide during World War I? While it was happening, no one called the slaughter of Armenian Christians by Ottoman Turks "genocide." No one could: The word wouldn't be coined for another 30 years. But those who made it their business to tell the world what the Turks were doing found other terms to describe the state-sponsored mass murder of the Armenians. ... Was there an Armenian genocide during World War I? The Turkish government today denies it, but the historical record, chronicled in works like Peter Balakian's powerful 2003 study, "The Burning Tigris," is overwhelming. Yet...
  • Last survivor re-lives the horrors of Passchendaele (World War I)

    07/29/2007 9:24:05 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 26 replies · 1,446+ views
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 7/28/07 | Nigel Blundell
    You have to strain to hear Harry Patch. At 109 years old, the last surviving Tommy from the horrors of the trenches in the First World War is growing increasingly frail. But his mind is every bit as sharp today as it was 90 years ago this week when, as a 19-year-old conscript, he was ordered over the top at the Third Battle of Ypres. The battle, better known simply as Passchendaele, has become a byword for senseless slaughter. Bitter memories: Harry Patch at Passchendaele today Read more... Hell on Earth: The never before seen colour photographs of the bloody...
  • A brave heart and true ('I will do my duty')

    04/20/2007 7:17:09 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 2 replies · 301+ views
    The Weekend Australian ^ | 21st April 2007 | Mark Day
    DONALD Clarkson came late to World War I. His first day on the front line was also his last. He was killed near Beaurevoir, northern France, on October 3, 1918, 39 days before the November 11 Armistice brought to an end four years of slaughter in Europe. A farmer from the gentle hills of the Avon Valley east of Perth, Clarkson battled through the drought of 1914-15 torn between his duty to his country and his love for his family. Clarkson, a sensitive, articulate man given to expressing himself in poetry, had married Helen Price, his childhood sweetheart, and had...
  • Last Known World War I Navy Veteran Dies in Maryland at Age 105

    04/02/2007 1:21:48 AM PDT · by COEXERJ145 · 9 replies · 992+ views
    Associated Press via North County Times ^ | April 1, 2007 | Associated Press
    CHARLOTTE HALL, Md. (AP) -- Lloyd Brown, the last known surviving World War I Navy veteran, has died. He was 105. Brown died Thursday at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in St. Mary's County, according to family and the U.S. Naval District in Washington. His death comes days after the death of the last known surviving American female World War I veteran, Charlotte L. Winters, 109. The deaths leave three known survivors who served in the Army, and a fourth who lives in Washington state but served in the Canadian army, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Brown was...
  • The valley of death

    03/09/2007 2:20:31 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 2 replies · 430+ views
    The Weekend Australian ^ | 10th March 2007 | Mark Day
    AS shells exploded around him and flares pierced the night sky, Lieutenant Cliff Sadlier and his platoon found themselves pinned down by the murderous machinegun fire of tracer bullets coming from a wooded area to the left. Sadlier's path to his objective was blocked. The words of his commanding officer rang in his ears: "Nothing will stop you getting to your goal. Kill every bloody German you see. We don't want any prisoners, and God bless you." Sadlier's second-in-command, Sergeant Charlie Stokes, crept up to Sadlier on his stomach. "What are we going to do?" he asked. "Carry out the...
  • BG Hiram Iddings Bearss, USMC, CMOH,

    06/12/2006 2:17:29 PM PDT · by robowombat · 1 replies · 952+ views
    Hiram Iddings Bearss--born on 13 April 1875 at Peru, Ind.--attended local public schools before attending the University of Notre Dame and Purdue and DePauw Universities in Indiana. Between 1894 and 1896, Bearss was a student at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt. On 26 May 1898, he was temporarily commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps, by special act of Congress, for service in the Spanish-American War. Bearss served in the old side-wheel steamer Michigan, operating in the Great Lakes, until his honorable discharge on 21 February 1899. Four months later, on 26 May 1899, he was appointed a first...
  • THE CHRISTMAS TRUCE OF 1914

    12/24/2005 9:26:11 AM PST · by Valin · 14 replies · 766+ views
    "A complete Boche figure suddenly appeared on the parapet and looked about. This complaint became infectious. It didn't take 'Our Bert' long to be up on the skyline. This was a signal for more Boche anatomy to be disclosed, and this was replied to by all our Alfs and Bills, until, in less time than it takes to tell, half a dozen or so of each of the belligerents were outside the trenches, and were advancing towards each other in no-man's land. "A strange sight, truly!" So writes Bruce Bairnsfather about the Christmas Truce of 1914. This event was an...
  • The Great War Project (Canada, WWI "Re-enactments" with a twist)

    07/27/2005 6:07:37 PM PDT · by IncPen · 34 replies · 3,887+ views
    The Great War ^ | 7.27.05 | Brian McKenna
    The Great War Project For a remarkable television series to mark the 90th anniversary of Canada and the First World War, we are recruiting 300 young Canadian descendants of those Canadians who participated. These 300 descendants of soldiers, nurses, airmen, will be put in uniforms and trained in boot camps like their great grandparents. In vivid battle recreations, these descendants will then get a glimmering of the horror that their great grandparents endured. They will be plunged into vivid recreations of Vimy Ridge and other epic Canadian Great War battles. Forging documentary, drama and living history, together we will create...
  • World War One Color Photos

    03/03/2005 2:25:44 PM PST · by Jinjelsnaps · 182 replies · 13,082+ views
    Big D & Bubba Show ^ | 3/2/05 | Unknown
    Found this on another message board, and thought my fellow Freepers would enjoy the history. From the site: "The color photo was invented in 1903 by the Lumiere brothers, and the French army was the only one taking color photos during the course of the war." http://www.bigdandbubba.com/nicknacks/color_photo_was_invented_in.htm