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Keyword: worldwarone

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  • How Peter Jackson Made WWI Footage Seem Astonishingly New

    12/16/2018 1:03:21 PM PST · by AFreeBird · 54 replies
    The New York Times ^ | December 16, 2018 | https://www.nytimes.com/by/mekado-murphy
    As the director of elaborate fantasy epics like the “Lord of the Rings” and “Hobbit” trilogies, Peter Jackson has become known for meticulous attention to detail. Now he has put the same amount of care into making a documentary. With “They Shall Not Grow Old,” Jackson has applied new technology to century-old World War I footage to create a vivid, you-are-there feeling that puts real faces front and center and allows us to hear their stories in their own words. The documentary, which will screen nationwide Dec. 17 and Dec. 27, concentrates on the experiences of British soldiers as revealed...
  • New Study Identifies Louse-Borne Diseases That Ravaged Napoleon's Army

    12/15/2005 5:32:37 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 738+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 12-15-2005
    : Infectious Diseases Society of America Date: 2005-12-15 New Study Identifies Louse-borne Diseases That Ravaged Napoleon's Army Using dental pulp extracted from the teeth of soldiers who died during Napoleon’s disastrous retreat through Russia in 1812, a new study finds DNA evidence that epidemic typhus and trench fever ran rampant among the French Grand Army. The study, published in the Jan. 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online, identifies the specific species of louse-borne pathogens that were a major cause of death among the remains of the retreating army. Napoleon marched into Russia in the summer...
  • LIVE: 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War

    11/11/2018 2:07:00 AM PST · by PghBaldy · 45 replies
    Youtube - Global News ^ | 11 Nov 2018 | Staff
    Heads of states and governments attend ceremonies to mark the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice which brought the First World War to a close. Watch live Sunday, Nov. 11 at 4am ET.
  • Field Marshal Douglas Haig would have let Germany win, biography says

    11/10/2008 11:14:39 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 31 replies · 374+ views
    The Times ^ | 11/11/2008 | Ben Hoyle
    He is the most pilloried military leader in British history, caricatured as a butcher and a bungler who sent hundreds of thousands of men over the top to their deaths. Now a new biography pins a further damning indictment on Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. Late in the final year of the First World War, it argues, he was pushing for a peace that would have left Germany as the real winner of the war. According to Dr J. P. Harris, senior lecturer in War Studies at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, Haig was not quite the uncaring monster of...
  • Trump to make Paris visit in November to mark 100 years since end of WWI

    08/19/2018 1:12:26 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 17 replies
    The Local France ^ | 17 Aug 2018
    US President Donald Trump announced on Friday that he will be visiting Paris on November 11th in honour of the centenary of the end of WWI. Trump who had planned to organise a military parade in November in Washington announced Friday that he would travel to Paris for the commemoration of the end of the First World War. The US president made the announcement on Twitter (see below) on Friday afternoon at the same as criticizing local politicians in Washington who he said were asking for too much money for the parade. "Never let anyone take you hostage!" he wrote....
  • First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger

    08/07/2018 4:43:59 PM PDT · by robowombat · 96 replies
    ITV REPORT ^ | 7 August 2018 at 5:50pm | ITV News Europe Editor James Mates
    First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger with thousands of exploded shells 100 years on Nearly 100 years since the end of the First World War and there are still areas of France unsafe to be visited because of unexploded shells. Some 300,000 soldiers were killed in the Battle of Verdun between France and Germany from February to December 1916. During the onslaught, around six million shells - including many containing mustard gas - were fired by the opposing sides. One million of those failed to explode. Dozens of unexploded shells are unearthed every day. At the end...
  • Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War I

    07/03/2018 4:21:36 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 10 replies
    ​Exploring the impact of World War One on British, German and French art Marking the 100 years since the end of World War One, Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One looks at how artists responded to the physical and psychological scars left on Europe. Art was used in many ways in the tumultuous period after the end of the war, from documenting its destructive impact, to the building of public memorials and as a social critique. This fascinating and moving exhibition shows how artists reacted to memories of war in many ways. George Grosz and Otto Dix...
  • What happened at the Battle of Hamel? (first time US/Australian troops fought together 7/4/1918)

    07/03/2018 9:34:49 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 4 replies
    SBS (Australia) ^ | 3rd July 2018
    At precisely 3.10am, the guns thundered into life and the soldiers rose, lit up cigarettes and followed the booming artillery barrage into battle, their objective a French village named Le Hamel. As dawn loomed it was all over. The village had fallen, casualties were mercifully light (by World War One standards) and victory was complete. In his detailed planning, Australian commander Lieutenant General John Monash calculated this would take 90 minutes. It actually took 93. The Battle of Hamel, fought on July 4, 1918, was a sign of what was to come as allied forces achieved battlefield mastery after three...
  • The Scottish island that buried America's dead

    05/04/2018 5:14:19 AM PDT · by Winniesboy · 12 replies
    BBC ^ | May 1st 1018 | Glenn Campbell
    It is the whisky-making Scottish island, world famous for its peaty single malts and warm hospitality. But the isle of Islay, in the Inner Hebrides, is now being recognised for an almost forgotten example of huge courage and humanity. A hundred years ago, Islay was on the frontline in the battle at sea during World War One. The island coped with mass casualties from two major troopship disasters just eight months apart. ... Between them, the sinkings of the SS Tuscania in February and HMS Otranto in October, claimed the lives of about 700 men in the last year of...
  • Warships pay respect over Islay war dead site

    05/04/2018 1:47:57 AM PDT · by MadMitch · 13 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 May 2018 | bbc
    Warships from Britain, America, France and Germany have gathered over the wreck of a World War One troopship to pay respect to the 700 men who died in two disasters off Islay. More than 200 US soldiers died when the Tuscania was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Islay in February in 1918. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-43988158
  • Macron taps into U.S. Marines lore with tree sapling gift to Trump

    04/22/2018 9:30:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 44 replies
    Macron will offer an oak sapling taken from the scene of a key World War One battle, where the Marine Corps repelled a German offensive in the final year of the conflict almost exactly a century ago, the French presidency said on Sunday. The sapling grew close to the so-called “Devil Dog” fountain, a spot that has become legendary within Marines ranks. It is where U.S. soldiers are said to have gathered after the battle, which took place in June 1918 in Belleau Wood, about 100 km (60 miles) northeast of Paris in the Champagne region. It won’t be Macron’s...
  • The Zimmerman Telegram Leads United States into WW I

    04/06/2017 9:54:07 AM PDT · by Retain Mike · 16 replies
    self | April 6 2017 | Self
    The Zimmerman Telegram finally prompted the decision Great Britain had been wishing for since the sinking of the Lusitania in May 1915. The text asked the Mexican government to enter the war on the side of Germany, if the U.S. declared war when Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare in February 1917. The German ambassador offered for them to make war and peace together, offered generous financial support, and to sustain an understanding Mexico was to reconquer the lost territory in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. The British were monitoring messages neutrals such as the U.S. and Sweden were improperly forwarding...
  • How J.R.R. Tolkien Found Mordor on the Western Front

    07/01/2016 5:10:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 30, 2016 | Joseph Laconte
    IN the summer of 1916, a young Oxford academic embarked for France as a second lieutenant in the British Expeditionary Force. The Great War, as World War I was known, was only half-done, but already its industrial carnage had no parallel in European history. “Junior officers were being killed off, a dozen a minute,” recalled J. R. R. Tolkien. “Parting from my wife,” he wrote, doubting that he would survive the trenches, “was like a death.”
  • Battle of the Somme: Royals at Somme centenary commemoration

    07/01/2016 7:45:08 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 11 replies
    bbc ^ | 1 july 2016
    More than a million men were killed or wounded on all sides at the Somme. The Battle of the Somme, one of WW1's bloodiest, was fought in northern France and lasted five months, with the British suffering almost 60,000 casualties on the first day alone... This was followed by the hymn Abide With Me... "It was in many ways the saddest day in the long story of our nation."
  • British accuse Australia of banning them from WWI Battle of Fromelles centenary commemoration

    02/05/2016 2:40:36 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 24 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 5th February 2016 | Sophie Aubrey
    THE relatives of slain British soldiers have accused the Department of Veterans' Affairs of banning them from attending centenary commemorations for a catastrophic WWI battle that killed thousands of Australian soldiers. The Battle of Fromelles is among Australia's bloodiest military encounters and the brutal loss has long been blamed on a disastrous incompetence of British military strategy. A special service to mark the battle's 100th anniversary is to take place on July 19 this year at the Pheasant Wood military cemetery in Fromelles, northern France. The slaughter is viewed by historians as the darkest 24 hours in the Australia's history...
  • Battle Without End: The casualties of Verdun

    03/04/2016 8:33:58 AM PST · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Weekly Standard ^ | March 14, 2016 | Geoffrey Norman
    There is something hard, cold, and brutal about the structure. It looks like a concrete airplane hangar and rising above it is what is called the “Lantern of the Dead." The shape suggests, appropriately, an artillery shell. When you walk around the outside of the building you find small windows, and when you look through them what you see are bones. Human bones and skulls. Piles of them. They are the remains of more than 130,000 men who were killed here and whose bodies could not be recovered or identified and so remained in the mud, blown apart again and...
  • Looking for a good book recommendation on WWI

    04/15/2014 4:18:24 PM PDT · by KosmicKitty · 104 replies
    4-15-2014 | Kosmickitty
    After listening to one of my favorite podcaster, Dan Carlin & his Hardcore History, about the beginning of World War I, I would love to find out more about this time in history. I know that Freepers are a well read bunch and I am asking for any recommendations you may care to make in a good book covering this time in history.
  • 100 Years Ago Today: Battle of Verdun starts

    02/21/2016 7:38:14 PM PST · by abishai · 41 replies
    Centenary News ^ | February 21, 2016
    A massive artillery bombardment on the morning of February 21st 1916 signalled the start of the German attack on Verdun, the longest single battle of the First World War. More than 1,200 guns opened fire before German troops began their assault on fortifications of major symbolic inportance to France. Even by the standards of the Great War, the Battle of Verdun was a particularly brutal campaign of attrition, fuelled by the determination of both sides not to give way as the struggle wore on. The battle was to last 300 days, almost until Christmas, on a narrow front stretching no...
  • Hitler had son with French teen

    02/17/2012 12:13:28 PM PST · by bkopto · 74 replies · 1+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | Feb 17, 2012 | Peter Allen
    Jean-Marie Loret, who died in 1985 aged 67, never met his father, but went on to fight Nazi forces during the Second World War. His extraordinary story has now been backed up by a range of compelling evidence, both in France and in Germany, which is published in the latest edition of Paris's Le Point magazine. Hitler is said to have had an affair with Mr Loret's mother, Charlotte Lobjoie, 16, as he took a break from the trenches in June 1917. Although he was fighting the French near Seboncourt, in the northern Picardy region, Hitler made his way to...
  • Did Hitler Have a Secret Son? Evidence Supports Alleged Son’s Claims

    02/21/2012 8:32:58 PM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies · 1+ views
    ABC News ^ | February 21, 2012 | Candace Smith
    Until his death in 1985, Jean-Marie Loret believed that he was the only son of Adolf Hitler. There is now renewed attention to evidence from France and Germany that apparently lends some credence to his claim. Loret collected information from two studies; one conducted by the University of Heidelberg in 1981 and another conducted by a handwriting analyst that showed Loret’s blood type and handwriting, respectively, were similar to the Nazi Germany dictator who died childless in 1945 at age 56. The evidence is inconclusive but Loret’s story itself was riveting enough to warrant some investigation. The French newspaper Le...