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Seafood Was The Spur For Man's First Migration
The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-13-2005 | Roger Highfield

Posted on 05/12/2005 5:26:39 PM PDT by blam

Seafood was the spur for Man's first migration

By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
(Filed: 13/05/2005)

The lure of a seafood diet may explain why the first people left Africa, according to a genetic analysis published today that overturns the conventional picture of the very first migration of modern humans.

The international project shows - contrary to previous thinking - that early modern humans spread across the Red Sea from the Horn of Africa, along the tropical coast of the Indian Ocean towards the Pacific in just a few thousand years.

And it suggests that the first migratory wave probably included fewer than 600 women, the mothers of all non-Africans alive today - including modern Europeans, whose ancestors splintered off from the group of pioneers around the Persian Gulf.

The new insight into the first human migration has emerged from DNA evidence described today in the journal Science by the Leeds biologist Martin Richards, the Glasgow statistician Vincent Macaulay and colleagues.

Early modern humans in East Africa initially survived on an inland diet based on big game but by 70,000 years ago, archaeological finds suggest their diet had changed to a coastal one consisting largely of shellfish.

However, climate change seems likely to have reduced the Red Sea's shellfish stocks, driving them to seek better fishing grounds.

Much of what we know about human migrations comes from studying mitochondrial DNA, that found in the "power packs" of cells, which is inherited maternally, from modern populations.

The amount of variation in mitochondrial DNA sequences among different groups reflects the amount of time since the groups diverged from each other.

The team studied DNA from aboriginal populations of South East Asia, notably the Orang Asli ("original people") of the Malay Peninsula, the direct descendants of the first modern people to settle in South East Asia.

Comparing their DNA with that of other people around the world allowed the team to piece together what happened in those formative years - helping to rewrite the human story.

Dr Macaulay said such studies of genetic diversity will help to reveal the genetic mutations behind many common diseases.

The work is backed by a second study, also in Science, by an Indian team that studied indigenous populations on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, which lie between India and Myanmar.

The team from the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology in Hyderabad identified two relatively old populations of Andaman islanders that probably survived in genetic isolation there since the out-of-Africa migration.

• A French genetics study comparing strains of leprosy-causing bacteria indicate that the disease may have begun in East Africa, not India as previously thought, and then spread to the other continents through European colonialism and the slave trade.

The ability to trace an infection back to a certain region may help health workers to monitor the movement of the disease over time and determine the geographic source of new infections.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: archaeology; dna; first; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; mans; migration; mtdna; multiregionalism; seafood; spur
This is not a new idea. This is called the 'Coastal Route.' I'll post and excellent map that shows this as soon as I can find it.
1 posted on 05/12/2005 5:26:41 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

"The international project shows - contrary to previous thinking - that early modern humans spread across the Red Sea from the Horn of Africa, along the tropical coast of the Indian Ocean towards the Pacific in just a few thousand years."

Wow - traffic must have been REALLY bad back then!


2 posted on 05/12/2005 5:28:27 PM PDT by mlc9852 (Here we go AGAIN!)
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To: blam
However, climate change seems likely to have reduced the Red Sea's shellfish stocks, driving them to seek better fishing grounds.

Caused by the introduction of the first SUV, no doubt.


3 posted on 05/12/2005 5:33:27 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: blam
The idea of coastal travel routes is also becoming the best explanation for human colonization of the New World ~14,000 years ago. It gives the Paleoindians a way around the ice sheets and a way to very quickly reach the tip of South America. It also conveniently explains traces of non-Indian peoples existing in the New World prior to that time. (If one group could skim the coasts or the edge of the pack ice, why couldn't others do it as well?)
4 posted on 05/12/2005 5:35:10 PM PDT by Redcloak (Over 16,000 served.)
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To: Redcloak; SunkenCiv
GGG Ping.

Here is the map, click on Journey Of Mankind to begin the journey.

5 posted on 05/12/2005 5:40:27 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Interestingly Europeans had come to America and established "fishing colonies" almost 100 years before the Pilgrims. Most were off the coast of maine, and they fished the same waters we do today, the Grand Banks.


6 posted on 05/12/2005 5:44:21 PM PDT by ProudVet77 (Warning: Frequent sarcastic posts)
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To: ProudVet77

Was that because they could no longer order brontosaurus burgers?


7 posted on 05/12/2005 5:46:57 PM PDT by elcid1970
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To: blam
A French genetics study comparing strains of leprosy-causing bacteria indicate that the disease may have begun in East Africa, not India as previously thought, and then spread to the other continents through European colonialism and the slave trade.
Slavery was rampant throughout the entire middle east 3,000 years ago. How did European colonialism spread it to there from East Africa?

8 posted on 05/12/2005 5:48:29 PM PDT by DallasMike
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To: blam

Even then people preferred to live on the coast.

We must end immigration because America is out of room.

America has only so much good coastal real estate, and there is not enough to go around as it is.


9 posted on 05/12/2005 5:57:06 PM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: DallasMike
" How did European colonialism spread it to there from East Africa? "

Fast, intercontinental transportation?

10 posted on 05/12/2005 5:57:27 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Blam, that was fascinating! Thanks for posting the link!


11 posted on 05/12/2005 5:57:34 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: blam
I read years ago about the "aquatic ape theory". Basically human physiology dictates that at some point in our evolution we lived in the sea for an extended period. Some "aquatic hominid's" eventually left the sea and became homo sapien, others who stayed in the seas became the live bearing sea mammals. This subject is like global warming, maybe a hoax, but nevertheless, unprovable.

Whether or not one accepts evolution or creationism, it is interesting.
12 posted on 05/12/2005 5:59:28 PM PDT by mmercier (live and learn)
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To: blam
The lure of a seafood diet may explain why the first people left Africa

People left Africa because it was overpopulated.

They either had to fight others for place or flee.

Some chose to flee--or fought and lost, and then fled.

13 posted on 05/12/2005 5:59:33 PM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: blam

Hell, I've been known to travel great distances in search of seafood.


14 posted on 05/12/2005 6:04:30 PM PDT by Junior (“Even if you are one-in-a-million, there are still 6,000 others just like you.”)
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To: Dog Gone
"Blam, that was fascinating! Thanks for posting the link!"

Thanks.

That was done by and from the studies of Professor Stephen Oppenheimer. I've read two of his excellent books, Eden In The East and Out Of Eden. I highly recommend both.

Did you notice that he put the first entry to the US at 25-26,000 years ago?

15 posted on 05/12/2005 6:04:52 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Mmmmm. Seafood causes me to migrate to it's source every time my wallet permits it. *CHOMP* :-)


16 posted on 05/12/2005 6:05:40 PM PDT by Viking2002 (Help Nature to thin the herd. Eat a liberal.)
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To: blam

17 posted on 05/12/2005 6:08:36 PM PDT by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: Age of Reason

Eh, the population of Africa was hardly enormous when people started leaving; but the climate was really marginal and when it took a downturn it was tough going and motivated people to move on.


18 posted on 05/12/2005 6:08:37 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: blam
Did you notice that he put the first entry to the US at 25-26,000 years ago?

Yes, far before the conventional timetable of even 6 or 7 years ago.

19 posted on 05/12/2005 6:10:29 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: blam
I'd walk a mile for a lobster with sidedishes of sea-bass and shrimp!

FMCDH(BITS)

20 posted on 05/12/2005 6:17:15 PM PDT by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
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To: wagglebee

Oh man...I want that! Those are scallops surrounded by lobtails, shrimp and Alaskan King Crab legs....right???...I want that!>P?FMCDH(BITS)


21 posted on 05/12/2005 6:24:01 PM PDT by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
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To: nothingnew
see how confused I am when I see a platter like that?

FMCDH(BITS)

22 posted on 05/12/2005 6:25:56 PM PDT by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
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To: blam

The liberals are direct descendants of what migratory wave?


23 posted on 05/12/2005 6:28:53 PM PDT by citizencon
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To: blam

Doesn't the popular theory of evolution hold that we evolved in water from single cell organisms, then (eventually) into fish and then onto land? Why leave the water if all we really needed was a fine piece o' bass?


24 posted on 05/12/2005 6:32:00 PM PDT by Sgt_Schultze
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To: ProudVet77

Interestingly Europeans had come to America and established "fishing colonies...

A brave man it was who first an oyster et


25 posted on 05/12/2005 6:33:29 PM PDT by bert (Rename Times Square......... Rudy Square.)
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To: blam

thanks for posting that.


26 posted on 05/12/2005 6:42:52 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
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To: mmercier

I saw a program advancing the aquatic ape theory. One of the more interesting facts cited was that body hair on humans lies in a hydrodynamic direction, while on apes, it sticks straight out of the skin. Also, they noted that there wasn't really a natural change in the hip that would allow the full upright posture. As you say, interesting, but unprovable.


27 posted on 05/12/2005 6:57:58 PM PDT by TN4Liberty (American... conservative... southern.... It doesn't get any better than this.)
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To: blam
However, climate change seems likely to have reduced the Red Sea's shellfish stocks, driving them to seek better fishing grounds.

I have a more plausible theory: youthful searching and the desire some people have to explore.  We all know people like that.  Hell, my brother and dad are like that.

 

28 posted on 05/12/2005 7:00:12 PM PDT by Psycho_Bunny (“I know a great deal about the Middle East because I’ve been raising Arabian horses" Patrick Swazey)
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To: TN4Liberty
"I saw a program advancing the aquatic ape theory. One of the more interesting facts cited was that body hair on humans lies in a hydrodynamic direction, while on apes, it sticks straight out of the skin. Also, they noted that there wasn't really a natural change in the hip that would allow the full upright posture. As you say, interesting, but unprovable."

I've read these sorts of things from time to time. I've read that this is also an explanation for the extra fat on females...they spent more time in the water (protection) than men and needed the fat for warmth. Also, the female long hair tradition gave the kids something to hang on to while they were in the water with mother. (???)

29 posted on 05/12/2005 7:22:06 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Mankind migrated from one Red Lobster to the next.
30 posted on 05/12/2005 8:15:25 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Mesocons for Rice '08)
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To: blam

The bravest guy who ever lived was the first guy to eat an oyster.


31 posted on 05/12/2005 8:18:39 PM PDT by righttackle44 (The most dangerous weapon in the world is a Marine with his rifle and the American people behind him)
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To: blam

I wonder how far they would have walked for cheesecake?


32 posted on 05/12/2005 8:22:35 PM PDT by Nachoman
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To: blam

Sounds kinda fishy.


33 posted on 05/12/2005 8:34:07 PM PDT by 4mycountry ("No, Samus, prioritize! Getting off of an exploding ship is more important than fighting a dragon!")
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To: blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; StayAt HomeMother; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; ...
Thanks Blam. Shell seems like a Sound idea.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

34 posted on 05/12/2005 10:39:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FR profiled updated Tuesday, May 10, 2005. Fewer graphics, faster loading.)
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To: blam

That map is sooo cool Blam, I'd lost my link to it. Our history imbedded in our DNA is so amazing. I suspect a lot of people don't know about this yet.


35 posted on 05/13/2005 4:51:27 AM PDT by FastCoyote
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To: Mike Darancette

There could be something to this theory. A Long John Silver was recently unearthed in rural Wyoming....


36 posted on 05/13/2005 4:55:14 AM PDT by Right Angler
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To: blam

The fascinating thing about the "Journey of Mankind" animation is the interaction between population and climate. I think we're a lot better off with a warmer climate.


37 posted on 05/14/2005 3:31:17 AM PDT by CobaltBlue (Extremism in the defence of liberty is no vice. Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.)
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