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Planets in all the wrong places
The Christian Science Monitor ^ | 03/06/06 | Michelle Thaller

Posted on 03/06/2006 5:16:39 PM PST by KevinDavis

At my age, I really should have expected this to happen. All of a sudden I'm seeing lots of little clues that the 1980s are making something of a nostalgic comeback. High school kids I speak to as part of my job have started wearing thin ties and studded belts, and I thoroughly approve of their newly spiked and teased hairstyles. The other day I saw a pair of plastic sandals (remember Jellies?) in a store window and heard Bon Jovi playing on a "classic rock" station. That's right; I'm a golden oldie.

Take, for instance, the fact that when I was in graduate school, a mere 10 years ago, we had no knowledge of planets outside our own solar system. Since we had only one example of a planetary system (our own), we studied its patterns and characteristics and tried to explain them with our best theories of planet formation. It made sense that all the planets close to the sun were small and rocky. After all, the sun puts off so much heat and solar wind pressure that it must have blown all the light material around it farther out into the solar system. That's where you find the giant planets, after all, like Jupiter and Saturn. More volatile substances, like hydrogen, water, or methane, needed the cooler, calmer conditions in the outer solar system to condense. More condensing material meant bigger planets, and - hey! That must be why our outer planets are much bigger than the Earth. It all made sense.

(Excerpt) Read more at csmonitor.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: astronomy; catastrophism; planets; rogueplanet; rogueplanets; space; worldsincollision; xplanets

1 posted on 03/06/2006 5:16:41 PM PST by KevinDavis
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To: RightWhale; Brett66; xrp; gdc314; anymouse; NonZeroSum; jimkress; discostu; The_Victor; ...

2 posted on 03/06/2006 5:17:00 PM PST by KevinDavis (http://www.cafepress.com/spacefuture)
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To: KevinDavis

At the rate our imaging technology is advancing I'm hoping to see some good photos of the extrasolar planets before my eysight fails.


3 posted on 03/06/2006 5:24:20 PM PST by cripplecreek (Never a minigun handy when you need one.)
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To: KevinDavis

"All of a sudden I'm seeing lots of little clues that the 1980s are making something of a nostalgic comeback."

Man, I hope not. The 80's sucked. I had two 70's and jumped right to the 90's. :-)


4 posted on 03/06/2006 5:29:24 PM PST by gate2wire
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To: KevinDavis

Okay, so where's Uranus supposed to be?


5 posted on 03/06/2006 5:30:38 PM PST by Fintan (Did you really think I could post such insightful replies if I actually read the article???)
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To: cripplecreek

The NASA project to look for earthlike planets was cancelled a couple of weeks ago. That was the one that was supposed to image these objects.


6 posted on 03/06/2006 5:32:15 PM PST by RightWhale (pas de lieu, Rhone que nous)
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To: KevinDavis
Far away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that orbits our Milky Way...

Cool! I've never heard that before. In fact I had always heard the Milky Way was isolated from other galaxies, thus lowering the risk of collision and keeping our insurance rates way down.

This information is really rather... creepy.

7 posted on 03/06/2006 6:09:54 PM PST by impatient (shoo, shoo, git, go on, dang galaxy)
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To: Physicist; RadioAstronomer; Dawsonville_Doc

the full article isn't bad at all. shallow, but well presented.


8 posted on 03/06/2006 8:28:40 PM PST by King Prout (many accuse me of being overly literal... this would not be a problem if many were not under-precise)
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To: Fintan

Hopefully you can find it with both hands.........


9 posted on 03/06/2006 8:31:05 PM PST by Brett66 (Where government advances and it advances relentlessly freedom is imperiled -Janice Rogers Brown)
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To: Brett66

j/k


10 posted on 03/06/2006 8:36:19 PM PST by Brett66 (Where government advances and it advances relentlessly freedom is imperiled -Janice Rogers Brown)
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To: gate2wire
I had two 70's and jumped right to the 90's.

Are you sure it wasn't just a case of double vision? The 70's were good like that...

11 posted on 03/06/2006 9:59:40 PM PST by wyattearp (The best weapon to have in a gunfight is a shotgun - preferably from ambush.)
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related, a Blast from the Past:

Astronomy Picture of the Day 09-01-04
NASA | 09-01-04 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
Posted on 09/01/2004 12:34:45 PM EDT by petuniasevan
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1204850/posts


12 posted on 03/06/2006 10:26:51 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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Moving the Orbits of Planets
David Jewitt | Last updated Sep 2004 | David Jewitt
Posted on 02/02/2006 12:44:25 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1570230/posts


13 posted on 03/06/2006 10:32:29 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Yes indeed, Civ updated his profile and links pages again, on Monday, March 6, 2006.)
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To: KevinDavis; King Prout; PatrickHenry; Physicist; RadioAstronomer; Dawsonville_Doc
A planet many times as massive as Jupiter was racing around its parent star in an incredibly close orbit, even closer than our planet Mercury's orbit of the sun. The intense energy from the star would have heated the atmosphere of the planet to well over 1,000 degrees, easily hot enough to cause gases to boil off the planet into space. What was a giant planet doing so close to a star, and how could it possibly manage to survive there?

I wonder if both scenarios might be right -- what if the inner planets start out as giant balls of gas just like the outer planets, but during the early stages of the newly formed solar system the Sun causes the gas to boil off of the closer planets over a hundred million years or so, eventually leaving just the denser, rocky residue that had originally been a small percentage of the young gas giant, but now remains as what we would recognize as an Earthlike (or Marslike/Venuslike) planet?

14 posted on 03/06/2006 10:45:46 PM PST by Ichneumon
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To: Fintan

At the bottom of Urspine??


15 posted on 03/06/2006 10:51:05 PM PST by rock58seg (As funny as Democrats pretending to know about Natl Security and quail hunting.)
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To: Fintan

At the bottom of Urspine??


16 posted on 03/06/2006 10:51:29 PM PST by rock58seg (As funny as Democrats pretending to know about Natl Security and quail hunting.)
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To: rock58seg

I hate when that happens. sorry


17 posted on 03/06/2006 10:52:13 PM PST by rock58seg (As funny as Democrats pretending to know about Natl Security and quail hunting.)
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To: Ichneumon

the universe is wierd. I would not be surprised if something along those lines has/had/will happen(ed) somewhere


18 posted on 03/07/2006 10:36:22 AM PST by King Prout (many accuse me of being overly literal... this would not be a problem if many were not under-precise)
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To: Fintan

19 posted on 03/07/2006 11:24:47 AM PST by Hatteras
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Note: this topic is from 3/06/2006. Thanks KevinDavis.



20 posted on 01/20/2015 11:52:17 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Imagine an imaginary menagerie manager imagining managing an imaginary menagerie.)
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Note: this topic is from 3/06/2006. Thanks KevinDavis.
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

21 posted on 01/20/2015 11:52:32 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Imagine an imaginary menagerie manager imagining managing an imaginary menagerie.)
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