Keyword: ancientautopsies

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  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    12/19/2014 11:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Tuesday, 16 December 2014 | Ms Monica Tromp
    Known to its Polynesian inhabitants as Rapa Nui, Easter Island is thought to have been colonised around the 13th Century and is famed for its mysterious large stone statues or moai. Otago Anatomy PhD student Monica Tromp and Idaho State University’s Dr John Dudgeon have just published new research clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been a staple plant food for Rapa Nui’s population over several centuries. However, no other line of archaeological or ethnohistoric evidence supports palm having a dietary role on Easter Island; in fact evidence points to the palm becoming extinct soon...
  • US researcher hoping to discover body of Jesus in Kashmir tomb

    03/11/2002 4:43:17 AM PST · by aculeus · 58 replies · 6,169+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | Monday, March 11, 2002 | Izhar Wani (AFP)
    An American researcher who believes she has found the final resting place of Jesus Christ is campaigning to exhume a body at a Muslim shrine in Kashmir for scientific tests. Suzanne Marie Olsson, a New York-based researcher is currently in Srinagar, studying the Muslim shrine of Rozabal. While Muslims say Rozabal houses the tomb of Yuza Asaf, a Muslim saint, many researchers believe it contains the body of Jesus Christ. To put an end to speculation Olsson has suggested exhuming the remains at Rozabal for DNA testing and carbon dating. quot;This will trace him (the saint) to his origin ......
  • Report: Ancient Roman graveyard found in suburban Copenhagen

    10/11/2007 11:55:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 309+ views
    IHT ^ | October 10, 2007 | Associated Press / Roskilde Dagblad
    Archaeologists have discovered a Roman cemetery from about 300 A.D. in suburban Copenhagen with about 30 graves, a newspaper reported Wednesday. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," archaeologist Rune Iversen was quoted as saying by the Roskilde Dagblad newspaper. The graveyard's exact location in Ishoej, southwest of downtown Copenhagen, was being kept secret until the archaeologists from the nearby Kroppedal Museum have completed their work, the newspaper wrote... Archaeologists found necklaces and other personal belongings, as well as ceramics for containing food. "It shows that we're dealing with...
  • Lost No More: An Etruscan Rebirth

    04/15/2003 10:36:32 AM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 543+ views
    New York Times ^ | 4-15-2003 | John Noble Wilford
    Lost No More: An Etruscan Rebirth By JOHN NOBLE WILFORDNY Times, 4-15-2003 HILADELPHIA — The Romans relished their founding myths. Aeneas, a fugitive from fallen Troy, anchored in the mouth of the Tiber River and there in the hills of Latium rekindled the flame of Trojan greatness. Romulus and Remus, twin sons of Mars and a sleeping beauty, were suckled by a she-wolf and grew up to establish the city destined for grandeur. In reality, though, the Romans owed more than they ever admitted to their accomplished predecessors and former enemies on the Italian peninsula, the Etruscans. They were known...
  • Shackled Skeletons Found In Ancient Gallo-Roman Cemetery in Southwest France; circa 2nd Century A.D.

    12/05/2014 3:22:15 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | December 4, 2014 | George Dvorsky
    • Skeletons Found In Ancient Cemetery Still Have Shackles On Their Necks Archaeologists working in southwest France have discovered hundreds of Gallo-Roman graves dating to the second half of the 2nd century AD, with some of the skeletons featuring shackles still strapped around their necks and ankles. The site, which may have been part of an important Gallo-Roman necropolis, is situated near the amphitheatre of Saintes. The Romans dominated the area during the first and second centuries AD. The amphitheatre, which featured battles between gladiators and wild animals, could hold between 12-18,000 people. The remains of the dead would be...
  • Roman skeletons found in Worcestershire

    11/13/2014 5:00:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Worcester News ^ | Friday 31 October 2014 | James Connell
    The two incomplete adult skeletons, an adult female and a younger adult male, during building works at Overbury Primary School, near Bredon in February this year. Experts from the Worcestershire County Council Archives and Archaeology Service have now confirmed that remains are from Roman times. The adult female, aged over 50, was found with hobnails, which are associated with rural Roman agricultural burials. The other was an adult male, aged 25 to 30 who had signs of degenerative joints and osteoarthritis. Also found were a selection of Roman pots. Archaeologist Tom Vaughan said: "The remains have been thoroughly examined and...
  • Dozens of Girls Found Sacrificed

    07/17/2009 9:17:53 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 25 replies · 1,498+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | July 14, 2009
    Many of the 33 mummies uncovered near Chiclayo, Peru, were those of girls—a rarity, experts say. Their throats slit, the girls were probably killed in a bid for agricultural fertility. Research into 33 mummies discovered in Peru has revealed most of the bodies were girls, most likely sacrificed in the belief their deaths would bring fertility to the peoples farmlands. Utah Valley University professor Haagen Klaus is an expert in bio-archaeology and has been examining the human remains found in 2007 at the Chotuna Huaca, a site located north east of Chiclayo, Peru.
  • About 50 Mummies Discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

    04/29/2014 4:15:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    NBC news ^ | April 28th 2014 | Reuters
    CAIRO — Remains of about 50 mummies, including newborn babies, thought to belong to the 18th Dynasty were found in a huge tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said Monday. Wooden coffins and death masks were found beside the bodies, probably dating from the New Kingdom, state news agency MENA quoted Ibrahim as saying. The New Kingdom takes in Egypt's 18th, 19th and 20th pharaonic dynasties, dating between about 1567 and 1085 B.C. According to initial studies of the find, princes and princesses were among the bodies found in the tomb, which had...
  • Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than Thought

    04/17/2008 2:24:57 PM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 239+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 4-17-2008 | Andrew Bossone
    Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than ThoughtAndrew Bossone in Cairo, Egypt for National Geographic NewsApril 17, 2008 Egyptian archaeologists have discovered that the tomb of the powerful pharaoh Seti I—the largest tomb in the Valley of the Kings—is bigger than originally believed. During a recent excavation, the team found that the crypt is actually 446 feet (136 meters) in length. Giovanni Battista Belzoni, who discovered the tomb in 1817, had noted the tomb at 328 feet (100 meters). "[This is] the largest tomb and this is longest tunnel that's ever found in any place in the Valley of the Kings,"...
  • The King Herself [ the pharaoh Hatshepsut ]

    04/05/2009 7:42:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 975+ views
    National Geographic ^ | April 2009 | Chip "Brindle" Brown
    In 1903 the renowned archaeologist Howard Carter had found Hatshepsut's sarcophagus in the 20th tomb discovered in the Valley of the Kings -- KV20. The sarcophagus, one of three Hatshepsut had prepared, was empty. Scholars did not know where her mummy was or whether it had even survived the campaign to eradicate the record of her rule during the reign of her co-regent and ultimate successor, Thutmose III, when almost all the images of her as king were systematically chiseled off temples, monuments, and obelisks... Zahi Hawass, head of the Egyptian Mummy Project and secretary general of the Supreme Council...
  • Russian Archaeologists Find Unique Mummies In Egypt

    11/29/2007 10:31:19 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 34+ views
    Novosti ^ | 11-27-2007
    Russian archaeologists find unique mummies in Egypt 21:56 | 27/ 11/ 2007 AL-FAYUM, November 27 (RIA Novosti) - Russian archaeologists have found well-preserved mummies in Egypt dating to the country's Ptolemaic era, the head of the Russian Academy of Science's Egyptology department announced on Tuesday. "Well-preserved mummies of this period are extremely rare," Galina Belova said. The discoveries were made in the Egyptian oasis of Al-Fayum, where several mummies, combining traits of Hellenic and Egyptian traditions, have previously been found. Teams of Russian archaeologists are currently carrying out excavations in Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt, in Alexandria on the...
  • Tomb May Shed Light On 10th Plague

    11/23/2004 6:11:43 PM PST · by blam · 86 replies · 4,257+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | 11-23-2004 | Charles M. Sennott
    Tomb may shed light on 10th plague By Charles M. Sennott, Globe Staff | November 23, 2004 LUXOR, Egypt — Out of the blinding light of a fall morning here in the Valley of the Kings, American archeologist Kent Weeks led the way down a narrow, stone passageway and into the entrance of a tomb. Weeks peered his flashlight into the enveloping darkness of ‘‘the hidden tomb,’’ as he calls it, and pressed on through the damp, winding passages toward what may be his archeological team’s most significant find after years of methodical digging, scraping, and brushing. At the end...
  • Mummy of Egyptian queen Hatshepsut may have been found (in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings)

    06/25/2007 8:05:18 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies · 1,521+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 6/25/07 | Jonathan Wright
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Egyptologists think they have identified with certainty the mummy of Hatshepsut, the most famous queen to rule ancient Egypt, found in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings, an archaeologist said on Monday. Egypt's chief archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, will hold a news conference in Cairo on Wednesday. The Discovery Channel said he would announce what it called the most important find in the Valley of the Kings since the discovery of King Tutankhamun. The archaeologist, who asked not to be named, said the candidate for identification as the mummy of Hatshepsut was one of two...
  • Tutankhamun Fetuses To Get Paternity Test

    08/07/2008 10:42:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 109+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, August 6, 2008 | staff and Reuters
    Egyptian scientists are doing DNA tests on stillborn children found in Tutankhamun's tomb in the hope of confirming if they are the pharoah's offspring and confirming his family tree. British archaeologist Howard Carter found the mummified fetuses when he discovered the tomb in 1922. Archaeologists assume they are the children of the teenage pharaoh, but this has not been confirmed. The identity of their mother is also still unknown. Many scholars believe their mother to be Ankhesenamun, the boy king's only known wife. Ankhesenamun is the daughter of the queen Nefertiti, who was renowned for her beauty. "For the first...
  • King Tut's Mummified Erect Penis May Point to Ancient Religious Struggle

    01/06/2014 6:58:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 97 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 02, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The pharaoh was buried in Egypt's Valley of the Kings without a heart (or a replacement artifact known as a heart scarab); his penis was mummified erect; and his mummy and coffins were covered in a thick layer of black liquid that appear to have resulted in the boy-king catching fire... The mummified erect penis and other burial anomalies were not accidents during embalming, Ikram suggests, but rather deliberate attempts to make the king appear as Osiris, the god of the underworld, in as literal a way as possible. The erect penis evokes Osiris' regenerative powers; the black liquid made...
  • Manchester University Helps With Pharaoh Analysis (Hatshepsut)

    07/16/2007 7:19:32 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 910+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 7-16-2007 | University Of Manchester
    Contact: Aeron Haworth aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk 44-771-788-1563 University of Manchester Manchester University helps with pharaoh DNA analysisPreliminary results support positive identification of Egyptian queen Preliminary results from DNA tests carried out on a mummy believed to be Queen Hatshepsut is expected to support the claim by Egyptian authorities that the remains are indeed those of Egypt’s most powerful female ruler. Egyptologists in Cairo announced last month that a tooth found in a wooden box associated with Hatshepsut exactly fitted the jaw socket and broken root of the unidentified mummy. Now, Dr Angelique Corthals, a biomedical Egyptologist at The University of Manchester, says...
  • Hatshepsut mummy found

    03/26/2006 8:43:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies · 4,775+ views
    Egyptian State News Service ^ | Friday, March 24, 2006 | unattributed
    The true mummy of ancient Egyptian queen Hatshepsut was discovered in the third floor of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Secretary General of Supreme Council for Antiquities Zahi Hawwas revealed on Thursday. The mummy was missing among thousands of artifacts lying in the museum, he said during his lecture at the New York-based Metropolitan Museum of Arts. He said for decades archaeologists believed that a mummy found in Luxor was that of the Egyptian queen. It was a streak of luck, he said, to find this mummy. The Metropolitan is hosting a Hatshepsut exhibition that displays 270 artifacts on the...
  • Study: King Tut Wasn't Bludgeoned to Death

    12/02/2006 9:01:58 AM PST · by aculeus · 31 replies · 840+ views
    Live Science.com ^ | November 27, 2006 | By E.J. Mundell, Health Day Reporter
    Dead men don't tell tales, but dead pharaohs might. CT scans of King Tutankhamun's mummy may put the world's oldest "cold case" to rest, refuting the notion that the ruler's enemies bludgeoned him to death. Instead, a festering leg wound may have led to the boy-king's early demise at 19, more than 3,300 years ago, researchers say. The scans, the first ever performed on an identified royal Egyptian mummy, "finally lay to rest this rather loosely based conjecture about a murder plot. I don't think that anyone who reads the findings as they are written can believe that any longer,"...
  • Egyptian Mummies Yield Earliest Evidence of Malaria

    10/28/2008 8:03:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 231+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Two Egyptian mummies who died more than 3,500 years ago have provided clear evidence for the earliest known cases of malaria, according to a study presented this week in Naples at an international conference on ancient DNA. Pathologist Andreas Nerlich and colleagues at the Academic Teaching Hospital München-Bogenhausen in Munich, Germany, studied 91 bone tissue samples from ancient Egyptian mummies and skeletons dating from 3500 to 500 B.C. Using special techniques from molecular biology, such as DNA amplification and gene sequencing, the researchers identified ancient DNA for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in tissues from two mummies... Caused by four...
  • Stanford archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at... Deir el-Medina

    11/23/2014 3:17:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stanford Report ^ | November 17, 2014 | Barbara Wilcox
    In many bodies Austin saw evidence of stress from the hard climb – today it's a thousand stone steps – from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Kings and back again. As Austin found, incidence of arthritis in the knees and ankles of the men at Deir el-Medina was significantly higher than for working populations from other Egyptian cemeteries. The bones also revealed clues that corroborate other scholars' findings that severely disabled Egyptians were well cared for. "I found the remains of a man who died at the age of 19 or 20 and was born without a useful...
  • Archaeologists might have found bone of England's King Alfred the Great

    01/18/2014 11:00:40 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Reuters ^ | January 17, 2014 | Michael Holden (editing by Stephen Addison)
    Tests have shown that a pelvic bone found in a museum box is likely to have been either that of Alfred - the only English king to have the moniker "Great" - or his son King Edward the Elder. The bone was found among remains dug up at a medieval abbey in Winchester, southwest England, the capital of Alfred's kingdom. The remains were initially discovered in an excavation some 15 years ago but were not tested at the time, and were stored in a box at Winchester Museum until archaeologists came upon them after a failed bid to find Alfred...
  • Unmarked Grave Dug up in Hunt for England's King Alfred the Great

    03/30/2013 5:24:37 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    CNN ^ | Wed March 27, 2013 | Laura Smith-Spark
    Archaeologists dug up an unmarked grave in a quiet English churchyard in search of remains of King Alfred the Great, a ninth century monarch credited with fending off the Vikings. The exhumation was apparently triggered by fears that interest over the recent discovery of the skeleton of Richard III could lead grave robbers to dig the area for his bones. Alfred the Great is known to generations of schoolchildren through a popular legend that tells of his scolding by a peasant woman for letting her cakes burn while he watched over them. He was at the time preoccupied with the...
  • "Amazing" Bronze Age burial in Buckinghamshire contained skeletons of two children...

    11/09/2014 2:53:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Culture24 ^ | November 05, 2014 | Ben Miller
    The skeletons of two pre-pubescent children have been discovered by archaeologists during an “amazing” dig at the back of an antiques shop which has also revealed pottery suggesting their bones could come from a Bronze Age burial. The bodies, whose teeth pinpointed their owners’ ages to between ten and 12, contained 250 bones and fragments. Experts in Marlow say the pit they were found in, which was originally opened up in March 2013, included a burial mound disturbed during the 12th century. “Local historians will know that the earliest recording of the town of Marlow dates from 1015AD, where it...
  • Dig reveals human skulls mounted on stakes (Sweden)

    09/20/2011 7:55:48 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 1+ views
    The Local ^ | September 19, 2011 | David Landes
    Several human skulls found mounted on wooden stakes have been uncovered from a Stone Age lake bed in central Sweden in what is believed to be the first discovery of its kind anywhere in the world. “We found two skulls that still had wooden stakes sticking out of them through a whole at the base of the skull,” archeologist Fredrik Hallgren, head of excavation with the Stiftelsen Kulturmiljövård Mälardalen (‘Cultural Preservation Society of Mälardalen’) told The Local. The skulls and other artifacts, including bones of wild animals, were recovered at the Kanaljorden excavation site in the town of Motala in...
  • Roman gums 'healthier than ours'

    11/02/2014 7:47:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    BBC News ^ | 23 October 2014 | James Gallagher
    People living in Roman Britain had healthier gums than their modern-day descendants, a feat of archaeological dentistry shows. A team at King's College London and the Natural History Museum found only 5% of adults had gum disease in the Roman, and certainly pre-toothbrush, era. Modern day smoking and type 2 diabetes are blamed for a figure of nearly one in three today. But ancient Britain was certainly not a golden age of gleaming gnashers. The smiles of our ancestors were littered with infections, abscesses and tooth decay, the study showed... The research group analysed 303 skulls from a burial ground...
  • Roman gladiators' diet probably not what you'd expect, researchers find

    10/21/2014 12:59:30 PM PDT · by dware · 42 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 10.21.2014 | Jenn Gidman
    You'd figure a typical Roman gladiator to be a real meat-and-potatoes guy, right? You'd be figuring wrong—at least if you were talking about gladiators from the city of Ephesus.
  • Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

    10/22/2014 2:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    www.centnews.com ^ | 2014-10-22 18:00:08 | Richard INGHAM
    France - Scientists said Wednesday they had unravelled the oldest DNA ever retrieved from a Homo sapiens bone, a feat that sheds light on modern humans' colonisation of the planet. A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago, they said. Teased out of collagen in the ancient bone, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals -- a cousin species who lived in Eurasia alongside H. sapiens before mysteriously disappearing. Previous research has found that Neanderthals and H. sapiens interbred, leaving a tiny Neanderthal...
  • Oldest complete human genome sequenced

    10/23/2014 4:19:36 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 17 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 23 October 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Scientists have sequenced the oldest complete human genome. The DNA comes from an anatomically modern man who roamed Western Siberia 45,000 years ago. It provides experts with a more accurate timeline of when modern humans mated with their Neanderthal cousins as they moved from Africa into Europe, between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago. Scientists have sequenced the oldest complete human genome. The DNA comes from an anatomically modern man who roamed Western Siberia 45,000 years ago. His remains were fund near the settlement of Ust’-Ishim in western Siberia in 2008. The male lived around the time the populations of Europe...
  • The REAL face of King Tut: Pharaoh had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth according to

    10/20/2014 10:07:52 AM PDT · by C19fan · 38 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 19, 2014 | Mario Ledwith and Francesco Infante
    With strong features cast in burnished gold, Tutankhamun’s burial mask projects an image of majestic beauty and royal power. But in the flesh, King Tut had buck teeth, a club foot and girlish hips, according to the most detailed examination ever of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh’s remains. And rather than being a boy king with a love of chariot racing, Tut relied on walking sticks to get around during his rule in the 14th century BC, researchers said.
  • St. Mary's doctors determine 2,100-year-old "Mummy Girl" died of appendicitis

    10/17/2014 7:10:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    WPTV ^ | October 17, 2014 | Marisa Gottesman, Sun Sentinel
    Doctors didn't have much of a medical history to help them unwrap the cause of death of their oldest patient, a 2,100-year-old female mummy... Doctors performed a CT scan on the mummy Oct. 10 to come up with the working diagnosis. Relying on the scans, they reviewed her bone structure, size and teeth. They compared their findings to X-rays that were taken of the mummy more than 40 years ago. The older scans had initially led doctors to believe the mummy was somewhere between the age of 4 and 9, and that she had died of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis had been...
  • Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found

    10/11/2014 9:03:49 AM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 21 replies
    Discovery.com News ^ | October 10, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis's mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great's father. The anthropological investigation examined 350 bones and fragments found in two larnakes, or caskets, of the tomb. It uncovered pathologies, activity markers and trauma that helped identify the tomb's occupants. Along with the cremated remains of Philip II, the burial, commonly known as Tomb II, also contained the bones of a woman warrior, possibly the daughter of the Skythian King...
  • Hi-tech scan of Descartes' skull reveals secret

    10/10/2014 12:35:59 PM PDT · by Sparklite · 36 replies
    Fox News ^ | October 10, 2014
    Charlier, for his part, has made a name for himself as a forensic scientist who has debunked several myths. Among them: that bone fragments in the Vatican's possession were those of Joan of Arc. He determined they were actually from a cat and Egyptian mummy.
  • Attention to gender imbalance : Terracotta female artists (Bilingual ) (Title translated)

    09/17/2014 10:06:48 PM PDT · by Morgana · 3 replies
    SINA.COM ^ | 中国日报网 China News Network
    ORIGINAL TITLE IN CHINESE: 关注性别失衡:艺术家创作女兵马俑(双语) When Emperor Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China, anticipated his death more than 2,000 years ago, he wanted an army of warriors to guard his mausoleum forever and protect him in the afterlife。   So he ordered the creation of some 8,000 terra-cotta soldiers, along with hundreds of terra-cotta horses and chariots, to be buried with him in his tomb. Historians speculate the soldiers were modeled after eight individuals. When the statues were discovered by workers digging a well in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, in 1974, the world was stunned by the spectacular funerary art...
  • Before He Died, Richard III Lived Large

    08/24/2014 10:48:27 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 37 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-19-14 | Rachel Nuwer
    Bone chemistry sheds light on the monarch's shifting diet throughout his brief life Richard III was only 32 years old when he was struck down at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. But according to new research, the King of England at least enjoyed some good eating throughout his life—especially in the few years leading up to his death. Scientists from the British Geological Survey and the University of Leicester analyzed Richard III's teeth, his femur and his ribs to see what they could reveal about the monarch's diet, Phys.org reports. They used isotope analysis to identify chemical signatures...
  • King Richard III's Final Moments Were Quick & Brutal

    09/17/2014 12:39:21 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 94 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | September 17, 2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    Richard III's last moments were likely quick but terrifying, according to a new study of the death wounds of the last king of England to die in battle. The last king of the Plantagenet dynasty faced his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug. 22, 1485, only two years after ascending the throne. The battle was the deciding clash in the long-running Wars of the Roses, and ended with the establishment of Henry Tudor as the new English monarch. But Richard III's last moments were the stuff of legend alone, as the king's body was lost until September...
  • The Kennewick Man Finally Freed to Share His Secrets

    08/27/2014 4:29:21 PM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 29 replies
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | SEPTEMBER 2014 | By Douglas Preston
    Instapundit: "The Army Corps of Engineers sure didn’t want this researched, and continues to interfere today. Why? " Why? It blows the native "indians" narrative of 'we were here first' out of the water. Land claims and free money is g-o-n-e gone: As work progressed, a portrait of Kennewick Man emerged. He does not belong to any living human population. Who, then, are his closest living relatives? Judging from the shape of his skull and bones, his closest living relatives appear to be the Moriori people of the Chatham Islands, a remote archipelago 420 miles southeast of New Zealand, as...
  • Kennewick Man ‘could have been Asian’

    08/25/2014 4:30:08 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 30 replies
    Seatle Pi Science Blog ^ | 08/25/2014 | Aubrey Cohen
    Researchers spent 16 days poring over Kennewick Man — the skeleton found on the bank of the Columbia River in 1996 — in two visits to Seattle’s Burke Museum in 2005 and 2006, after a court ruling permitting the study. Since then, they’ve said little about what they’ve learned. A new, 688-page, peer-reviewed book, “Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation of an Ancient American Skeleton,” changes that. Texas A&M University Press is scheduled to publish the book in September.
  • Merovingian Necropolis Reveals 300 Graves

    08/02/2014 12:51:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Thursday, July 31, 2014 | Source: INRAP
    A team of archaeologists working on a site at Saint-Aubin-des-Champs in France have discovered the remains of a Merovingian necropolis dating to the 5th -7th centuries AD... The graves were found at a variety of depths with some up to 1.50 m deep. Each burial contained the deceased once contained within a wooden coffin, now completely rotted away. An examination of the contents of these burials allowed them to be split into three main groups or periods of inhumation. Fewer grave goods are in evidence after 5th century AD as the population has become Christian. 7th century AD burials are...
  • Buried secrets of medieval Leith uncovered

    08/02/2014 8:52:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Edinburgh Evening News ^ | July 25, 2014 | Katie Richardson
    Buried secrets of life in medieval Leith have been uncovered after the results of a five-year project to analyse bodies discovered during an archaeological dig were unveiled... the remains of almost 400 men, women and children were discovered on the Constitution Street site – previously a section of the South Leith Parish Church’s graveyard – during preparation work for the trams in 2009... bones which have been dated between the 14th and 17th centuries. One skeleton, of a woman aged between 25 and 35 who died anywhere between 1360 and 1435, was found to be 4ft 11in, 1.5 inches shorter...
  • Warriors' Bones Reveal Bizarre Iron Age Rituals

    08/01/2014 1:05:34 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    Live Science ^ | | July 31, 2014 08:16am ET | Stephanie Pappas, Contributor
    The bones of dozens of Iron Age warriors found in Denmark were collected and ritually mutilated after spending months on the battlefield, archaeologists say. At least six months after the soldiers died, their bones were collected, scraped of remaining flesh, sorted and dumped in a lake. Some were handled in a truly bizarre manner; for instance, four pelvises were found strung on a stick. ... The site of the boneyard is in East Jutland, in a wetland area known as Alken Enge. Drainage work and peat digging have been turning up ancient human remains in this bog for decades, Holst...
  • Scientists Tantalize With 'Iceman' Findings (Canada)

    04/04/2008 7:56:26 AM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 200+ views
    The Vancouver Sun ^ | 4-4-2008 | Darah Hansen
    Scientists tantalize with 'iceman' findings Darah Hansen, Vancouver Sun Published: Friday, April 04, 2008 Scientists from around the world who have been studying the centuries-old human remains that melted out of a glacier in northwestern British Columbia in 1999 will gather for the first time in Victoria later this month to talk about what they've learned from the unnamed "iceman." The Kwäday Dän Ts'ìnchi Symposium will be held April 24-27 at the University of Victoria. It is being held in conjunction with the Northwest Anthropology Conference. The conference brings together more than 30 researchers from fields as diverse as archeology,...
  • Iceman's DNA Linked To Coastal Aboriginals (Canada)

    04/26/2008 7:01:25 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 879+ views
    Leader - Post ^ | 4-26-2008 | Judith Lavoie
    Iceman's DNA linked to coastal aboriginals Judith Lavoie, Canwest News Service; Victoria Times Colonist Published: Saturday, April 26, 2008 VICTORIA -- Sisters Sheila Clark and Pearl Callaghan held hands and blinked back tears Friday as they talked about their ancestor Kwaday Dan Ts'inchi, better known as Long Ago Person Found, a young aboriginal man whose frozen body was discovered nine years ago at the foot of a melting glacier in Northern B.C. Three hunters found the body in 1999 in Tatshenshini-Alsek Park, part of the traditional territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. And earlier this month, 17 aboriginal...
  • 'Iceman' was murdered, science sleuths say

    08/12/2003 9:37:09 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 94 replies · 1,146+ views
    USA Today ^ | 8/11/2003 | Tim Friend
    <p>The 5,300-year-old "Iceman" discovered in 1991 in the Italian Alps was killed by one or more assailants in a fight that lasted at least two days, shows evidence obtained by sophisticated DNA testing and old-fashioned detective work.</p> <p>Scientists initially presumed that the Stone Age Iceman, nicknamed Otzi, was caught in a storm and froze to death. But a new team said Monday that Otzi's case instead has become the world's oldest, and coldest, murder case.</p>
  • DNA reveals how the Italian Iceman went down fighting

    08/12/2003 1:49:37 PM PDT · by Pokey78 · 27 replies · 571+ views
    The Independent (U.K.) ^ | 08/13/03 | Peter Popham
    Italy's prehistoric Iceman was murdered by an arrow in the back, despite the efforts of a companion to save him. But although he apparently died fleeing from a skirmish, he did not give up without a fight. He bore traces of the blood of four other men on his weapons and clothes, three of whom he had killed or wounded. These are among the startling findings of Dr Tom Loy of Queensland University in Brisbane, Australia, published this week after analysis of blood traces found on the 5,300-year- old mummy, which was dug out of the Alpine ice 12 years...
  • Italy's 5,000-Year-Old Iceman Put Up a Fight [DNA of 4 foes, venison and ibex his final meal]

    08/14/2003 6:39:27 PM PDT · by SJackson · 33 replies · 966+ views
    Reuters/Yahoo ^ | 8-11-03 | Shasta Darlington
    ROME (Reuters) - A prehistoric Italian iceman nicknamed "Otzi" may have been shot in the back with an arrow, but he only died after prolonged combat with his foes, new DNA evidence has shown. Reuters Photo Missed Tech Tuesday? Check out the powerful new PDA crop, plus the best buys for any budget The 5,000-year-old corpse, dug out of a glacier in northern Italy more than a decade ago, had traces of blood from four different people on his clothes and weapons, molecular archeologist Tom Loy said Wednesday. He also had "defensive cut wounds" on his hands, wrists and rib...
  • Iceman Found in Italy Didn't Wander Far

    10/30/2003 1:22:40 PM PST · by Junior · 40 replies · 567+ views
    AP-Science ^ | 2003-10-30 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    WASHINGTON - The mysterious 5,200-year-old iceman found in an Alpine glacier was born in a valley in what is now northern Italy and didn't travel far from home, an international team of researchers has concluded. Indeed, the iceman, known as Oetzi, probably spent his whole life within about 37 miles of the spot near the Italy-Austria border where he was found frozen, according to the team led by Wolfgang Mueller of the Australian National University in Canberra. Their findings are being reported Friday in the journal Science. A group of hikers discovered Oetzi's well-preserved body in 1991; since then, he...
  • Iceman's bones lead scientists to his home turf

    10/31/2003 9:30:13 AM PST · by inPhase · 7 replies · 345+ views
    The Age ^ | Nov 1, 2003 | Lucy Beaumont
    Iceman's bones lead scientists to his home turf By Lucy Beaumont November 1, 2003 Printer friendly version Print this article Email to a friend Email to a friend The Iceman lived and died in a small area of northern Italy, scientists have deduced from analysis of his tooth enamel and bone samples. The home turf of a man who died 5200 years ago has been located by a team of scientists, including Australians, who analysed his teeth, bones and intestines. Examination of the famed "Iceman", whose frozen remains were found in a glacier on the Italian-Austrian border in 1991, has...
  • Was Ancient Alpine "Iceman" Killed in Battle?

    11/02/2003 8:24:38 PM PST · by SteveH · 14 replies · 532+ views
    Was Ancient Alpine "Iceman" Killed in Battle? Sarah Ives for National Geographic News October 30, 2003 In 1991, two Germans hiking in the Alps of northern Italy discovered the 5,200-year-old remains of a Copper Age man frozen in a glacier. The well-preserved corpse, dubbed "Ötzi the Iceman," was found with tools, arrows, and a knife. Since then, scientists have speculated about how the 46-year-old male died, offering scenarios from hypothermia to ritual sacrifice. Now a team of researchers has added another theory to the mix, suggesting that the Iceman died in battle. The "Iceman" made a valiant effort to fight...
  • Death Renews Iceman 'Curse' Claim (Oetzi)

    11/05/2005 3:47:36 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,027+ views
    BBC ^ | 11-3-2005
    Death renews iceman 'curse' claim Should working with Oetzi carry a health warning? The death of a molecular biologist has fuelled renewed speculation about a "curse" connected to an ancient corpse. Tom Loy, 63, had analysed DNA found on "Oetzi", the Stone Age hunter whose remains were discovered in 1991. Dr Loy died in unclear circumstances in Australia two weeks ago, it has been announced, making him the seventh person connected with Oetzi to die. Colleagues and family of Dr Loy have rejected the notion that he was the victim of a "curse". It is not known how many people...
  • 'Iceman' discoverer joins his find in Alpine grave

    10/23/2004 7:26:02 PM PDT · by aculeus · 14 replies · 1,209+ views
    The Observer (UK) ^ | October 24, 2004 | Sophie Arie in Rome
    For 13 years, mountaineer Helmut Simon had basked in the glory of his unique encounter with history. In 1991, the 67-year-old German discovered Otzi the Iceman, the perfectly preserved body of a Neolithic hunter, emerging from the Similaun glacier, 3,200m (10,500ft) up the Austrian Alps. Wherever he went in his beloved Alps, Simon wore a badge identifying himself as 'Discoverer of Otzi'. But yesterday, Simon's body was found in a stream in these same mountains. On 15 October, the pensioner departed alone from the village of Bad Hofgastein, near Salzburg, up the 2,134m (7,000ft) Gamskarkogel peak. His wife, Erika, who...