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Keyword: ancientautopsies

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  • Cold Case Squad Resolves 47-Year-Old Missing Person Report in Jefferson County

    01/30/2016 9:30:33 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    ptleader.com ^ | Jan 29, 2016 | Patrick J. Sullivan
    Camper went into the mountains in 1968, body found in 1975, remains identified in 2015 By Patrick J. Sullivan of the Leader Jan 29, 2016 0 Camper went missing in Olympic Mountains in 1968 A forensic artist in 2000 made a sketch from the skull found in the Olympic Mountains in 1975. In 2015, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office’s Cold Case Squad confirmed that the remains belonged to a camper who went missing in 1968. Images courtesy Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office cold case squad has resolved a 47-year-old mystery of a Tacoma man who went missing...
  • The Iceman's Stomach Bugs Offer Clues to Ancient Human Migration

    01/07/2016 7:00:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 25 replies
    smithsonianmag ^ | 01/07/2016 | Brian Handwerk
    Otzi the legendary “Iceman” wasn't alone when he was mummified on a glacier 5,300 years ago. With him were gut microbes known to cause some serious tummy trouble. These bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, are providing fresh evidence about Otzi's diet and poor health in the days leading up to his murder. Intriguingly, they could also help scientists better understand who his people were and how they came to live in the region. ... Discovered in the 1990s, Otzi lived in what are today the Eastern Italian Alps, where he was naturally mummified by ice after his violent death. The body is...
  • Hunter-gatherer diet caused tooth decay

    01/12/2014 3:03:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, January 7, 2014 | Natural History Museum
    ...The results published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) also suggest tooth decay was more prevalent in earlier societies than previously estimated. The results also suggest that the hunter-gatherer society studied may have developed a more sedentary lifestyle than previously thought, relying on nut harvesting. Dental disease was thought to have originated with the introduction of farming and changes in food processing around 10,000 years ago. A greater reliance on cultivated plant foods, rich in fermentable carbohydrates, resulted in rotting teeth.High level of decayNow, the analysis of 52 adult dentitions from hunter-gatherer skeletons found in a cave...
  • New insights on origin of Polynesians

    12/28/2015 10:31:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 28, 2015 | Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    Analysis of the oldest-known cemetery in the South Pacific may help resolve a longstanding debate over the origins and ancestry of Polynesians. Modern-day Polynesians bear strong cultural and linguistic similarities to the ancient people associated with the Lapita Culture who settled on Vanuatu more than 3,000 years ago. However, the origin of the Lapita people remains debated, with recent biological studies suggesting that the group may be of mixed ancestry with a strong contribution from Melanesian populations, who were already established on islands to the west near New Guinea. Frederique Valentin, Matthew Spriggs, and colleagues conducted morphological analyses involving craniometric...
  • Laois 'bog body' said to be world's oldest

    08/23/2013 6:12:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Irish Times ^ | Friday, August 2, 2013 | Eoin Burke-Kennedy
    The mummified remains of a body found in a Laois bog two years ago have been found to date back to 2,000BC, making it the oldest "bog body" discovered anywhere in the world. The 4,000-year-old remains, which predate the famed Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun by nearly 700 years, are those of a young adult male. He is believed to have met a violent death in some sort of ritual sacrifice. The body was unearthed in the Cl na Mna bog in Cashel in 2011 by a Bord na Mna worker operating a milling machine. Initially, experts thought it dated from the...
  • Scientists ID Head of France's King Henry IV

    12/15/2010 2:19:47 PM PST · by billorites · 31 replies
    CBS.com ^ | December 14, 2010
    After nine months of tests, researchers in France have identified the head of France's King Henry IV, who was assassinated in 1610 aged 57. The scientific tests helped identify the late monarch's embalmed head, which was shuffled between private collections ever since it disappeared during the French Revolution in 1793. The results of the research identifying Henry IV's head were published online Wednesday in the medical journal, BMJ. Henry IV was buried in the Basilica of Saint Denis near Paris, but during the frenzy of the French Revolution, the royal graves were dug up and revolutionaries chopped off Henry's head,...
  • Dig Unearths 1,500 Year Old 'Tarbat Man' (Pict)

    09/23/2005 4:05:01 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,685+ views
    North Star ^ | 9-22-2005
    Dig unearths 1,500 year old 'Tarbat Man' HUMAN remains have been discovered at Portmahomack - but police will not be called in as the skeleton is thought to be around 1,500 years old and likely to be that of a Pictish monk. The discovery was made by archaeologists from the University of York who come to the Port each season to dig in the grounds of the Tarbat Old Church, one of the most important Pictish sites in Scotland. They are excited by the find came in the last week of the archaeological dig and means that the team will...
  • 'Early Pictish Royal remains' discovered at Rhynie

    09/15/2013 2:05:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 9 September 2013 | unattributed
    The remains of what it is thought could be a member of early Pictish royalty have been discovered during an archaeological dig in Aberdeenshire. The discovery at Rhynie was made by teams from the universities of Aberdeen and Chester. The remains were found in a carefully made sandstone grave, which the experts believe suggests the person was of high status. It is the first time remains of a body have been uncovered at the site. Project leader Dr Gordon Noble, of the University of Aberdeen, said: "We found elements of the legs, pelvis and jaw bone which we recovered and...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 69 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeletons teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • Tut's Life And Death Unmasked

    10/01/2002 7:53:03 AM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 773+ views
    BBC ^ | 10-01-2002 | Kate Botting
    Monday, 30 September, 2002, 20:30 GMT 21:30 UKTut's life and death unmasked British and NZ experts have reconstructed the faceThis is the face behind the famous golden death mask of King Tutankhamun. He lived in very turbulent times and it does seem likely from what the detectives have found out that he was assassinated Scientists and special effects artists in the UK and in New Zealand employed digital techniques normally reserved for crime investigations to reconstruct what the young pharaoh might have looked like. The fibreglass bust has gone on display at London's Science Museum. It was produced to illustrate...
  • Who Killed King Tut?

    09/11/2002 3:08:55 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 45 replies · 3,932+ views
    Time.com ^ | 9-11-02 | JEFFREY KLUGER AND ANDREA DORFMAN
    The boy King died young and was buried in haste. Now a pair of U.S. gumshoes, armed with modern forensics, is trying to crack an ancient case The tomb of the boy King Tutankhamen created a sensation from the moment it was uncovered in 1922. One of the few royal burial chambers that survived the centuries relatively intact, it was by far the richest filled with gold, ivory and carved wooden treasures, including what may be the world's most famous funerary mask. But there was also something troubling about the way King Tut was buried hints and omissions...
  • Siberian tomb gives up warrior's golden hoard

    09/08/2001 5:05:56 PM PDT · by Pokey78 · 31 replies · 1+ views
    The Sunday Times (U.K.) ^ | 09/09/2001 | Nick Fielding and Mark Franchetti
    RUSSIAN archeologists working in a remote area of southern Siberia have discovered a golden treasure hoard in the tomb of a warrior prince from a civilisation that died out more than 2,000 years ago. The tomb was found in Tuva, a republic within Russia and bordering Mongolia. Lying beneath thousands of huge rocks and buried in a deep pit covered with logs, it contains the remains of the Scythian prince and his consort, along with more than 45lb of golden treasure. The team's leader, Konstantin Chugunov, 39, a professor from the Hermitage museum in St Petersburg, has described it as ...
  • Ice-Maiden Returns to Siberia (more tattoos)

    08/25/2012 10:23:09 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 19 replies
    The body of the ice-maiden (aka Ukok Princess, etc.) is finally returning to the Altai Republic in a region close to Russia's frontiers with Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan. Her well-preserved remains were discovered in 1993 by Novosibirsk scientist Natalia Polosmak during an archeological expedition. After discovery, she was taken to a scientific institute in Novosibirsk. The local people in the Altai believe the princess's removal led to bad consequences, causing a crash of the helicopter carrying her remains away and a spate of 300 earth tremors in a six month period. Upon return, she'll be kept in a special mausoleum...
  • The Ice-Maiden with the Tiger Tattoo

    08/17/2012 11:09:05 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 55 replies
    WebProNews/Science ^ | 17 Aug 2012 | Amanda Crum
    The Ice-Maiden is the most famous Pazyryk (Siberian culture probably related to the Scythians) mummy yet found. She died at about the age of 25. Buried clothed in luxurious wild silk, her body was perfectly preserved in perma-frost. But it is the tattoos that set Pazyryk burials apart. Compared to all tattoos found by archeologists around the world, those on the mummies of the Pazyryk people are the most complicated and the most beautiful, according to the lead researcher, Dr. Natalia Polosmak.
  • Female 'Amazon' warrior buried 2,500 years ago in Altai Mountains was... male

    12/13/2015 6:38:09 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 39 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | December 01, 2015
    Female 'Amazon' warrior buried 2,500 years ago in Altai Mountains was... male By The Siberian Times reporter 01 December 2015 New DNA findings alter the sex of one of most famous recent Siberian archeological finds of human remains. Archeologists and anthropologists believed she was not only female - and a pig-tailed teenager - but a member of an elite corps of warriors within the Pazyryk culture.Picture: MarcelNyffenegger, Natalia Polosmak A Swiss taxidermy expert brought 'her' to life, recreating the 'virgin' warrior's looks from facial bones, and some observers commented on her distinctly masculine appearance. Yet archeologists and anthropologists believed she...
  • Xinjiang discovery provides intriguing DNA link

    05/01/2010 4:55:38 AM PDT · by Palter · 11 replies · 539+ views
    English.news.cn ^ | 28 April 2010 | Mu Xuequan
    The DNA of some 4,000 year-old bodies unearthed five years ago in Xinjiang, in northwest China, provides scientific evidence of early intermingling between people of European and Asian origin. Zhou Hui, a professor of life science and her team discovered that some of the earliest inhabitants of the Tarim Basin in the Taklamakan Desert were of European and Siberian descent. The basin, where hundreds of well-preserved mummies have been found since the 1980s, has attracted great attention from scientists worldwide. Professor Victor Mair of Pennsylvania University claimed in 2006, "From around 1800 B.C. the earliest mummies in the Tarim Basin...
  • Frozen Siberian Mummies Reveal A Lost Civilization

    06/25/2008 5:16:28 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,787+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 6-25-2008 | Andrew Curry
    Frozen Siberian Mummies Reveal a Lost CivilizationGlobal warming may finally do in the bodies of the ancient Scythians. by Andrew Curry That the warrior survived the arrows strike for even a short time was remarkable. The triple-barbed arrowhead, probably launched by an opponent on horseback, shattered bone below his right eye and lodged firmly in his flesh. The injury wasnt the mans first brush with death. In his youth he had survived a glancing sword blow that fractured the back of his skull. This injury was different. The man was probably begging for death, says Michael Schultz, a paleopathologist at...
  • 'Mummy of a child warrior from 'lost medieval civilisation'

    08/12/2015 4:01:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | August 4, 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    Five mummies were found to be shrouded in copper, while also elaborately covered in reindeer, beaver, wolverine or bear fur. Nearby were found three copper masked infant mummies - all males. They were bound in four or five copper hoops, several centimetres wide. Similarly, a red-haired man was found, protected from chest to foot by copper plating. In his resting place, was an iron hatchet, furs, and a head buckle made of bronze depicting a bear. The feet of the deceased are all pointing towards the Gorny Poluy River, a fact which is seen as having religious significance. The burial...
  • 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals blocks study of Kennewick Man bones! (they just won't let it go!)

    02/24/2003 5:56:23 AM PST · by vannrox · 69 replies · 720+ views
    AP via SF Gate ^ | Thursday, February 20, 2003 | AP Editorial Staff
    <p>Eight anthropologists who want to study an ancient skeleton must want until a federal court has heard an appeal of the case by four Northwest tribes that consider the bones sacred.</p> <p>The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision, made last week, prevents any study of the 9,300-year-old skeleton known as Kennewick Man, which scientists have sought to examine since 1996.</p>
  • 2,500-year-old Female Siberian Warrior Is Beheaded By Excavator

    10/31/2015 8:11:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | October 29, 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    The excavator smashed the prehistoric ceremonial burial chamber in the Altai Mountains, wrecking the grave of a suspected the grave of a suspected 16 to 20 year old combatant from the colourful Pazyryk culture. Local culture heritage official Dr Vasily Oinoshev said: 'Only the human head and upper part of the horse remained intact in the burial ground.Unfortunately, the rest was destroyed by heavy machinery. 'Apparently, this was a young woman, judging by the teeth. All of them are intact and in good condition. We attribute her to Pazyryk culture, and we have preliminarily dated the burial as being 2,500...
  • Has Queen Nefertiti been found behind King Tut's tomb?

    08/11/2015 11:34:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | August 10, 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    After analysing high-resolution scans of the walls of Tutankhamun's grave complex in the Valley of the Kings, Dr Reeves spotted what appeared to be a secret entrance. He described how he uncovered the 'ghosts' of two portals that tomb builders blocked up, one of which is believed to be a storage room. The other, on the north side of Tutankhamun's tomb, contains 'the undisturbed burial of the tomb's original owner - Nefertiti', Dr Reeves argued. If Dr Reeves is correct, the hidden tomb could be far more magnificent than anything found in Tutankhamun's burial chamber. He believes it is her...
  • Where Is the Tomb of Queen Nefertiti?

    10/19/2015 10:15:26 PM PDT · by SteveH · 40 replies
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 10/18/2015 | Zahi Hawass
    Any scholar who knows archaeology should discuss his theory in the presence of scholars who know the Valley of the Kings and are working there now. Instead, this theory was analysed by Egyptologists who have never worked in the valley or written a single article on Tutankhamun or his tomb. Reeves has gained a lot of publicity for saying nothing.
  • INTERVIEW: Egypt's antiquities minister speaks on the search for Nefertiti in Tutankhamuns tomb

    10/05/2015 8:03:38 PM PDT · by SteveH · 6 replies
    ahramonline ^ | 2 October 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    Ahram Online spoke with Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty regarding an upcoming radar scan of Tutankhamuns tomb to determine if Queen Nefertiti is buried in a hidden chamber. The theory that Nefertiti may be buried in Tutankhamuns tomb was introduced by Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves. Ahram Online (AO): What is your opinion about Reeves' theory, and could it be true? Minister: It is a respectable scientific theory that could prove right or wrong, and when examining the west and north walls of Tutankhamuns burial chamber, I realised that all the evidence that Reeves mentioned regarding the existence of hidden chambers is...
  • Egypt approves Radar for Nefertiti Tomb Quest

    09/22/2015 10:03:35 PM PDT · by SteveH · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | 9/22/2015 | Maram Mazen
    CAIRO (AP) An Egyptian official says the Antiquities Ministry has given initial approval for the use of non-invasive radar to verify a theory that Queen Nefertiti's crypt may be hidden behind King Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old tomb in the famous Valley of the Kings.
  • Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards [They ate them!]

    10/13/2015 2:16:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 60 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | October 9, 2015 | By Mark Stevenson
    Students stand on a temple at the Zultepec-Tecoaque archeological site in Tlaxcala state, Mexico Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. New excavations here, the site of one of the Spanish conquistadors' worst defeats in Mexico, are yielding new evidence about what happened when two cultures clashed, and the native Mexicans, at least temporarily, were in control. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It was one of the worst defeats in one of history's most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten. Excavations at a site just east...
  • Mummification Practiced in Bronze Age Britain

    10/05/2015 11:35:06 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 4 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 5, 2015 | By SINDYA N. BHANOO
    Mummification was widely practiced in what is now Britain throughout the Bronze Age, a new study reports. Archaeologists used microscopic bone analysis to study 34 human remains from Britain dating to the Bronze Age, spanning from 2200 B.C. to 750 B.C., and compared them with known mummies in northern Yemen and Ireland. The pattern of erosion in 16 of the British skeletons was consistent with that of the known mummies. Since it was widespread in Britain, theres no reason to think that it wasnt a common practice in Bronze Age societies across Europe, said Tom Booth, an archaeologist at the...
  • Mass Grave Found in California Reveals Prehistoric Violence Against Outsiders

    10/02/2015 11:34:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Western Digs ^ | September 28, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    ...Now, chemical analysis has revealed that the men were far from home when they were killed, up to several days journey from where they were born and raised. The discovery is only the most recent example of violence among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in the region, anthropologists say. But it bears important lessons about the nature of conflict and warfare in pre-contact California... The grave was unearthed in 2012 during the construction of a shopping center in the town of Pleasanton, in the Amador Valley just east of Oakland... One of the men suffered a severe blow above the left eye, causing...
  • Could Cramond hold the secret of Scotland during Dark Ages?

    10/02/2015 11:26:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    City of Edinburgh ^ | Thursday, 1st October 2015 | unattributed
    The mass burial in Cramond, believed to be the oldest occupied village in Scotland, was uncovered in 1975 during an excavation of a Roman Bathhouse found at the site of a car park. Forty years later, a team led by the City of Edinburgh Council has embraced modern science to examine the remains of nine individuals found in the grave with fascinating results. The evidence has disproved an early theory that the bodies were victims of the bubonic plague, instead dating the individuals back another 800 years to the 6th Century AD. Thanks to state-of-the-art computer programming, researchers were able...
  • Mummification was commonplace in Bronze Age Britain

    10/02/2015 1:12:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    University of Sheffield ^ | 1 October 2015 | Sean Barton
    Building on a previous study conducted at a single Bronze Age burial site in the Outer Hebrides, Dr Booth used microscopic analysis to compare the bacterial bioerosion of skeletons from various sites across the UK with the bones of the mummified bodies from Yemen and Ireland. Archaeologists widely agree that the damp British climate is not favourable to organic materials and all prehistoric mummified bodies that may be located in the UK will have lost their preserved tissue if buried outside of a preservative environment such as a bog. Dr Booth, who is now based at the Department of Earth...
  • Lethal Thermal Impact at Periphery of Pyroclastic Surges: Evidences at Pompeii

    06/18/2010 5:51:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 367+ views
    Public Library of Science ^ | June 2010 | Giuseppe Mastrolorenzo, Pierpaolo Petrone, Lucia Pappalardo, Fabio M. Guarino
    The evaluation of mortality of pyroclastic surges and flows (PDCs) produced by explosive eruptions is a major goal in risk assessment and mitigation, particularly in distal reaches of flows that are often heavily urbanized. Pompeii and the nearby archaeological sites preserve the most complete set of evidence of the 79 AD catastrophic eruption recording its effects on structures and people. Here we investigate the causes of mortality in PDCs at Pompeii and surroundings on the bases of a multidisciplinary volcanological and bio-anthropological study. Field and laboratory study of the eruption products and victims merged with numerical simulations and experiments indicate...
  • OLDEST KNOWN GOSPEL RETRIEVED FROM MUMMY MASK, RESEARCHERS CLAIM

    01/21/2015 11:34:40 AM PST · by bkopto · 76 replies
    Breitbart/UPI ^ | Jan 21, 2015 | staff
    The mummy masks of ancient commoners are a treasure trove of classical and religious documents Christian scripture, Phoenician histories, Greek poetry. While the rich and royal members of ancient Egyptian society were buried in mummy masks of flaked gold and other precious metals, common people were forced to construct theirs with recycled pieces of paper. Recently, archaeologists found what they believe to be the worlds oldest piece of scripture in the mask of mummy from the first century. Researchers say the new scrap of spiritual papyrus is a portion of the the Gospel of Mark, the second chapter of...
  • Pompeii's Mystery Horse Is a Donkey

    11/03/2010 8:28:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 1+ views
    Softpedia ^ | Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 | Smaranda Biliuti
    Back in 2004, when academics unearthed skeletons found at a house in the ancient Roman town that was covered in ashes in 79 AD, they thought it belonged to an extinct breed of horse... What happened really was that there seems to have been a mix-up in the lab, which led to horse DNA being combined with donkey DNA, creating an artificial hybrid that actually never existed. Six years ago, the skeletons of equids having belonged to a rich Roman household in Pompeii were analyzed. There were found in the stables of a probably wealthy politician, and all five of...
  • Pompeii Family's Final Hours Reconstructed

    12/15/2008 7:31:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 1,546+ views
    Discovery News ^ | December 11, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    At around 1:00 p.m. on Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Pompeii residents saw a pine tree-shaped column of smoke bursting from Vesuvius. Reaching nine miles into the sky, the column began spewing a thick pumice rain. Many residents rushed in the streets, trying to leave the city. "At that moment, Polybius' house was inhabited by 12 people, including a young woman in advanced pregnancy. They decided to remain in the house, most likely because it was safer for the pregnant woman. Given the circumstances, it was the right strategy," Scarpati said... At around 7:00 p.m., by which time the front part...
  • The Fall and Rise and Fall of Pompeii

    07/01/2015 5:37:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | July 2015 | Joshua Hammer
    ...The two towns remained largely undisturbed, lost to history, through the rise of Byzantium, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In 1738, Maria Amalia Christine, a nobleman's daughter from Saxony, wed Charles of Bourbon, the King of Naples, and became entranced by classical sculptures displayed in the garden of the royal palace in Naples. A French prince digging in the vicinity of his villa on Mount Vesuvius had discovered the antiquities nearly 30 years earlier, but had never conducted a systematic excavation. So Charles dispatched teams of laborers and engineers equipped with tools and blasting powder to the site of...
  • Rancher unveils Indian site kept secret for years

    06/24/2004 7:04:48 PM PDT · by Dog Gone · 106 replies · 2,181+ views
    Associated Press ^ | June 24, 2004 | PAUL FOY
    Archaeologists says it's one of the West's most spectacular SALT LAKE CITY -- For more than 50 years, rancher Waldo Wilcox kept most outsiders off his land and the secret under wraps: a string of ancient Indian settlements so remarkably well-preserved that arrowheads and beads are still lying out in the open. Archaeologists are calling it one of the most spectacular finds in the West. Hidden deep inside Utah's nearly inaccessible Book Cliffs region, 130 miles from Salt Lake City, the prehistoric villages run for 12 miles and include hundreds of rock art panels, cliffside granaries, stone houses built...
  • Archaeologists Reveal Utah Canyon Filled With Ancient Settlements

    06/30/2004 8:44:46 PM PDT · by nuconvert · 35 replies · 2,054+ views
    AP ^ | June 30, 2004
    Archaeologists Reveal Utah Canyon Filled With Ancient Settlements By Paul Foy/Associated Press Jun 30, 2004 EAST CARBON CITY, Utah (AP) - Archaeologists led reporters into a remote canyon Wednesday to reveal an almost perfectly preserved picture of ancient life: stone pit houses, granaries and a bounty of artifacts kept secret for more than a half-century. Hundreds of sites on a private ranch turned over to the state offer some of the best evidence of the little-understood Fremont culture, hunter-gatherers and farmers who lived mostly within the present-day borders of Utah. Hundreds of rock art panels are scattered across the canyon...
  • Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese

    10/10/2002 11:02:29 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 49 replies · 681+ views
    Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese Oct. 9 By E. J. Mundell NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A tiny piece of cheese, carbonized in the volcanic eruption that killed the citizens of Pompeii, is yielding up secrets as to how ancient Romans ate, lived and died. Using an electron microscope, anthropological researcher Dr. Luigi Capasso of the State University G. d'Annunzio in Chieti, Italy, has been able to pinpoint goats' milk cheese as a prime source of brucellosis--a debilitating joint disease that ravaged the ancient world. "Roman cheese was an important and continuous source of possible infectious...
  • Scans show Pompeii victims 'in good health' [other than being dead]

    09/30/2015 12:36:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    The Local ^ | September 29, 2015 | Patrick Browne
    A recently launched project that is performing CAT scans on the remains of Pompeii victims contained within plaster casts has revealed that good health was widespread among people of the ancient city. For sure, they ate better than we did, orthodontist Elisa Vanacore said during a press conference in Pompeii on Tuesday, after analyzing some of the initial results. They have really good teeth they ate a diet that contained few sugars, and was high in fruit and vegetables, she added, perhaps busting the image of Romans as decadent banquet-loving individuals who loved nothing more than a good binge...
  • Builders in Omsk stumble across Bronze Age burial site

    09/30/2015 12:27:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 29 September 2015 | reporter
    Two graves dating back 2,700 years believed to be from ancient necropolis under city centre. Workmen called in police and archeologists after discovery of the remains of the ancient people. One was buried with a knife and buckle. Archeologists are still inspecting the find but they grave is believed to be from the Irmen culture and dates to approximately 700 BC to 800 BC. The experts believe the graves are in the same Bronze Age necropolis as was disturbed 103 years ago when the site was previously excavated during construction of a building that is now being renovated. At this...
  • 17th Century Scottish Soldiers Identified from Mass Graves [Battle of Dunbar]

    09/04/2015 11:37:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, September 2, 2015 | Durham University/Scottish Soldiers Project
    In November 2013, during construction of a new café for the University's Palace Green Library, on the City's UNESCO World Heritage Site, human remains were uncovered by Durham University archaeologists who were present throughout the building work. The jumbled skeletons of at least 17 and up to 28 individuals were subsequently excavated from two burial pits (a 29th individual was not exhumed). Since then the researchers have been carrying out a wide range of tests to establish their identities. Experts initially considered that most of the evidence was consistent with the bodies being those of the Scottish soldiers but could...
  • Scientists find evidence of prehistoric massacre in Europe

    08/18/2015 6:16:15 AM PDT · by ETL · 61 replies
    AP, via Yahoo News ^ | Aug 17, 2015 | FRANK JORDANS
    BERLIN (AP) Scientists say they have found rare evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe after discovering a 7,000-year-old mass grave with skeletal remains from some of the continent's first farmers bearing terrible wounds. Archaeologists who painstakingly examined the bones of some 26 men, women and children buried in the Stone Age grave site at Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten, near Frankfurt, say they found blunt force marks to the head, arrow wounds and deliberate efforts to smash at least half of the victims' shins either to stop them from running away or as a grim message to survivors. [snip] "What is...
  • Another Tomb Discovered at Al-Qurna [18th Dynasty Egypt]

    03/11/2015 9:56:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 10, 2015 | editors
    Another 18th Dynasty tomb has been discovered by archaeologists from the American Research Center in Egypt at Al-Qurna in Luxor. Paintings on the walls of this New Kingdom (1550-1070 B.C.) tomb "are records of daily life practices that prevailed in that era," according to a statement made by Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty. This tomb, which belonged to Satmut and his wife Ta-kh-at, was also looted in antiquity, and some of the scenes and inscriptions on its walls were erased. "The newly discovered tomb is located to the east of TT110 and they share the same courtyard. The tomb door is...
  • Tombs of legendary lovers

    02/15/2014 11:25:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    al-Ahram ^ | February 13, 2014 | Nevine El-Aref
    Queen Nefertari, whose name means beautiful companion, was one of Ramses IIs eight royal wives and his most beloved one. Although Nefertaris family background is unknown, the discovery of an inscription of the cartouche of the pharaoh Ay inside her tomb has led archaeologists to speculate that she was related to him. If any relation exists, she could be his great-granddaughter because of the time between the reign of Ay and Ramses II in Ancient Egyptian history. Until now no decisive archaeological evidence has been found to link Nefertari to the royal family of the 18th Dynasty. Nefertari married Ramses...
  • Amenhotep I -- the undiscovered tomb [ 18th Dynasty Egypt ]

    11/14/2010 1:32:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    News from the Valley of the Kings 'blog ^ | Thursday, June 26, 2008 | Kate Phizackerley
    The first announcement of a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings came in August 2005 when the Egyptian State Information Service announced that an Egyptian Polish team had been given to excavate the tomb of the New Kingdom Pharaoh Amenhotep I in the Valley of the Kings. As I describe below, unfortunately this was mis-reported by the press how announced the stunning find of an intact tomb. Amenhotep I was the second pharaoh (1526-1506 BC) of the 18th Dynasty. His tomb was mentioned in the Abbott Papyrus, one of the highlights of the British Museum. The papyrus dates...
  • DNA Shows that KV55 Mummy Probably Not Akhenaten [Smenkhare]

    03/02/2010 7:00:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 626+ views
    KV-64 blog ^ | Tuesday, March 2, 2010 | Kate Phizackerley
    If we identify the KV55 mummy as Smenkhare and assume that Akhenaten remains missing, we can add Akhenaten and Nefertiti into the family tree, while retaining KV55 (Smenkhare) as the father of Tutankhamun as shown by the Hawass team. It's tempting to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady are also daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. While not essential for my revised theory, this would neatly fit historical facts. In considering whether the DNA data would fit the revised family tree, it seems appropriate to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady may also have been daughters of Akhenaten and...
  • Archaeology professor scrutinizes age-old mystery [ Uluburun wreck excavation]

    11/24/2008 3:39:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 1,338+ views
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Kayla Kitts
    In 1983 a sponge diver found funny metal biscuits with ears at the ocean floor. That is how the excavation got started, Hirschfeld said. The ship carried ten tons of copper ingots, which after being analyzed, were determined to be from Cyprus. Each ingot weighs approximately 60 pounds, she said. She and her team also excavated glass ingots, tons of tin, and three Italian swords that were not part of the cargo of the ship. Among the 130 Canaanite jars they found, there were traces of wine in the jars and one was full of glass beads. The team also...
  • Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy

    07/10/2007 4:52:43 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 852+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-10-2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy Brian Handwerk for National Geographic News July 10, 2007 Egyptologists have uncovered new evidence that bolsters the controversial theory that a mysterious mummy is the corpse of the heretic pharaoh Akhenaten, husband of Nefertiti and, some experts believe, the father of King Tut. (Photos: Who Was Tut's Father?) The mummy's identity has generated fierce debate ever since its discovery in 1907 in tomb KV 55, located less than 100 feet (30 meters) from King Tutankhamun's then hidden burial chamber. So an international team of researchers led by Zahi Hawass, head of...
  • Mummy dearest: riddle wrapped in a mystery [Nefertiti, Maya, Ankhesenpamon?] [ KV-63 ]

    06/07/2006 9:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 1,113+ views
    Washington Times / AFP ^ | June 7, 2006 | Alain Navarro
    Could the small tomb, designated KV63, hold a royal mummy, perhaps that of Tutankhamen's widow or even his mother? ...Otto Schaden, the man who found them, leads the American team. He believes they may have located the mummy of Tutankhamen's widow, Ankhesenamen, after traces of her name were found on the seal of one urn. The secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, thinks the final coffins may contain the remains of the pharaoh's mother, whose identity is unknown, and not the wife of Tutankhamen, the boy king who died at age 18.
  • Mystery tomb could hold Tutankhamen's widow

    06/02/2006 4:46:30 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 55 replies · 2,132+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | 6/2/06 | The Daily Telegraph
    LONDON: It has been 84 years since Egypt's famed Valley of the Kings revealed its last great riches the fabulous gold of Tutankhamen's tomb. Now archaeologists believe they have stumbled across one final secret: The mummified remains of the boy king's widow buried 3000 years ago. In a mysterious shaft less than 15m from Tutankhamen's burial ground, US archaeologists found seven coffins. They believe one they have not yet been able to open may contain the remains of Queen Ankhesenpaaten. The tomb found by accident by Memphis University team leader Dr Otto Schaden contained seven coffins stacked...
  • Pharaonic tomb find stuns Egypt [Possibly Nefertiti ... find by American archaeologists]

    02/10/2006 3:57:33 PM PST · by aculeus · 63 replies · 1,951+ views
    BBC News on line ^ | February 10, 2006 | Unsigned
    Archaeologists have discovered an intact, ancient Egyptian tomb in the Valley of the Kings, the first since King Tutankhamun's was found in 1922. A University of Memphis-led team found the previously unknown tomb complete with sarcophagi and five mummies. The archaeologists have not yet been able to identify them. But Egypt's chief archaeologist Zahi Hawass says they "might be royals or nobles" moved from "original graves to protect them from grave robbers". "We don't really know what kind of people are inside but I do believe they look royal. Maybe they are kings or queens or nobles," he told Reuters...