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Keyword: ancientautopsies

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Oldest evidence of breast cancer found in Egyptian skeleton

    03/29/2015 4:44:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Reuters ^ | Tuesday, March 24, 2015 | Mahmoud Mourad; editing by John Stonestreet
    A team from a Spanish university has discovered what Egyptian authorities are calling the world's oldest evidence of breast cancer in the 4,200-year-old skeleton of an adult woman. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said the bones of the woman, who lived at the end of the 6th Pharaonic Dynasty, showed "an extraordinary deterioration". "The study of her remains shows the typical destructive damage provoked by the extension of a breast cancer as a metastasis," he said in a statement on Tuesday. Despite being one of the world's leading causes of death today, cancer is virtually absent in archaeological records compared to...
  • The stapes of a neanderthal child points to the anatomical differences with respect to our species [

    03/29/2015 4:34:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    University of the Basque Country• ^ | Wednesday, March 25, 2015 | (press release)
    New remains recovered in an excavation carried out over 40 years ago have enabled this auditory ossicle to be reconstructedAsier Gómez-Olivencia, an Ikerbasque researcher at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, has published in The Journal of Human Evolution a piece of research in which he stresses the importance of reviewing old excavationsThe Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia between 230,000 and 28,000 years ago... The archaeological site at La Ferrassie, excavated throughout the 20th century, is a mythical enclave because it was where 7 Neanderthal skeletons, ranging from foetuses to almost complete skeletons of...
  • The Secrets of Paviland Cave

    04/30/2011 1:07:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Past Horizons (from The Guardian) ^ | Wednesday, April 27, 2011 | Stephen Moss
    Paviland cave, on the Gower peninsula in South Wales, is a crucial site for tracing the origins of human life in Britain. It was in here, in 1823, that William Buckland, the first professor of geology at Oxford University, excavated the remains of a body that had been smeared with red ochre (naturally occurring iron oxide) and buried with a selection of periwinkle shells and ivory rods. Buckland initially thought the body was that of a customs officer, killed by smugglers. Then he decided it was a Roman prostitute... This misidentification gave the headless skeleton its name -- "the Red...
  • Ancient Skeleton Was 'Even Older' (Red Lady Of Paviland)

    10/30/2007 7:59:59 PM PDT · by blam · 34 replies · 79+ views
    BBC ^ | 10-30-2007
    Ancient skeleton was 'even older' The burial site was in Goat's Hole Cave at Paviland on Gower The Red Lady of Paviland has always been a little coy about her age - but it appears she may be 4,000 years older than previously thought. Scientists say more accurate tests date the earliest human burial found in the UK to just over 29,000 years ago. When discovered in a cave on Gower in the 1820s the bones were thought to be around 18,000 years old, but were later redated to between 25,000 and 26,000. Researchers said it casts a new light...
  • Paviland Cave And The Red Lady

    01/17/2007 12:39:44 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 857+ views
    Paviland Cave and The Red Lady Paviland Cave, on the south coast of the Gower peninsula, South Wales, is an Early Upper Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) archaeological site, dating to roughly 30,000 - 20,000 years ago. It is the richest site of its kind in Britain, with four and a half thousand finds, including worked bone and stone (lithic) tools. The Red Lady of Paviland was a fairly complete human skeleton dyed in red ochre that was discovered in 1826 by the Reverend William Buckland in one of the Paviland limestone caves at )Goat’s Hole Cave). The "lady" has since...
  • Campaign To Bring 'Red Lady' Back To Swansea After 180 Years

    12/27/2004 12:05:01 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 695+ views
    IC Wales ^ | 12-27-2004 | Robin Turner
    Campaign to bring 'Red Lady' back to Swansea after 180 years Dec 27 2004 Robin Turner, Western Mail THE chairman of Swansea's tourism association is backing an Elgin Marbles style campaign to secure the return to Wales of the Red Lady of Paviland. The skeleton of the "red lady", complete with jewellery and a mammoth's head grave marker, is regarded as one of the world's most important archaeological finds. It was discovered in 1823 at Paviland Cave on Gower. Later analysis showed the skeleton to be that of a man, probably a chieftain, but the Red Lady tag has stuck....
  • Red Lady cave burial reveals Stone Age secrets

    03/29/2015 11:54:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    New Scientist ^ | March 18, 2015 | Penny Sarchet
    Aged between 35 and 40 when she died, she was laid to rest alongside a large engraved stone, her body seemingly daubed in sparkling red pigment. Small, yellow flowers may even have adorned her grave 18,700 years ago -- a time when cave burials, let alone one so elaborate, appear to have been very rare. It was a momentous honour, and no one knows why she was given it... Her remains were discovered when Straus's team began digging behind this block in 2010. Radiocarbon dating reveals that the block fell from the ceiling at most only a few hundred years...
  • The House of Tudor Didn't Get the Last Word

    03/27/2015 8:49:58 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 61 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | March 26, 2015 | Jeff Jacoby
    IT'S REMARKABLE what five centuries can do for a guy's reputation. When Richard III, the last Plantaganet king of England, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, his corpse was stripped and hauled in disgrace through the streets of Leicester, "all besprinkled with mire and blood … a miserable spectacle," as Holinshed's Chronicle recounted. Then it was stuffed into a crude grave, naked and coffinless, while "few lamented and many rejoiced." This week, the medieval king, whose bones were found under a parking lot in 2012, will be reburied in Leicester Cathedral with full reverence and honor....
  • Richard III returns to Bosworth Field for final time

    03/22/2015 11:44:34 AM PDT · by Prospero · 49 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/22/2015 | Sarah Knapton
    The last time Richard III was at Bosworth Field the outcome proved less than satisfactory for the King. The battle, which was the last significant skirmish in the War of the Roses, saw Richard not only lose the English throne but also his life.
  • The Battle of Towton :Nasty, brutish and not that short

    12/29/2010 5:00:36 PM PST · by worst-case scenario · 19 replies · 9+ views
    The Economist ^ | Dec 16 2010
    Medieval warfare was just as terrifying as you might imagine. THE soldier now known as Towton 25 had survived battle before. A healed skull fracture points to previous engagements. He was old enough—somewhere between 36 and 45 when he died—to have gained plenty of experience of fighting. But on March 29th 1461, his luck ran out. Towton 25 suffered eight wounds to his head that day. The precise order can be worked out from the direction of fractures on his skull: when bone breaks, the cracks veer towards existing areas of weakness. The first five blows were delivered by a...
  • Towton, the bloodbath that changed the course of English history. (Well worth reading)

    08/23/2008 7:45:39 PM PDT · by PotatoHeadMick · 58 replies · 406+ views
    The Sunday Times (UK) ^ | August 24, 2008 | AA Gill
    Get onto the B1217 – the Ferrybridge-to-Tadcaster road – just after the M1 joins the A1M, and you’ve crossed that unmapped line where the north stops being grim and begins to be bracing. Go through Saxton, past the Crooked Billet pub, and on your left you’ll see rising farmland, green corn and copses – an old landscape, untroubled by poets or painters or the hyperbole of tourist boards, but handsome, still and hushed. The road is straight; it knows where it’s going, hurrying along, averting its gaze. Through the tonsured hedge you might just notice a big old holly tree...
  • Battle of Towton, the birth of modern warfare and the killing of 1% of the population

    12/06/2010 7:45:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Archaeology News (UK) ^ | November 25, 2010 | Stephen
    The Battle of Towton was one of the bloodiest battle to ever take place on English soil, with nearly 1% of the English population of the time killed during the battle. New finds on the site has produced the earliest evidence of the use of guns on the battle field. The Battle of Towton took place on a snowy 29 March 1461 on high ground between the villages of Towton and Saxton in Yorkshire (about 12 miles (19 km) southwest of York and about 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Tadcaster). The battle was one of the key battles of...
  • Skeletons Of Bloodiest Day (Towton - 1461AD)

    09/12/2006 2:45:57 PM PDT · by blam · 71 replies · 2,073+ views
    The Press ^ | 9-12-2006 | Nadia Jefferson-Brown
    Skeletons of bloodiest day By Nadia Jefferson-Brown SKELETONS bearing marks of horrendous sword injuries have been unearthed beneath a North Yorkshire hall. The victims of a medieval battle were discovered beneath the floor of the dining room of Towton Hall, between Tadcaster and Sherburn-in- Elmet, dating from the Battle of Towton in 1461. The discovery was made as part of a ten-year investigation into the archaeological evidence of the longest and bloodiest battle ever fought in England. Taking place on Palm Sunday, March 29, 1461, the Lancastrian army was handed an enormous blow with its leader, King Henry VI, forced...
  • Veni Vidi, Veggie...(Roman Gladiators)

    03/01/2004 6:03:18 PM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 679+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-3-2004 | Tom Leonard
    Veni, vidi, veggie... By Tom Leonard, Media Editor (Filed: 02/03/2004) Roman gladiators were overweight vegetarians who lived on barley and beans, according to a scientific study of the largest gladiator graveyard discovered. Analysis of the bones of more than 70 gladiators recently found near Ephesus, the Roman capital of Asia Minor, puts paid to traditional Hollywood images of macho carnivores with the physique of boxers. The dietary findings of the scientists from the University of Vienna are detailed in a forthcoming documentary on Channel Five. They may give vegetarians a new, harder image. But the vegetarian stereotype is shattered by...
  • Treasure-hunting sisters find human remains from Roman era

    12/20/2007 8:04:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 38+ views
    Haaretz ^ | Wednesday, December 19, 2007 | Fadi Eyadat
    Julia Shvicky of Kibbutz Barkai and Janet Daws, visiting from England, found some bones that had washed up on the shore during a stroll by the beach... At first, the sisters did not know they had found human bones. They took them to the kibbutz nurse who told them the bones were part of a human spinal cord and hip. They immediately handed their find over to the police who briefly quizzed them and sent the human remains to the National Institute of Forensic Medicine at Abu Kabir for examination. Though test results are not yet in, police and the...
  • Human Sacrifice Was Rarer Than Thought

    07/22/2004 4:53:50 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 845+ views
    ABC Science News ^ | 7-22-2004 | Anna Salleh
    Human sacrifice was rarer than thought Anna Salleh in Brisbane ABC Science Online Thursday, 22 July 2004 Did this skull from the Lichtenstein cave come from someone who was sacrificed or who died naturally? (Image: Stefan Flindt) Bronze Age ritual human sacrifice may have been rarer than believed, according to a unique study of ancient DNA from bones in central Europe. German anthropologist Dr Susanne Hummel from the University of Göttingen presented her team's research at a recent ancient DNA conference in Brisbane, Australia. Hummel said the research was also the first to use ancient DNA to complete a family...
  • Study finds significant facial variation in pre-Columbian South America

    03/15/2015 8:06:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 5, 2013 | North Carolina State University
    A team of anthropology researchers has found significant differences in facial features between all seven pre-Columbian peoples they evaluated from what is now Peru -- disproving a longstanding perception that these groups were physically homogenous. The finding may lead scholars to revisit any hypotheses about human migration patterns that rested on the idea that there was little skeletal variation in pre-Columbian South America. Skeletal variation is a prominent area of research in New World bioarchaeology, because it can help us understand the origins and migration patterns of various pre-Columbian groups through the Americas... The recently-published findings may affect a lot...
  • Harvard study: global warming may end threat of mummies

    03/12/2015 9:07:09 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | Pedro Gonzales
    For generations, books, films, and TV have warned us of the danger of mummies. In their crypts they are relatively harmless, but when they rise from the dead and start strangling people, as they did in the Cotswolds of south central England in “Doctor Who and the Pyramids of Mars,” they become a much greater threat. But this problem may shortly be solved, thanks to global warming. The world’s oldest mummies are at risk of disappearing because of man-made climate change, according to a group of Harvard University scientists. Bodies mummified about 7,000 years ago in Chile are starting to...
  • Incan Skull Surgery

    04/26/2008 7:32:58 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 595+ views
    Science News ^ | 4-25-2008 | Bruce Bower
    Incan skull surgery By Bruce BowerApril 25th, 2008 Holes in ancient skulls reflect skilled medical careHealing Hole in the HeadANCIENT SURGERY A new analysis of ancient skulls reveals skills of Incan healers in cranial cutting.Valerie AndrushkoWhen Incan healers scraped or cut a hunk of bone out of a person’s head, they meant business. Practitioners of this technique, known as trepanation, demonstrated great skill more than 500 years ago in treating warriors’ head wounds and possibly other medical problems, rarely causing infections or killing their patients, two anthropologists find. Trepanation emerged as a promising but dangerous medical procedure by about 1,000...
  • Spartans Did Not Throw Deformed Babies Away: Researchers

    12/12/2007 11:10:15 AM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 2,464+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 12-10-2007
    Spartans did not throw deformed babies away: researchers Mon Dec 10, 1:22 PM ETAFP/File Photo: The statue of King Leonidas of ancient Sparta stands over the battlefield of Thermopylae, some... ATHENS (AFP) - The Greek myth that ancient Spartans threw their stunted and sickly newborns off a cliff was not corroborated by archaeological digs in the area, researchers said Monday. After more than five years of analysis of human remains culled from the pit, also called an apothetes, researchers found only the remains of adolescents and adults between the ages of 18 and 35, Athens Faculty of Medicine Anthropologist Theodoros...
  • American Drugs In Egyptian Mummies

    11/11/2006 3:14:05 PM PST · by blam · 56 replies · 2,009+ views
    American Drugs in Egyptian MummiesS. A. Wells www.colostate.edu Abstract: The recent findings of cocaine, nicotine, and hashishin Egyptian mummies by Balabanova et. al. have been criticized on grounds that: contamination of the mummies may have occurred, improper techniques may have been used, chemical decomposition may have produced the compounds in question, recent mummies of drug users were mistakenly evaluated, that no similar cases are known of such compounds in long-dead bodies, and especially that pre-Columbian transoceanic voyages are highly speculative. These criticisms are each discussed in turn. Balabanova et. al. are shown to have used and confirmed their findings with...
  • Mystery of the Cocaine Mummies

    03/25/2005 8:28:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 1,185+ views
    For in Manchester, the mummies under the care of Rosalie David, the Egyptologist [Keeper of Egyptology, Manchester Museum] once so sure that Balabanova had made a mistake, produced some odd results of their own... "We've received results back from the tests on our mummy tissue samples and two of the samples and the one hair sample both have evidence of nicotine in them. I'm really very surprised at this."
  • Mystery Pharaoh Found in Egypt

    01/18/2014 10:50:21 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | January 16, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of a previously unknown pharaoh who reigned more than 3,600 years ago have emerged from the desert sand at South Abydos in Sohag province, about 300 miles south of Cairo... The skeleton of Woseribre Senebkay, who appears to be one of the earliest kings of a forgotten Abydos Dynasty (1650–1600 B.C.) was found by a University of Pennsylvania expedition... It rested in a four-chambered tomb amidst the fragmented debris of his coffin, funerary mask and canopic chest... Senebkay's tomb dates to about 1650 B.C., during Egypt's Second Intermediate Period, when central authority collapsed, giving rise to several small...
  • Pharaoh Brutally Killed in Battle, Analysis Shows

    02/27/2015 7:09:59 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    discovery,com ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Pharaoh Senebkay, one of the earliest kings of a forgotten Abydos Dynasty, was brutally killed in battle more than 3,600 years ago, says a study that has reconstructed, blow by blow, the king’s last moments. The research identified 18 wounds on the pharaoh’s bones. It also established that Senebkay is the earliest Egyptian pharaoh to have died in battle. Woseribre Senebkay was unknown to history until last year, when a University of Pennsylvania expedition led by archaeologist Josef Wegner, working with Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, found his remains in a four-chambered tomb at South Abydos in Sohag province, about...
  • 'Civil War' skull from Gettysburg that was nearly auctioned off is actually more than 700 years old

    02/08/2015 12:56:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | Sunday, February 8, 2015 | Belinda Robinson
    A skull that was thought to have belonged to a Civil War soldier killed at Gettysburg is actually more than 700 years old and from the Southwest, say experts. The National Park Service has revealed that forensic anthropologists determined that the skull is from the late 1200s and belonged to a Native American man in his early-to-mid 20s. That's nearly 300 years before Christopher Columbus sailed to the New World and 400 years before the first settlement of English in the United States. The company that nearly auctioned the skull last year said notarized documents had showed it was discovered...
  • Rare Twin Birth Identified in Russia Hunter-Gatherer Cemetery

    02/07/2015 5:58:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Friday, February 06, 2015 | editors, LiveScience
    A 7,700-year-old skeleton may bear the oldest confirmed evidence of twins, and be one of the earliest examples of death during childbirth, according to archaeologist Angela Lieverse of the University of Saskatchewan. She found the skeleton, which had been excavated at Lokomotive, a hunter-gatherer cemetery near the southern tip of Russia's Lake Baikal, in storage at Irkutsk State University. It had been thought to represent the death of a mother and a single child, but Lieverse soon realized that some of the fetal bones had duplicates. "Within five minutes, I said to my colleague, 'Oh my gosh; these are twins,'"...
  • Jesus' Words Backed by Archaeology: The Stones Are Crying Out

    02/07/2015 12:06:39 AM PST · by Faith Presses On · 15 replies
    Charisma News/CBN ^ | 2/5/15 | Charles Colson
    A few years ago, people exploring caves outside Jerusalem came across the find of a lifetime: an ancient burial cave containing the remains of a crucified man. This find is only one in a series of finds that overturns a century-old scholarly consensus. That consensus held that the Gospels are almost entirely proclamation and contain little, if any, real history. The remains belonged to a man who had been executed in the first century A.D., that is, from the time of Jesus. As Jeffrey Sheler writes in his book Is the Bible True? the skeleton confirms what the evangelists wrote...
  • Chinese mummy suggests brain surgery was carried out 3,600 years ago...

    02/03/2015 2:28:29 PM PST · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 16:13 EST, 3 February 2015 | By Victoria Woollaston
    A skull that's more than three and a half millennia old has revealed signs of an early form of brain surgery. The perforated skull belongs to a mummified woman found in the Xiaohe tomb in China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Experts said that the hole, which measures around 2 inches (50mm) in diameter, was most likely an early form of craniotomy. A craniotomy involves temporarily removing a 'flap' of bone from the skull to give surgeons access to the brain. The amount of skull removed depends on the type of surgery being performed, and the flap is later replaced using...
  • In Mongolia Archaeologists Discover Permafrost Mummy With Fur Coat (Scythian Soldier - 2,500 YO)

    08/17/2006 5:04:52 PM PDT · by blam · 46 replies · 6,197+ views
    Mongolia Web ^ | 8-17-2006 | Ulaanbaatar
    In Mongolia archaeologists discover permafrost mummy with fur coat. Written by Ulaanbaatar correspondent Thursday, 17 August 2006 Research workers of the German archaeological institute have discovered a mummy in permafrost at excavation work in Mongolia of approximately 2,500 years old. At the "sensational find" of a sepulchre chamber of the Scythian rider people a crew of the German television sender ZDF were present. In front of the camera the archaeologists opened the sepulchre where the mummy of the Scythian soldier was stored. The mummy, conserved in permafrost, carried still a fur coat and had a decorated gilded head ornament. According...
  • Anthropologists Have Mapped All 61 Tattoos On Ötzi The Iceman

    01/29/2015 7:56:36 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 79 replies
    By using an innovative non-invasive photographic technique, European researchers have managed to locate and map the extensive set of tattoos on the exquisitely preserved remains of Ötzi the Iceman. Remarkably, they even found a previously unknown tattoo on his ribcage. Ötzi's frozen remains were discovered by two German tourists in the Ötzal Alps on the border between Austria and Italy in 1991. He lived around 3,300 BCE and represents Europe's oldest natural human mummy. Because he was so well preserved in ice, he has provided anthropologists with a slew of information about Copper Age (or Chalcolithic) humans. ... It's worth...
  • Scan finds new tattoos on 5300-year-old Iceman

    01/24/2015 3:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    redOrbit ^ | January 22, 2015 | Aaron Deter-Wolf
    A new study has used advanced imaging techniques to identify previously unknown tattoos on the ribcage of the 5300-year old man known as Ötzi, bringing his total number of tattoos to 61... Thanks to more than two decades of analysis, scientists arguably know more about Ötzi's health and final days than those of any other ancient human. He died at around 45 years of age after being shot in the back with a stone-tipped arrow and bludgeoned. In the 12 hours preceding his death he climbed into the mountains from an Italian valley, and ate a last meal consisting of...
  • Beard on King Tut's burial mask damaged after epoxy gluing

    01/22/2015 8:36:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    AP ^ | January 22, 2014 | Staff
    The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with epoxy, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning, conservators at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo said Wednesday. The museum is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds, mounted on walls, crumble from behind open panels of glass. Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are its top exhibits. Three of the museum's conservators reached by telephone gave...
  • First indication for embalming in Roman Greece

    07/31/2008 8:42:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 175+ views
    AlphaGalileo ^ | Wednesday, July 30, 2008 | unattributed
    A Swiss-Greek research team co-lead by Dr. Frank Rühli from the Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, found indication for embalming in Roman Greek times. By means of physico-chemical and histological methods, it was possible to show that various resins, oils and spices were used during embalming of a ca. 55 year old female in Northern Greece. This is the first ever multidisciplinary-based indication for artificial mummification in Greece at 300 AD. The remains of a ca. 55-year old female (ca. 300 AD, most likely of high-social status; actual location: Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki, Greece) shows the preservation of various...
  • Cemetery with one MILLION mummies unearthed in Egypt: 1,500-year-old desert necropolis

    12/18/2014 6:00:19 AM PST · by C19fan · 14 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 18, 2014 | Richard Gray
    A cemetery containing more than a million mummified human bodies has been unearthed in central Egypt, according to archaeologists. Scientists have already excavated more than 1,700 mummies, preserved by the hot dry desert in the Faiyum region of Egypt about 60 miles (96km) south of Cairo. But those leading the work believe their could be up to a million similar bodies buried in shafts cut into the limestone rock that are at times up to 75ft (22.9 metres) deep.
  • Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits

    09/23/2004 7:24:12 PM PDT · by blam · 41 replies · 1,168+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 9-23-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Sept. 23, 2004 Mummy hair has revealed the first direct evidence of alcohol consumption in ancient populations, according to new forensic research.The study, still in its preliminary stage, examined hair samples from spontaneously mummified remains discovered in one of the most arid regions of the world, the Atacama Desert of northern Chile and southern Peru. The research was presented at the 5th World Congress on Mummy Studies in Turin, Italy, this month. “ In modern human hair the levels would generally be in the ranges of social drinking, but we...
  • Mummifird Dogs Uncovered In Peru

    09/23/2006 3:40:14 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 598+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-23-2006 | Dan Collins
    Mummified dogs uncovered in Peru By Dan Collins BBC News, Lima Archaeologists in Peru have uncovered the mummified remains of more than 40 dogs buried with blankets and food alongside their human masters. The discovery was made during the excavation of two of the ancient Chiribaya people who lived in southern Peru between 900 and 1350 AD. Experts say the dogs' treatment in death indicated the belief that the animals had an afterlife. Such a status for pets has only previously been seen in ancient Egypt. Hundreds of years before the European conquest of South America, the Chiribaya civilisation valued...
  • Ancient pet cemeteries found in Peru

    09/23/2006 3:53:20 PM PDT · by fanfan · 8 replies · 259+ views
    AP via CTV News ^ | Sat. Sep. 23 2006 | Associated Press
    LIMA, Peru -- Even in ancient Peru, it seems dogs were a man's best friend. Peruvian investigators have discovered a pre-Columbian culture of dog lovers who built pet cemeteries and buried their pets with warm blankets and even treats for the afterlife. "They are dogs that were thanked and recognized for their social and familial contribution," anthropologist Sonia Guillen said. "These dogs were not sacrificed." Since 1993, researchers have unearthed 82 dog tombs in pet cemetery plots, laid alongside human mummy tombs of the Chiribaya people in the fertile Osmore River valley, 540 miles southeast of Lima. The Chiribaya were...
  • 700-year-old Peruvian mummies found (so well preserved – an eye and internal organs intact)

    02/24/2004 6:35:01 AM PST · by dead · 15 replies · 373+ views
    Reuters via SMH | February 25, 2004
    Two of the oldest mummies found in Peru - so well preserved that one had an eye and internal organs intact - have gone on display after their discovery by building workers two weeks ago. Officials from the National Institute of Culture said the mummies - a young boy and a man in his mid-30s - were at least 700 years old. They came from a culture that predated the Incas, who dominated a vast swathe of South America from Colombia to Chile until they were toppled by Spanish invaders in the 1530s. Well preserved ... one of the recently...
  • North America's Oldest Skeleton Discovery: 13,000-Year-Old Body of 'Naia' Discovered in Mexico

    05/16/2014 10:02:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | May 15, 2014 19:00 GMT | Lydia Smith
    One of the oldest human skeletons in North America has been discovered by a team of international scientists in an underwater Yucatán Peninsula cave. Named "Naia", the teenager fell to her death in a large pit called Hoyo Nego, meaning "black hole" in Spanish. Patricia Beddows, a cave-diving researcher from Northwestern University, said: "The preservation of all the bones in this deep water-filled cave is amazing - the bones are beautifully laid out." "The girl's skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died -- she ended up in the right water and in a quiet place...
  • King Tut, Totally Intact -- King Tut's Penis Rediscovered

    05/03/2006 11:10:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies · 1,015+ views
    Discovery News ^ | May 3, 2006 | Rossella Lorenzi
    King Tutankhamun's rediscovered penis could make the pharaoh stand out in the shrunken world of male mummies, according to a close look into old pictures of the 3,300-year-old mummified king... Photographed intact by Harry Burton (1879-1940) during Howard Carter's excavation of Tut's tomb in 1922, the royal penis was reported missing in 1968, when British scientist Ronald Harrison took a series of X-rays of the mummy. Speculation abounded that the penis had been stolen and sold. "Instead, it has always been there. I found it during the CT scan last year, when the mummy was lifted. It lay loose in...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Amphipolis skeleton from Alexander's time found in Greece

    11/12/2014 10:41:24 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/12/2014 | By Giorgos Christides
    Archaeologists in northern Greece have found a skeleton inside a tomb from the time of Alexander the Great, during a dig that has enthralled the public. The burial site at Amphipolis is the largest ever discovered in Greece. The culture ministry said the almost intact skeleton belonged to a "distinguished public figure", given the tomb's dimensions and lavishness. Chief archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said "the tomb in all probability belongs to a male and a general". The excavation has fascinated Greeks ever since Prime Minister Antonis Samaras visited the site in August 2014 and announced it amounted to "an exceptionally important...
  • Large mosaic in ancient tomb uncovered in Greece [Amphipolis update]

    10/13/2014 11:11:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/12/2014 | by Demetris Nellas
    Archaeologists digging through a vast ancient tomb in Amphipolis in northern Greece have uncovered a floor mosaic that covers the whole area of a room seen as the antechamber to the main burial ground. The mosaic, 3 meters (10 feet) long and 4.5 meters (15 feet) wide, depicts a horseman with a laurel wreath driving a chariot drawn by two horses and preceded by the god Hermes. According to a Culture Ministry announcement on Sunday, Hermes is depicted here as the conductor of souls to the afterlife. The mosaic is made up of pebbles in many colors: white, black, gray,...
  • Have they found Alexander the Great's tomb? Or maybe his mother's?

    10/03/2014 3:06:14 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 19 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 10-3-14 | Sarah Griffiths
    Speculation about who the mysterious ancient tomb recently unearthed in Greece belongs to continues, with one academic now suggesting Alexander the Great’s mother was buried there. A number of scholars believe that the presence of female figures, known as caryatids, show that the tomb in the Amphipolis region of Serres belongs to a female. However, one expert has gone as far as to state that he believes that archaeologists could eventually discover the remains of Alexander the Great's parent, Olympias, inside. Writer Andrew Chugg, who has published a book on the search for the legendary leader's tomb, as well as...
  • Fever mounts as stunning statues found at ancient Greek tomb (Amphipolis)

    09/07/2014 5:44:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 19 replies
    AFP via Yahoo ^ | September 7, 2014
    Athens (AFP) - Two stunning caryatid statues have been unearthed holding up the entrance to the biggest ancient tomb ever found in Greece, archaeologists said. The two female figures in long-sleeved tunics were found standing guard at the opening to the mysterious Alexander The Great-era tomb near Amphipolis in the Macedonia region of northern Greece.
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • Greek tomb at Amphipolis is 'important discovery'

    08/13/2014 10:23:09 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13th August 2014 | BBC News
    'Archaeologists unearthing a burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have made an "extremely important find", says Greek PM Antonis Samaras. Experts believe the tomb belonged to an important figure dating back to the last quarter of the Fourth Century BC. A large mound complex has been unearthed at the Kasta hill site in the past two years. Lead archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said it certainly dated from after the death of Alexander the Great.'
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great?

    08/23/2013 7:47:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | August 23, 2013
    Experts find enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a massive mound in Greece Archaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis, 370 miles north of Athens The warrior king was thought to be buried in Egypt but experts have discovered a marble-faced wall dating from the 4th century BC Site archaeologist Aikaterini Peristeri has voiced hopes of finding 'a significant individual or individuals' withinArchaeologists have uncovered what could be the grave of Alexander the Great at a site near ancient Amphipolis. The warrior king - who ruled in...