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Keyword: archaeoastronomy

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  • A piece of research challenges the view that Neolithic societies were egalitarian

    05/01/2015 1:33:33 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | May 1, 2015 | Heritage Daily
    The data obtained by Teresa Fernández-Crespo in seven megalithic graves in La Rioja and Araba-Álava suggest that certain individuals were excluded from burial on the basis of age and sex. The research Demographic evidence of selective burial in megalithic graves of northern Spain by Teresa Fernández-Crespo and Concepción de la Rúa of the Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country challenges the widely-held view that societies were egalitarian during the late Neolithic and Chalcolithic ages. This work, published in the leading Journal of Archaeological Science, comes from Fernández-Crespo’s PhD thesis entitled Antropología...
  • John Switzer commentary: Serpent Mound continues to confound

    04/08/2015 10:00:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Columbus Dispatch ^ | Sunday April 5, 2015 | John Switzer
    There’s something new about the very old Great Serpent Mound, the earthen snake effigy that stretches a quarter of a mile along the terrain in Adams County in southern Ohio... What is new about Serpent Mound is that it might be far more ancient than currently thought. Some archaeologists have recently discovered evidence that it was constructed around 300 B.C. by the Adena culture. That contrasts with the prevailing school of thought that it is about 920 years old and was built by the Fort Ancient culture... For instance, the massive head of the snake effigy points to where the...
  • Coral Pyramids in Micronesia Date Back to Middle Ages

    03/25/2015 11:41:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 13, 2015 | Megan Gannon
    On a remote Pacific island not much bigger than Manhattan, there are ancient pyramids built out of living coral. New evidence reveals that these tombs could be up to 700 years old — much older than experts had previously thought. The royal tombs are tucked away in an artificially built ancient city called Leluh just off the mainland of Kosrae, a Micronesian island. Leluh was home to Kosraean high chiefs (as well as some lower chiefs and commoners, too) from about 1250 until the mid-1800s, when foreign whalers, traders and missionaries started to arrive on the island. With impressive canals...
  • Forgotten monuments of Northern Sweden

    03/24/2015 7:15:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 22, 2015 | Carl L. Thunberg
    The vast majority of the cairns appear to have been built as monuments to the dead, mainly during the southern Scandinavian Bronze Age; circa 1800-500 BC. They occupy prominent positions overlooking the surrounding area, and some researchers speculate that they had a function as tribal markers for family group territories... Unlike the cairns from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age which appear to contain cremation burials, the Early Bronze Age examples like one of the Spir Mountain cairns (RAÄ Grundsunda 109:1), have internal burial chambers with cists containing skeletal remains, accompanied by various grave goods. In some cases...
  • Stonehenge "King" was from central Europe

    02/10/2003 9:48:39 PM PST · by spetznaz · 19 replies · 458+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Mon, Feb 10, 2003
    LONDON (Reuters) - The construction of one of the country's most famous ancient landmarks, the towering megaliths at Stonehenge in southern England, might have been supervised by the Swiss, or maybe even the Germans. Archaeologists studying the remains of a wealthy archer found in a 4,000-year-old grave exhumed near Stonehenge last year said on Monday he was originally from the Alps region, probably modern-day Switzerland, Austria or Germany. "He would have been a very important person in the Stonehenge area and it is fascinating to think that someone from abroad -- probably modern-day Switzerland -- could have played an important...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • Archaeologists start Stonehenge dig

    03/31/2008 10:37:19 PM PDT · by bamahead · 19 replies · 374+ views
    AP/Yahoo! ^ | March 31, 2008 | GREGORY KATZ
    LONDON - Some of England's most sacred soil was disturbed Monday for the first time in more than four decades as archaeologists worked to solve the enduring riddle of Stonehenge: When and why was the prehistoric monument built? The excavation project, set to last until April 11, is designed to unearth materials that can be used to establish a firm date for when the first mysterious set of bluestones was put in place at Stonehenge, one of Britain's best known and least understood landmarks. The World Heritage site, a favorite with visitors the world over, has become popular with Druids,...
  • History's Largest Megalith

    02/24/2015 2:16:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, February 09, 2015 | Eric A. Powell
    A team of archaeologists at a 2,000-year-old limestone quarry in Lebanon’s Bekka Valley recently excavated around a megalith weighing approximately 1,000 tons and dubbed Hajjar al-Hibla, or “stone of the pregnant woman.” It was intended for the Temple of Jupiter, which sits on three limestone blocks of similar size at the nearby site of Baalbek. To the team’s shock, they unearthed yet another block, this one weighing an estimated 1,650 tons, making it the largest known megalith. The German Archaeological Institute’s Margarete van Esse says excavation was suspended when the trench became dangerously deep. “Hopefully in a following campaign we...
  • Ancient Stonehenge Houses Unearthed

    10/14/2006 12:29:58 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,583+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | 10-13-2006 | Jennifer Viegas
    Ancient Stonehenge Houses Unearthed Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Oct. 13, 2006 —Nine Neolithic-era buildings have been excavated in the Stonehenge world heritage site, according to a report in the journal British Archaeology. The structures, which appear to have been homes, date to 2,600-2,500 B.C. and were contemporary with the earliest stone settings at the site's famous megalith. They are the first house-like structures discovered there. Julian Thomas, who worked on the project and is chair of the archaeology department at Manchester University in England, said Stonehenge could have been a key gathering place at the Neolithic era's version of a...
  • Cahokia's Woodhenge: a supprising implication [sic]

    11/29/2010 8:19:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Examiner.com ^ | Friday, November 26th, 2010 | Richard Thornton
    Today we travel to southern Illinois, where just across the Mississippi River is located the Cahokia Archaeological Zone. Cahokia was the largest known Native American city north of Mexico. At its peak population around 1250 AD, it was larger that London, England. Of course, Cahokia was not its real name. No one knows its real name. Unlike the ancient towns in the Southeast, where direct descendants of the original occupants still live, no one even knows yet what happened to the population of Cahokia, after it was abandoned. There was an indigenous village in the vicinity of Cahokia as early...
  • Stonehenge Builders' Village Found

    06/15/2010 2:16:33 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 19 replies · 526+ views
    National Geographic ^ | June 15 2010 | National Geographic
    A prehistoric village has been discovered in southern England that was likely home to the builders of Stonehenge, archaeologists announced on January 30, 2007 (read the full story). The village, located 1.75 miles (2.8 kilometers) from the famous stone circle, includes eight wooden houses dated back to around 2500 B.C. The remains of a cluster of homes include the outlines of floors, beds, and cupboards. Tools, jewelry, pottery, and human and animal bones were also found. The excavated houses formed part of a much bigger settlement dating back to the Late Stone Age, according to project leader Mike Parker Pearson...
  • Archaeologists to explore feasting habits of ancient builders of Stonehenge

    12/23/2009 6:29:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 408+ views
    Culture24 ^ | Monday, December 21, 2009 | Culture24 Staff
    The team who worked on the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2009 are to return to their findings to explain the eating habits of the people who built and worshipped at the stone circle over four thousand years ago... the new 'Feeding Stonehenge' project will analyse a range of materials including cattle bones and plant residue... Initial research suggests the animals were brought considerable distances to the ceremonial site.. The original Stonehenge Riverside project, which strengthened the idea that nearby Durrington Walls was part of the Stonehenge complex, yielded a surprisingly wide range of material ranging from ancient tools to animal...
  • Stone-age pilgrims trekked hundreds of miles to attend feast [ Stonehenge ]

    09/15/2008 9:08:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 202+ views
    Guardian ^ | September 11, 2008 | James Randerson
    Stone age people drove animals hundreds of miles to a site close to Stonehenge to be slaughtered for ritual feasts, according to scientists who have examined the chemical signatures of animal remains buried there... Durrington Walls is a stone-age village containing the remains of numerous cattle and pigs which are thought to have been buried there after successive ritual feasts. The site is two miles north east of Stonehenge and dates from around 3000 BC, 500 years before the first stones were erected... The evidence points to groups of people driving animals from as far away as Wales for the...
  • Stonehenge Could Have Been Resting Place For Royalty

    05/29/2008 6:43:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies · 163+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 30, 2008 | ScienceDaily
    Archaeologists at the University of Sheffield have revealed new radiocarbon dates of human cremation burials at Stonehenge, which indicate that the monument was used as a cemetery from its inception just after 3000 B.C. until well after the large stones went up around 2500 B.C. The Sheffield archaeologists, Professor Mike Parker-Pearson and Professor Andrew Chamberlain, believe that the cremation burials could represent the natural deaths of a single elite family and its descendants, perhaps a ruling dynasty. One clue to this is the small number of burials in Stonehenge´s earliest phase, a number that grows larger in subsequent centuries, as...
  • Stonehenge's huge support settlement

    11/05/2007 9:19:47 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies · 66+ views
    BBC News ^ | 11-05-07 | Sian Price
    Archaeologists working near Stonehenge have uncovered what they believe is the largest Neolithic settlement ever discovered in Northern Europe. Remains of an estimated 300 houses are thought to survive under earthworks 3km (2 miles) from the famous stone rings, and 10 have been excavated so far. But there could have been double that total according to the archaeologist leading the work. "What is really exciting is realising just how big the village for the Stonehenge builders was," says Professor Mike Parker Pearson of Sheffield University. Allowing four per house, he estimates there could have been room for more than 2,000...
  • Message In The Stones

    11/01/2007 1:50:09 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 200+ views
    Message in the Stones Why transport 82 two-tonne megaliths across more than 250 miles of mountain, river and sea to build a stone circle at Stonehenge? This is one of the greatest mysteries of Britain’s best-known, but least understood, prehistoric monument. Now Tim Darvill thinks he has the answer: the famous bluestones had healing powers, and the builders of Stonehenge were creating a prehistoric Lourdes. The latest issue of CA tells all. Despite centuries of study, we seem no nearer to answering such basic questions as what is Stonehenge, who built it and why. The publication in 1965 of Stonehenge...
  • Stonehenge Builders' Houses Found

    01/30/2007 8:13:43 AM PST · by blam · 39 replies · 1,233+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-30-2007
    Stonehenge builders' houses found The village would have housed hundreds of people (Image: National Geographic) Archaeologists say they have found a huge ancient settlement used by the people who built Stonehenge. Excavations at Durrington Walls, near the legendary Salisbury Plain monument, uncovered remains of ancient houses. People seem to have occupied the sites seasonally, using them for ritual feasting and funeral ceremonies. In ancient times, this settlement would have housed hundreds of people, making it the largest Neolithic village ever found in Britain. The dwellings date back to 2,600-2,500 BC, the same period that Stonehenge was built. "In what were...
  • Ancient Caribou hunting site found underneath Lake Huron

    04/29/2014 7:43:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    An elaborate array of linear stone lanes and V-shaped structures has been discovered on an underwater ridge in Lake Huron, marking what is thought to be the most complex set of ancient hunting structures ever found beneath the Great Lakes, according to a new report. Researchers based at the University of Michigan think the roughly 9,000-year-old-structure helped natives corral caribou herds migrating across what was then an exposed land-corridor the so-called Alpena-Amberley Ridge connecting northeast Michigan to southern Ontario. The area is now covered by 120 feet of water, but at the time, was exposed due to dry conditions of...
  • Archeological evidence of human activity found beneath Lake Huron

    06/08/2009 2:21:10 PM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,218+ views
    University of Michigan ^ | Jun 8, 2009 | Unknown
    ANN ARBOR, Mich.---More than 100 feet deep in Lake Huron, on a wide stoney ridge that 9,000 years ago was a land bridge, University of Michigan researchers have found the first archeological evidence of human activity preserved beneath the Great Lakes. The researchers located what they believe to be caribou-hunting structures and camps used by the early hunters of the period. "This is the first time we've identified structures like these on the lake bottom," said John O'Shea, curator of Great Lakes Archaeology in the Museum of Anthropology and professor in the Department of Anthropology. "Scientifically, it's important because the...
  • Origins of underwater stones a mystery

    02/09/2009 11:42:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1,521+ views
    United Press International ^ | Monday, February 9, 2009 | unattributed
    An archaeologist says it remains a mystery how a circle of stones initially arrived at the floor of Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay. Underwater archeologist Mark Holley said while he first discovered the underwater stones in 2007, no one has been able to prove whether the rocks were placed there by nature or by mankind, the Chicago Tribune reported Sunday. "The first thing I said when I came out of the water was, 'Oh no, I wish we wouldn't have found this,'" Holley said of his discovery. "This is going to invite so much controversy that this is where we're going...
  • Stonehenge in Lake Michigan?(Potentially pre-historic stone formation discovered deep underwater)

    01/13/2009 5:24:22 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 26 replies · 2,116+ views
    nbcchicago.com ^ | January 8, 2009 | MATT BARTOSIK
    The iconic Stonehenge in the UK is one of the most famous prehistoric monuments in the world, but it is not the only stone formation of its kind. Similar stone alignments have been found throughout England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales… and now, it seems, in Lake Michigan. According to BLDGBLOG, in 2007, Mark Holley, professor of underwater archeology at Northwestern Michigan College, discovered a series of stones arranged in a circle 40 feet below the surface of Lake Michigan. One stone outside the circle seems to have carvings that resemble a mastodon—an elephant-like animal that went extinct about 10,000 years...
  • Judaculla Rock [ Sylva, North Carolina ]

    02/15/2015 12:13:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    Judaculla Rock website ^ | 2002-2014 | Presented by L.E.M.U.R.
    Deep in the mountains of Jackson County, just outside Sylva, North Carolina, sets a large, baffling stone. It is a soapstone boulder, and it's covered with a plethora of strange drawings that some archaeologists believe may be 2,000 to 3,000 years old. Even the Cherokee Indians consider the site ancient, pre-dating their presence in the area... According to Cherokee legend, the markings on the rock were created by Judaculla, a slant-eyed giant who dominated the mountains in years long past. He was the "Great Lord of the hunt," a powerful being who could leap from one mountain to another, and...
  • Stone Mystery in Sea of Galilee

    05/25/2013 6:42:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience via Discovery News ^ | April 12, 2013 | Owen Jarus
    This circular structure, detected in a sonar survey of the Sea of Galilee, has archeologists baffled. The cone-shaped structure sits on the seafloor just south of the old city of Tiberias and was first discovered in the summer of 2003.
  • 'Monumental' mystery under Sea of Galilee

    04/10/2013 1:53:12 PM PDT · by wesagain · 27 replies
    WorldNetDaily ^ | Aug 10, 2013 | Joe Kovacs
    "Scientists probe puzzle at site made famous by Jesus, Peter"Some 2,000 years ago, the Sea of Galilee in Israel became famous as the Bible says Jesus and His apostle Peter walked on top of the water in a spectacular miracle. Now, a mysterious find from beneath the surface is bringing new attention to the ancient body of water. Scientists have discovered a massive, “monumental” structure on the sea’s floor, leaving experts puzzled as to what it actually is and how and when it became located there.The structure is basically a cone-shaped pile of boulders with an estimated weight of 60,000...
  • The Mystery of Stonehenge, Ancient Petroglyphs and Crop Circles

    03/11/2014 5:23:38 AM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | 3-6-2014 | G. L. Leale
    The Mystery of Stonehenge, Ancient Petroglyphs and Crop Circles There are many theories about the origins and functions of Stonehenge. Only through exploring the significance of the electromagnetic universe do we begin to understand the implications of this great stone megalith. Revelations have appeared via another great mystery, crop circles but in a formation so obtuse it was largely bypassed.In 2009 at Manton, Wiltshire, UK, a stand alone pattern appeared. A peculiar stark design, it attracted little in the way of analysis going largely unexplored.However it is a major key to much crop circle imagery and meaning; that Earth life...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Malta’s Magnificent Hypogeum

    09/21/2004 11:07:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 831+ views
    The Cultured Traveler ^ | May 2001 | Patrick Totty
    5,600 years ago, patient Stone Age laborers gouged emptiness from solid living rock, fashioning a complex three-level interior that contains astounding textural detail. Covering a total of about 5,400 square feet, with its levels extending down about 35 feet, the Hypogeum was discovered by accident in 1902 near the center of the town of Paola... For about a 1,000-year span, the Hypogeum served as a necropolis, a city of the dead that eventually housed the remains of about 7,000 people. It was one of many megalithic structures strewn across Malta, built by a complex Neolithic culture that mysteriously disappeared around...
  • 5,000-year-old graffiti at Tarxien Temples to be saved

    10/20/2006 1:21:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 319+ views
    Malta Independent Online ^ | Friday, October 20, 2006 | unattributed
    Heritage Malta is currently undertaking the preservation of two unique megaliths at Tarxien Temples as part of the BOV Tarxien Temples Project. These megaliths are significant because they bear witness to the vessels that transported the very first people to the Maltese Islands, and may well be the oldest representations of ships or boats ever discovered. The Tarxien Temples, dating back to around 3600BC, hold an impressive number of prehistoric works of art, consisting mostly of megaliths carved in relief to depict various animals, spirals and other intricate designs... The so-called ship graffiti megaliths were not removed from the site...
  • Pagans Flock to Stone Henge Solstice

    06/21/2010 11:21:30 AM PDT · by mlizzy · 40 replies
    Newser ^ | 6-21-10 | Kevin Spak
    (NEWSER) – Thousands of New Agers and neo-pagans danced and whooped in delight this morning as a bright early morning sun rose above the ancient stone circle Stonehenge, marking the summer solstice. About 20,000 alternative-minded revelers crowded the prehistoric site in southern England to see the 4:52am (11:52pm EST) sunrise, following an annual all-night party. They waited for dawn at the Heel Stone, a pockmarked pillar just outside the main circle that aligns with the rising sun. Unlike previous recent years, when the sunrise has been obscured by cloud, the bright sun bathed the monument in orange and gold today....
  • Pagans celebrate winter solstice on the wrong day

    12/25/2009 4:14:30 AM PST · by Brugmansian · 32 replies · 1,678+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Dec 23 2009 | Martin Evans
    Pagan worshippers, who braved freezing dawn temperatures to celebrate the winter solstice at Stonehenge, were dismayed to discover they had turned up on the wrong day . . . Pagan leader Arthur Pendragon said: "It is the most important day of the year for us . . ."
  • Stonehenge Druids 'Mark Wrong Solstice'

    06/21/2005 2:52:07 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 1,488+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-21-2005 | Charles Clover
    Stonehenge druids 'mark wrong solstice' By Charles Clover, Environment Editor (Filed: 21/06/2005) Modern-day druids, hippies and revellers who turn up at Stonehenge to celebrate the summer solstice may not be marking an ancient festival as they believe. The latest archaeological findings add weight to growing evidence that our ancestors visited Stonehenge to celebrate the winter solstice. Analysis of pigs's teeth found at Durrington Walls, a ceremonial site of wooden post circles near Stonehenge on the River Avon, has shown that most pigs were less than a year old when slaughtered. Dr Umburto Albarella, an animal bone expert at the University...
  • Pagans celebrate Winter Solstice at Stonehenge on the wrong day...

    12/22/2006 9:27:14 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 73 replies · 2,359+ views
    Monsters & Critics ^ | Dec 22, 2006 | UPI
    Religion News Solstice rite held early at Stonehenge Dec 22, 2006 LONDON, England (UPI) -- Around 60 people turned up to celebrate the Winter Solstice at Stonehenge Thursday - on the wrong day. After negotiating with site managers, the crowd performed traditional solstice activities and left peacefully. One reveller, who wished to remain anonymous, said: 'We formed a ring and held hands, and touched the stones. The man with the green cloak was there. But there were an awful lot of red faces,' she said. The Pagan Winter Solstice celebration is one of the oldest winter celebrations in the world....
  • Stonehenge dig finds 6,000-year-old encampment

    12/20/2014 11:21:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC ^ | December19, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working on a site near Stonehenge say they have found an untouched 6,000-year-old encampment which "could rewrite British history". David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, made the discovery at Blick Mead in October, and said the carbon dating results had just been confirmed. But he also raised concerns about possible damage to the site over plans to build a road tunnel past Stonehenge. The Department of Transport said it would "consult before any building". The Blick Mead site is about 1.5 miles (2.4km) from Stonehenge and archaeologists said "scientifically tested charcoal" dug up from the site had "revealed...
  • Stonemason James Vieira of Ashfield studies 'mound builders,' ancient stonework

    11/29/2012 1:04:15 PM PST · by Theoria · 17 replies
    MassLive ^ | 05 Sept 2012 | Cori Urban
    Many New England communities have within them dirt-covered stone “mounds,” dug into the earth and meticulously lined and covered with stones; some of the stones that cover the tops weigh tons. Some would say they are the remnants of root cellars, but an Ashfield man who for 15 years has studied the ancient stonework thinks otherwise. James E. Vieira, a stonemason, writer and Northeast Antiquities Research Association member, believes there is ample evidence that Ancient America was a melting pot of races from other lands, noting that other parts of the country have ancient stone ruins. He says the mound...
  • Ancient Stone Circles in Mideast Baffle Archaeologists

    10/31/2014 10:45:18 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 30, 2014 07:49am ET | Owen Jarus,
    Their purpose is unknown, and archaeologists are unsure when these structures were built. Analysis of the photographs, as well as artifacts found on the ground, suggest the circles date back at least 2,000 years, but they may be much older. They could even have been constructed in prehistoric times, before writing was invented, scientists say. Though the Big Circles were first spotted by aircraft in the 1920s, little research has focused on these structures, and many scientists are not even aware of their existence, something these archaeologists hope the new aerial images will help to change. The "most important contribution...
  • Ancient 'moon god' monument unearthed in Israel

    09/17/2014 11:02:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:55PM BST 17 Sep 2014 | By Inna Lazareva, Tel Aviv
    A structure once believed to form part of an ancient town is identified as a 5,000 year old monument believed to have been used to honour the Mesopotamian moon god 'Sin' A stone monument in the shape of a crescent moon found in northern Israel is more than 5,000 years old, archaeologists have said. The structure, known as Rujum en-Nabi Shua'ayb or Jethro Cairn, is located near the Sea of Galilee and predates the construction of Stonehenge, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, as well as the writing of the Bible. It was initially discovered in the early part of the...
  • Mysterious stone structure found beneath Sea of Galilee

    04/10/2013 9:34:04 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    nbc ^ | Owen Jarus
    Rising nearly 32 feet (10 meters) high, it has a diameter of about 230 feet (70 meters). To put that in perspective, the outer stone circle of Stonehenge has a diameter just half that with its tallest stones not reaching that height. It appears to be a giant cairn, rocks piled on top of each other. Structures like this are known from elsewhere in the world and are sometimes used to mark burials. Researchers do not know if the newly discovered structure was used for this purpose. They say it is definitely human-made and probably was built on land, only...
  • Massive submerged structure stumps Israeli archaeologists

    05/23/2013 11:36:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | 05-23-2013 | Staff
    The massive circular structure appears to be an archaeologist's dream: a recently discovered antiquity that could reveal secrets of ancient life in the Middle East and is just waiting to be excavated. It's thousands of years old -- a conical, manmade behemoth weighing hundreds of tons, practically begging to be explored. The problem is -- it's at the bottom of the biblical Sea of Galilee. For now, at least, Israeli researchers are left stranded on dry land, wondering what finds lurk below. The monumental structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 230 feet, emerged from a routine...
  • Rogem Hiri An Ancient, Mysterious Construction

    01/19/2008 3:41:43 AM PST · by Fred Nerks · 43 replies · 2,906+ views
    The megalithic complex of Rogem Hiri (Rujm al-Hiri in Arabic, meaning stone heap of the wild cat) is located in the central Golan, some 16 km. east of the Sea of Galilee, on a desolate plateau of basalt boulders. Since its discovery in a survey of the Golan in the late 1960s, this mysterious site has aroused the curiosity of archeologists. Between 1988 and 1991, archeological excavations and research were conducted in order to establish facts and determine the time of its construction and its function. Rogem Hiri is a monumental construction of local basalt fieldstones of various sizes. It...
  • Underground map reveals mysteries of Stonehenge (+video)

    09/10/2014 2:54:42 PM PDT · by BBell · 50 replies
    http://www.csmonitor.com/A.P. ^ | September 10, 2014
    Using ground-penetrating radar and other high-tech devices, archaeologists at Stonehenge have discovered a complex of monuments buried beneath Britain's iconic paleolithic shrine.
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found

    09/06/2014 5:54:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | August 30, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists say the discovery adds weight to the theory that Stonehenge was once a complete circle. Evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete has been found, because a hosepipe used to water the site was not long enough. Parch marks in the grass, in an area that had not been watered, have revealed places where two "missing" huge sarsen stones may once have stood. The marks were spotted by an English Heritage steward who alerted archaeologists to their existence. Previous scientific techniques such as geophysics failed to find any evidence. Historians have long debated whether Stonehenge...
  • Why was Stonehenge built? 'Groundbreaking' discovery of 15 new monuments suggests the answer...

    08/26/2014 10:21:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 51 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 13:41 EST, 22 August 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Archaeologist Vince Gaffney, of the University of Birmingham, is involved in the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project – a four-year collaboration with the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria. The team has conducted the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, covering around four square miles (6km), journalist Ed Caesar reported for Smithsonian. They discovered evidence of 15 unknown and poorly-understood late Neolithic monuments, including other henges, barrows, pits and ditches, which could all harbour valuable information about the prehistoric site. ... Historians are not sure what purpose the Curcus served and Professor Gaffney...
  • Archaeologists compare Neolithic Kent site to Stonehenge, find Bronze Age funerary monument

    08/17/2014 1:10:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 12 August 2014 | Ben Miller
    Archaeologists suspect a “sacred way” could have led to a henge 6,000 years ago at Iwade Meadows, to the west of the Kent industrial town of Sittingbourne. Positioned on a north-west slope, the 30-metre diameter structure is one of several prehistoric monuments on a north-west slope above the Ridham fleet stream running through the centre of the site. ...says Dr Paul Wilkinson, of... SWAT Archaeology... “The monuments are in a location that would have formerly had extensive views to the Swale Estuary and the Island of Sheppey beyond. “The archaeological evidence suggests that the outer ditch may have originated in...
  • Peru: Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Astronomy Lab In Peruvian Ruins

    07/27/2014 6:49:07 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 9 replies
    IBTimes ^ | 7-26-14 | Kathleen Caulderwood
    Archeologists have stumbled upon a site where ancient people observed the stars thousands of years ago in Peru, a country famous for using drones to help uncover and map archeological treasures, as Reuters reported. Excavators working on a complex at Licurnique, in the country’s northern region, have uncovered evidence of an “astronomical laboratory,” that dates back between 3,500 and 4,000 years, according to Peru This Week.
  • Ancient Town Found Near Stonehenge

    01/30/2007 10:28:33 AM PST · by Froufrou · 16 replies · 552+ views
    woai.com ^ | 01/30/07 | Unknown
    Evidence of a large settlement full of houses dating back to 2,600 BC has been discovered near the ancient stone monument of Stonehenge in southwest England, scientists said on Tuesday. They suspect inhabitants of the houses, forming the largest Neolithic village ever found in Britain, built the stone circle at Stonehenge -- generally thought to have been a temple, burial ground or an astronomy site -- between 3,000 and 1,600 BC. "We found the remains of eight houses," Mike Parker Pearson, a professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, said in a teleconference to announce the discovery. "We think they are...
  • Tests Reveal Amesbury Archer "King Of Stonehenge' Was A Settler From The Alps

    02/08/2004 12:40:04 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 2,101+ views
    Tests reveal Amesbury Archer ‘King of Stonehenge’ was a settler from the Alps The man who may have helped organise the building of Stonehenge was a settler from continental Europe, archaeologists say. The latest tests on the Amesbury Archer, whose grave astonished archaeologists last year with the richness of its contents, show he was originally from the Alps region, probably Switzerland, Austria or Germany. The tests also show that the gold hair tresses found in the grave are the earliest gold objects found in Britain. The grave of the Archer, who lived around 2,300BC, contained about 100 items, more than...
  • The Mysterious Dolmens of the Caucasus

    06/17/2014 10:56:24 AM PDT · by Renfield · 12 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | 6-17-2014 | April Holloway
    The Western Caucasus, extending over 275,000 ha of the extreme western end of the Caucasus mountains and located 50 km north-east of the Black Sea, is one of the few large mountain areas of Europe that has not experienced significant human impact. Yet dotted within the pristine landscape are thousands of ancient megalithic structures built many millennia ago. Archaeologists do not know who built them, where the stones came from, or what their true purpose was, leading to much speculation in the scientific community.The Russians call the megalithic structures dolmens, which means ‘portal tomb’, but despite the name, there is...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...