Keyword: archaeoastronomy

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunrise Solstice over Stonehenge

    06/20/2016 3:35:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, June 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today the Sun reaches its northernmost point in planet Earth's sky. Called a solstice, the date traditionally marks a change of seasons -- from spring to summer in Earth's Northern Hemisphere and from fall to winter in Earth's Southern Hemisphere. The featured image was taken during the week of the 2008 summer solstice at Stonehenge in United Kingdom, and captures a picturesque sunrise involving fog, trees, clouds, stones placed about 4,500 years ago, and a 4.5 billion year old large glowing orb. Even given the precession of the Earth's rotational axis over the millennia, the Sun continues to rise...
  • The Stone Pages are BACK!

    04/11/2006 11:32:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 414+ views
    Stone Pages ^ | Last updated: 3 April 2006 | Paola Arosio & Diego Meozzi
    Over the last 14 years we have personally visited and photographed all 529 archæological sites you will find in these pages (117 in the six national sections and 412 in our Tours section), creating the first Web guide to European megaliths and other prehistoric sites, online since February 1996
  • Stonehenge May Not Have Been So Difficult To Build After All, Archaeologists Have Found

    05/31/2016 4:33:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | May 24, 2016 | Sarah Knapton
    The Preseli stones from Stonehenge are approximately double the weight as the experimental block, but it is possible that one huge stone could have been brought by a group of just 20 people. The community living in the area during the Neolithic would have numbered several thousand so the absence of just a few dozen people was unlikely to cause any hardship. Doctoral student Barney Harris, who conducted the trial in Gordon Square, London, a stone's throw from UCL's Institute of Archaeology, said he was surprised that so few people had been required to move the block. "We were expecting...
  • Teen uses satellite imagery to discover possible ancient Mayan ruins

    05/20/2016 10:31:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 11, 2016 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: Canadian Space Agency, via TheTelegraph ====================================================================================================================== William Gadoury, a 15 year old Mayan history enthusiast who lives in Saint-Jean-de-Matha in Lanaudière, Quebec, has, according to Le Journal de Montréal, used satellite imagery to make associations between ancient Mayan city locations and constellations, and in so doing, may have actually discovered a site that has not been previously known. According to the news report, Gadoury, who claims to have been long interested in the Mayan culture, gained access to satellite imagery—after applying the Geographic Information System he found a correlation between 22 constellations and 117 Mayan cities. But, in so...
  • Breaking down the mythical 'Mayan city' discovery

    05/11/2016 3:12:04 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    cnn ^ | 05/11/2016 | AJ Willingham
    We're all suckers for a great story, and "Teen finds lost Mayan city" definitely sounds promising. Throw in some ancient cosmology, a little help from the Canadian Space Agency and some satellite sleuthing, and the movie offers practically write themselves. Sadly, the reality may not be as cinematic as promised. Experts say the "city" found by Canadian teen William Gadoury could be something much simpler: Abandoned fields. This whole archaeological kerfuffle started as a tantalizing possibility: Gadoury, 15, says he used Mayan constellation patterns to pinpoint ruins of a heretofore unknown ancient Mayan city. The Canadian Space Agency helped him...
  • Star pupil finds lost Mayan city by studying ancient charts of the night sky from his bedroom

    05/10/2016 6:51:59 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 94 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 10 May 16 | Telegraph Reporters
    (Title was shortened. Add: "of the night sky from his bedroom ") A Canadian schoolboy appears to have discovered a lost Mayan city hidden deep in the jungles of Mexico using a new method of matching stars to the location of temples on earth. William Gadoury, 15, was fascinated by the ancient Central American civilization and spent hours poring over diagrams of constellations and maps of known Mayan cities. And then he made a startling realisation: the two appeared to be linked. “I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched...
  • Ara Pacis Illuminated: 3D models shed light on shadowy theory [update]

    04/25/2016 9:54:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Using NASA data and 3D modeling, Indiana University Bloomington professor Bernard Frischer and his research team have dispelled a long-held theory regarding the relationship between two famous monuments in ancient Rome. The Ara Pacis Augustae, or Altar of Augustan Peace, was built in 9 B.C.E. in ancient Rome's Campus Martius. The marble altar stood as a propagandistic celebration of the peace and prosperity ushered into the new empire by Rome's first emperor, Augustus. Near the Ara Pacis sat a 71-foot-high granite obelisk brought from Egypt by Augustus, which served as the gnomon, or pointer, of a meridian line. Following a...
  • Scientists Study Anasazi Calendar

    03/27/2005 2:32:14 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 1,832+ views
    KSL-TV ^ | 3-21-2005 | Ed Yeates
    Scientists Study Anasazi Calender Mar. 21, 2005 Ed Yeates reporting Don Smith, College of Eastern Utah, San Juan branch: "I think we're becoming more aware that those people were far more familiar with astronomy, science and possibly math than we give them credit for." In a secluded ravine near Blanding, scientists and researchers gather to watch mysterious images forming right before their eyes. Although the rite of Spring, at least on our calendar, slipped in here yesterday almost unnoticed, it's literally in your face in this strange little canyon. We arrived weeks before spring equinox because people studying this place...
  • "By the Dawn's Early Light"

    02/25/2005 3:34:55 PM PST · by Congressman Billybob · 21 replies · 1,266+ views
    Special to FreeRepublic ^ | 26 February 2005 | John Armor (Congressman Billybob)
    No, this isn’t about the Star-Spangled Banner, neither the flag nor the anthem. It’s about dawn itself. The promise of a new beginning. Civilization began, thousands of years before recorded history, when men discovered how to cultivate crops. That meant communities and social organization. It also meant the beginnings of astronomy, studying the movement of the sun. Early evidence of this includes the “solar observatories” built by the Incas in South America, by the Anasazi in North America, and most famously, by Druids and others at Stonehenge in Britain. All these identified the solar equinoxes, especially in the spring. Coupled...
  • Archaeologists uncover monumental prehistoric structure on island of Menorca

    04/02/2016 3:10:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016
    Archaeologists have recently begun revealing the features of an ancient prehistoric stone structure on the Mediterranean island of Menorca in the Balearic Islands, an archipelago near the eastern coast of Spain. Beginning in 2015, under the direction of archaeologists Montserrat Anglada, Irene Riudavets, and Cristina Bravo, an archaeological team began excavating a newly opened structure at the site, known as Sa Cudia Cremada, a site that is composed of distinctive Iron Age (part of Spain's prehistoric period) stone structures such as talayots -- truncated tower-shaped constructions. The builders were members of the mysterious Talayotic culture, a people who left no...
  • Bronze Age burial near Stonehenge discovered by badger

    02/13/2016 12:59:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | February 9, 2016 | unattributed
    <p>A Bronze Age cremation burial has been discovered near Stonehenge after being accidentally dug up by a badger.</p>
  • Once a 'majestic roundhouse' - architect Sarah Ewbank believes she's solved Stonehenge's...

    01/30/2016 10:32:53 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    Sarah Ewbank spent the last year researching the ancient monument and applying her architectural background to the site to determine what its purpose and form once might have been. She has concluded, based on the layout of the stones, that they were used as support structures for a massive wooden frame that featured a second story for the site as well as an enormous round roof. Ewbank argues that a roof at the monument would allow for it to have been used throughout the year which, she believes, makes more sense that it simply being a religious site used on...
  • Ingleborough Archaeology Group witnesses the rising of the mid-winter sun

    01/05/2016 12:23:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Craven Herald ^ | Monday, January 4, 2015 | Lindsey Moore, Deputy Editor
    Members of the Ingleborough Archaeology Group gathered on a neolithic burial cairn at Low Hard Rigg on the slopes of Whernside to witness the rising of the mid-winter sun above the summit of Ingleborough. It is a practice that would probably have been carried out by our prehistoric antecedents 5,000 years ago. The alignment of the cairn with the winter solstice is thought to be highly significant. Yvonne Luke, of Historic England, said: "I shall never forget those last dramatic moments, ever!" More photos and a link to Yvonne's publication, The Neolithic Long Mounds of the Yorkshire Dales, can be...
  • Great Riddles in Archaeology

    02/26/2012 2:37:08 PM PST · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Penn Museum ^ | Penn Museum
    Great Riddles in ArchaeologyWednesday Evenings, October 2011 through June 2012 From the knights of King Arthur’s roundtable to the deepest depths of Atlantis, some of the world’s greatest archaeological riddles have eluded us for centuries. Discover and explore these mind-boggling riddles in the next season of the Penn Museum’s popular monthly lecture series presented by current archaeologists and scholars. Mark your calendars for Great Riddles in Archaeology, offered the first Wednesday of every month, October 2011 through June 2012. General Admission is $5 per event in advance or $10 at the door. Subscriptions to all nine events are available for...
  • New glacier theory on Stonehenge

    06/13/2006 7:27:54 AM PDT · by billorites · 79 replies · 1,406+ views
    BBC News ^ | June 13, 2006
    A geology team has contradicted claims that bluestones were dug by Bronze Age man from a west Wales quarry and carried 240 miles to build Stonehenge. In a new twist, Open University geologists say the stones were in fact moved to Salisbury Plain by glaciers. Last year archaeologists said the stones came from the Preseli Hills. Recent research in the Oxford Journal of Archaeology suggests the stones were ripped from the ground and moved by glaciers during the Ice Age. Geologists from the Open University first claimed in 1991 that the bluestones at one of Britain's best-known historic landmarks had...
  • Solstice sun beams into chamber [ Bryn Celli Ddu on Anglesey ]

    06/22/2006 8:28:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 346+ views
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, 21 June 2006 | unattributed
    Archaeologist Steve Burrow made the discovery after reading a book by Sir Norman Lockyear published almost 100 years ago... Sir Norman - the man who discovered helium - had travelled to the site, otherwise known as the Hill of Black Grove, and measured the alignment of the sun at Easter... "I came across this reference in a book dating back to 1908 but nobody had checked it, nobody had gone and verified it in person," he said... Mr Burrow, a curator of Neolithic archaeology at the National Museum of Wales, delayed his book by a year to test the theory....
  • Stonehenge Was A Site For Sore Eyes In 2300BC

    11/26/2006 10:51:42 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 1,231+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 11-27-2006 | Nic Fleming
    Stonehenge was a site for sore eyes in 2300BC By Nic Fleming, Science Correspondent Last Updated: 2:48am GMT 27/11/2006 Stonehenge was the Lourdes of its day, to which diseased and injured ancient Britons flocked seeking cures for their ailments, according to a new theory. For most of the 20th century archaeologists have debated what motivated primitive humans to go to the immense effort of transporting giant stones 240 miles from south Wales to erect Britain's most significant prehistoric monument. Druids gather at Stonehenge for sunrise on the summer solstice. A new book suggests the gathering should take place in December...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso’s research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois – were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise — Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 36 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • Welsh people could be most ancient in UK, DNA suggests

    06/20/2012 5:01:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    BBC ^ | Tuesday, June 19, 2012 | unattributed
    Professor Peter Donnelly, of Oxford University, said the Welsh carry DNA which could be traced back to the last Ice Age, 10,000 years ago. The project surveyed 2,000 people in rural areas across Britain. Participants, as well as their parents and grandparents, had to be born in those areas to be included in the study. Prof Donnelly, a professor of statistical science at Oxford University and director of the Wellcome Trust centre for human genetics, said DNA samples were analysed at about 500,000 different points. After comparing statistics, a map was compiled which showed Wales and Cornwall stood out. Prof...