Keyword: clovis

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  • 10,000-Year-Old Stone Tool Site Discovered in Suburban Seattle

    03/21/2015 2:29:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Western Digs ^ | March 18, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    The find includes thousands of stone flakes, an array of bifaces, scrapers, and hammerstones, plus several projectile points, some of which were fashioned in a style that experts describe as “completely new” for this region and period in its history... And in the layer with the artifacts were burned bits of willow, poplar, and pine, which were themselves dated between 10,000 and 12,500 years ago... While other sites in Washington’s lowlands have produced animal remains from the end of the last Ice Age, this is the first discovery of stone tools that date back more than 10,000 years, according to...
  • Ancient Tools At High Desert Site Go Back 135,000 Years (California)

    11/24/2005 1:02:17 PM PST · by blam · 110 replies · 5,433+ views
    San Bernardino Sun ^ | 11-24-2005 | Chuck Mueller
    Ancient tools at High Desert site go back 135,000 years Chuck Mueller, Staff Writer BARSTOW - In the multicolored hills overlooking the Mojave River Valley, the excavation of stone tools and flakes reveals human activities from the distant past. A new system of geologic dating has confirmed that an alluvial deposit bearing the stone tools and flakes at the Calico archaeological site is about 135,000 years old. But the site could even be older. Calico project director Fred Budinger Jr. said a soil sample, taken at a depth of 17 1/2 feet in one of three master pits at the...
  • First Americans - Homo Erectus in America

    09/24/2004 7:54:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,483+ views
    http://home.pacbell.net/tcbpfb/ ^ | January 01, 1999 | Tom Baldwin (apparently)
    While the author of this webpage does not believe that Homo Erectus is responsible for the surface lithics found in the Calico Mountains of California, he does believe the presence of these lithics is quite important in establishing the fact that man was on this continent eons before those of the Clovis school are willing to admit. Once the door is thrown open to an earlier arrival date for man on this continent, then serious study will hopefully begin on the many early man sites to be found in both North and South America, but currently ignored because of their...
  • Archaeologist Talks About Oregon's Early Natives

    04/13/2004 4:52:32 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 377+ views
    The World Link ^ | 4-12-2004 | Daniel Schreiber
    Page Updated: Monday, April 12, 2004 1:28 PM PDT Archaeologist talks about Oregon's early natives Dr. Dennis Jenkins believes the entire Sumner Lake Basin was once filled with water up to state Highway 31. Contributed Photo By Daniel Schreiber, Staff Writer Were humans present 12,000 years ago in the Great Basin region of Oregon when buffalo, non-Spanish horses and even camels roamed the landscape? This, the central question of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins' series of digs, is what researchers have been trying to determine since the 1930s. In 1938, Luther Cressman, the first to explore the region, discovered...
  • Study finds significant facial variation in pre-Columbian South America

    03/15/2015 8:06:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 5, 2013 | North Carolina State University
    A team of anthropology researchers has found significant differences in facial features between all seven pre-Columbian peoples they evaluated from what is now Peru -- disproving a longstanding perception that these groups were physically homogenous. The finding may lead scholars to revisit any hypotheses about human migration patterns that rested on the idea that there was little skeletal variation in pre-Columbian South America. Skeletal variation is a prominent area of research in New World bioarchaeology, because it can help us understand the origins and migration patterns of various pre-Columbian groups through the Americas... The recently-published findings may affect a lot...
  • ‘Tantalizing’ discovery of ancient tool in Oregon prompts ‘extreme skepticism’

    03/06/2015 5:05:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 51 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Sarah Larimer
    “The discovery of this tool below a layer of undisturbed ash that dates to 15,800 years old means that this tool is likely more than 15,800 years old, which would suggest the oldest human occupation west of the Rockies,” U.S. Bureau of Land Management Burns District archaeologist Scott Thomas said in the release. But! Don’t get too excited, because the Associated Press spoke with Donald K. Grayson, a professor of archaeology at the University of Washington, and he didn’t seem completely sold on the find just yet.
  • Fossil Feces Push Back Earliest Date of Humans in Americas

    04/04/2008 7:47:46 AM PDT · by Malone LaVeigh · 22 replies · 76+ views
    Foxnews.com ^ | April 04, 2008
    New evidence shows humans lived in North America more than 14,000 years ago, 1,000 years earlier than had previously been known. Discovered in a cave in Oregon, fossil feces yielded DNA indicating these early residents were related to people living in Siberia and East Asia, according to a report in Thursday's online edition of the journal Science. "This is the first time we have been able to get dates that are undeniably human, and they are 1,000 years before Clovis," said Dennis L. Jenkins, a University of Oregon archaeologist, referring to the Clovis culture, well known for its unique spear-points...
  • Finding Pre-Clovis Humans in the Oregon High Desert

    04/15/2008 6:50:32 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 133+ views
    The Archaeology Channel ^ | Dennis jenkins
    Finding Pre-Clovis Humans in the Oregon High Desert An interview with Dennis Jenkins See Interview About Dennis Jenkins In this interview, conducted at Paisley Five Mile Point Caves on June 13, 2007, by Rick Pettigrew of ALI, Dr. Dennis Jenkins describes the remarkable discovery of human DNA in coprolites dated between 14,000 and 15,000 calibrated years ago. This evidence, reported in the 3 April 2008, issue of the journal Science, strongly supports the proposition that human migrants to North America arrived at least 1000 years before the widespread Clovis complex appeared. The data also support the conclusion that the first...
  • 14,300-year-old Dried Human Feces found in Paisley Caves

    10/07/2014 6:42:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    austriantribune.com ^ | Tue, 10/07/2014 - 07:59 | Anja Prohaska on
    The discovery demonstrates the presence of an ancient human population in America's Far West at the end of the last ice age. It was found that human coprolites were of Siberia-east Asian origins and is between 13,000 and 13,200 years old. The findings also confirmed that these fossilized samples were a thousand years older than the Clovis civilization, Paleo-Indian people who were used to reside in New Mexico around 11,500 years ago. Jenkins's work at the site began in 2002, but archaeologists first began exploring the caves as early as 1938. He said, "As we have used increasingly sophisticated scientific...
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • Oregon cave discovery suggests lost ancient American culture (Pre-Clovis)

    07/13/2012 5:29:43 AM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 7-12-2012 | Wynne Parry
    Ancient stone projectile points and fossilized feces suggest a previously unknown culture that existed on the West Coast some 13,000 years ago. Ancient stone projectile points discovered in a Central Oregon cave complex have cast new light on the identity of the first Americans. ~~~snip~~~ These stone points, a type known as Western temmed points, are narrower and lack the distinctive flute, or shallow groove, found on Clovis points. Researchers believe the two types of points represent different technologies, produced by different cultures....
  • Fossilized human feces hints at long-lost, 13,500-year-old West Coast culture

    07/12/2012 2:19:04 PM PDT · by Sopater · 41 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 12, 2012 | Gene J. Koprowski
    <p>Maybe the 1992 movie Brendan Fraser film Encino Man wasn’t too far from the mark?</p> <p>Fossilized human feces and other evidence from a West Coast cave demonstrates the existence of a long-lost, 13,500-year-old American culture, scientists said Thursday.</p> <p>The fossilized feces, known to researchers as a coprolite, from the Paisley Caves in Oregon has turned assumptions about the history of the Americas on its ear.</p>
  • Oregon Discovery Challenges Beliefs About First Humans

    07/01/2008 8:20:04 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 253+ views
    PBS ^ | 7-1-2008 | Lee Hochberg
    Ore. Discovery Challenges Beliefs About First Humans Until recently, most scientists believed that the first humans came to the Americas 13,000 years ago. But new archaeological findings from a cave in Oregon are challenging that assumption. Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Television reports on the controversial discovery. LEE HOCHBERG, NewsHour correspondent: What archaeologist Dennis Jenkins found in the Paisley Caves in south central Oregon may turn on its head the theory of how and when the first people came to North America. Many scientists believe humans first came to this continent 13,000 years ago across a land bridge from Asia...
  • Iowa Republicans gird for fall campaign

    06/15/2014 7:22:38 PM PDT · by iowamark · 1 replies
    Cedar Rapids Gazette ^ | 6/15/2014 | Rod Boshart
    Des Moines – Iowa Republicans forged a unified plan of attack Saturday to seize opportunities in Iowa’s fall election and begin assessing their choices looking ahead to the first-in-the-nation presidential nominating process in 2016. Nearly 1,450 delegates to the Iowa GOP state convention heard rallying cries from U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst, Gov. Terry Branstad and three presidential hopefuls before finalizing a conservative platform and nominating Kim Reynolds as lieutenant governor, Sam Clovis as their state treasurer candidate and Adam Gregg for his attorney general bid. “I think we’re going to have a very strong and unified party and the...
  • Iowa GOP Senate Primary Update

    05/30/2014 2:07:30 AM PDT · by ObamahatesPACoal · 4 replies
    Imagine winning a U.S. Senate debate when you did the following: Admitted you didn’t know what the current immigration law was. Flip-flopped on the marriage issue from a previous debate. Flip-flopped on subsidies during this debate. Said the first thing that differentiated yourself from your opponent was you were female. Gave probably the single most wretchedly-awful example of pandering in modern Iowa political history. No one would expect to win a debate, and likely the Republican Party’s nomination for U.S. Senate, committing these kinds of gaffes. But “no one” isn’t Joni Ernst, who is living the semi-charmed kind of life....
  • New World's Oldest Skeleton Is a Key Genetic Link

    05/15/2014 11:37:31 AM PDT · by Theoria · 37 replies
    WSJ ^ | 15 May 2014 | Robert Lee Hotz
    Remains Found in Mexico Connect Earliest Settlers With Continent's Natives She was just a teenager when she died alone in the dark. The scientists who analyzed her bones said Thursday that she is the oldest nearly complete, genetically intact human skeleton in the New World. Her remains—discovered deep within a flooded cave in Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula—cement the connection between the earliest settlers of the Americas and modern Native Americans. A unique genetic marker exhumed from her 12,000-year-old skeleton offers evidence that the first hunter-gatherers who crossed the Bering Sea from northeast Asia on a now-submerged territory called Beringia belonged to...
  • Bikini with your coffee? In Clovis, a move to get barista beauties to cover up (video)

    04/08/2014 10:12:54 AM PDT · by Enterprise · 85 replies
    The Fresno Bee ^ | April 4, 2014 | Marc Benjamin
    "It isn't the coffee that's too hot, but the nearly bare baristas of Bottom's Up, a Clovis drive-through coffee shop that has trouble brewing with some neighbors who oppose the business."
  • Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas

    03/28/2014 9:09:21 AM PDT · by Theoria · 68 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Mar 2014 | SIMON ROMERO
    Niede Guidon still remembers her astonishment when she glimpsed the paintings. Preserved amid the bromeliad-encrusted plateaus that tower over the thorn forests of northeast Brazil, the ancient rock art depicts fierce battles among tribesmen, orgiastic scenes of prehistoric revelry and hunters pursuing their game, spears in hand. “These were stunning compositions, people and animals together, not just figures alone,” said Dr. Guidon, 81, remembering what first lured her and other archaeologists in the 1970s to this remote site where jaguars still prowl. Hidden in the rock shelters where prehistoric humans once lived, the paintings number in the thousands. Some are...
  • Glenn Champ - Candidate for Calif. Governoe

    03/24/2014 10:43:06 AM PDT · by GodAndCountryFirst · 8 replies
    GLENN CHAMP is a small contractor businessman that makes the crooked places straight and the rough places smooth. He builds roads, Highways, and freeways. A former G-man, welder, mechanic and contract firefighter. Born in Clovis, California. Glenn Champ is a longtime resident of the state of California who lives in the mountains, in Tollhouse CA. He was also raised in the mountains where work starts at a young age. He graduated from Sierra High school, college poly science, and would not stand for the unbiblical, communist, socialist, curriculum brain washing in college. CHAMP 48, is of all American Christian heritage....
  • Tumbleweeds bury Clovis homes

    01/30/2014 11:27:22 AM PST · by Kartographer · 61 replies
    KRQE ^ | 1/28/14 | Emily Younger
    Clovis city officials say the whopping weeds are covering homes and blocking streets and residents are calling it the tumbleweed invasion of 2014. “It looked like a herd of cows coming in,” said Clovis resident Lee Cassidy. “The tumbleweeds were just rolling in.” After those tumbleweeds rolled in, they got stuck.
  • First Americans came from Europe NOT Asia?

    10/18/2013 1:13:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 2-28-2012 | Jill Reilly
    America was first discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe, according to new archaeological evidence. Across six locations on the U.S. east coast, several dozen stone tools have been found. After close analysis it was discovered that they were between 19,000 and 26,000 years old and were a European-style of tool. The discovery suggests that the owners of the tools arrived 10,000 years before the ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World, reported The Independent...
  • Clovis Points -- PaleoIndian Boy Scout Knives?

    09/15/2013 2:20:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Ohio Historical Society Archaeology Blog ^ | September 8, 2013 | Brad Lepper
    Clovis points are undeniably special. For one thing, they are among the oldest artifacts in America. (Some archaeologists would remove the qualification and say they are THE oldest, but the evidence and arguments for a pre-Clovis human presence in the Americas are compelling -- at least to me.) In addition to being really old, 13,000 years old give or take a century or two, Clovis points also are large, beautifully-crafted, often made from high-quality flint, and at least occasionally were used to kill mammoths and mastodons. Because a few have been found in direct association with the bones of these...
  • Don't blame a comet for Clovis culture demise, scientists say

    03/10/2013 3:10:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    nbc ^ | Nola Taylor Redd
    comet crashing into the Earth some 13,000 years ago was thought to have spelled doom to a group of early North American people, and possibly the extinction of ice age beasts in the region. But the space rock was wrongly accused, according to a group of 16 scientists in fields ranging from archaeology to crystallography to physics, who have offered counterevidence to the existence of such a collision. Almost 13,000 years ago, a prehistoric Paleo-Indian group known as the Clovis culture suffered its demise at the same time the region underwent significant climate cooling known as the Younger Dryas. Animals...
  • When People Fled Hyenas

    11/20/2002 6:43:45 PM PST · by VadeRetro · 52 replies · 1,373+ views
    ABC News ^ | By Lee Dye
    When People Fled Hyenas By Lee Dye Special to ABCNEWS.com Nov. 20 — Deep inside a cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains, Christy Turner and his Russian colleagues may have found an answer to a question that has hounded him for more than three decades. As a young anthropologist, Turner spent time in Alaska's Aleutian Islands in the 1970s, working at several archaeological sites and occasionally gazing westward toward Siberia. "I thought, 'That's the place that Native Americans came from,' " he says now from his laboratory at Arizona State University in Tempe. But why, he wondered then as he still...
  • Old dog, new tricks: Study IDs 9,400-year-old mutt

    01/19/2011 5:59:52 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 58 replies
    palmbeachpost ^ | Jan. 19, 2011 | CLARKE CANFIELD
    PORTLAND, Maine — Nearly 10,000 years ago, man's best friend provided protection and companionship — and an occasional meal. That's what researchers are saying after finding a bone fragment from what they are calling the earliest confirmed domesticated dog in the Americas. University of Maine graduate student Samuel Belknap III came across the fragment while analyzing a dried-out sample of human waste unearthed in southwest Texas in the 1970s. A carbon-dating test put the age of the bone at 9,400 years, and a DNA analysis confirmed it came from a dog — not a wolf, coyote or fox, Belknap said....
  • Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago

    09/30/2007 10:14:28 AM PDT · by baynut · 55 replies · 1,887+ views
    A carbon-rich black layer, dating to 12.9 ka, has been previously identified at 50 Clovis-age sites across North America and appears contemporaneous with the abrupt onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. The in situ bones of extinct Pleistocene megafauna, along with Clovis tool assemblages, occur below this black layer but not within or above it. Causes for the extinctions, YD cooling, and termination of Clovis culture have long been controversial. In this paper, we provide evidence for an extraterrestrial (ET) impact event at 12.9 ka, which we hypothesize caused abrupt environmental changes that contributed to YD cooling, major ecological reorganization,...
  • Research Team Says Extraterrestrial Impact To Blame For Ice Age Extinctions (More)

    09/25/2007 12:58:19 PM PDT · by blam · 56 replies · 1,456+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | Northern Arizona University - Lisa Nelson
    Contact: Lisa Nelson Lisa.Nelson@nau.edu 928-523-6123 Northern Arizona University Research team says extraterrestrial impact to blame for Ice Age extinctions A colorized scanning electron microscope image of a glassy carbon sphere that contains evidence of extraterrestrial impact. The sphere measures about .012 inches in width. What caused the extinction of mammoths and the decline of Stone Age people about 13,000 years ago remains hotly debated. Overhunting by Paleoindians, climate change and disease lead the list of probable causes. But an idea once considered a little out there is now hitting closer to home. A team of international researchers, including two Northern...
  • NSF Press Release: Comet May Have Exploded Over North America 13,000 Years Ago

    08/15/2007 5:32:04 PM PDT · by baynut · 49 replies · 2,218+ views
    National Science Foundation Press Release ^ | August 14, 2007 | Cheryl Dybas, NSF
    A "black mat" of algal growth in Arizona marks the extinction of mammoths 12,900 years ago New scientific findings suggest that a large comet may have exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, explaining riddles that scientists have wrestled with for decades, including an abrupt cooling of much of the planet and the extinction of large mammals. The discovery was made by scientists from the University of California at Santa Barbara and their colleagues. James Kennett, a paleoceanographer at the university, said that the discovery may explain some of the highly debated geologic controversies of recent decades. The period in...
  • Climate alarmists lose another piece of evidence

    06/11/2007 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Neville72 · 39 replies · 3,392+ views
    enterstageright ^ | 6/11/2007 | Dennis T. Avery
    Don't look now, but another big chunk of the "evidence" for man-made global warming suddenly disappeared. Poof! Researchers just reported that the world's most recent case of "abrupt climate change"—which occurred a mere 12,000 years ago—was probably due to a comet strike, not to "climate sensitivity." The Younger Dryas occurred as an Ice Age was ending. As the climate began to warm, a huge and sudden rush of fresh meltwater broke out from the Great Lakes and swept out to sea. The water surge was monumental enough that the meltwater lowered the salinity of the ocean, shut down the Atlantic...
  • Diamonds tell tale of comet that killed off the cavemen

    05/20/2007 4:50:33 PM PDT · by Renfield · 71 replies · 3,536+ views
    Guardian ^ | 5-20-07 | Robin McKie
    Fireballs set half the planet ablaze, wiping out the mammoth and America's Stone Age hunters Scientists will outline dramatic evidence this week that suggests a comet exploded over the Earth nearly 13,000 years ago, creating a hail of fireballs that set fire to most of the northern hemisphere. Primitive Stone Age cultures were destroyed and populations of mammoths and other large land animals, such as the mastodon, were wiped out. The blast also caused a major bout of climatic cooling that lasted 1,000 years and seriously disrupted the development of the early human civilisations that were emerging in Europe and...
  • Did comet start deadly cold snap?

    05/16/2007 3:00:33 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 84 replies · 4,671+ views
    Canada.com ^ | Monday, May 14, 2007 | Margaret Munro
    An extraterrestrial impact 13,000 years ago wiped out mammoths and started a mini-ice age, scientists believe Margaret Munro CanWest News Service Monday, May 14, 2007 A comet or some other extraterrestrial object appears to have slammed into northern Canada 12,900 years ago and triggered an abrupt and catastrophic climate change that wiped out the mammoths and many other prehistoric creatures, according to a team of U.S. scientists. Evidence of the ecological disaster exists in a thin layer of sediment that has been found from Alberta to New Mexico, say the researchers, whose work adds a dramatic and provocative twist to...
  • Scientist: Comets Blasted Early Americans

    10/28/2005 6:33:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 48 replies · 1,824+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/28/05 | Meg Kinnard - ap
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - A supernova could be the "quick and dirty" explanation for what may have happened to an early North American culture, a nuclear scientist here said Thursday. Richard Firestone said at the "Clovis in the Southeast" conference that he thinks "impact regions" on mammoth tusks found in Gainey, Mich., were caused by magnetic particles rich in elements like titanium and uranium. This composition, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist said, resembles rocks that were discovered on the moon and have also been found in lunar meteorites that fell to Earth about 10,000 years ago. Firestone said that, based...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/17/2005 8:57:32 AM PDT · by Fzob · 110 replies · 12,216+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Sept. 28, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Sept. 28, 2005— A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago. Mammoths and mastodons, both relatives of today's elephants, mysteriously died out then, as did giant ground sloths, a large-horned bison, a huge species of armadillo, saber-toothed cats, and many other animals and plants. Richard Firestone, a nuclear scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/04/2005 11:47:27 PM PDT · by planetesimal · 84 replies · 3,723+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 09/28/05 | Jennifer Viegas
    A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago.
  • Supernova debris found on Earth

    11/24/2004 1:22:08 PM PST · by Phsstpok · 64 replies · 7,836+ views
    NEWS@NATURE.COM ^ | 02 November 2004 | Mark Peplow
    Published online: 02 November 2004; | doi:10.1038/news041101-5 Supernova debris found on Earth Mark Peplow Ancient explosion may have affected climate and, possibly, human evolution. Cosmic fallout from an exploding star dusted the Earth about 2.8 million years ago, and may have triggered a change in climate that affected the course of human evolution. The evidence comes from an unusual form of iron that was blasted through space by a supernova before eventually settling into the rocky crust beneath the Pacific Ocean. Gunther Korschinek, a physicist from the Technical University of Munich in Germany, leads a team who in 1999 found...
  • Scientists find signs of 13,000-year-old extinction event

    01/01/2009 2:09:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 79 replies · 3,658+ views
    Chicago Tribune ^ | January 2, 2009 | Robert Mitchum
    Comet may have exploded over planet, causing fires, die-offs, researchers say A meteorite colliding with the Earth 65 million years ago is considered to be the most likely reason dinosaurs vanished from the planet. Now a team of scientists says it has found new evidence that an object from space caused a similar extinction event only 13,000 years ago. In an article to be published Friday in the journal Science, researchers present what one author calls the "smoking bullet"—proof that an exploding comet triggered the sudden, thousand-year freeze that killed off mammoths, saber-toothed tigers and other large mammals that used...
  • Exploding Asteroid Theory Strengthened By New Evidence Located In Ohio, Indiana

    07/02/2008 3:27:51 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies · 1,699+ views
    Physorg ^ | 7-1-2008 | University of Cincinnati
    Exploding asteroid theory strengthened by new evidence located in Ohio, Indiana Space & Earth science / Earth Sciences Ken Tankersley seen working in the field in a cave in this publicity photo from the National Geographic Channel. Geological evidence found in Ohio and Indiana in recent weeks is strengthening the case to attribute what happened 12,900 years ago in North America -- when the end of the last Ice Age unexpectedly turned into a phase of extinction for animals and humans -- to a cataclysmic comet or asteroid explosion over top of Canada. A comet/asteroid theory advanced by Arizona-based geophysicist...
  • Fungi, Feces Show Comet Didn't Kill Ice Age Mammals?

    06/24/2010 8:43:43 AM PDT · by Palter · 18 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 22 June 2010 | John Roach
    Tiny balls of fungus and feces may disprove the theory that a huge space rock exploded over North America about 12,900 years ago, triggering a thousand-year cold snap, according to a new study. The ancient temperature drop, called the Younger Dryas, has been well documented in the geologic record, including soil and ice core samples.The cool-down also coincides with the extinction of mammoths and other Ice Age mammals in North America, and it's thought to have spurred our hunter-gatherer ancestors in the Middle East to adopt an agricultural lifestyle.But the theory that a comet or asteroid explosion is behind the...
  • The Mystery Of Mammoth Tusks With Iron Fillings

    03/08/2008 2:03:28 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 2,731+ views
    Alaska Report News ^ | 3-5-2008 | Ned Rozell
    The mystery of mammoth tusks with iron fillings By By Ned RozellMarch 5, 2008 A giant meteor may have exploded over Alaska thousands of years ago, shooting out metal fragments like buckshot, some of which embedded in the tusks of woolly mammoths and the horns of bison. Simultaneously, a large chunk of the meteor hit Alaska south of Allakaket, sending up a dust cloud that blacked out the sun over the entire state and surrounding areas, killing most of the life in the area. Embedded iron particles surrounded by carbonized rings in the outer layer of a mammoth tusk from...
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!

    06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 16, 2012 | Guest Post By: Rodney Chilton
    Posted on June 16, 2012 by Anthony Watts WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I’ve added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event. – Anthony The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland. From:Quaternary Science Reviews Volume 19, Issues 1-5, 1 January 2000, Richard B. AlleyGuest Post By: Rodney Chilton www.bcclimate.com A consideration of many...
  • Did Comets Cause Ancient American Extinctions?

    05/07/2008 6:40:10 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 475+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 5-6-2008 | Anne Casselman
    Did Comets Cause Ancient American Extinctions?Anne Casselman for National Geographic NewsMay 6, 2008 Debate has heated up over a controversial theory that suggests huge comet impacts wiped out North America's large mammals nearly 13,000 years ago. The hypothesis, first presented in May 2007, proposes that an onslaught of extraterrestrial bodies caused the mass extinction known as the Younger Dryas event and triggered a period of climatic cooling. The theory has been debated widely since it was introduced, but it drew new scrutiny in March at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Stuart...
  • Comet May Have Collided With Earth 13,000 Years Ago(MEXICO)

    07/15/2012 5:03:34 PM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 49 replies
    Spacedotcom ^ | March 6, 2012 | Clara Moskowitz
    Central Mexico’s Lake Cuitzeo contains melted rock formations and nanodiamonds that suggest a comet impacted Earth around 12,900 years ago, scientists say. CREDIT: Israde et al. (2012) New evidence supports the idea that a huge space rock collided with our planet about 13,000 years ago and broke up in Earth's atmosphere, a new study suggests. This impact would have been powerful enough to melt the ground, and could have killed off many large mammals and humans. It may even have set off a period of unusual cold called the Younger Dryas that began at that time, researchers say. The...
  • Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    01/02/2009 6:02:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 35 replies · 2,014+ views
    Scientific American ^ | January 2, 2009 | David Biello
    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigatedRoughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary...
  • Going Into The Water: A Survey Of Impact Events And The Coastal Peoples Of South-East North America

    01/17/2002 4:08:32 PM PST · by blam · 59 replies · 7,892+ views
    Very long but good anthropology/archaeology article Click Here
  • 12,900 Years Ago: North American Comet Impact Theory Disproved

    01/27/2009 3:06:57 AM PST · by decimon · 35 replies · 782+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Jan. 27, 2009 | Unknown
    New data disproves the recent theory that a large comet exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, causing a shock wave that travelled across North America at hundreds of kilometres per hour and triggering continent-wide wildfires. Dr Sandy Harrison from the University of Bristol and colleagues tested the theory by examining charcoal and pollen records to assess how fire regimes in North America changed between 15 and 10,000 years ago, a time of large and rapid climate changes. Their results provide no evidence for continental-scale fires, but support the fact that the increase in large-scale wildfires in all regions of...
  • Ice Age Ends Smashingly: Did A Comet Blow Up Over Eastern Canada? (More) (Carolina Bays)

    06/02/2007 3:14:23 PM PDT · by blam · 106 replies · 5,308+ views
    Science News ^ | 6-1-2007 | Sid Perkins
    Ice Age Ends Smashingly: Did a comet blow up over eastern Canada? Sid Perkins Evidence unearthed at more than two dozen sites across North America suggests that an extraterrestrial object exploded in Earth's atmosphere above Canada about 12,900 years ago, just as the climate was warming at the end of the last ice age. The explosion sparked immense wildfires, devastated North America's ecosystems and prehistoric cultures, and triggered a millennium-long cold spell, scientists say. IT'S IN THERE. A layer of carbon-rich sediment (arrow) found here at Murray Springs, Ariz., and elsewhere across North America, provides evidence that an extraterrestrial object...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Great beasts peppered from space

    12/12/2007 9:55:00 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies · 531+ views
    BBC News ^ | 12-11-07
    Startling evidence has been found which shows mammoth and other great beasts from the last ice age were blasted with material that came from space.Eight tusks dating to some 35,000 years ago all show signs of having being peppered with meteorite fragments. The ancient remains come from Alaska, but researchers also have a Siberian bison skull with the same pockmarks. The scientists released details of the discovery at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, US. They painted a picture of a calamitous event over North America that may have severely knocked back the populations of some...
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...