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Keyword: dillehay

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  • Dental Plaque Gives Clue To Diet Of Ancient People [ Peru's Nanchoc Valley ]

    12/02/2008 8:22:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 57,877+ views
    CBS News Interactive ^ | December 1, 2008 | Associated Press
    Thanks to poor dental hygiene, researchers are getting a more detailed understanding of what people ate thousands of years ago in what is now Peru.
  • Trying To Fathom Farming's Origins

    08/15/2007 10:42:04 AM PDT · by blam · 60 replies · 929+ views
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | 8-14-2007 | Bradley T Lepper
    Trying to fathom farming's origins Tuesday, August 14, 2007 3:22 AM By Bradley T. Lepper Tom Dillehay, an archaeologist with Vanderbilt University, and several colleagues announced last month in the journal Science that they had recovered remarkably early evidence for agriculture in South America. Working at several sites in the Nanchoc Valley of northern Peru, they found squash seeds that were more than 9,000 years old. This is nearly twice as old as previously reported farming evidence in the region. Dillehay and his co-authors point out that one of the most important aspects of this discovery is that "horticulture and...
  • Ancient Hearths Test Carbon Dating (Humans In Brazil 56K+ Years Ago)

    11/17/2003 4:02:54 PM PST · by blam · 69 replies · 2,469+ views
    ABC Science Online ^ | 11-17-2003 | Bob Beale
    Ancient hearth tests carbon dating Bob Beale ABC Science Online Monday, 17 November 2003 Rock art at Serra da Capivara National Park, home of the Pedra Furada site in Brazil (Embassy of Brazil, London) People were keeping warm by a fire in a rock shelter at least 56,000 years ago, according to new analysis of what may be the oldest known human record in the Americas. This is about 40,000 years earlier than generally agreed for when people first arrived in the Americas. The international team of researchers dated charcoal from a hearth at the controversial Pedra Furada archaeological site...
  • 'First Americans' May Be Johnnies-Come-Lately (Topper Site)

    08/22/2004 8:17:24 AM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 2,036+ views
    Atlanta Journal Constitution ^ | 8-20-2004 | Mike Toner
    'First Americans' may be Johnnies-come-lately By MIKE TONER The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Published on: 08/20/04 Human history is being written —and rewritten — a shovelful at a time on a shaded hillside along the Savannah River. Each summer Al Goodyear's team of archaeologists digs deeper into the riverbank in South Carolina's Allendale County. Each summer the story of the first Americans, the primitive hunters who first populated the continent, grows longer. And more complex. And more controversial. David Tulis/AJC (ENLARGE) Archaeologist Al Goodyear holds a hand-made 'microblade,' one of the hundreds of artifacts unearthed during his team's seven years of excavations...
  • Archeologist finds evidence of humans in North America 50,000 years ago

    11/17/2004 10:04:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 3,117+ views
    Canoe (Canada) ^ | November 17, 2004 | AP
    University of South Carolina archeologist Al Goodyear said he has uncovered a layer of charcoal from a possible hearth or fire pit at a site near the Savannah River. Samples from the layer have been laboratory-dated to more than 50,000 years old. Yet Goodyear stopped short of declaring it proof of the continent's earliest human occupation. "It does look like a hearth," he said, "and the material that was dated has been burned." ...Goodyear, who has worked the Topper site since 1981, discovered the charcoal layer in May.
  • Calico: A 200,000-year Old Site In The Americas?

    12/17/2001 2:22:22 PM PST · by blam · 142 replies · 13,626+ views
    ASA On Line ^ | unknown
    Calico: A 200,000-year old site in the Americas? New World archaeological sites inferred to be even slightly older than the 11.5 ka Clovis complexes have been controversial; so claims for a 200 ka site in North America have heretofore been treated with substantial disdain. But the acceptance of Monte Verde and Diring may soon change that. The classic "ancient site" in the New World is "Calico," located in the Central Mojave Desert of California (Shlemon and Budinger, 1990). Two issues have dogged acceptance of Calico by mainstream archaeologists: (1) the authenticity of the artifacts; are they truly the product of ...
  • First Americans

    10/06/2002 9:57:05 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 4,116+ views
    Discover ^ | 2-1999 | Karen Wright
    Discover Feb, 1999 First Americans.(origins of man) Author/s: Karen Wright Not long ago we thought the first humans in the New World were mammoth hunters from Siberia who crossed the Bering Strait at the end of the Ice Age. Now, we are learning, none of that may be true not the who, not the where, not the how, and certainly not the when. You don't expect someone who has been dead for more than 9,000 years to have any odor left--let alone a strong one. But you don't expect him to have any hair or skin or clothes left, either,...
  • Immigrants From The Other Side (Clovis Is Solutrean?)

    11/02/2003 4:11:21 PM PST · by blam · 54 replies · 16,673+ views
    CSFA ^ | 11-3-2003 | Dennis Sanford
    Immigrants from the Other Side? According to the Clovis-First theory, for decades the gospel preached by authorities on the peopling of the Americas, the first Americans walked across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia about 12,000 years ago, and after finding a corridor through the Cordilleran Ice Sheet--admittedly it wasn't an easy trip and the timing was tricky--descended into temperate North America. We know them by their classic fluted points, unlike any others in the world, they left at campsites on their journey south to populate Central and South America. [~ 45:l ~] There have been variations of the basic...
  • Probe Into Cuba's Possible 'Sunken City' Advances

    03/29/2002 4:55:12 PM PST · by Lessismore · 23 replies · 2,072+ views
    Yahoo Science News ^ | Fri Mar 29, 6:20 PM ET | By Andrew Cawthorne
    HAVANA (Reuters) - Scientific investigators said on Friday they hope to better determine later this year if an unusual rock formation deep off Cuba's coast could be a sunken city from a previously unknown ancient civilization. "These are extremely peculiar structures ... They have captured all our imagination," Cuban geologist Manuel Iturralde said at a conference after a week on a boat over the site. "If I had to explain this geologically, I would have a hard time," he told reporters later, saying examination of rock samples due to be collected in a few months should shed further light on...
  • Retracing the footprints of time

    09/30/2004 7:56:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 667+ views
    Alberta Report (via Web Archive) ^ | September 9, 1996 | Steve Sandford
    In an otherwise unremarkable gravel bluff on the banks of the Bow River in Calgary, University of Alberta researchers Jiri Chlachula and Alan Bryan believe they have unearthed the remains of what could be the oldest human artifacts in North America, the pair announced this month. If substantiated, the discovery pushes back the known date of human settlement in North America by several thousand years. Other earth scientists are sceptical about the find's authenticity: U of A geomorphologist Rob Young describes it as "based only on pure speculation." ...Comments Prof. Young: "Any dude could have put that rock there."
  • Science Trumps Ritual in Mystery Skeleton Row [Kennewick Man]

    02/05/2004 5:52:19 AM PST · by syriacus · 50 replies · 766+ views
    Reuters--UK ^ | Thu 5 February, 2004 | Adam Tanner
    SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Denying a request by American Indian tribes who sought an immediate burial, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Wednesday that scientists should be allowed to continue testing on a 9,000-year-old skeleton. "It's terrific," said Robson Bonnichsen director of Texas A&M University's Center for the Study of the First Americans and a plaintiff in the case. "The court has upheld the principle for scientific study of very early human remains." The legal battle pitting Bonnichsen and seven other scientists against the U.S. government and Indian tribes dates back to 1996, after two teenagers discovered a skeleton near...
  • Skulls Found In Mexico Suggest Early Americans Would Have Said 'G'Day Mate'

    09/03/2003 4:42:49 PM PDT · by blam · 48 replies · 1,657+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 9-4-2003 | Steve Conner
    Skulls found in Mexico suggest the early Americans would have said 'G'day mate' By Steve Connor, Science Editor 04 September 2003 The accepted theory of how prehistoric humans first migrated to America has been challenged by a study of an ancient set of bones unearthed in Mexico. An analysis of 33 skulls found on the Mexican peninsula of Baja California suggests that the first Americans were not north Asians who crossed to the American continent about 12,000 years ago. The skulls more closely resemble the present-day natives of Australia and the South Pacific, suggesting that there might have been an...
  • The Solutrean Solution--Did Some Ancient Americans Come from Europe?

    09/24/2004 7:31:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 2,961+ views
    Clovis and Beyond ^ | 1999 | Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley
    Years of research in eastern Asia and Alaska have produced little evidence of any historical or technological connection between the Asian Paleolithic (Stone Age) and Clovis peoples. Also, the southeastern United States has produced more Clovis sites than the West, and a few radiocarbon dates suggest some of them may predate those in the western states. If correct, that hardly fits the notion that Clovis technology originated in northeast Asia or Alaska. Over the years, various scholars have noted similarities between Clovis projectile points and "Solutrean" points, the product of a Paleolithic culture on the north coast of Spain between...
  • A Surprising Survival Story in the Siberian Arctic

    01/02/2004 2:47:55 PM PST · by Lessismore · 9 replies · 961+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2004-01-02 | Richard Stone
    Artifacts dated to 30,000 years ago tell of human resilience in an unforgiving environment, and they may provide new clues to the peopling of the Americas Primates are simply not primed for Arctic survival. A person lost on the tundra in winter will quickly perish, and even the sturdiest shelter atop the permafrost provides scant refuge without a supply of fuel. Yet somehow, at the height of the last Ice Age, humans endured a similarly unforgiving environment in northern Siberia, in the Yana River valley 500 kilometers above the Arctic Circle. That's the surprising conclusion from a trove of artifacts...
  • PEOPLING OF THE AMERICAS: Late Date for Siberian Site Challenges Bering Pathway

    07/25/2003 6:40:03 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 33 replies · 4,547+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-07-25 | Richard Stone
    As elusive as the Cheshire Cat, the first people to arrive in the Americas have tended to appear and vanish with each new twist in the archaeological record. The latest disappearing act may be taking place on page 501, where new evidence, some claim, casts another shadow over a once-cherished idea: that Asian big-game hunters crossed the Bering Land Bridge to give rise to the Clovis people, who were considered the first Americans. New dates show that a crucial Siberian site, thought to be a way station along the Bering road, wasn't occupied until after the Clovis had begun killing...
  • Study: Neanderthals, Modern Humans Same Species

    01/10/2002 5:42:43 AM PST · by blam · 82 replies · 4,240+ views
    USA Today ^ | 12-26-2001 | Michael A. Stowe
    <p>Humanity's first steps out of Africa along a path that led ultimately to dominion over the earth are subject to intense scientific debate. So is the role played by the Neandertals who roamed across Europe for 100,000 years before quietly disappearing. The two issues may well be related, and a University of Tennessee anthropologist reports statistical evidence that Neandertals and emerging modern humans likely interbred and evolved together.</p>
  • Big Chill Killed Off The Neanderthals

    01/21/2004 3:26:51 PM PST · by blam · 104 replies · 1,901+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 1-21-2004 | Douglas Palmer
    Big chill killed off the Neanderthals 19:00 21 January 04 It is possibly the longest-running murder mystery of them all. What, or even who, killed humankind's nearest relatives, the Neanderthals who once roamed Europe before dying out almost 30,000 years ago? Suspects have ranged from the climate to humans themselves, and the mystery has deeply divided experts. Now 30 scientists have come together to publish the most definitive answer yet to this enigma. They say Neanderthals simply did not have the technological know-how to survive the increasingly harsh winters. And intriguingly, rather than being Neanderthal killers, the original human settlers...
  • Did hardy Ice Age hunters find the West?

    01/02/2004 8:42:57 PM PST · by Holly_P · 38 replies · 1,574+ views
    Springfield News-Leader ^ | 010204 | Paul Recer (A.P.)
    <p>Washington — A people who may have been ancestors of the first Americans lived in Arctic Siberia, enduring one of the most unforgiving environments on Earth at the height of the Ice Age, according to researchers who discovered the oldest evidence yet of humans living near the frigid gateway to the New World. Russian scientists uncovered a 30,000-year-old site where ancient hunters lived on the Yana River in Siberia, some 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle and not far from the Bering land bridge that then connected Asia with North America.</p>
  • The Oldest Americans May Prove Even Older

    06/29/2004 4:20:56 PM PDT · by NukeMan · 31 replies · 1,657+ views
    New York Times ^ | 6/29/04 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    BARNWELL, S.C., June 24 - On a hillside by the Savannah River, under tall oaks bearded with Spanish moss, an archaeologist and a graduate student crouched in the humid depths of a trench. They had reason to think they were in the presence of a breathtaking discovery. Or at the least, they were on to something more than 20,000 years old that would throw American archaeology into further turmoil over its most contentious issue: when did people first reach America, and who were they?