Keyword: greatestpresident

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  • The Civil War in Four Minutes

    07/03/2016 11:22:22 AM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 53 replies
    http://www.civilwar.org/education/in4/ ^ | Jun 26, 2013 | Civil War Trust
    "Historian Garry Adelman describes the events that took place during the Battle of Gettysburg from July 1-July 3, 1863." I found this video very well done in just 4 minutes. Gave me a good start to understanding this complex battle and also something to think about on this day of Pickett's Charge. I don't know how many of you here are well versed with the way the battle went but for me it's still a learning experience.
  • Crowdsourcing a modern means to crack code on Civil War texts

    07/03/2016 11:32:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    The Wall Street Journal reported on a trove of Civil War era telegrams — many of them to and from Abraham Lincoln — that have never been decoded. The telegrams are owned by the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. They have started a project, "Decoding the Civil War," to transcribe and decipher their collection of nearly 16,000 Civil War telegrams between Lincoln, his Cabinet and Union Army officers. About a third of the telegrams were written in code. The library is crowdsourcing the project through the largest online platform for collaborative volunteer research, Zooniverse. They...
  • Get it straight: Democrats enslaved the Black America Republicans fought and died to free Part 1

    06/16/2016 9:08:16 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 8 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 6/16/16 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    Like many Americans who were adults in the mid-1970s I was curious to see what the re-make of Roots would look like. I found that the problems with the project actually appeared during an hour long discussion among historians. In the whole hour the word Democrat was not heard and the single reference to a political party was that the “Republicans did not do enough” to help the slaves. As a student of the history of that era I bristled at such textbook knee jerk liberal pap. Here is my response. Save for the 1960s, and the last seven years,...
  • 20 Arkansas homes evacuated because of Civil War landmine

    04/01/2016 7:22:11 PM PDT · by Morgana · 71 replies
    msn.com ^ | April 1, 2016 | AP
    HOT SPRINGS, Ark. — Police in Hot Springs, Arkansas, have evacuated about 20 homes after a man mistook a Civil War-era landmine for a cannonball and took it home. Police say as of about 4 p.m. Thursday that the U.S. Air Force Bomb Squad was looking for a place to explode the ordinance. Police spokesman Cpl. Kirk Zaner said a Hot Springs man dug up what he thought was a cannonball near Danville. The man put the 32-pound landmine in the back of his pickup and drove about 65 miles home. After researching pictures of Civil War-era weapons, the man...
  • Today, March 30, 1870: African-Americans Granted the Right to Vote

    03/30/2016 8:33:15 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 87 replies
    Constitution.com ^ | March 30, 2016 | Dave Jolly
    Even though the Civil War had ended in 1865, political and racial strife continued to northern and southern states. In an attempt to mend the rift, the Republican-controlled Congress passed the First Reconstruction Act in 1867, but many southerners objected to the act saying it favored northern interests and not their own. At the same time, two groups of disenfranchised Americans lobbied for the right to vote – women and blacks. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were among the leading women suffragists. The most prominent among the black suffragists was Frederick Douglas. All these groups wanted was the...
  • 1855

    11/21/2015 11:35:55 AM PST · by Homer_J_Simpson · 376 replies
    Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era | 2004 | Nicole Etcheson
    Before when free-soil men invoked the right of revolution in defense of their political rights, proslavery men condemned them for defying the legitimate government. But proslavery men feared the loss of their right to own slaves as much as free soilers feared the loss of the right to exclude slavery. At Hickory Point, [Kansas] a squabble over land claims ignited these political quarrels. A settler named Franklin M. Coleman had been squatting on land abandoned by some Hoosiers, who subsequently sold the claim to Jacob Branson, another Hoosier. In late 1854, when Branson informed Coleman of his legal claim and...
  • The Party of Lincoln AND Calhoun? The Right and the Civil War

    11/03/2015 6:52:26 AM PST · by don-o · 277 replies
    The Imaginative Conservative ^ | November 3, 2015 | Tony Petersen
    The Civil War is, as Shelby Foote noted, at the crossroads of our being. Looked at one way, it marked the end of a long struggle against slavery and the beginning of a long one for civil rights and racial equality. Looked at another, it marked the end of limited government and the beginning of the encroaching, ever-present Leviathan that exists today. These memories can be both in sync and in conflict. After all, it was the deployment of strong government in the form of a dominant army and the passage of federal amendments that played a large role in...
  • Meet the guy who convinced Russia to side with the North during the Civil War

    10/17/2015 1:46:27 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 19 replies
    We Are The Mighty ^ | Oct 16, 2015 9:04:57 am | Blake Stilwell
    It’s hard to determine which is more surprising: the British aching to send troops and materiel to aid the Confederacy during the Civil War or that the first “Special Relationship” was between the U.S. and Russia against the British. Both of these facts are true and for the latter negating the former, we can thank one Cassius Marcellus Clay. Clay was more than just a namesake for the greatest boxer of all time. He was also a politician, representative, officer in the Mexican War and Civil War, abolitionist, and ambassador with a pedigree in badassery. This man once frightened an...
  • Civil War Medal of Honor winner

    09/22/2015 3:21:45 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 49 replies
    Civil War Veteran Jacob Miller was shot in the  forehead on Sept.19th 1863 at Brock Field at  Chickamauga. He lived with an open bullet wound  for many years, with the last pieces of lead dropping  out 31 years after he was first shot !
  • Then & now photos from the Civil War

    08/09/2015 7:31:06 PM PDT · by Altura Ct. · 62 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 8/7/2015
    Very cool then & now photo shoot. The women who dug the graves, the kids who watched the largest battle in US history – and the slaves forced to help fighters at the front. 150 years after the last shots were fired, Guardian photographer David Levene travelled across the US photographing the sites scarred by the American civil war. http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/ng-interactive/2015/jun/22/american-civil-war-photography-interactive
  • How God Ended North American Slavery

    08/03/2015 2:32:33 PM PDT · by kathsua · 7 replies
    London Telegraph ^ | August 3rd, 2015 | reasonmclucus
    The actions God took to end slavery in North America provide an example of the truth of the religious phrase “God works in mysterious ways His wonders to perform
  • Family of Doctor Who Treated Lincoln Assassin Visit Prison

    07/27/2015 8:04:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    About 80 descendants of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd marked Friday's 150th anniversary of Mudd's July 24, 1865, arrival at an isolated Gulf of Mexico fort where he was imprisoned after splinting the broken leg of President Abraham Lincoln's assassin. Wearing "Free Dr. Mudd'' T-shirts, the group toured Fort Jefferson, a former Union military prison on an island 68 miles west of Key West in remote Dry Tortugas National Park. Most visited the cell where Mudd spent four years after being convicted as a co-conspirator in Lincoln's assassination. Great-grandson Tom Mudd, who spearheaded the pilgrimage, believes the doctor was unaware of...
  • HISTORICAL IGNORANCE II: Forgotten facts about Lincoln, slavery and the Civil War

    07/22/2015 7:36:12 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 1,086 replies
    FrontPage Mag ^ | 07/22/2015 | Prof. Walter Williams
    We call the war of 1861 the Civil War. But is that right? A civil war is a struggle between two or more entities trying to take over the central government. Confederate President Jefferson Davis no more sought to take over Washington, D.C., than George Washington sought to take over London in 1776. Both wars, those of 1776 and 1861, were wars of independence. Such a recognition does not require one to sanction the horrors of slavery. We might ask, How much of the war was about slavery? Was President Abraham Lincoln really for outlawing slavery? Let's look at his...
  • What Did Lincoln Really Think of Jefferson?

    07/05/2015 3:24:11 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 503 replies
    New York Times ^ | 07/05/2015 | By ALLEN C. GUELZO
    GETTYSBURG, Pa. — “Lincoln hated Thomas Jefferson.” That is not exactly what we expect to hear about the president who spoke of “malice toward none,” referring to the president who wrote that “all men are created equal.” Presidents have never been immune from criticism by other presidents. But Jefferson and Lincoln? These two stare down at us from Mount Rushmore as heroic, stainless and serene, and any suggestion of disharmony seems somehow a criticism of America itself. Still, Lincoln seems not to have gotten that message. “Mr. Lincoln hated Thomas Jefferson as a man,” wrote William Henry Herndon, Lincoln’s law...
  • Shocker: There’s a Confederate Flag Sewn Into Lincoln’s Chair at Ford’s Theatre

    07/01/2015 7:03:16 AM PDT · by DoodleDawg · 17 replies
    New York Observer ^ | 6/29/15 | Joe Lapointe
    As national debate rages about the Confederate flag, a peculiar installation of that controversial banner may be hiding in plain sight – inside the cushion of Abraham Lincoln’s rocking chair, a replica that rests in a balcony box in the re-built Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The theatre—a functioning play space and a museum—reopened in 1968, 103 years after President Lincoln died by gunfire in April of 1865 at the end of the Civil War while he watched a play there. The builder of the replica chair—a now-deceased craftsman named Carlton McLendon—lived in Montgomery, Ala. and felt bitter toward the...
  • Mike Huckabee: Conservatives Can Ignore Gay Marriage Ruling Like Lincoln Ignored Dred Scott

    06/27/2015 9:34:27 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 19 replies
    WashingtonTimes ^ | June 27, 2015 | Valerie Richardson
    Mike Huckabee: Conservatives Can Ignore Gay Marriage Ruling Like Lincoln Ignored Dred Scott By Valerie Richardson - The Washington Times June 27, 2015 DENVER — Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee suggested Saturday that conservatives treat the Supreme Court’s gay marriage decision like Abraham Lincoln treated the high court’s pro-slavery ruling in Dred Scott: Ignore it. “They can do same thing that Abraham Lincoln did about the Dred Scott decision of 1857,” Mr. Huckabee said at the Western Conservative Summit. “The Dred Scott decision said that African-Americans were not fully human, that they need not be treated as fully human.”
  • Abraham Lincoln: First Inaugural Address [on slavery, more statues need to come down]

    06/26/2015 1:29:13 PM PDT · by SJackson · 23 replies
    Bartleby.com ^ | March 4, 1861 | Abraham Lincoln
    Abraham Lincoln First Inaugural Address Monday, March 4, 1861 Fellow-Citizens of the United States: IN compliance with a custom as old as the Government itself, I appear before you to address you briefly and to take in your presence the oath prescribed by the Constitution of the United States to be taken by the President "before he enters on the execution of this office." I do not consider it necessary at present for me to discuss those matters of administration about which there is no special anxiety or excitement. Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States...
  • Women on 20s nominates [Republican] Harriet Tubman as Andrew Jackson’s successor on currency

    05/13/2015 7:31:41 AM PDT · by grundle · 75 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | May 12, 2015 | Michael Walsh
    A feminist group that wants to boot Andrew Jackson from the $20 bill has chosen a female hero to replace him — abolitionist Harriet Tubman. On Tuesday morning, Women on 20s revealed the results of a 10-week poll for a possible Jackson replacement and emailed a petition — addressed to President Barack Obama — to the White House Council on Women and Girls. By midday, the council’s chair, Valerie Jarrett, and executive director, Tina Tchen, responded, saying they “would like to continue the conversation.” “We’re waiting for some kind of meeting with the White House, and I can tell you...
  • Why Memorial Day Has Special Significance for African Americans

    05/25/2015 5:11:13 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    The Root ^ | May 25 2015 | THEODORE R. JOHNSON III
    They have long been overrepresented in the military, serving and dying for a country that has not always celebrated their freedom or rewarded their sacrifice.Memorial Day is a sacred occasion when we pay tribute to all the military men and women who have died in service to the United States. It is also an observance that owes its creation to blacks. This tradition began when newly freed slaves decorated the grave sites of Civil War soldiers as a way to honor those who had fought for their freedom. But blacks were not just passive bystanders. Many of volunteered to...
  • How the Civil War Changed the World

    05/19/2015 10:33:26 PM PDT · by iowamark · 258 replies
    New York Times Disunion ^ | May 19, 2015 | Don Doyle
    Even while the Civil War raged, slaves in Cuba could be heard singing, “Avanza, Lincoln, avanza! Tu eres nuestra esperanza!” (Onward, Lincoln, Onward! You are our hope!) – as if they knew, even before the soldiers fighting the war far to the North and long before most politicians understood, that the war in America would change their lives, and the world. The secession crisis of 1860-1861 threatened to be a major setback to the world antislavery movement, and it imperiled the whole experiment in democracy. If slavery was allowed to exist, and if the world’s leading democracy could fall apart...
  • Lincoln sought to deport freed slaves

    04/28/2015 12:18:27 PM PDT · by concernedcitizen76 · 193 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | February 9, 2011 | Stephen Dinan
    The Great Emancipator was almost the Great Colonizer: Newly released documents show that to a greater degree than historians had previously known, President Lincoln laid the groundwork to ship freed slaves overseas to help prevent racial strife in the U.S. Just after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, Lincoln authorized plans to pursue a freedmen’s settlement in present-day Belize and another in Guyana, both colonial possessions of Great Britain at the time, said Phillip W. Magness, one of the researchers who uncovered the new documents.
  • George Washington and most of Jamestown had gay sex... and John Wilkes Booth was one of Abraham [tr]

    04/15/2015 1:43:09 PM PDT · by C19fan · 216 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 15, 2015 | Alexandra Klaunser
    Abraham Lincoln and George Washington were gay, says a new book by a gay activist and award winning writer. Larry Kramer, 79, says he believes what's written in his history book is true though he is selling it as fiction to avoid legal troubles. In Volume One of his two part book 'The American People,' Kramer says that Abraham Lincoln was gay and his killer John Wilkes Booth was actually Lincoln's spurned gay lover. 'We know that Abraham Lincoln was gay,' Kramer told CBS in an interview about the book which came out this month.
  • Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

    04/15/2015 11:05:21 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 94 replies
    NPR ^ | APRIL 15, 2015 | Renee Montagne
    John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln. But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president. Booth was born into a prominent family of actors. According to Alford, he had good looks and an exceptional acting range, playing both dark roles as bad guys and softer roles such...
  • Lincoln assassinated

    04/14/2015 6:57:32 AM PDT · by Paisan · 333 replies
    On this date in 1865, Good Friday, Abraham Lincoln was shot at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. The 16th president died the next morning.
  • Grierson's Grand Raid

    04/17/2015 8:49:02 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 15 replies
    After conferring with General William Sooy Smith, commanding at La Grange, Grierson issued orders for "light rations" to his brigade, which now consisted of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois, and the second Iowa. On the beautiful spring morning of April 17, Grierson led the long column of seventeen hundred officers and men out of La Grange and headed south. Grierson himself, carried a small-scale map of plantations and Confederate storehouses, and a jew's harp in his blouse. The command met no opposition on the first day, traveling an easy thirty miles to halt just short of Ripley, Mississippi at the...
  • Applying Lincoln to our Culture's Civil Wars

    04/09/2015 9:53:10 AM PDT · by Aspenhuskerette · 1 replies
    The Aspen Times ^ | April 9, 2015 | Melanie Sturm
    Last week, as radical Islamists slaughtered 148 Christian students at a Kenyan university, America’s faithful celebrated Easter and Passover in tranquility, demonstrating why religious liberty is not the eccentric uncle in the human-rights family — it’s the matriarch. Yet with demonic evil spanning the globe, and religion a life-and-death matter, punishment for defending one’s faith is now acceptable in America. Our “live and let live” ethic is increasingly imperiled. Witness the firestorm after Indiana became the 20th state to enact its version of the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act. In our morally upside-down world, we accommodate the nuclear ambitions of...
  • Civil War: 150th Anniversary of Lee Surrender at Appomattox

    04/09/2015 10:03:31 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 39 replies
    US News and World Report ^ | APRIL 9, 2015 | STEVE SZKOTAK
    The surrender of Confederate Robert E. Lee to Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant 150 years ago Thursday was the definitive milestone of the end of the Civil War.
  • Bells to ring marking end of Civil War

    04/09/2015 9:55:17 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 35 replies
    News Advance ^ | 4-8-15 | staff report
    Bells will ring across the country and in Lynchburg on Thursday to mark the 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, the symbolic end of four years of bloodshed. A historic bell will be rung at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park at 3 p.m., the time the surrender occurred. People at historic sites, schools, parks, government buildings and within communities throughout Lynchburg and the country will join in at 3:15 p.m., ringing bells for four continuous minutes, representing the four years of fighting.
  • Could the South Have Won the War?

    03/17/2015 8:14:26 AM PDT · by iowamark · 313 replies
    NY Times Disunion ^ | March 16, 2015 | Terry L. Jones
    By March 1865, it was obvious to all but the most die-hard Confederates that the South was going to lose the war. Whether that loss was inevitable is an unanswerable question, but considering various “what if” scenarios has long been a popular exercise among historians, novelists and Civil War buffs... Perhaps the most common scenario centers on the actions of Gen. Robert E. Lee... What many fail to recognize is that Northerners were just as committed to winning as the Southerners. Some saw it as a war to free the slaves, while others fought to ensure that their republican form...
  • A surprising number of presidents never graduated college

    02/16/2015 10:09:14 AM PST · by blueyon · 41 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | 2/16/15 | Claire Daniel |
    Media and potential opponents are scandalized that Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is considering a run for president even though he didn’t graduate from college. But if Walker (who dropped out of Marquette University in his senior year) won in 2016, he would be joining an exalted group that includes the two presidents most frequently named as the favorites of the American people. Eleven presidents — exactly 25 percent — were not college graduates. Most prominent on that list are George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, who make up half of Mt. Rushmore’s foursome and are in the top three or top...
  • Happy birthday, Abraham Lincoln: Thanks for 'Michigander'

    02/12/2015 8:32:20 AM PST · by cripplecreek · 32 replies
    Mlive.com ^ | February 12, 2015 | Fritz Klug
    LANSING, MI -- Today is the 206th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth, one of the greatest U.S. presidents. There's a lot to be thankful to Lincoln for: guiding the country through the Civil War and helping end slavery. But residents of Michigan have something special to thank the 16th president for. He coined the term many of us use to describe ourselves: Michigander. There is an ongoing debate about if Michigan citizens should be described as Michiganians or Michiganders. Lincoln coined the term Michigander when he was in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1848, Lincoln gave a speech against...
  • Son of ex-slave who served in Union army during Civil War dies 179 years after father's birth

    01/27/2015 7:40:15 PM PST · by iowamark · 55 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1/27/2015 | AP
    RALEIGH, N.C. – Luke Martin Jr., whose father was an ex-slave and Civil War Union soldier, has died — 179 years after his father was born. Martin was 97 when he died Sunday at his home in New Bern, North Carolina.. ..lived in the house where he was born — a house his father built in the 1890s. Martin had little memory of his father, Luke Martin Sr., who died at age 84 in 1920 when the son was just a few years old, according to Martin-Williams. The elder Martin, who was born in 1836, was married twice, the second...
  • Abraham Lincoln First Inaugural Address Monday, March 4, 1861

    11/25/2014 7:19:47 AM PST · by don-o · 3 replies
    Bartleby ^ | March 4, 1861 | Abraham Lincoln
    ....By the frame of the Government under which we live this same people have wisely given their public servants but little power for mischief, and have with equal wisdom provided for the return of that little to their own hands at very short intervals. While the people retain their virtue and vigilance no Administration by any extreme of wickedness or folly can very seriously injure the Government in the short space of four years.
  • The Gettysburg Address

    11/23/2014 1:51:47 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 69 replies
    Archives ^ | November 19,1863 | Abraham Lincoln
    The Gettysburg Address November 19, 1863 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether...
  • Children of Civil War Veterans Still Walk Among Us, 150 Years After the War

    11/13/2014 5:52:24 AM PST · by Gamecock · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 11, 2014 | David A. Lande
    How many people alive today can say that their father was a Civil War soldier who shook hands with Abraham Lincoln in the White House? Fred Upham can. Despite sounding like a tall tale and a mathematical impossibility, it's documented truth. Fred's father, William, was a private in the Union Army's Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was severely wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run, in 1861, and later personally appointed by President Lincoln to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Fred's in exclusive company—the dwindling group of children of soldiers who fought, North against South, 150...
  • The Death of Taney

    10/16/2014 9:05:49 PM PDT · by iowamark · 61 replies
    On Oct. 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln must have breathed a bit easier. Not because the war was over — it would last another six months. Not because he had been re-elected — the election remained nearly a month away. And not because Gen. William T. Sherman had begun his decisive march through Georgia — the general was still holding Atlanta. While much remained unsettled, Lincoln’s achievements as president seemed more secure that autumn day because the president learned that his old nemesis Roger B. Taney, the Maryland-born chief justice of the Supreme Court, had died. Ever since Taney had...
  • Duquesne speaker to discuss religious causes of Civil War

    10/10/2014 7:30:16 AM PDT · by Ditto · 29 replies
    Pittsburgh Post Gazette ^ | October 6, 2014 | Len Barcousky
    Strong belief in heaven likely was one of the factors that made the Civil War so long and so bloody, public historian Barbara Franco says. “It made people more tolerant of death,” she explained in a recent telephone interview. Dying in the 19th century was compared to passing through a curtain and reuniting with family members on the other side. That belief made soldiers and civilians more willing to accept the unprecedented number of casualties from disease and combat during the nation’s most catastrophic conflict, she said.
  • Did Lincoln Want to Ship Black People Back to Africa?

    09/27/2014 12:46:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 95 replies
    The Root ^ | September 22, 2014 | Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
    Editor’s note: For those who are wondering about the retro title of this black-history series, please take a moment to learn about historian Joel A. Rogers, author of the 1934 book 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro With Complete Proof, to whom these “amazing facts” are an homage. Amazing Fact About the Negro No. 92: When President Abraham Lincoln met with free black leaders in 1862, what did he propose? Today marks the anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s “shot heard ’round the world.” I’m referring, of course, to the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation he fired off from the White House on...
  • Do the Fed’s Really Own the Land in Nevada? Nope!

    04/20/2014 2:14:01 PM PDT · by foundedonpurpose · 53 replies
    Armstrong Economics Blog ^ | April 19, 2014 | Martin Armstrong
    Do the Fed’s Really Own the Land in Nevada? Nope! Posted on April 19, 2014 by Martin Armstrong Nevada-Protest QUESTION: Is it true that nearly 80% of Nevada is still owned by the Federal Government who then pays no tax to the State of Nevada? This seems very strange if true as a backdrop to this entire Bundy affair. You seem to be the only person to tell the truth without getting crazy. Thank you so much HF REPLY: The truth behind Nevada is of course just a quagmire of politics. Nevada was a key pawn in getting Abraham Lincoln...
  • Lincoln’s Character

    04/14/2014 6:49:47 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 31 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 14, 2014 | Thomas Bogar
    "Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing." ––Abraham Lincoln The 149th anniversary of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln provides an appropriate opportunity to appreciate the character of the man beyond the customary veneration afforded by his memorials in statuary, currency and the names of thousands of streets and commercial institutions. He was, in his own words, “the real thing.” This was a man of humble origins whose determination and perseverance led him to the highest office in the land. At no point in...
  • LINCOLN SIGNS THE FEDERAL CONSCRIPTION ACT (March 3, 1863)

    03/03/2014 8:58:36 PM PST · by smoothsailing · 9 replies
    March 3, 2013 LINCOLN SIGNS THE FEDERAL CONSCRIPTION ACT March 3, 1863 (Tuesday)Though the Confederacy has been heralded as the bastion for states rights pretty much since the war ended, they had been the first “federal” government to impose a nationwide draft. By this point in the war, the Southern draft had been in effect for nearly a year, undergoing many changes, mostly involving wealthy people being excepted from it. For a time, the North seemed not to need one. Enrollment had been great for much of the early war, but over the summer of 1862, when Lincoln called for...
  • The Key To It All/ Lincoln's Birthday, 2014

    02/11/2014 2:10:40 PM PST · by Kaslin · 46 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 11, 2014 | Paul Greenberg
    An Italian exchange student once asked me what he should know in order to understand America. The best I could come up with on the spot was the U.S. Constitution, jazz and baseball. Later it would come to me that to study each of those only in the abstract, as just a rule book or a series of notes on a page, would be less than useful to someone trying to understand America. The notes would be there, but not the music. The rules of the game would be there, but not the spirit. That spirit cannot be appreciated...
  • The American Flag Daily: Abraham Lincoln

    01/24/2014 3:46:18 AM PST · by Master Zinja · 6 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | January 24, 2014 | FlagBearer
    Let every American, every lover of liberty, every well-wisher to his posterity swear by the blood of the Revolution never to violate in the least particular the laws of the country, and never to tolerate their violation by others. As the patriots of seventy-six did to the support of the Declaration of Independence, so to the support of the Constitution and laws let every American pledge his life, his property, and his sacred honor—let every man remember that to violate the law is to trample on the blood of his father, and to tear the charter of his own and...
  • Historian finds newspaper from 1864 in archives

    11/30/2013 6:38:17 AM PST · by NYer · 25 replies
    Register-Star ^ | November 28, 2013
    Finding a treasured piece of history hidden in a file cabinet may be the dream of many, but it happened to Stuyvesant Town Historian Juanita Knott. She recently found what could be handwritten copies of an 1864 newspaper, “The Old Flag” which lists pages of Union soldier prisoners of war during the Civil War, including those from New York state.“I’m not sure if they’re copies or hand-written,” Knott said, carefully turning the yellow, almost crumbling pages of “The Old Flag” newspaper that she had clipped to acid-free paper so as not to destroy this voice from the past.“It’s much too...
  • The Civil War in COLOR for the first time: Painstakingly remastered images of a divided America

    11/13/2013 2:36:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 61 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10-13-2013 | Alex Greig
    Two professional colorists have combined their skills with photographs and fascination with the American Civil War to create a remarkable series of color photographs from the era. British colorist Jordan Lloyd, 27, met fellow colorist Mads Madsen, 19, from Denmark when he started posting on Madsen's subreddit 'Colorized History'. Initially it was Madsen who was colorizing images from the Civil War era, but Lloyd eventually got interested and now the two work together restoring the images, improving their technique by giving each other critiques. Madsen has been interested in the Civil War since he was 12, and was especially fascinated...
  • Obama to be a no-show at Gettysburg 150th anniversary ceremony

    10/31/2013 8:18:32 AM PDT · by markomalley · 108 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 10/31/2013 | Ben Wolfgang
    President Obama has declined an invitation to speak at next month’s ceremony marking the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. The event, slated for Nov. 19 at the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, instead will feature Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and renowned historian James McPherson as the keynote speakers, the Gettysburg National Military Park said in a press release. “President Obama will not attend and the Secretary of Interior will represent the administration,” the park pointed out in the first paragraph of its press release. It’s unclear why Mr. Obama, a noted admirer of President Lincoln, declined the...
  • The Union’s Most Undervalued General (Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas)

    10/25/2013 5:52:30 AM PDT · by C19fan · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 24, 2013 | Phil Leigh
    Despite his brilliant victory at Vicksburg in July, some lingering doubts remained about Gen. Ulysses S. Grant when he took command of the besieged Union forces at Chattanooga, Tenn., on Oct. 23, 1863. .......................................................... But until it proved successful, Grant had angrily denounced the unauthorized assault that chased the rebels away from Chattanooga and brought him glory, muttering that, should it fail, “somebody will suffer.” And Grant had a very particular somebody in mind, a leader he persistently disparaged because he dreaded the man as a rival: Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas.
  • An Historic Event for my blog

    10/27/2013 1:36:35 PM PDT · by DanMiller · 46 replies
    Dan Miller's Blog ^ | October 27, 2013 | Dan Miller
    One of my posts on the Civil War just got its 40,000th "view." On December 27, 2011, I posted an article titled The U.S. Constitution and Civil War. It had 42 views that year, 18,728 in 2012 and has had 21,234 so far this year, for a total of 40,004. That amounts to just over thirty percent of the views at my little blog since it began. The progression, suggesting a current level of interest in the Civil War, strikes me as interesting and I thought that maybe others might be similarly interested.For anyone who may be interested, here is...
  • How a Disney animator 'discovered' a new picture of Abraham Lincoln at the Gettysburg Address[snip]

    09/25/2013 12:21:17 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 36 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 24 September 2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A Disney animator-turned Lincoln historian believes he has found the second of only two pictures of the 16th president taken at the Gettysburg Address. The incredible discovery has caused no small controversy in the world of Civil War history - because it means two other images of believed to be Abraham Lincoln do not, in fact, show the president. Christopher Oakley, a professor at the University of North Carolina-Asheville, found the shot of Lincoln in March while combing over historical photos from the Gettysburg Address.
  • Frederick Douglass Escapes Slavery, 175 Years Ago

    09/04/2013 5:10:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Channel ^ | September 3, 2013 | Christopher Klein
    On September 3, 1838, Frederick Bailey undertook the riskiest journey of his life. The 20-year-old slave made a daring escape from his master in Baltimore, and with his newfound freedom came a new name -- Frederick Douglass... After Douglass’ attempt to escape slavery two years prior was betrayed by a fellow slave, he had been jailed, sent to Baltimore by his master and hired out to work in the city’s shipyards. Undeterred, Douglass vowed to try to escape again on September 3, 1838, although he knew the risk. "I felt assured that if I failed in this attempt, my case...