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Keyword: sahara

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  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Why humans left Africa - Climate Change

    01/26/2018 1:31:18 AM PST · by vannrox · 22 replies
    International Business Times ^ | ON 10/05/17 AT 3:09 PM | BY ELANA GLOWATZ
    Why Humans Left Africa: Our Ancestors Watched Climate Change To Cold, Dry BY ELANA GLOWATZ @ELANAGLOW ON 10/05/17 AT 3:09 PM Early humans may have left Africa and spread all over the globe because their home climate was drying up. The idea comes from samples of marine sediment taken from northeastern Africa that show the area was cold and dry around 60,000 years ago, which is around the time humans might have migrated off that continent and into Europe and Asia. A team of scientists wrote in the journal Geology that after warm and wet conditions between 120,000 and 90,000...
  • More Evidence of a Wet Sahara

    02/23/2017 8:30:41 AM PST · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2-23-2017 | Jake Hebert, Ph.D.
    More Evidence of a Wet Sahara by Jake Hebert, Ph.D. * Scientists from the University of Arizona recently announced that what is now the Sahara desert was once wet and green and extended as far north as the Mediterranean Sea.1,2 The scientists examined chemical clues found within leaf waxes preserved in four marine sediment cores located off the northwestern African coast. Plants experience subtle changes in the chemical composition of their wax, depending upon the wetness or dryness of the climate. Because leaf wax washes into the oceans, it can be preserved in sediment cores extracted from the ocean floor....
  • Snow Falls on the Sahara Desert for First Time in 40 Years

    12/23/2016 10:43:54 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 31 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | December 21, 2016 | 1:27 PM EST | Melanie Hunter
    For the first time in 40 years, snow has fallen on the Sahara Desert, the Independent reported Wednesday. […] “In his images [Karim Bouchetat, an amateur photographer who captured images of the snow on Monday], a thin layer of snow rests on deep orange dunes, where he said it stayed for about a day, and forms whirling patterns where the slopes are too steep for it to settle. Snow was reportedly last seen in Ain Sefra in 1979, when a half-hour snowstorm stopped traffic,” the Independent stated in its article. …
  • ‘Everyone was stunned': Snow falls in Sahara desert town for first time in 37 years

    12/21/2016 10:16:14 AM PST · by rktman · 33 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | 12/21/2016 | Jason Samenow
    In the Sahara desert, known for its suffocating heat, a freak snow shower coated the dusty dunes near the Algerian town of Ain Sefra. It hadn’t snowed in the town called “The Gateway to the Desert” since 1979. Photographer Karim Bouchetata captured gorgeous images of the red rolling dunes frosted in white. “Everyone was stunned to see snow falling in the desert, it is such a rare occurrence,” Bouchetata told the Independent. “It looked amazing as the snow settled on the sand.”
  • Migration of Early Humans From Africa Aided By Wet Weather

    08/30/2007 10:15:20 AM PDT · by blam · 46 replies · 846+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 8-30-2007 | Geological Society of America
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: August 30, 2007 Migration of Early Humans From Africa Aided By Wet Weather Science Daily — The African origin of early modern humans 200,000--150,000 years ago is now well documented, with archaeological data suggesting that a major migration from tropical east Africa to the Levant took place between 130,000 and 100,000 years ago via the presently hyper-arid Saharan-Arabian desert. This migration was dependent on the occurrence of wetter climate in the region. Whereas there is good evidence that the southern and central Saharan-Arabian desert experienced increased monsoon precipitation during this period, no unequivocal evidence...
  • Scientists discover 8000-year-old tiny hand prints in ancient cave were NOT made by humans

    03/01/2016 12:56:01 PM PST · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated 18:23, 1 Mar 2016 | By Siobhan McFadyen
    Experts probing the discovery of 13 hand prints in the eerie Egyptian Cave of Beasts say the 8000-year-old stencils did not belong to humans Anthropologists probing the discovery of tiny 8000-year-old hand prints in an Egyptian cave say they were not made by human hands. Explorers stumbled across the tiny hand imprints in a Saharan cave after unearthing more than 5000 images carved into the stone in Egypt's southwest border with Libya 14 years ago. But a study of the 13 tiny hand prints show that not only are they not human - but that they are believed to belong...
  • Fossil of massive crocodile found on edge of Sahara desert

    01/11/2016 6:15:44 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 51 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1-11-2016 | Michael Casey
    Paleontologists have discovered the fossil remains of the world’s biggest ocean-dwelling crocodile buried on the edge of the Sahara, a creature that was twice the size of anything seen today. Named Machimosaurus rex, this croc would have weighed in at least 6,600 pounds and been around 32 feet long. Other than its size, it would have looked much like a modern day crocodile except for its narrow snout – which was designed to allow it swim in the ocean.
  • Maltese claims extraordinary discovery in Sahara desert

    12/29/2007 8:01:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 176+ views
    Independent Online ^ | Saturday, December 29, 2007 | unattributed
    Mark Borda and Mahmoud Marai, from Malta and Egypt respectively, were surveying a field of boulders on the flanks of a hill deep in the Libyan desert some 700 kilometres west of the Nile Valley when engravings on a large rock consisting of hieroglyphic writing, Pharaonic cartouche, an image of the king and other Pharaonic iconography came into view. Mr Borda would not reveal the precise location in order to protect the site... "The consensus among Egyptologists is that the Egyptians did not penetrate this desert any further than the area around Djedefre's Water Mountain. This is a sandstone hill...
  • Study reveals hidden talent of mushrooms: They can make it rain

    10/30/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 27 replies
    Fox News ^ | October 29, 2015 | Michael Harthorne
    Discovery reports researchers documented a previously unknown system in which rain makes mushrooms grow, mushrooms release spores into the atmosphere, and those spores create moisture droplets that could lead to rain. “We can watch big water droplets grow as vapor condenses on (the mushroom spore’s) surface,” study author Nicholas Money tells Discovery. “Nothing else works like this in nature.” This process could be influencing climate patterns around the world, especially in fungus-heavy tropical forests like the Amazon, Gizmodo reports. According to Gizmodo, a single mushroom can "catapult" up to 30,000 spores per second at speeds of up to 4mph. And...
  • Egyptian researchers developed a cost-effective method for cleaning saltwater in just minutes

    09/09/2015 8:52:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Inhabitat ^ | 09/09/2015 | by Cat DiStasio,
    Finding ways to create clean drinking water where there is none is a field of constant innovation. Desalination, the process of filtering seawater to make it fit for human use, is perhaps the most common and researchers around the globe are on a quest to bring cost-effective and portable desalination technology to rural areas where it is desperately needed. So it’s exciting news that researchers at Alexandria University in Egypt have developed a promising new method that can turn salt water into fresh water in just a few minutes. The new Egyptian method relies on salt-attracting membranes and vaporizing heat...
  • Inside the abandoned City of Libraries

    09/02/2015 4:02:19 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1st September 2015 | Michael Huniewicz
    'The desert city of Chinguetti, sinking ever-deeper under the sands of the Sahara, is the last place in the world you would expect to find a library. Yet this crumbling outpost in the west-African country of Mauritania is home to around 6,000 rare books and manuscripts, including some of the oldest Koranic texts in existence which date back to the 9th Century. It was once the prosperous and bustling trade centre of several 'trans-Sahara' trade routes. Traders from all over Europe, north-Africa and the Levant would stop in Chinguetti before moving on to sub-Saharan Africa. There, they would rub shoulders...
  • An origin of new world agriculture in coastal Ecuador (12,000 BP)

    02/14/2003 1:34:27 PM PST · by vannrox · 11 replies · 1,547+ views
    Eureka ^ | Public release date: 13-Feb-2003 | Dr. Dolores Piperno
    Contact: Dr. Dolores Pipernopipernod@tivoli.si.edu 011-507-212-8101Smithsonian Institution An origin of new world agriculture in coastal Ecuador New archaeological evidence points to an independent origin of agriculture in coastal Ecuador 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. Suddenly, the remains of larger squash plants appear in the record. The Las Vegas site, described by Dolores Piperno of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and Karen Stothert, University of Texas at Austin in the February 14th issue of Science, may predate plant domestication sites in the Mesoamerican highlands. The fertile and amazingly diverse lowland tropics seem like a likely place for agriculture to develop. But...
  • Is the Amazon rainforest MAN-MADE? At least 8 MILLION humans may have lived and farmed the basin

    07/24/2015 10:16:10 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 30 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 24 July 2015 | RICHARD GRAY
    It is often held aloft by environmental campaign groups as an example of one of the last remaining regions of unspoiled habitat left in the world. But instead of being a pristine rainforest untouched by human hands, the Amazon appears to have been profoundly shaped by mankind. An international team of researchers have published evidence that suggests the Amazon was once home to millions of people who lived and farmed in the area now covered by trees.
  • Is the Amazon rainforest MAN-MADE? At least 8 MILLION humans may have lived and farmed the [tr]

    07/24/2015 6:22:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 24, 2015 | Richard Gray
    It is often held aloft by environmental campaign groups as an example of one of the last remaining regions of unspoiled habitat left in the world. But instead of being a pristine rainforest untouched by human hands, the Amazon appears to have been profoundly shaped by mankind. An international team of researchers have published evidence that suggests the Amazon was once home to millions of people who lived and farmed in the area now covered by trees.
  • Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations

    01/13/2014 3:40:59 PM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 1-7-2014 | Crystal McMichael
    Look around the Amazon rainforest today and it’s hard to imagine it filled with people. But in recent decades, archaeologists have started to find evidence that before Columbus’s arrival, the region was dotted with towns and perhaps even cities. The extent of human settlement in the Amazon remains hotly debated, partly because huge swaths of the 6-million-square-kilometer rainforest remain unstudied by archaeologists. Now, researchers have built a model predicting where signs of pre-Columbian agriculture are most likely to be found, a tool they hope will help guide future archaeological work in the region. In many ways, archaeology in the Amazon...
  • Hidden shell middens reveal ancient human presence in Bolivian Amazon

    09/02/2013 8:22:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | August 28, 2013 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Previously unknown archeological sites in forest islands reveal human presence in the western Amazon as early as 10,000 years ago, according to research published August 28 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Umberto Lombardo from the University of Bern, Switzerland and colleagues from other institutions. The study focuses on a region in the Bolivian Amazon thought to be rarely occupied by pre-agricultural communities due to unfavorable environmental conditions. Hundreds of 'forest islands'- small forested mounds of earth- are found throughout the region, their origins attributed to termites, erosion or ancient human activity. In this study, the authors report...
  • Stone age etchings found in Amazon basin as river levels fall

    11/11/2010 4:47:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday, November 10, 2010 | Tom Phillips
    A series of ancient underwater etchings has been uncovered near the jungle city of Manaus, following a drought in the Brazilian Amazon. The previously submerged images -- engraved on rocks and possibly up to 7,000 years old -- were reportedly discovered by a fisherman after the Rio Negro, a tributary of the Amazon river, fell to its lowest level in more than 100 years last month... Though water levels are now rising again, partly covering the apparently stone age etchings, local researchers photographed them before they began to disappear under the river's dark waters. Archaeologists who have studied the photographs...
  • Tracking the Ancestry of Corn Back 9,000 Years

    05/25/2010 6:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies · 1,099+ views
    New York Times ^ | Monday, May 24, 2010 | Sean B. Carroll
    Many botanists did not see any connection between maize and other living plants. Some concluded that the crop plant arose through the domestication by early agriculturalists of a wild maize that was now extinct, or at least undiscovered. However, a few scientists working during the first part of the 20th century uncovered evidence that they believed linked maize to what, at first glance, would seem to be a very unlikely parent, a Mexican grass called teosinte... George W. Beadle, while a graduate student at Cornell University in the early 1930s, found that maize and teosinte had very similar chromosomes....
  • In Amazon, traces of an advanced civilization

    09/06/2010 8:42:43 AM PDT · by Palter · 37 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 05 Sep 2010 | Juan Forero
    To the untrained eye, all evidence here in the heart of the Amazon signals virgin forest, untouched by man for time immemorial - from the ubiquitous fruit palms to the cry of howler monkeys, from the air thick with mosquitoes to the unruly tangle of jungle vines. Archaeologists, many of them Americans, say the opposite is true: This patch of forest, and many others across the Amazon, was instead home to an advanced, even spectacular civilization that managed the forest and enriched infertile soil to feed thousands. The findings are discrediting a once-bedrock theory of archaeology that long held that...