Free Republic 2nd Qtr 2020 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $2,213
2%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 2% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: sahara

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ancient Africans used 'no fly zones' to bring herds south

    03/12/2015 7:02:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Washington University ^ | March 9, 2015 | Gerry Everding
    Once green, the Sahara expanded 5,500 years ago, leading ancient herders to follow the rain and grasslands south to eastern Africa. But about 2,000 years ago, their southward migration stalled out, stopped in its tracks, archaeologists presumed, by tsetse-infested bush and disease. As the theory goes, the tiny tsetse fly altered the course of history, stopping the spread of domesticated animal herding with a bite that carries sleeping sickness and nagana, diseases often fatal for the herder and the herded. Now, isotopic research on animal remains from a nearly 2,000-year-old settlement near Gogo Falls in the present-day bushy woodlands of...
  • Disease Dustup

    06/12/2003 7:48:06 AM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 282+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 6-9-2003 | Otto Pohl
    June 09, 2003Disease DustupDust clouds may carry infectious organisms across oceans By Otto Pohl> Image: ORBITAL IMAGING CORPORATION Photo Researchers, Inc. SANDSTORM blows particulates out from the Sahara Desert in Africa (landmass at right) over the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean. The storm occurred in February 2001. On February 11, 2001, an enormous cloud of dust whipped out of the Sahara Desert and moved north across the Atlantic, reaching the U.K. two days later. A few days afterward, counties across the island began reporting simultaneous outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease, a viral sickness of livestock (sometimes confused with mad cow...
  • Phase of the moon affects amount of rainfall

    01/31/2016 3:46:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 29, 2016 by | Hannah Hickey
    When the moon is high in the sky, it creates bulges in the planet's atmosphere that creates imperceptible changes in the amount of rain that falls below. New University of Washington research to be published in Geophysical Research Letters shows that the lunar forces affect the amount of rain - though very slightly. ... Kohyama was studying atmospheric waves when he noticed a slight oscillation in the air pressure. He and co-author John (Michael) Wallace, a UW professor of atmospheric sciences, spent two years tracking down the phenomenon. Air pressure changes linked to the phases of the moon were first...
  • Mycenaean and Hittite Diplomatic Correspondence: Fact and Fiction [ PDF file ]

    05/03/2007 10:59:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 744+ views
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ^ | circa 2004 | H. Craig Melchert
    I now regard as established that Ahhiyawa of the Hittite texts refers to a Mycenaean Greek kingdom not located in Asia Minor. Those who wish to wait for the proverbial "smoking gun" may do so, but the circumstantial evidence is now overwhelming. The alternative hypothesis of Hajnal (2003: 40-42) of Ahhiyawa as a small city state of Cilicia is not credible. Hittite references show that Ahhiyawa was a formidable power influential in far western Asia Minor. I leave to others the problem of determining just which Mycenaean kingdom (or kingdoms) should be identified with the Ahhiyawa of the Hittite texts......
  • Ancient DNA identifies donkey ancestors, people who domesticated them

    07/28/2010 11:21:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 18 replies · 5+ views
    University of Florida ^ | July 28, 2010 | Unknown
    Genetic investigators say the partnership between people and the ancestors of today's donkeys was sealed not by monarchs trying to establish kingdoms, but by mobile, pastoral people who had to recruit animals to help them survive the harsh Saharan landscape in northern Africa more than 5,000 years ago. The findings, reported today by an international research team in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, paint a surprising picture of what small, isolated groups of people were able to accomplish when confronted with unpredictable storms and expanding desert. "It says those early people were quite innovative, more so than many people...
  • 1989: U.N. Predicts Disaster if Global Warming Not Checked

    03/18/2019 7:14:07 AM PDT · by TexasGurl24 · 63 replies
    AP ^ | June 29, 1989 | PETER JAMES SPIELMANN
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) _ A senior U.N. environmental official says entire nations could be wiped off the face of the Earth by rising sea levels if the global warming trend is not reversed by the year 2000. Coastal flooding and crop failures would create an exodus of ″eco- refugees,′ ′ threatening political chaos, said Noel Brown, director of the New York office of the U.N. Environment Program, or UNEP. He said governments have a 10-year window of opportunity to solve the greenhouse effect before it goes beyond human control. As the warming melts polar icecaps, ocean levels will rise by...
  • Study shows the Sahara swung between lush and desert conditions every 20,000 years...

    01/03/2019 7:16:04 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 2, 2019 by | Jennifer Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    [R]esearchers at MIT have analyzed dust deposited off the coast of west Africa over the last 240,000 years, and found that the Sahara, and North Africa in general, has swung between wet and dry climates every 20,000 years. They say that this climatic pendulum is mainly driven by changes to the Earth's axis as the planet orbits the sun, which in turn affect the distribution of sunlight between seasonsevery 20,000 years, the Earth swings from more sunlight in summer to less, and back again. For North Africa, it is likely that, when the Earth is tilted to receive maximum summer...
  • Climate Change More than Global Warming

    11/28/2018 12:37:51 AM PST · by Tilting · 18 replies
    Armstrong Economics ^ | Nov 28, 2018 | Martin Armstrong
    There is a lot more to Climate Change than the dire predictions that we will be eating each other by now. The Sahara Desert was once lush and green. Then the weather systems shifted and the once fertile land turns to desert. The Sphinx is believed to have the face of Khafra of the 4th dynasty during the Old Kingdom which was carved perhaps around 2500BC. Some believe that the Sphinx predates the Egyptians and was actually a lion because there appear to be what some claim are water erosion marks. If true, then the original Sphinx may have existed...
  • Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years

    10/01/2018 9:21:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 1, 2018 | University College London
    Credit: Chris Ford via Flickr ====================================================================== Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL. The study by a team of geographers and archaeologists from UCL and King's College London, published in Nature Communications, suggests that early pastoralists in North Africa combined detailed knowledge of the environment with newly domesticated species to deal with the long-term drying trend. It is thought that early pastoralists in North Africa developed intricate ways to efficiently manage sparse...
  • Trump suggested Spain build Sahara wall to stem migrants [Spains FM claimed, last week]

    09/30/2018 6:39:59 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    TheLocal.es ^ | 20 September 2018 16:07 CEST+02:00 | AFP
    Spains foreign minister revealed that US President Donald Trump suggested building a wall along the Sahara desert to stem the arrival of migrants, as he plans to do on the Mexican border. Closing ports is not a solution, and neither is building a wall along the Sahara like President Trump suggested to me recently, Josep Borrell told a lunchtime gathering this week, according to a video released by Spanish media. Just build a wall that borders the Sahara, he quoted Trump as telling him. But do you know how big the Sahara is? the minister responded. He did not give...
  • Red Tide & Blaming Farmers & Global Warming Yet it Conforms to Pi

    09/17/2018 5:51:52 PM PDT · by dontreadthis
    armstrong economics ^ | Sep 17, 2018 | Martin Armstrong
    If you ever live at the shore, one thing that crops up in 13-year cycles is what they call Red Tide. The traditional explanation I have always heard is that is caused by farming and the runoff of their pesticides that contaminate the water. I use to hear that in New Jersey and the same thing in Florida. It seems to be linked to the same people who promote Global Warming who want us to starve and stop driving to work. I would ask, where is the runoff from farmers when there are none in this area? It would go...
  • GLOBAL "DUSTING", NOT WARMING!

    09/13/2018 9:12:21 AM PDT · by w.m.rose · 13 replies
    I'm the source | Thursday 9-13,'18 at 11:30 a.m. | Wayne Rose
    (ON MONDAY 10-24-2016 OUR DAUGHTER TRACI'S BIRTHDAY I WROTE THE FOLLOWING): CALL BE CRAZY AND LAUGH, BUT I BELIEVE THAT WHICH THE WORLD CALLS THE EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING IS ACTUALLY "THE EFFECTS OF GLOBAL DUSTING." TRUE, I'M NOT A METEOROLOGIST OR CLIMATE EXPERT, BUT NEITHER ARE THE ONE'S WITH DEGREES "LOL". I've made many such claims since I was a little boy and most have become reality as confirmed by science and other formal authorities, PLUS my own Family and Friends. My theory here is, due to there being more people on earth at this time than ever before...
  • NASA video shows how dust from Sahara Desert fuels Amazon rain forest

    02/28/2015 5:50:18 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 13 replies
    Globe & Mail | February 25, 2015
    How dust from the Sahara is fuelling the Amazon
  • Large-Scale Solar and Wind Farms in Sahara Would Increase Rain and Vegetation

    09/10/2018 7:40:03 AM PDT · by ETL · 68 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Sept 10, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Energy generation by wind and solar farms could reduce carbon emissions and thus mitigate anthropogenic climate change. A new climate-modeling study, published in the journal Science, finds that large-scale installations of wind and solar farms in the Sahara Desert and the neighboring Sahel region areas particularly desirable for such farms because of their vastness and lack of inhabitants would increase local temperature, precipitation and vegetation. ..." Our study is among the first to model the climate effects of wind and solar installations while taking into account how vegetation responds to changes in heat and precipitation, Dr. Li said.Previous...
  • The problem of the wet Sahara

    08/10/2018 7:45:03 AM PDT · by fishtank · 8 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | Posted 8-10-18 on CMI. | Michael Oard
    The problem of the wet Sahara by Michael Oard This article is from Journal of Creation 31(1):34 April 2017 Both creation and secular geologists agree the earths deserts and semi-arid areas were once well watered.1 Creation scientists attribute this to the ponding of water in enclosed basins during the run-off stage of the Flood and greater Ice Age precipitation. During this time the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA, was about 12 times its current area and about 330 m deeper.2 Measuring the ancient shorelines in Death Valley, California, USA (figure 1), shows a lake once filled Death Valley 170...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Why humans left Africa - Climate Change

    01/26/2018 1:31:18 AM PST · by vannrox · 22 replies
    International Business Times ^ | ON 10/05/17 AT 3:09 PM | BY ELANA GLOWATZ
    Why Humans Left Africa: Our Ancestors Watched Climate Change To Cold, Dry BY ELANA GLOWATZ @ELANAGLOW ON 10/05/17 AT 3:09 PM Early humans may have left Africa and spread all over the globe because their home climate was drying up. The idea comes from samples of marine sediment taken from northeastern Africa that show the area was cold and dry around 60,000 years ago, which is around the time humans might have migrated off that continent and into Europe and Asia. A team of scientists wrote in the journal Geology that after warm and wet conditions between 120,000 and 90,000...
  • More Evidence of a Wet Sahara

    02/23/2017 8:30:41 AM PST · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2-23-2017 | Jake Hebert, Ph.D.
    More Evidence of a Wet Sahara by Jake Hebert, Ph.D. * Scientists from the University of Arizona recently announced that what is now the Sahara desert was once wet and green and extended as far north as the Mediterranean Sea.1,2 The scientists examined chemical clues found within leaf waxes preserved in four marine sediment cores located off the northwestern African coast. Plants experience subtle changes in the chemical composition of their wax, depending upon the wetness or dryness of the climate. Because leaf wax washes into the oceans, it can be preserved in sediment cores extracted from the ocean floor....
  • Snow Falls on the Sahara Desert for First Time in 40 Years

    12/23/2016 10:43:54 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 31 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | December 21, 2016 | 1:27 PM EST | Melanie Hunter
    For the first time in 40 years, snow has fallen on the Sahara Desert, the Independent reported Wednesday. [] In his images [Karim Bouchetat, an amateur photographer who captured images of the snow on Monday], a thin layer of snow rests on deep orange dunes, where he said it stayed for about a day, and forms whirling patterns where the slopes are too steep for it to settle. Snow was reportedly last seen in Ain Sefra in 1979, when a half-hour snowstorm stopped traffic, the Independent stated in its article.
  • Everyone was stunned': Snow falls in Sahara desert town for first time in 37 years

    12/21/2016 10:16:14 AM PST · by rktman · 33 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | 12/21/2016 | Jason Samenow
    In the Sahara desert, known for its suffocating heat, a freak snow shower coated the dusty dunes near the Algerian town of Ain Sefra. It hadnt snowed in the town called The Gateway to the Desert since 1979. Photographer Karim Bouchetata captured gorgeous images of the red rolling dunes frosted in white. Everyone was stunned to see snow falling in the desert, it is such a rare occurrence, Bouchetata told the Independent. It looked amazing as the snow settled on the sand.