Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $47,400
53%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 53%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: thecivilwar

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • 1855

    11/21/2015 11:35:55 AM PST · by Homer_J_Simpson · 376 replies
    Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era | 2004 | Nicole Etcheson
    Before when free-soil men invoked the right of revolution in defense of their political rights, proslavery men condemned them for defying the legitimate government. But proslavery men feared the loss of their right to own slaves as much as free soilers feared the loss of the right to exclude slavery. At Hickory Point, [Kansas] a squabble over land claims ignited these political quarrels. A settler named Franklin M. Coleman had been squatting on land abandoned by some Hoosiers, who subsequently sold the claim to Jacob Branson, another Hoosier. In late 1854, when Branson informed Coleman of his legal claim and...
  • The Party of Lincoln AND Calhoun? The Right and the Civil War

    11/03/2015 6:52:26 AM PST · by don-o · 277 replies
    The Imaginative Conservative ^ | November 3, 2015 | Tony Petersen
    The Civil War is, as Shelby Foote noted, at the crossroads of our being. Looked at one way, it marked the end of a long struggle against slavery and the beginning of a long one for civil rights and racial equality. Looked at another, it marked the end of limited government and the beginning of the encroaching, ever-present Leviathan that exists today. These memories can be both in sync and in conflict. After all, it was the deployment of strong government in the form of a dominant army and the passage of federal amendments that played a large role in...
  • Sons of Confederate Veterans say they’re preserving history, not racism

    10/11/2015 10:08:23 AM PDT · by DoodleDawg · 161 replies
    Kansas City Star ^ | 10/11/15 | Sarah Gish
    On a warm day in August, a couple dozen people gathered for an afternoon picnic at Shawnee Mission Park. Under the shade of a shelter surrounded by leafy green trees, two men cooked burgers and brats on a charcoal grill next to a row of tables topped with red plastic tablecloths and a summery spread of sliced watermelon, barbecue-flavored potato chips and sopapilla cheesecake. The weather would have been perfect if not for occasional gusts of wind that whipped through the grove and threatened to topple the three flags fixed to portable poles next to the dessert table: an American...
  • A monument to MLK will crown Stone Mountain

    10/11/2015 10:48:18 AM PDT · by Timber Rattler · 52 replies
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution ^ | October 11, 2015 | Jim Galloway
    On the summit of Stone Mountain, yards away from where Ku Klux Klansmen once burned giant crosses, just above and beyond the behemoth carving of three Confederate heroes, state authorities have agreed to erect a monument to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Specifically, an elevated tower — featuring a replica of the Liberty Bell — would celebrate the single line in the civil rights martyr’s 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech that makes reference to the 825-foot-tall hunk of granite: “Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.” (snip) Gov. Nathan Deal has green-lighted the projects, and a formal...
  • Angel's Glow: The Bacterium that Saved Civil War Soldiers

    08/01/2015 5:39:54 PM PDT · by Talisker · 33 replies
    Kids Discover ^ | August 19, 2013
    As the sun went down after the 1862 Battle of Shiloh during the Civil War, some soldiers noticed that their wounds were glowing a faint blue. Many men waited on the rainy, muddy Tennessee battlefield for two days that April, until medics could treat them. Once they were taken to field hospitals, the troops with glowing wounds were more likely to survive their injuries — and to get better faster. Thus the mysterious blue light was dubbed “Angel’s Glow.” In 2001, 17-year-old Civil War buff Bill Martin visited the Shiloh battlefield with his family and heard the legend of Angel’s...
  • Then & now photos from the Civil War

    08/09/2015 7:31:06 PM PDT · by Altura Ct. · 62 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 8/7/2015
    Very cool then & now photo shoot. The women who dug the graves, the kids who watched the largest battle in US history – and the slaves forced to help fighters at the front. 150 years after the last shots were fired, Guardian photographer David Levene travelled across the US photographing the sites scarred by the American civil war. http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/ng-interactive/2015/jun/22/american-civil-war-photography-interactive
  • How God Ended North American Slavery

    08/03/2015 2:32:33 PM PDT · by kathsua · 7 replies
    London Telegraph ^ | August 3rd, 2015 | reasonmclucus
    The actions God took to end slavery in North America provide an example of the truth of the religious phrase “God works in mysterious ways His wonders to perform
  • Ulysses S. Grant Died 130 Years Ago. Racists Hate Him, But Historians No Longer Do.

    07/24/2015 2:30:32 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 117 replies
    The Huffington Post ^ | 23rd July 2015 | Nick Baumann
    'After Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died 130 years ago today, a million and a half Americans watched his funeral procession. His mausoleum was a popular tourist attraction in New York City for decades. But for most of the 20th Century, historians and non-historians alike believed Grant was corrupt, drunken and incompetent, that he was one of the country's worst presidents, and that as a general, he was more lucky than good. A generation of historians, led by Columbia's William A. Dunning, criticized Grant for backing Reconstruction, the federal government's attempt to protect the rights...
  • Shocker: There’s a Confederate Flag Sewn Into Lincoln’s Chair at Ford’s Theatre

    07/01/2015 7:03:16 AM PDT · by DoodleDawg · 17 replies
    New York Observer ^ | 6/29/15 | Joe Lapointe
    As national debate rages about the Confederate flag, a peculiar installation of that controversial banner may be hiding in plain sight – inside the cushion of Abraham Lincoln’s rocking chair, a replica that rests in a balcony box in the re-built Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The theatre—a functioning play space and a museum—reopened in 1968, 103 years after President Lincoln died by gunfire in April of 1865 at the end of the Civil War while he watched a play there. The builder of the replica chair—a now-deceased craftsman named Carlton McLendon—lived in Montgomery, Ala. and felt bitter toward the...
  • Apple Pulls All Civil War Games From The App Store

    06/25/2015 9:47:23 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 06/25/2015 | Tyler Durden
    We have been following the Confederate flag scandal with bemused detachment, painfully aware for what it is: i) a welcome distraction from the real and very profound problems this country faces and ii) the latest escalation in what has been a relentless attempt to polarize the nation over the past several years, only instead of political ideology, gender, sexual preference, ethnic background, and most certainly wealth, this time the emphasis is on geographic origin and an implied relapse to the days of latent the pre-civil war "racism."And yet while most such scandals fizzle quickly after the have heat their...
  • Apple Pulls All Civil War Games Over Confederate Flag Controversy

    06/25/2015 9:16:51 AM PDT · by absentee · 26 replies
    Truth Revolt ^ | 6/25/15 | Caleb Howe
    In a bold move against reason, Apple has apparently removed all civil war games from their App Store over the display of the Confederate flag within the games. This is just the latest in a series of absurd moves taken by corporations following the national debate and eventual decision by South Carolina to remove the flag from the South Carolina capitol grounds. Apple's Tim Cook Tweeted on Sunday of this week: "My thoughts are with the victim's families in SC. Let us honor their lives by eradicating racism & removing the symbols & words that feed it." Apparently he truly...
  • Apple Removes All American Civil War Games From the App Store Because of Confederate Flag

    06/25/2015 8:40:06 AM PDT · by St_Thomas_Aquinas · 25 replies
    Touch Arcade ^ | 2015-06-25 | Tasos Lazarides
    If you've been watching the news recently, you'll know of the huge debate in the U.S over the role of the Confederate flag in contemporary America. Many see it as a reminder of the many pre-Civil War injustices while others see it simply as a way to honor the soldiers who died for the Confederacy. Many large US companies, like Walmart and Amazon, have already banned the sale of any Confederate flag merchandise as a reaction to the recent events. Now, it appears that Apple has decided to join them by pulling many Civil War wargames from the App Store....
  • Apple Removes Civil War Games From App Store Over Confederate Flag Usage

    06/25/2015 7:54:45 AM PDT · by C19fan · 36 replies
    MacRumors ^ | June 25, 2015 | Staff
    Apple has removed seemingly all Civil War games from the App Store for displaying the Confederate Flag in "offensive and mean-spirited ways," our sister website TouchArcade has learned. Apple has sent a removal letter to affected developers to inform them that their app does not comply with Section 19.1 of the App Store Review Guidelines.
  • Women on 20s nominates [Republican] Harriet Tubman as Andrew Jackson’s successor on currency

    05/13/2015 7:31:41 AM PDT · by grundle · 75 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | May 12, 2015 | Michael Walsh
    A feminist group that wants to boot Andrew Jackson from the $20 bill has chosen a female hero to replace him — abolitionist Harriet Tubman. On Tuesday morning, Women on 20s revealed the results of a 10-week poll for a possible Jackson replacement and emailed a petition — addressed to President Barack Obama — to the White House Council on Women and Girls. By midday, the council’s chair, Valerie Jarrett, and executive director, Tina Tchen, responded, saying they “would like to continue the conversation.” “We’re waiting for some kind of meeting with the White House, and I can tell you...
  • Civil War Historical Marker Ceremony To Be Held In June In Cleveland

    05/14/2015 3:16:55 PM PDT · by Tennessee Nana · 5 replies
    TheChattanoogan ^ | May 14,2015 | Staff
    The latest Civil War-related historical roadside marker will be dedicated during a special ceremony next month in Cleveland. The marker commemorates the difficult time during the Civil War when much of Bradley County lay between Union and Confederate lines. During this period, homes and businesses were vandalized and robbed by both pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces who took advantage of the prevailing lawlessness. This marker also commemorates the courageous actions of War of 1812 veteran Joseph Lusk II, who at 73, defended his home with determination against a group of outlaws attempting to steal his mules. He shot and killed one...
  • 'Radical' Republican president righted wrongs

    04/27/2015 1:01:41 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper
    wnd.com ^ | April 27, 2015 | Bill Federer
    Born April 27, 1822, into a Methodist family in Ohio, he was nominated at age 17 for a position at West Point by Congressman Thomas Hamer, who mistakenly added the middle initial “S” to his name.
  • The Civil War in Four Minutes: Ulysses S. Grant

    04/26/2015 7:36:09 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 35 replies
    Civil War Trust ^ | 1 year ago | Curt Fields
    Living historian Curt Fields describes the life and accomplishments of Ulysses S. Grant. This video is part of the Civil War Trust's In4 video series, which presents short videos on basic Civil War topics. The Civil War in Four Minutes: Ulysses S. Grant
  • Lincoln assassinated

    04/14/2015 6:57:32 AM PDT · by Paisan · 333 replies
    On this date in 1865, Good Friday, Abraham Lincoln was shot at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. The 16th president died the next morning.
  • Grierson's Grand Raid

    04/17/2015 8:49:02 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 15 replies
    After conferring with General William Sooy Smith, commanding at La Grange, Grierson issued orders for "light rations" to his brigade, which now consisted of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois, and the second Iowa. On the beautiful spring morning of April 17, Grierson led the long column of seventeen hundred officers and men out of La Grange and headed south. Grierson himself, carried a small-scale map of plantations and Confederate storehouses, and a jew's harp in his blouse. The command met no opposition on the first day, traveling an easy thirty miles to halt just short of Ripley, Mississippi at the...
  • Ted Cruz’s frightening gun fanaticism: When a presidential contender encourages armed insurrection

    04/17/2015 11:48:06 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 135 replies
    Salon ^ | April 17, 2015 | Simon Maloy
    Ted Cruz thinks Americans should arm themselves against "tyranny," and Lindsey Graham thinks that's crazy. As incredible as it sounds, there’s an argument going on right now between two Republican senators (and, potentially, two Republican candidates for the presidency) over whether the American citizenry should be ready to fight a war against the federal government. The two senators in question are Ted Cruz and Lindsey Graham, and they can’t seem to agree whether the Second Amendment serves as bulwark against government “tyranny.” It all started with a fundraising email Cruz sent making the case that “The 2nd Amendment to the...
  • Man says photo at center of Civil War mystery is a 30-year-old hoax he did as a teen

    04/13/2015 11:02:03 AM PDT · by dware · 43 replies
    Fox News ^ | 04.13.2015 | Fox News
    A photograph that has posed a Civil War mystery, puzzling historians for three decades, appears to be a long-surviving hoax. The mysterious photograph of what appeared to be a far older photo — showing a figure in a coat and hat and the blurred image of a warship — surfaced in 1986. Some historians believed it might be a photo of the CSS Georgia, a Confederate ironclad that sank 150 years ago in Georgia as Union troops captured Savannah.
  • Civil War: 150th Anniversary of Lee Surrender at Appomattox

    04/09/2015 10:03:31 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 39 replies
    US News and World Report ^ | APRIL 9, 2015 | STEVE SZKOTAK
    The surrender of Confederate Robert E. Lee to Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant 150 years ago Thursday was the definitive milestone of the end of the Civil War.
  • Bells to ring marking end of Civil War

    04/09/2015 9:55:17 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 35 replies
    News Advance ^ | 4-8-15 | staff report
    Bells will ring across the country and in Lynchburg on Thursday to mark the 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, the symbolic end of four years of bloodshed. A historic bell will be rung at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park at 3 p.m., the time the surrender occurred. People at historic sites, schools, parks, government buildings and within communities throughout Lynchburg and the country will join in at 3:15 p.m., ringing bells for four continuous minutes, representing the four years of fighting.
  • Has the mystery of Confederate submarine that sank Union ship then vanished finally been solved afte

    01/30/2015 12:59:21 PM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 71 replies
    DailyMail.co.uk ^ | January 30, 2015 | Sadie Whitelocks
    After 15 years of painstaking restoration, scientists say they are on the brink of solving what sank the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley - the first sub in history to wreck an enemy warship. Considered the Confederacy's stealth weapon during the Civil War, the hand-cranked Hunley sank the Union warship Housatonic in winter 1864 and then disappeared with all eight Confederate sailors inside. Its remains were discovered in 1995 in waters off South Carolina and five later it was raised to a conservation lab. Now with about 70per cent of the hull cleaned of heavy rust, Paul Mardikian, a senior conservator...
  • After 150 years, Confederate submarine's hull again revealed

    01/30/2015 11:13:54 AM PST · by Kartographer · 148 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 1/30/15 | BRUCE SMITH
    A century and a half after it sank and a decade and a half after it was raised, scientists are finally getting a look at the hull of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. What they find may finally solve the mystery of why the hand-cranked submarine sank during the Civil War. "It's like unwrapping a Christmas gift after 15 years. We have been wanting to do this for many years now," said Paul Mardikian, senior conservator on the Hunley project.
  • Son of ex-slave who served in Union army during Civil War dies 179 years after father's birth

    01/27/2015 7:40:15 PM PST · by iowamark · 55 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1/27/2015 | AP
    RALEIGH, N.C. – Luke Martin Jr., whose father was an ex-slave and Civil War Union soldier, has died — 179 years after his father was born. Martin was 97 when he died Sunday at his home in New Bern, North Carolina.. ..lived in the house where he was born — a house his father built in the 1890s. Martin had little memory of his father, Luke Martin Sr., who died at age 84 in 1920 when the son was just a few years old, according to Martin-Williams. The elder Martin, who was born in 1836, was married twice, the second...
  • Children of Civil War Veterans Still Walk Among Us, 150 Years After the War

    11/13/2014 5:52:24 AM PST · by Gamecock · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 11, 2014 | David A. Lande
    How many people alive today can say that their father was a Civil War soldier who shook hands with Abraham Lincoln in the White House? Fred Upham can. Despite sounding like a tall tale and a mathematical impossibility, it's documented truth. Fred's father, William, was a private in the Union Army's Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was severely wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run, in 1861, and later personally appointed by President Lincoln to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Fred's in exclusive company—the dwindling group of children of soldiers who fought, North against South, 150...
  • The Death of Taney

    10/16/2014 9:05:49 PM PDT · by iowamark · 61 replies
    On Oct. 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln must have breathed a bit easier. Not because the war was over — it would last another six months. Not because he had been re-elected — the election remained nearly a month away. And not because Gen. William T. Sherman had begun his decisive march through Georgia — the general was still holding Atlanta. While much remained unsettled, Lincoln’s achievements as president seemed more secure that autumn day because the president learned that his old nemesis Roger B. Taney, the Maryland-born chief justice of the Supreme Court, had died. Ever since Taney had...
  • Duquesne speaker to discuss religious causes of Civil War

    10/10/2014 7:30:16 AM PDT · by Ditto · 29 replies
    Pittsburgh Post Gazette ^ | October 6, 2014 | Len Barcousky
    Strong belief in heaven likely was one of the factors that made the Civil War so long and so bloody, public historian Barbara Franco says. “It made people more tolerant of death,” she explained in a recent telephone interview. Dying in the 19th century was compared to passing through a curtain and reuniting with family members on the other side. That belief made soldiers and civilians more willing to accept the unprecedented number of casualties from disease and combat during the nation’s most catastrophic conflict, she said.
  • How Coffee Fueled the Civil War

    07/12/2014 6:45:01 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 36 replies
    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com ^ | July 9, 2014 | JON GRINSPAN
    It was the greatest coffee run in American history. The Ohio boys had been fighting since morning, trapped in the raging battle of Antietam, in September 1862. Suddenly, a 19-year-old William McKinley appeared, under heavy fire, hauling vats of hot coffee. The men held out tin cups, gulped the brew and started firing again. “It was like putting a new regiment in the fight,” their officer recalled. Three decades later, McKinley ran for president in part on this singular act of caffeinated heroism. At the time, no one found McKinley’s act all that strange. For Union soldiers, and the lucky...
  • Still paying for the Civil War

    05/09/2014 10:36:45 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    WSJ ^ | 09 May 2014 | Michael M. Phillips
    Veterans' Benefits Live On Long After Bullets Stop Each month, Irene Triplett collects $73.13 from the Department of Veterans Affairs, a pension payment for her father's military service—in the Civil War. More than 3 million men fought and 530,000 men died in the conflict between North and South. Pvt. Mose Triplett joined the rebels, deserted on the road to Gettysburg, defected to the Union and married so late in life to a woman so young that their daughter Irene is today 84 years old—and the last child of any Civil War veteran still on the VA benefits rolls. Ms. Triplett's...
  • Finding and Losing the World's Oldest Subway Tunnel (& a steam loco)

    03/27/2014 9:50:37 AM PDT · by logi_cal869 · 20 replies
    Daily Paul ^ | 3/13/2014 | unkn
    History, Mystery, and Tunnels (& Trains). Reading The Cosgrove Report sent this guy on a hunt for a missing tunnel possibly used by John Wilkes Booth. After finding the tunnel, and running tours in the tunnel for 30+ years the city all the sudden revoked his business license and a part of history goes back undercover.
  • Looking for Slave's Friend Bowie Knife Pamphlet

    03/26/2014 11:53:25 AM PDT · by marktwain · 13 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 27 March, 2014 | Dean Weingarten
    A number of years ago I came across a good image of the above Slave's Friend abolitionist pamphlet.   It was published sometime between 1836 and 1860, most likely in the earlier years.    Freeper Ruy Dias de Bivar was kind enough to send me the image above, which is from MAN AT ARMS, published by the NRA, August, 1997, page 12. I intend to make this pamphlet easily available on the Internets, but I need a better image than the one above.   I know at least one better one exists, because I saw it in a reference book on weapons...
  • The Civil War in COLOR for the first time: Painstakingly remastered images of a divided America

    11/13/2013 2:36:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 61 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10-13-2013 | Alex Greig
    Two professional colorists have combined their skills with photographs and fascination with the American Civil War to create a remarkable series of color photographs from the era. British colorist Jordan Lloyd, 27, met fellow colorist Mads Madsen, 19, from Denmark when he started posting on Madsen's subreddit 'Colorized History'. Initially it was Madsen who was colorizing images from the Civil War era, but Lloyd eventually got interested and now the two work together restoring the images, improving their technique by giving each other critiques. Madsen has been interested in the Civil War since he was 12, and was especially fascinated...
  • Obama to be a no-show at Gettysburg 150th anniversary ceremony

    10/31/2013 8:18:32 AM PDT · by markomalley · 108 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 10/31/2013 | Ben Wolfgang
    President Obama has declined an invitation to speak at next month’s ceremony marking the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. The event, slated for Nov. 19 at the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, instead will feature Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and renowned historian James McPherson as the keynote speakers, the Gettysburg National Military Park said in a press release. “President Obama will not attend and the Secretary of Interior will represent the administration,” the park pointed out in the first paragraph of its press release. It’s unclear why Mr. Obama, a noted admirer of President Lincoln, declined the...
  • Divers spy ship relic in Winyah-Researchers think boat may belong to Civil War era(SC)

    09/15/2006 6:48:47 AM PDT · by GinJax · 14 replies · 706+ views
    The Sun News ^ | 15 Sep 2006 | Kelly Marshall Fuller
    GEORGETOWN - A shipwreck that could be the remains of a lost Confederate blockade runner, or possibly a vessel that predates the Civil War, was found Thursday near the entrance to Winyah Bay, researchers said. Divers from the Maritime Research Division of the S.C. Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology dove in about 13 feet of water and discovered a vessel that is about 90 feet long, with a wooden hull and a possible copper coating. The wreck could be the Sir Robert Peel, a blockade runner that was used by Confederate soldiers to get supplies to Georgetown during the Civil...
  • The Income Tax: A century is enough

    10/03/2013 12:58:41 PM PDT · by ThethoughtsofGreg · 15 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 10-3-13 | Chris Edwards
    Alexander Hamilton won in the end. As Treasury Secretary in the 1790s he championed an array of “internal” taxes to supplement federal revenues from import tariffs. Thomas Jefferson despised Hamilton’s internal taxes as assault on liberty, and when elected in 1800 he made sure that they were abolished. The Jeffersonian view held sway for decades, but by the late 19th century the growth in government and concerns about high tariffs led to calls for new revenue sources. The first income tax was imposed to fund the Civil War and lasted until 1872. Another income tax was imposed in 1894, but...
  • How a Disney animator 'discovered' a new picture of Abraham Lincoln at the Gettysburg Address[snip]

    09/25/2013 12:21:17 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 36 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 24 September 2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A Disney animator-turned Lincoln historian believes he has found the second of only two pictures of the 16th president taken at the Gettysburg Address. The incredible discovery has caused no small controversy in the world of Civil War history - because it means two other images of believed to be Abraham Lincoln do not, in fact, show the president. Christopher Oakley, a professor at the University of North Carolina-Asheville, found the shot of Lincoln in March while combing over historical photos from the Gettysburg Address.
  • Frederick Douglass Escapes Slavery, 175 Years Ago

    09/04/2013 5:10:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Channel ^ | September 3, 2013 | Christopher Klein
    On September 3, 1838, Frederick Bailey undertook the riskiest journey of his life. The 20-year-old slave made a daring escape from his master in Baltimore, and with his newfound freedom came a new name -- Frederick Douglass... After Douglass’ attempt to escape slavery two years prior was betrayed by a fellow slave, he had been jailed, sent to Baltimore by his master and hired out to work in the city’s shipyards. Undeterred, Douglass vowed to try to escape again on September 3, 1838, although he knew the risk. "I felt assured that if I failed in this attempt, my case...
  • SEE THE GREEN PAINT SPLATTERED ON THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL DURING APPARENT VANDALISM ATTACK

    07/26/2013 6:41:29 AM PDT · by ConservativeMan55 · 35 replies
    The Blaze ^ | 7/26/13 | Jonathon M. Seidl
    The U.S. Park Police in Washington say the Lincoln Memorial has been temporarily closed after someone splattered a splash of green paint on the statue.
  • GREEN PAINT SPLATTERED ON THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL

    07/26/2013 3:29:47 AM PDT · by bryan999 · 20 replies
    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The U.S. Park Police in Washington say the Lincoln Memorial is temporarily closed after someone splattered green paint on the statue and the floor area. Police say the apparent vandalism was discovered early Friday morning. No words, letters or symbols were visible in the paint. Police say the memorial on the National Mall will be closed until a maintenance crew from the National Park Service can finish cleaning up the paint. That's expected to happen Friday morning.
  • Woman arrested in green paint vandalism at Washington National Cathedral

    07/29/2013 3:14:33 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 68 replies
    StarTribune.com ^ | 7/29/13 | BEN NUCKOLS/AP
    A woman was arrested Monday after green paint was found splattered inside two chapels at the Washington National Cathedral, and police were investigating her in connection with two similar incidents on the National Mall, authorities said. The woman was arrested in the area of the cathedral shortly after the paint was found, Assistant D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said. Investigators were hoping to question her about the vandalism on the Mall, including at the Lincoln Memorial, but a language barrier delayed the interrogation, Newsham said.
  • Lincoln Memorial Vandalized

    07/26/2013 3:42:50 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 141 replies
    CBS ^ | 7/26/13
    Green paint was splattered overnight on parts of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S. Park police say. They say a patrol officer found green plant splashed on the floor near the famous statue of President Lincoln, and some on the base of the statue, at around 1:20 a.m. local time. The memorial, on the National Mall, will be closed until the U.S. Park Service can clean it up. An investigation is under way. CBS Washington affiliate WUSA-TV says its crew members got as close as they could to the statue and didn't see the paint, but saw evidence of...
  • Jim Carrey on Lincoln Memorial Vandals: People Tired of Corporate Tyranny

    07/27/2013 7:49:58 AM PDT · by ColdOne · 75 replies
    breitbart.com ^ | 7/26/13 | Breitbart News
    Carrey commented on vandals splashing green paint on the Lincoln Memorial with a predictably left of center viewpoint: Green paint on Lincoln memorial. Ppl are getting tired of corporate tyranny disguised as democracy. ;^\ http://say.ly/iqj6mai
  • Unknown vandals smear paint on Lincoln Memorial

    07/26/2013 6:28:05 AM PDT · by cll · 48 replies
    The Washington comPost ^ | 7/26/2013 | Maggie Fazeli Fard
    The Lincoln Memorial was shut down Friday morning after vandals splashed the statue of the nation’s 16th president and the marble floor around it with green paint, U.S. Park Police said. Police are reviewing surveillance footage from the popular tourist attraction on the west end of the Mall, but so far they have released no information about who may have been responsible. Authorities believe the vandalism happened around 1:30 a.m. The National Park Service will work to clean up the paint, police said, and the memorial will be closed to the public until cleanup is complete. Police said no words...
  • ‘Meade’s Army Annihilated!’

    07/13/2013 11:19:13 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 12, 2013 | By Peter Carlson
    Outside, a heavy summer rainstorm thrashed the streets of Richmond, Va. Inside Libby Prison that afternoon — July 8, 1863 — hundreds of captured Union officers sprawled across the bare wooden floors of the converted tobacco warehouse, picking lice out of their underwear and passing around copies of Richmond newspapers. The news was grim for the Yankees: Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Confederate army had defeated Gen. George Meade’s Union troops at a Pennsylvania town called Gettysburg. “OUR ARMY AGAIN VICTORIOUS,” read the headline in The Richmond Examiner, “MEADE’S ARMY ANNIHILATED.” “THE ENEMY ROUTED,” reported the Richmond Dispatch. “FORTY THOUSAND PRISONERS...
  • Give150 -- Preserve Our Past, Protect Our Future

    07/08/2013 7:08:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    History Channel ^ | ~2013 | unattributed
    One hundred and fifty years ago, America was torn apart by Civil War before the union was finally restored in 1865. Today, HISTORY invites all Americans to help preserve Civil War sites and stories through the Give 150™ national campaign. Give 150™ donations will go directly to the Civil War Trust and the National Park Foundation, both non-profit 501 (c) 3 organizations, to help protect Civil War sites and lands, and support their interpretation. HISTORY will also provide the public with the opportunity to actively give back to your communities through service and preservation projects as part of this initiative.
  • Frederick Douglass - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery

    07/04/2013 12:55:38 PM PDT · by Osage Orange · 35 replies
    The History Place ^ | 07-04-13 | Rich Lowry
    The History Place - Great Speeches Collection Frederick Douglass - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery Frederick Douglass (1817-1895) was the best known and most influential African American leader of the 1800s. He was born a slave in Maryland but managed to escape to the North in 1838. He traveled to Massachusetts and settled in New Bedford, working as a laborer to support himself. In 1841, he attended a convention of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society and quickly came to the attention of its members, eventually becoming a leading figure in the New England antislavery movement. In 1845, Douglass published his autobiography,...
  • Commemorating the Sesquicentennial of the Most Important Week in the History of the Republic

    07/04/2013 4:36:35 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 21 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 3, 2013 | Hugh Hewitt
    July 3 marks the last day of the battle of Gettysburg 150 years ago -- Pickett's Charge, the "high water mark of the Confederacy." July 4 is of course Independence Day, but this year it is also the sesquicentennial of the surrender of Vicksburg, which split the rebel states in two by securing the length of the Mississippi for the Union. This week, a century and a half ago, marked the certain beginning of the end for the Confederacy and thus of slavery and the rise of the great Republic of freedom. To commemorate this week, I am spending the...
  • Confederates' 'slave hunt' in North a military disgrace

    07/03/2013 5:41:43 PM PDT · by donmeaker · 62 replies
    Pittsburg Post Gazette ^ | June 30, 2013 12:16 am | Frank Reeves
    In June 1863, when Brig. Gen. Albert Jenkins' cavalry, in the vanguard of the Confederate army, galloped into Pennsylvania, its aim wasn't only to spy and steal supplies. The soldiers were also determined, as historian Margaret Creighton notes, to round up African-Americans, whom the Confederates regarded as "contraband" that should be returned to "rightful" owners. The "slave hunt," as contemporaries and later historians called this phase of the Confederate invasion, would last as long as Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia remained in Pennsylvania. It ended only when the defeated Southern troops retreated back to Virginia after the...