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Keyword: thecivilwar

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  • Son of ex-slave who served in Union army during Civil War dies 179 years after father's birth

    01/27/2015 7:40:15 PM PST · by iowamark · 55 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1/27/2015 | AP
    RALEIGH, N.C. – Luke Martin Jr., whose father was an ex-slave and Civil War Union soldier, has died — 179 years after his father was born. Martin was 97 when he died Sunday at his home in New Bern, North Carolina.. ..lived in the house where he was born — a house his father built in the 1890s. Martin had little memory of his father, Luke Martin Sr., who died at age 84 in 1920 when the son was just a few years old, according to Martin-Williams. The elder Martin, who was born in 1836, was married twice, the second...
  • Children of Civil War Veterans Still Walk Among Us, 150 Years After the War

    11/13/2014 5:52:24 AM PST · by Gamecock · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 11, 2014 | David A. Lande
    How many people alive today can say that their father was a Civil War soldier who shook hands with Abraham Lincoln in the White House? Fred Upham can. Despite sounding like a tall tale and a mathematical impossibility, it's documented truth. Fred's father, William, was a private in the Union Army's Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was severely wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run, in 1861, and later personally appointed by President Lincoln to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Fred's in exclusive company—the dwindling group of children of soldiers who fought, North against South, 150...
  • The Death of Taney

    10/16/2014 9:05:49 PM PDT · by iowamark · 61 replies
    On Oct. 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln must have breathed a bit easier. Not because the war was over — it would last another six months. Not because he had been re-elected — the election remained nearly a month away. And not because Gen. William T. Sherman had begun his decisive march through Georgia — the general was still holding Atlanta. While much remained unsettled, Lincoln’s achievements as president seemed more secure that autumn day because the president learned that his old nemesis Roger B. Taney, the Maryland-born chief justice of the Supreme Court, had died. Ever since Taney had...
  • Duquesne speaker to discuss religious causes of Civil War

    10/10/2014 7:30:16 AM PDT · by Ditto · 29 replies
    Pittsburgh Post Gazette ^ | October 6, 2014 | Len Barcousky
    Strong belief in heaven likely was one of the factors that made the Civil War so long and so bloody, public historian Barbara Franco says. “It made people more tolerant of death,” she explained in a recent telephone interview. Dying in the 19th century was compared to passing through a curtain and reuniting with family members on the other side. That belief made soldiers and civilians more willing to accept the unprecedented number of casualties from disease and combat during the nation’s most catastrophic conflict, she said.
  • How Coffee Fueled the Civil War

    07/12/2014 6:45:01 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 36 replies
    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com ^ | July 9, 2014 | JON GRINSPAN
    It was the greatest coffee run in American history. The Ohio boys had been fighting since morning, trapped in the raging battle of Antietam, in September 1862. Suddenly, a 19-year-old William McKinley appeared, under heavy fire, hauling vats of hot coffee. The men held out tin cups, gulped the brew and started firing again. “It was like putting a new regiment in the fight,” their officer recalled. Three decades later, McKinley ran for president in part on this singular act of caffeinated heroism. At the time, no one found McKinley’s act all that strange. For Union soldiers, and the lucky...
  • Still paying for the Civil War

    05/09/2014 10:36:45 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    WSJ ^ | 09 May 2014 | Michael M. Phillips
    Veterans' Benefits Live On Long After Bullets Stop Each month, Irene Triplett collects $73.13 from the Department of Veterans Affairs, a pension payment for her father's military service—in the Civil War. More than 3 million men fought and 530,000 men died in the conflict between North and South. Pvt. Mose Triplett joined the rebels, deserted on the road to Gettysburg, defected to the Union and married so late in life to a woman so young that their daughter Irene is today 84 years old—and the last child of any Civil War veteran still on the VA benefits rolls. Ms. Triplett's...
  • Finding and Losing the World's Oldest Subway Tunnel (& a steam loco)

    03/27/2014 9:50:37 AM PDT · by logi_cal869 · 20 replies
    Daily Paul ^ | 3/13/2014 | unkn
    History, Mystery, and Tunnels (& Trains). Reading The Cosgrove Report sent this guy on a hunt for a missing tunnel possibly used by John Wilkes Booth. After finding the tunnel, and running tours in the tunnel for 30+ years the city all the sudden revoked his business license and a part of history goes back undercover.
  • Looking for Slave's Friend Bowie Knife Pamphlet

    03/26/2014 11:53:25 AM PDT · by marktwain · 13 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 27 March, 2014 | Dean Weingarten
    A number of years ago I came across a good image of the above Slave's Friend abolitionist pamphlet.   It was published sometime between 1836 and 1860, most likely in the earlier years.    Freeper Ruy Dias de Bivar was kind enough to send me the image above, which is from MAN AT ARMS, published by the NRA, August, 1997, page 12. I intend to make this pamphlet easily available on the Internets, but I need a better image than the one above.   I know at least one better one exists, because I saw it in a reference book on weapons...
  • The Civil War in COLOR for the first time: Painstakingly remastered images of a divided America

    11/13/2013 2:36:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 61 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10-13-2013 | Alex Greig
    Two professional colorists have combined their skills with photographs and fascination with the American Civil War to create a remarkable series of color photographs from the era. British colorist Jordan Lloyd, 27, met fellow colorist Mads Madsen, 19, from Denmark when he started posting on Madsen's subreddit 'Colorized History'. Initially it was Madsen who was colorizing images from the Civil War era, but Lloyd eventually got interested and now the two work together restoring the images, improving their technique by giving each other critiques. Madsen has been interested in the Civil War since he was 12, and was especially fascinated...
  • Obama to be a no-show at Gettysburg 150th anniversary ceremony

    10/31/2013 8:18:32 AM PDT · by markomalley · 108 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 10/31/2013 | Ben Wolfgang
    President Obama has declined an invitation to speak at next month’s ceremony marking the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. The event, slated for Nov. 19 at the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, instead will feature Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and renowned historian James McPherson as the keynote speakers, the Gettysburg National Military Park said in a press release. “President Obama will not attend and the Secretary of Interior will represent the administration,” the park pointed out in the first paragraph of its press release. It’s unclear why Mr. Obama, a noted admirer of President Lincoln, declined the...
  • Divers spy ship relic in Winyah-Researchers think boat may belong to Civil War era(SC)

    09/15/2006 6:48:47 AM PDT · by GinJax · 14 replies · 706+ views
    The Sun News ^ | 15 Sep 2006 | Kelly Marshall Fuller
    GEORGETOWN - A shipwreck that could be the remains of a lost Confederate blockade runner, or possibly a vessel that predates the Civil War, was found Thursday near the entrance to Winyah Bay, researchers said. Divers from the Maritime Research Division of the S.C. Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology dove in about 13 feet of water and discovered a vessel that is about 90 feet long, with a wooden hull and a possible copper coating. The wreck could be the Sir Robert Peel, a blockade runner that was used by Confederate soldiers to get supplies to Georgetown during the Civil...
  • The Income Tax: A century is enough

    10/03/2013 12:58:41 PM PDT · by ThethoughtsofGreg · 15 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 10-3-13 | Chris Edwards
    Alexander Hamilton won in the end. As Treasury Secretary in the 1790s he championed an array of “internal” taxes to supplement federal revenues from import tariffs. Thomas Jefferson despised Hamilton’s internal taxes as assault on liberty, and when elected in 1800 he made sure that they were abolished. The Jeffersonian view held sway for decades, but by the late 19th century the growth in government and concerns about high tariffs led to calls for new revenue sources. The first income tax was imposed to fund the Civil War and lasted until 1872. Another income tax was imposed in 1894, but...
  • How a Disney animator 'discovered' a new picture of Abraham Lincoln at the Gettysburg Address[snip]

    09/25/2013 12:21:17 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 36 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 24 September 2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A Disney animator-turned Lincoln historian believes he has found the second of only two pictures of the 16th president taken at the Gettysburg Address. The incredible discovery has caused no small controversy in the world of Civil War history - because it means two other images of believed to be Abraham Lincoln do not, in fact, show the president. Christopher Oakley, a professor at the University of North Carolina-Asheville, found the shot of Lincoln in March while combing over historical photos from the Gettysburg Address.
  • Frederick Douglass Escapes Slavery, 175 Years Ago

    09/04/2013 5:10:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Channel ^ | September 3, 2013 | Christopher Klein
    On September 3, 1838, Frederick Bailey undertook the riskiest journey of his life. The 20-year-old slave made a daring escape from his master in Baltimore, and with his newfound freedom came a new name -- Frederick Douglass... After Douglass’ attempt to escape slavery two years prior was betrayed by a fellow slave, he had been jailed, sent to Baltimore by his master and hired out to work in the city’s shipyards. Undeterred, Douglass vowed to try to escape again on September 3, 1838, although he knew the risk. "I felt assured that if I failed in this attempt, my case...
  • SEE THE GREEN PAINT SPLATTERED ON THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL DURING APPARENT VANDALISM ATTACK

    07/26/2013 6:41:29 AM PDT · by ConservativeMan55 · 35 replies
    The Blaze ^ | 7/26/13 | Jonathon M. Seidl
    The U.S. Park Police in Washington say the Lincoln Memorial has been temporarily closed after someone splattered a splash of green paint on the statue.
  • GREEN PAINT SPLATTERED ON THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL

    07/26/2013 3:29:47 AM PDT · by bryan999 · 20 replies
    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The U.S. Park Police in Washington say the Lincoln Memorial is temporarily closed after someone splattered green paint on the statue and the floor area. Police say the apparent vandalism was discovered early Friday morning. No words, letters or symbols were visible in the paint. Police say the memorial on the National Mall will be closed until a maintenance crew from the National Park Service can finish cleaning up the paint. That's expected to happen Friday morning.
  • Woman arrested in green paint vandalism at Washington National Cathedral

    07/29/2013 3:14:33 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 68 replies
    StarTribune.com ^ | 7/29/13 | BEN NUCKOLS/AP
    A woman was arrested Monday after green paint was found splattered inside two chapels at the Washington National Cathedral, and police were investigating her in connection with two similar incidents on the National Mall, authorities said. The woman was arrested in the area of the cathedral shortly after the paint was found, Assistant D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said. Investigators were hoping to question her about the vandalism on the Mall, including at the Lincoln Memorial, but a language barrier delayed the interrogation, Newsham said.
  • Lincoln Memorial Vandalized

    07/26/2013 3:42:50 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 141 replies
    CBS ^ | 7/26/13
    Green paint was splattered overnight on parts of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S. Park police say. They say a patrol officer found green plant splashed on the floor near the famous statue of President Lincoln, and some on the base of the statue, at around 1:20 a.m. local time. The memorial, on the National Mall, will be closed until the U.S. Park Service can clean it up. An investigation is under way. CBS Washington affiliate WUSA-TV says its crew members got as close as they could to the statue and didn't see the paint, but saw evidence of...
  • Jim Carrey on Lincoln Memorial Vandals: People Tired of Corporate Tyranny

    07/27/2013 7:49:58 AM PDT · by ColdOne · 75 replies
    breitbart.com ^ | 7/26/13 | Breitbart News
    Carrey commented on vandals splashing green paint on the Lincoln Memorial with a predictably left of center viewpoint: Green paint on Lincoln memorial. Ppl are getting tired of corporate tyranny disguised as democracy. ;^\ http://say.ly/iqj6mai
  • Unknown vandals smear paint on Lincoln Memorial

    07/26/2013 6:28:05 AM PDT · by cll · 48 replies
    The Washington comPost ^ | 7/26/2013 | Maggie Fazeli Fard
    The Lincoln Memorial was shut down Friday morning after vandals splashed the statue of the nation’s 16th president and the marble floor around it with green paint, U.S. Park Police said. Police are reviewing surveillance footage from the popular tourist attraction on the west end of the Mall, but so far they have released no information about who may have been responsible. Authorities believe the vandalism happened around 1:30 a.m. The National Park Service will work to clean up the paint, police said, and the memorial will be closed to the public until cleanup is complete. Police said no words...
  • ‘Meade’s Army Annihilated!’

    07/13/2013 11:19:13 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 12, 2013 | By Peter Carlson
    Outside, a heavy summer rainstorm thrashed the streets of Richmond, Va. Inside Libby Prison that afternoon — July 8, 1863 — hundreds of captured Union officers sprawled across the bare wooden floors of the converted tobacco warehouse, picking lice out of their underwear and passing around copies of Richmond newspapers. The news was grim for the Yankees: Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Confederate army had defeated Gen. George Meade’s Union troops at a Pennsylvania town called Gettysburg. “OUR ARMY AGAIN VICTORIOUS,” read the headline in The Richmond Examiner, “MEADE’S ARMY ANNIHILATED.” “THE ENEMY ROUTED,” reported the Richmond Dispatch. “FORTY THOUSAND PRISONERS...
  • Give150 -- Preserve Our Past, Protect Our Future

    07/08/2013 7:08:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    History Channel ^ | ~2013 | unattributed
    One hundred and fifty years ago, America was torn apart by Civil War before the union was finally restored in 1865. Today, HISTORY invites all Americans to help preserve Civil War sites and stories through the Give 150™ national campaign. Give 150™ donations will go directly to the Civil War Trust and the National Park Foundation, both non-profit 501 (c) 3 organizations, to help protect Civil War sites and lands, and support their interpretation. HISTORY will also provide the public with the opportunity to actively give back to your communities through service and preservation projects as part of this initiative.
  • Frederick Douglass - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery

    07/04/2013 12:55:38 PM PDT · by Osage Orange · 35 replies
    The History Place ^ | 07-04-13 | Rich Lowry
    The History Place - Great Speeches Collection Frederick Douglass - The Hypocrisy of American Slavery Frederick Douglass (1817-1895) was the best known and most influential African American leader of the 1800s. He was born a slave in Maryland but managed to escape to the North in 1838. He traveled to Massachusetts and settled in New Bedford, working as a laborer to support himself. In 1841, he attended a convention of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society and quickly came to the attention of its members, eventually becoming a leading figure in the New England antislavery movement. In 1845, Douglass published his autobiography,...
  • Commemorating the Sesquicentennial of the Most Important Week in the History of the Republic

    07/04/2013 4:36:35 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 21 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 3, 2013 | Hugh Hewitt
    July 3 marks the last day of the battle of Gettysburg 150 years ago -- Pickett's Charge, the "high water mark of the Confederacy." July 4 is of course Independence Day, but this year it is also the sesquicentennial of the surrender of Vicksburg, which split the rebel states in two by securing the length of the Mississippi for the Union. This week, a century and a half ago, marked the certain beginning of the end for the Confederacy and thus of slavery and the rise of the great Republic of freedom. To commemorate this week, I am spending the...
  • Confederates' 'slave hunt' in North a military disgrace

    07/03/2013 5:41:43 PM PDT · by donmeaker · 62 replies
    Pittsburg Post Gazette ^ | June 30, 2013 12:16 am | Frank Reeves
    In June 1863, when Brig. Gen. Albert Jenkins' cavalry, in the vanguard of the Confederate army, galloped into Pennsylvania, its aim wasn't only to spy and steal supplies. The soldiers were also determined, as historian Margaret Creighton notes, to round up African-Americans, whom the Confederates regarded as "contraband" that should be returned to "rightful" owners. The "slave hunt," as contemporaries and later historians called this phase of the Confederate invasion, would last as long as Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia remained in Pennsylvania. It ended only when the defeated Southern troops retreated back to Virginia after the...
  • What Gettysburg Proved

    07/02/2013 5:04:26 PM PDT · by iowamark · 75 replies
    NY Times Disunion ^ | July 1, 2013 | ALLEN C. GUELZO
    It took no more than a few days after the Battle of Gettysburg for the men who had fought there to realize how important it had been... And it marked something even more important in Lincoln’s mind. The American republic was, in 1863, a dangerously isolated democratic flower in a garden full of aristocratic weeds, and if the Civil War succeeded in sundering the United States into two separate pieces, it would be the final confirmation that democracies were unstable and unworkable pipe dreams. “The central idea pervading this struggle,” Lincoln said in 1861, “is the necessity … of proving...
  • Lincoln on the Defensive

    06/23/2013 5:55:07 PM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 418 replies
    http://spectator.org ^ | June 20 2013 | By CHRISTOPHER ORLET
    From the time Abraham Lincoln entered the White House nearly a century and a half ago, there has been an anti-Lincoln tradition in American life. President John Tyler’s son, writing in 1932, seemed to speak for a silent minority: “I think he was a bad man,” wrote Lyon Gardiner Tyler, “a man who forced the country into an unnecessary war and conducted it with great inhumanity.” Throughout his presidency Lincoln was surrounded by rivals, even among his own cabinet. Outside the White House, his many enemies included conservative Whigs, Democrats, northern copperheads and New England abolitionists. Wisconsin editor, Marcus M....
  • Gettysburg offers lessons on battlefield medicine

    06/23/2013 6:15:39 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 8 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 6/22/13 | KEVIN BEGOS
    As gunshots ravaged the bodies of tens of thousands of soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg, military doctors responded with a method of treatment that is still the foundation of combat medicine today. Union Army Maj. Dr. Jonathan Letterman is remembered as the father of battlefield medicine for his Civil War innovations. He realized that organizing the medical corps was a key for any battle. "For military medicine, in particular, the lessons that Letterman gave us are as true today as they were then," said retired Lt. Gen. Ronald Ray Blanck, the former surgeon general for the U.S. Army.
  • 1913 Gettysburg Reunion of Blue and Gray

    06/15/2013 2:53:18 PM PDT · by BigReb555 · 262 replies
    Huntington News ^ | June 14, 2013 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.
    A highlight of the reunion was the Confederate Veterans walk on the path of Gen. George Pickett’s charge that was greeted, this time, by a handshake from the Union Veterans.
  • The Great Civil War Lie

    06/11/2013 4:48:08 AM PDT · by iowamark · 194 replies
    NY Times Disunion ^ | June 5, 2013 | MARC-WILLIAM PALEN
    Civil War buffs have long speculated about how different the war might have been if only the Confederacy had won formal recognition from Britain. But few recognize how close that came to happening — and how much pro-Southern sympathy in Britain was built on a lie... Early British support for the South was further buttressed by something as mundane as a protective tariff — the Morrill Tariff — approved by Congress on March 2, 1861. This new tariff, passed to protect American infant industries, also unwittingly gave rise to a troublesome myth of mounting trans-Atlantic proportions. The tariff had been...
  • 150 years ago today -- the Gettysburg campaign begins

    06/10/2013 3:07:23 PM PDT · by lowbridge · 41 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | june 10, 2013 | Rod Gragg
    On June 10, 1863, the lead troops of General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia left the army’s staging area near Culpeper Court House, Virginia and began a march northward. Their destination: Pennsylvania – where Lee hoped to win a major battle on Northern soil and end the Civil War with a Southern victory. Soon his army would be trailed by his main Northern adversary, the Federal Army of the Potomac. Ahead of both armies, across the Potomac River and in the heartland of southern Pennsylvania, lay the quiet crossroads town of Gettysburg, which would become the site of...
  • Sen. Kerry is a reincarnation of Stephen Douglas

    05/01/2004 2:45:59 AM PDT · by Prince Charles · 18 replies · 306+ views
    Chicago Sun-Times ^ | 5-1-2004 | Tom Roeser
    Sen. Kerry is a reincarnation of Stephen Douglas May 1, 2004 BY THOMAS ROESER He was ''personally opposed, but'' -- the nation's most prominent pro-choicer. A nationally known U.S. senator. Straddled the most divisive domestic issue of his day. Sought the presidency by flip-flopping to please all sides. Beset by clergymen he charged were mixing politics with religion. Married a controversial heiress whose vast holdings spurred severe criticism. John Kerry? Sounds like him, but guess again. It was Stephen A. Douglas, who served as Illinois senator for 14 years (1847-61). The biography of a flip-flopper by Robert Johannsen (Stephen A....
  • The Gettysburg Address

    02/24/2010 6:09:09 AM PST · by NoGrayZone · 44 replies · 844+ views
    November 19, 1863 | Abraham Lincoln
    Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should...
  • Gettysburg Address (Today is Abes' Birthday)

    02/12/2006 1:46:59 PM PST · by Kimmers · 17 replies · 558+ views
    University of Oklahoma Law Center ^ | 11/19/1863 | President Lincoln
    Nov. 19, 1863 Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a...
  • The Rhetoric of Remembrance - Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

    09/16/2006 6:58:01 PM PDT · by Tailgunner Joe · 5 replies · 7,425+ views
    aei.org ^ | September 11, 2006 | Ronald C. White Jr.
    Within days after the battle of Gettysburg, plans were set in motion that would lead to a national soldier’s cemetery. The decision was made early on that the nation’s first national cemetery at Gettysburg required an appropriate dedication. Edward Everett, the nation’s most celebrated speaker, was invited to offer the central address. Everett’s delivery was in the grand manner, committed to an ornate style of rhetoric. Abraham Lincoln was the last speaker invited. David Wills, the Gettysburg lawyer who was the organizer of the event, included a brief word about the nature of the remarks the president was being asked...
  • The Gettysburg Address, still a relevant message in 2012.

    09/18/2012 7:53:01 PM PDT · by carlo3b · 14 replies
    The Battle of Gettysburg ^ | Sept. 18, 2012 | Carlo3b, Dad, Dad, Author
    The Gettysburg Address "Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation: conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war. . .testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated. . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether...
  • The Gettysburg Address still gives us hope we can free ourselves

    07/04/2011 6:57:54 AM PDT · by jmaroneps37 · 234 replies
    coachisright.com ^ | July 4, 2011 | Kevin “Coach” Collins
    In his Gettysburg Address, …… Abraham Lincoln found the precise words to describe America’s dire situation. Here they are. Hear them, and savor them. “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. “Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a...
  • Gettysburg Address

    11/19/2002 6:05:28 AM PST · by WhiskeyPapa · 7 replies · 309+ views
    November 19, 1863 | Abraham Lincoln
    Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation: conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war. . .testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated. . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper...
  • What They Said About The Gettysburg Address (A Rush Perspective On Nay-sayers Then And Now)

    01/21/2005 3:31:21 PM PST · by goldstategop · 20 replies · 2,318+ views
    RushLimbaugh.com ^ | 01/21/05 | Rush Limbaugh
    Ladies and gentlemen, I want to read the Gettysburg Address to you. November 19th, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered this speech on the battlefield, and I want to read to you after I read it -- and it's very short and it's recognized now as one of the greatest presidential speeches in history; one of the greatest speeches in history, period -- and I want to read to you the reaction to the Gettysburg address from the Harrisburg Patriot and Union, the Chicago Times, the Springfield Republican, and the Harrisburg Patriot and Union again. But first, here's the Gettysburg Address. "Four...
  • The Gettysburg Address, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, November 19, 1863

    On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner commented on what is now considered the most famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called it a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech." The Gettysburg Address Gettysburg, Pennsylvania November 19, 1863 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this...
  • Gettysburg Address Remembered

    11/26/2009 5:46:15 PM PST · by Steelfish · 9 replies · 453+ views
    Washington Times ^ | November 27th 2009
    Gettysburg Address Remembered Thursday, November 19, 2009 - The Civil War by Martha M. Boltz Today is the anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, delivered at the dedication of the Gettysburg Cemetery in Gettysburg, PA on November 19, 1863. The assembly had just heard a speech by noted orator Edward Everett, who spoke for two and one-half hours, using 13,607 words. Quite honestly, today there are perhaps a handful of people who can remember any of what he said. The President, Abraham Lincoln, stood up at the podium, pulled a small slip of paper from his coat pocket, and began to...
  • This Day in History November 19,1863 President Lincoln delivers Gettysburg Address

    11/19/2007 2:51:38 PM PST · by mdittmar · 28 replies · 66+ views
    Various | 11/19/07 | President Lincoln
    Delivered at Gettysburg on November 19,1863 "Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and...
  • The Gettysburg Address still gives us hope we can free ourselves

    07/04/2010 6:36:51 AM PDT · by jmaroneps37 · 21 replies
    The Collins Report ^ | Juky 4, 2010 | Kevin “Coach” Collins
    In his Gettysburg Address, during the darkest days of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln found the precise words to describe America’s dire situation. Here they are. Hear them, and savor them. “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. “Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate...
  • TODAY IN HISTORY 1863: The Gettysburg Address

    11/19/2002 6:03:52 AM PST · by Petronski · 61 replies · 1,360+ views
    A Great Republican President ^ | November 19, 1863 | Abraham Lincoln
    Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do...
  • Sam Waterston Reads Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" - Video 2/12/09

    02/12/2009 7:50:41 AM PST · by Federalist Patriot · 3 replies · 259+ views
    Freedom's Lighthouse ^ | February 12, 2009 | BrianinMO
    Here is video of actor Sam Waterston reading President Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," which Lincoln delivered at Gettsburg, Pennsylvania on November 19, 1863. Waterston's reading is in observance of Lincoln's birthday today, which is also the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth in Kentucky on February 12, 1809. . . . . (Watch Video)
  • 145th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address - Video

    11/19/2008 6:14:18 AM PST · by Federalist Patriot · 7 replies · 388+ views
    Freedom's Lighthouse ^ | November 19, 2008 | BrianinMO
    Today, November 19, 2008, is the 146th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. It is truly one of the most amazing speeches ever delivered. Lincoln was preceded on the program by orator Edward Everett, who delivered a two-hour speech with more than 13,000 words. It took Lincoln little more than 2 minutes to deliver his words on that day, but what he said endures to this day, and will endure as long as America endures as a nation. The video above contains Ken Burns' narration of the Gettysburg Address. . . . (Watch Video)
  • Doctors say Lincoln had smallpox when giving Gettysburg Address

    05/24/2007 4:06:51 PM PDT · by Graybeard58 · 8 replies · 534+ views
    Waterbury Republican-American ^ | May 24, 2007 | Lindsey Tanner (A.P.)
    CHICAGO -- Abraham Lincoln has been dead for 142 years, but he still manages to make medical headlines, this time from doctors who say he had a bad case of smallpox when he delivered the Gettysburg Address. Physicians in Baltimore said last week that Lincoln might have survived being shot if today's medical technology had existed in 1865. Last year, University of Minnesota researchers suggested that a genetic nerve disorder rather than the long-speculated Marfan syndrome might have caused his clunky gait. "If you play doctor, it's difficult to shut down the diagnostic process" when reading about historical figures, said...
  • On Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

    05/25/2008 11:08:45 PM PDT · by ashok · 13 replies · 21+ views
    Rethink. ^ | 5/31/2007 | Ashok
    Lincoln understands the Civil War to be the most significant war. The question is whether people can govern themselves or not, "whether any nation so conceived can long endure." Is any attempt at democracy doomed to failure, since majority/minority divergences mean one group may always be slighted to the point of war? You can see all throughout this speech Lincoln's refusal to talk about the Civil War in particular terms: there is no mention of Gettysburg, no mention of the number dead, no mention of the Confederacy or slavery or the battle itself or even the fact this is America....
  • Abraham Lincoln most influential American: survey

    11/22/2006 6:59:59 AM PST · by presidio9 · 98 replies · 1,595+ views
    Reuters ^ | 11/22/06
    Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. president who won the Civil War and ended slavery, topped a list of the 100 most influential American figures in shaping U.S. history, a survey released on Tuesday said. The Atlantic Monthly magazine asked 10 notable historians to rank the Americans they felt had the greatest impact on U.S. history. Other figures who made the top 10 included U.S. Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt, as well as civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. Also included were Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall and inventor...
  • The Stuff of Democratic Life (Why The Gettysburg Address Was So Important)

    11/22/2006 6:50:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 54 replies · 1,165+ views
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | November 22, 2006 | ALLEN GUELZO
    On Nov. 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the dedication remarks at the opening ceremonies of a cemetery for soldiers of the Civil War in Gettysburg, Pa. This "Gettysburg Address" -- a gem-like model of conciseness, passion and political eloquence -- quickly became a fixed feature of McGuffey's Eclectic Readers and triple-decker Fourth of July orations, even the soundtrack of the first "talking" motion picture in 1922. It was read once again to dedicate a block of burnt earth in Manhattan during the solemn first anniversary of 9/11 at Ground Zero. Lincoln wrote a great many other memorable speeches, from his...