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Kazakh Archeologists Discover Ancient Scythian "Sun Lord"
Eurasia Net ^ | Monday, July 19, 2010 | Joanna Lillis

Posted on 07/19/2010 6:51:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Archeologists in Kazakhstan have discovered the grave of a gold-clad ancient Scythian warrior who has already earned himself a nickname: "The Sun Lord." Researchers uncovered the find in a Scythian grave consisting of seven burial mounds in Karaganda Region east of the capital, Astana.

The opulence of the warrior's burial indicates that he was a leader as well as a fighter, expedition leader Arman Beysenov explained. "He was probably a ruler and a warrior simultaneously," Beysenov said in remarks quoted by the Kazinform news agency on July 16. "The person's torso was entirely covered with gold. The figure of a leader like this was associated with the sun. He was a sort of 'sun lord.'"

The warrior was likely buried in the 4th or 5th century BC in a grave that was actually discovered half a century ago, though excavation work only started last year.

Robbers had looted the grave in ancient times, Beysenov said, but it still contained quite a horde of ancient treasure. One of the burial mounds alone yielded 130 gold objects that included the figure of a feline predator, pendants and parts of sword belts. Archeologists also found hundreds of gold beads and 14 bronze arrowheads in the grave.

Inevitably, the archeological discovery is being trumpeted as comparable to that of the Golden Man, found in the Issyk burial mound just outside Kazakhstan's commercial capital, Almaty, in 1969. The Golden Man, who [i]s believed to have been a young Scythian prince who lived in the 4th or 5th century BC, was interred wearing some 4,000 gold ornaments.

...

Archeologists are now hoping that their digs in eastern Kazakhstan will reveal more information about the glorious "Sun Lord," the latest find from the Scythian past.

(Excerpt) Read more at eurasianet.org ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; kazakhstan; scythians

1 posted on 07/19/2010 6:51:38 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; ..

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2 posted on 07/19/2010 6:54:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
he was a leader as well as a fighter

Remember when human civilizations were led by actual human men?


Frowning takes 68 muscles.
Smiling takes 6.
Pulling this trigger takes 2.
I'm lazy.

3 posted on 07/19/2010 7:31:46 PM PDT by The Comedian (Evil can only succeed if good men don't point at it and laugh.)
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To: SunkenCiv
"He was probably a ruler and a warrior simultaneously," Beysenov said in remarks quoted by the Kazinform news agency on July 16.

This Beysenov fella is a real certified genius. That's what the folks we commonly call "kings" actually were, back in the day. A "king" was any man who led a body of armed men, to enforce his will on others...

the infowarrior

4 posted on 07/19/2010 7:37:35 PM PDT by infowarrior
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To: SunkenCiv

Didn’t they find a woman warrior dressed in gold stuff in a burial mound over there somewhere not too long ago?

Think they called her the Amazon queen or something.

Wish this article had some pics.
.


5 posted on 07/19/2010 7:51:44 PM PDT by wildbill (You're just jealous because the Voices talk only to me.)
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To: SunkenCiv
"Inevitably, the archeological discovery is being trumpeted as comparable to that of the Golden Man, found in the Issyk burial mound just outside Kazakhstan's commercial capital, Almaty, in 1969. The Golden Man, who [i]s believed to have been a young Scythian prince who lived in the 4th or 5th century BC, was interred wearing some 4,000 gold ornaments.

Golden Man

The 4,000 year old mummies found in China wore tall pointed hats such as this one...they were mostly made of felt.

6 posted on 07/19/2010 9:50:28 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam; SunkenCiv; All

The noble women found in that area from that time period and earlier also had 3 foot high headdresses. This seems similar to the tall combined crown of upper and lower Egypt. Almost 2,000 years BC Sesostres II (I think?) sent Egyptians to settle on the East side of the Black Sea. Perhaps the Scythians and related peoples picked up the custom from them.


7 posted on 07/19/2010 11:23:32 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: blam

You mean they all wore big ol’ dunce caps, in public, on purpose?


8 posted on 07/20/2010 1:49:14 AM PDT by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: Scythian

Ping


9 posted on 07/20/2010 4:48:51 AM PDT by Travis T. OJustice (I can spell just fine, thanks, it's my typing that sucks.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Fwiw, here are some tiny pics.

I've never understood why these stories of fantastic finds either have no images or in this case thumbnails, but anyways, that's what I found on a couple of Kazakhstan websites.

10 posted on 07/20/2010 5:18:51 AM PDT by csvset
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To: SunkenCiv

Hey, thanks for the heads up, I know quite a lot about the Scythians, they were greatly feared nomads of the Asian steppes who could take down birds in mid-flight with either their left or right hands while galloping on horse back.

They are even mentioned in the bible:

Colossians 3:11
Here there is no Greek or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave or free, but Christ is all, and is in all ...

We spoke about this very statement in my Greek class and the instructor mentioned specificall the Scythian and stated that this verse was very powerful and shows the depth of the cross in that salvation is not only offered to the barbarian, but unto the “utter barbarian” and such were these Scythians.

Chuck Misslers tape on Gog and Magog talks a great deal about Scythians from a historical perspective, absolutely facinating. Frankly, I’m suprised Hollywood hasn’t made a movie about them, they make the mongel hoards look like sissy’s.

The Scythian were never defeated in battle (ever)
http://knol.google.com/k/jeff-franzmann/scythians/13zhsbvkuz0iy/10#

-Yes, they really did lop the heads off their foes and turn them into drinking cups. They also turned the scalps of their fallen enemies into ornaments for their horses bridles.

-The Scythians were expert goldsmiths, whose fame for artistic works in gold was known even in Rome

-The Scythians were never defeated or conquered in battle. They simply disappeared as their lands, part of the Great Silk Road, were gradually settled and they gave up their nomadic lifestyle.

-They smoked pot. A lot of it. The kurgans not only contain cannibis seeds in bowls in abundance, but Greek accounts seem to indicate that made a great deal of recreational use of cannibis.


11 posted on 07/20/2010 7:26:23 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: blam

My conehead is taller than your conehead.


12 posted on 07/20/2010 10:00:11 AM PDT by ZULU
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To: gleeaikin

Do a search on a Wizard and a Dunce hat...same hats?


13 posted on 07/20/2010 11:24:16 AM PDT by blam
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To: Scythian

Dude, pass me the doobie.

14 posted on 07/20/2010 1:27:26 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: blam
was interred wearing some 4,000 gold ornaments.
Maybe he was just a great big princess. :')
15 posted on 07/20/2010 7:48:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: gleeaikin
Sesostris was the name told to Herodotus, but it probably wasn't the right name, and/or was the short or common name of a later pharaoh; the surviving accounts show that the Egyptians of the Late Kingdom had almost no idea about who or what went before. Ramses II had a lot of monuments and statues recarved with his own name and/or likeness, including a monumental head of one of the Sesostris'es. Here's most of the Sesostris stuff:
Histories, book II: Euterpe
by Herodotus
translation by George Rawlinson
transcription by Daniel C. Stevenson
Passing over these monarchs, therefore, I shall speak of the king who reigned next, whose name was Sesostris. He, the priests said, first of all proceeded in a fleet of ships of war from the Arabian gulf along the shores of the Erythraean sea, subduing the nations as he went, until he finally reached a sea which could not be navigated by reason of the shoals. Hence he returned to Egypt, where, they told me, he collected a vast armament, and made a progress by land across the continent, conquering every people which fell in his way. In the countries where the natives withstood his attack, and fought gallantly for their liberties, he erected pillars, on which he inscribed his own name and country, and how that he had here reduced the inhabitants to subjection by the might of his arms: where, on the contrary, they submitted readily and without a struggle, he inscribed on the pillars, in addition to these particulars, an emblem to mark that they were a nation of women, that is, unwarlike and effeminate.

In this way he traversed the whole continent of Asia, whence he passed on into Europe, and made himself master of Scythia and of Thrace, beyond which countries I do not think that his army extended its march. For thus far the pillars which he erected are still visible, but in the remoter regions they are no longer found. Returning to Egypt from Thrace, he came, on his way, to the banks of the river Phasis. Here I cannot say with any certainty what took place. Either he of his own accord detached a body of troops from his main army and left them to colonise the country, or else a certain number of his soldiers, wearied with their long wanderings, deserted, and established themselves on the banks of this stream.

There can be no doubt that the Colchians are an Egyptian race. Before I heard any mention of the fact from others, I had remarked it myself. After the thought had struck me, I made inquiries on the subject both in Colchis and in Egypt, and I found that the Colchians had a more distinct recollection of the Egyptians, than the Egyptians had of them. Still the Egyptians said that they believed the Colchians to be descended from the army of Sesostris. My own conjectures were founded, first, on the fact that they are black-skinned and have woolly hair, which certainly amounts to but little, since several other nations are so too; but further and more especially, on the circumstance that the Colchians, the Egyptians, and the Ethiopians, are the only nations who have practised circumcision from the earliest times.

...The pillars which Sesostris erected in the conquered countries have for the most part disappeared; but in the part of Syria called Palestine, I myself saw them still standing, with the writing above-mentioned, and the emblem distinctly visible. In Ionia also, there are two representations of this prince engraved upon rocks, one on the road from Ephesus to Phocaea, the other between Sardis and Smyrna. In each case the figure is that of a man, four cubits and a span high, with a spear in his right hand and a bow in his left, the rest of his costume being likewise half Egyptian, half Ethiopian. There is an inscription across the breast from shoulder to shoulder, in the sacred character of Egypt, which says, "With my own shoulders I conquered this land." The conqueror does not tell who he is, or whence he comes, though elsewhere Sesostris records these facts. Hence it has been imagined by some of those who have seen these forms, that they are figures of Memnon; but such as think so err very widely from the truth.

...

Sesostris was king not only of Egypt, but also of Ethiopia. He was the only Egyptian monarch who ever ruled over the latter country. He left, as memorials of his reign, the stone statues which stand in front of the temple of Vulcan, two of which, representing himself and his wife, are thirty cubits in height, while the remaining four, which represent his sons, are twenty cubits. These are the statues, in front of which the priest of Vulcan, very many years afterwards, would not allow Darius the Persian to place a statue of himself; "because," he said, "Darius had not equalled the achievements of Sesostris the Egyptian: for while Sesostris had subdued to the full as many nations as ever Darius had brought under, he had likewise conquered the Scythians, whom Darius had failed to master. It was not fair, therefore, that he should erect his statue in front of the offerings of a king, whose deeds he had been unable to surpass." Darius, they say, pardoned the freedom of this speech.
Herodotus is here describing statues he himself saw; Ptah was the Egyptian deity understood to be the same as the Greek Hephaestos / Roman Vulcan; there was a major temple of Ptah at Memphis, seems to be what he saw. The surviving colossal statue there is of Ramses II (or at least, it seems to be; as I said, Ramses II had a lot of stuff recarved).
16 posted on 07/20/2010 8:15:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: The Comedian; infowarrior

[cueing “Those Were The Days, My Friends”]


17 posted on 07/20/2010 8:20:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: csvset; wildbill

Thanks!


18 posted on 07/20/2010 8:21:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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