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The Origins of Archery in Africa

Posted on 07/06/2011 4:15:09 AM PDT by Renfield

It is well understood that projectile weapons allow lethal killing power at a safe distance and their use is near universal among human groups. Before the firearm began it’s rise to prominence over the last 500 years the most popular projectile weapons systems were the atlatl (spearthrower/dart) and the bow and arrow.

Most researchers consider these as ‘‘true’’ projectile technologies, distinguishing them from thrown spears, throwing sticks and other hurled weapons. There is considerable archaeological consensus that projectile weapons were in use by the Late Palaeolithic at least 30,000 years ago. However, last year, anthropologist Marlize Lombard of South Africa’s University of Johannesburg and her colleagues, reported in the journal Antiquity, that arrows were dated to at least 64,000 years old, and were discovered not in Europe, but in South Africa. This was based on a single bloodstained quartz arrowhead recovered from the the Sibudu Cave site.

In the new Journal of Archaeological Science study, Lombard reports more arrowheads and more evidence to push back the age of the bow and arrow. This adds more weight to a bone point, that could have been an arrow tip that was also excavated from the same site and published in 2008 by Lucinda Backwell and colleagues from the University of the Witwatersrand.

The real importance of these finds is what it represents in terms of cognitive archaeology. The concepts of complex thought that are required and the methodology of thought may provide further clues into the minds of our distant ancestors and what prepared them for their spread across the globe.

“Although the existence of bow and arrow technology (more than 60,000 years ago) may have far-reaching consequences for hypotheses about human behavioural evolution and adaptation, it is by no means easy to establish,” Lombard says at the beginning of her study which looks in microscopic detail at 16 quartz blades.

Her study concludes that some of these hafted points might have been launched from bows. While “most attributes such as micro-residue distribution patterns and micro-wear will develop similarly on points used to tip spears, darts or arrows” and “explicit tests for distinctions between thrown spears and projected arrows have not yet been conducted” the researchers find “contextual support” for the use of these points on arrows: a broad range of animals were hunted, with an emphasis on taxa that prefer closed forested niches, including fast moving, terrestrial and arboreal animals which would be difficult to hunt with anything other than an bow and arrow.

Expanding further, this is also an argument for the use of traps, including snares with the associated comprehension for the use of cords and knots which would also have been adequate for the production of bows. The employment of snares would also demonstrate a practical understanding of the latent energy stored in bent branches, the main principle of bow construction.

Despite a body of literature focusing on the functionality of modern and stylistically distinct projectile points, comparatively little attention has been paid to quantifying the functionality of the early stages of projectile use. Previous work identified a simple ballistics measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Area, as a way of determining if a given class of stone points could have served as effective projectile.

The new study adds an alternate measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Perimeter, a more accurate proxy of the force needed to penetrate a target to a lethal depth. The current study discusses this measure and uses it to analyse a collection of measurements from African Middle Stone Age pointed stone artefacts. Several point types that were rejected in previous studies are statistically indistinguishable from ethnographic projectile points using this new measure.

The researchers wrote in their paper: “Hunting with a bow and arrow requires intricate multi-staged planning, material collection and tool preparation and implies a range of innovative social and communication skills.”

Dr Lombard explained that her ultimate aim was to answer the “big question“: When did we start to think in the same way that we do now?


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: africa; archaeology; archery; ggg; godsgravesglyphs

Sibudu rock shelter, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and examples of reconstructed arrow points. Photo credit: G.Baker / M.Lombard and J.Pargeter

Other innovations such as engraved ochre and bone points found at Sibudu. Photo credit: C.Henshilwood

Howieson’s Poort stone tools with sharp cutting edges and blunted back edges (left panel) which were fixed (hafted) to make hunting weapons (right panel). Photo credit: M.Lombard

1 posted on 07/06/2011 4:15:11 AM PDT by Renfield
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To: SunkenCiv; Ernest_at_the_Beach

Paleoarchery ping.


2 posted on 07/06/2011 4:16:30 AM PDT by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: Renfield
Origins of Archery:

Caveman 1: Stab lion with stick, he turn into dinner and coat.
Caveman 2: Yeh, but lion have stabbies, too, also.
Caveman 3: Throw stick!
Caveman 1: Nah, arm get tired.
Caveman 2: Teach other stick to throw stick!
Cavemen 1 & 3: YAY!
Caveman 3: Uhhh...how we do dat?
3 posted on 07/06/2011 4:37:52 AM PDT by arderkrag (Georgia is God's Country.----------In the same way Rush is balance, I am consensus.)
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To: Renfield

The evolution of the brain is something I would love to get into as soon as I get to retire. I hope my brain doesn’t devolve before I retire.


4 posted on 07/06/2011 4:48:06 AM PDT by RadiationRomeo (Step into my mind and glimpse the madness that is me)
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To: arderkrag

You forgot Caveman #4 - let’s just go get our food stamps.


5 posted on 07/06/2011 5:13:50 AM PDT by conservaterian (Sarah/DeMint '12)
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To: conservaterian

Cavewoman #1....Seeing that I don’t have a blender, if I see you with her again, I’m gonna stick this where the sun don’t shine.


6 posted on 07/06/2011 5:24:10 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Renfield

There is other evidence of archery.

I think it was Peter Freuchen, the Danish Arctic explorer, who wrote about this in one of his books.

There was an object in a Danish museum. It was a section of reindeer antler with a neat hole drilled in it about 3/8 inch diameter. The museum sign said, “Religious object of unknown significance dated to 50,000 year ago”.

Some Inuit (Eskimos, in the popular parlance) were visiting from Greenland and immediately recognized the object. “That’s an arrow straightener. You heat the shaft over the lamp and then use it like a wrench to straighten that shaft as it cools. My grandfather used one before we got rifles”.


7 posted on 07/06/2011 7:55:04 AM PDT by darth
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To: Renfield

Could you post a source link? Thanks.


8 posted on 07/06/2011 9:10:19 AM PDT by Sidebar Moderator
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To: Sidebar Moderator

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2011/the-origins-of-archery-in-africa

Sorry, I thought I included that.


9 posted on 07/06/2011 10:58:15 AM PDT by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: arderkrag
Caveman 1: Stab lion with stick, he turn into dinner and coat.
Caveman 2: Yeh, but lion have stabbies, too, also.
Caveman 3: Throw stick!
Caveman 1: Nah, arm get tired.
Caveman 2: Teach other stick to throw stick!
Cavemen 1 & 3: YAY!
Caveman 3: Uhhh...how we do dat?

Caveman 2 (suddenly assuming British accent): Elementary, old bean. We use something I will call, a BOW. In a nutshell, a bow is a device that converts slow and steady human force over a distance (Work) into stored Mechanical Potential Energy (in the form of tension in the Bowstave, Limbs, or Prod). This energy is converted into Kinetic Energy upon release of the Bowstring, and a great deal of that kinetic energy is transfered to the arrow. When you throw something, you're also throwing your arm's Mass along with it. Two-- Humans are only capable of exerting a certain amount of Force. With a bow, a human can exert that force over a longer period of time, storing it up in the force of Elastic Potential Energy. An archer draws back on his bow, applying a force to the bowstring which in turn bends the bow as it adds elastic potential energy. Thus, a bow is basically a spring which stores enegry to be put into the arrow. The Draw Weight(F) is directly proportional to the Draw Length(x), so like a spring, it follows Hooke's Law. However, it is only an apparent relationship. The Draw Curve is actually a slight curve (because of the shape of the bowstave), but combined with other factors, it nets a straight line relationship. The Energy stored in the bow is equal to Fx/2 (because there are two limbs). For a Recurve Bow, the straight line graph above works. However, for a Compound Bow, which utilizes levers and such, the weight actually decreases with the draw length, allowing a bow with the same amount of energy to require less force. The graph at left represents the weight of a compound bow over its draw length. The Draw Force Curve determines: 1. The Weight on the Archers Fingers at Full Draw. 2. How much energy is stored in the bow at full draw. 3. The shape of the Draw Curve determines the Stacking quality of the bow. And, if you allow, I will draw out the recurve force diagram on this wall:

Caveman 1 & 3 look at eachother, and yell "KILL HIM WITH FIRE!"

10 posted on 07/06/2011 11:04:52 AM PDT by Lazamataz (Until Obama, has there ever been, in history, a Traitorous Ruler?)
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To: Lazamataz

OK now that was funny.


11 posted on 07/06/2011 11:07:55 AM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Renfield; JoeProBono; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

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Thanks Renfield.

The Sibudu Cave site, an update. White supremacist scientists refuse to acknowledge that the Arrow shirt also originated in Africa.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
 

· History topic · history keyword · archaeology keyword · paleontology keyword ·
· Science topic · science keyword · Books/Literature topic · pages keyword ·


12 posted on 07/06/2011 7:47:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Yes, as a matter of fact, it is that time again -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Sacajaweau; SunkenCiv
Cavewoman #1....Seeing that I don’t have a blender, if I see you with her again, I’m gonna stick this where the sun don’t shine.

Cavewoman #2...If he only he had a projectile weapon.

13 posted on 07/06/2011 7:55:53 PM PDT by bigheadfred (Beat me, Bite me, Make Me write Bad Checks)
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To: SunkenCiv

14 posted on 07/06/2011 8:01:58 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: SunkenCiv
You Sibudu recruits listen up! This is my arrow, this is my gun, this is for hunting, this is for fun . . . .
15 posted on 07/07/2011 1:29:41 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Sibudu, somebadon’t.


16 posted on 07/07/2011 4:50:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Yes, as a matter of fact, it is that time again -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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