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Archaeology: Acropolis of forgotten kingdom uncovered
ANSA ^ | Friday, February 10, 2012 | ANSAmed

Posted on 02/21/2012 8:33:21 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Numerous archaeological excavations are underway at a huge site in Anatolia which will uncover an ancient and rich yet forgotten kingdom known as Tuwana from the darkness of history, which will be featured in an open-air museum. The news was reported by Lorenzo d'Alfonso, an Italian archaeologist leading the joint mission by the University of Pavia and NYU, who provided details on the excavation campaign in a press conference in Istanbul this month, during which the details of the Italian archaeological missions in Turkey were explained. This "new discovery" from the pre-classical age which "needs to be continued" in southern Cappadocia took place in Kinik Hoyuk, the scholar said, referring to a site mainly involving the beginning of the first millennium BC. The area is "fully" part of the "forgotten kingdom" of Tuwana, said d'Alfonso, known until now through hieroglyphics and from several sources from the Assyrian Empire, but "never studied archaeologically": "A completely intact site that has been left untouched", trying to "place it historically to understand which civilisation it belonged to and what it's role was in the region". Kinik Hoyuk, the archaeologist said, is "one of the major sites" in terms of size in pre-classical Anatolia, if you leave the capital of the Hittites out: the most conservative estimates say that it spans 24 hectares "but topographers say that it could cover 81 hectares".

(Excerpt) Read more at ansamed.info ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: anatolia; assyria; assyrianempire; assyrians; cappadocia; ciliciangates; godsgravesglyphs; italy; kinikkoyuk; kinikkoyuktuwana; turkey; tuwana
Subtitled: "Thanks to Italian excavations in southern Cappadocia"

1 posted on 02/21/2012 8:33:26 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 02/21/2012 8:36:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Anatolia? They could have said Turkey.

You can’t go back to Constantinople, ‘cause they changed it to Istanbul.


3 posted on 02/21/2012 8:38:03 PM PST by Rocky (REPEAL IT!)
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To: SunkenCiv
There are so many interesting archaeological sites in Turkey I would love to go there if I had the time and cash. They would have even more tourists if they would quit playing footsies with the radical Muslims.
4 posted on 02/21/2012 8:49:01 PM PST by dog breath
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To: Rocky

Why did Constantinople get the works?
That’s no one’s business but the Turks...


5 posted on 02/21/2012 8:49:27 PM PST by null and void (Day 1127 of America's ObamaVacation from reality [Heroes aren't made, Frank, they're cornered...])
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To: null and void

Even old New York
Was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed I can’t say


6 posted on 02/21/2012 8:55:05 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Would you sing if someone sucked YOU up the vacuum cleaner hose?)
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To: null and void

The jerks.


7 posted on 02/21/2012 8:55:47 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: dog breath

They *are* the radical Muslims. :’) But I’m with you, if I had the time and cash, I’d be all over the landscape over there.


8 posted on 02/21/2012 8:59:26 PM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

People just liked it better that way


9 posted on 02/21/2012 9:00:08 PM PST by null and void (Day 1127 of America's ObamaVacation from reality [Heroes aren't made, Frank, they're cornered...])
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To: Rocky
Turkey is a country (less than 100 years old under that name) and Anatolia is a region, aka Asia Minor. Makes sense to keep the national name out of it since Anatolia was populated and ruled by quite a few different peoples, including the Greeks, long before the Turks rode in from the steppes.

In fact the coastal cities were still predominantly Greek until the 1920's when they were ethnically cleansed by the forces of General and then President Ataturk ("Father Turk") founder of the Republic of Turkey, occupying all that was left of the Ottoman Empire. The Armenians weren't the only people to be manhandled and massacred by the Turks.

10 posted on 02/21/2012 9:14:19 PM PST by katana (Just my opinions)
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To: SunkenCiv

I wanna be a Tuwannabe too so long as I don’t have wear those tu-tu’s too.


11 posted on 02/21/2012 9:19:03 PM PST by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: SunkenCiv
One hectare is about 2.47 acres so the site seems to be somewhere between 60 and 200 acres.

So the mystery is solved as to why Mrs. Brawley named her daughter Tuwana.

12 posted on 02/21/2012 9:32:04 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: count-your-change; Verginius Rufus

:’)


13 posted on 02/21/2012 10:02:32 PM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
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To: count-your-change

“as I don’t have wear those tu-tu’s too.”

Are you referring to two tu-tus too?


14 posted on 02/21/2012 11:28:53 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Rocky

Everyone there calls it Anatolia.


15 posted on 02/21/2012 11:49:13 PM PST by Domangart
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Yes, I forgot that the plural of tu-tu’s is toot.


16 posted on 02/22/2012 12:45:33 AM PST by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: katana
most of the people of Turkey, the ethnic "Turks" have very little Turkic blood in them -- they look and have very little true blood relationship with the Kipchaks or Turkomen or Kirghiz. But they have the same language family.

They are mostly ethnically greek-hittite-hatti-armenian-caucasian mix with some semitic elements and some traces of Turks. This is where the rulers (Turks) put their language on the conquered

17 posted on 02/22/2012 1:26:52 AM PST by Cronos (Party like it's 12 20, 2012)
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To: count-your-change

Nah, Toot is Obama’s grandmommy who took his secrets to her grave.


18 posted on 02/22/2012 3:37:24 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: null and void

LOL. Someone else knows the song.


19 posted on 02/22/2012 3:59:43 AM PST by Rocky (REPEAL IT!)
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To: dog breath
Turkey I would love to go there ...

No you would not, unless you are a muslim. These sites are in rural Turkey, which is still in the 7th century, complete with all the traditions and beliefs of that time. Remain in the large cities, do not venture alone into the countryside, without an armed guard. Do not travel between cities unless by air.

Rural Turky begins where large cities end - abruptly. There are no burbs, after that, wealthy people live in small towns and villages, the not so wealthy live in ditches and will beg you for ecmec (bread).

Do not go to Sinope Province. It is a prison province for people who have been judged enemies of the state or common criminals (many of whom are keep in the 10th Century prison for the remainder of their very short lives). Uprisings are put down by the military, usually with artillery fire.

Do not drink the local water. It can make you very sick or even kill you. Do not drink out of the waterseller’s cup - they are not washed after use.

As a non-muslim, you are automatically hated. Any possessions you have belong to the first Turk to take them. If you look at any woman directly, you will be beaten by as many males as are available for the task. If you photograph anyone, you will be considered to have stolen their soul.

If you eat at a local restaurant, they will treat you nicely, but if you fail to look in the kitchen, you will have no idea what you are being fed nor which dish has the least flies in it.

If you are a male and get horny, you can visit the local karahanni, where you will find various holes in wooden walls to insert ... the women are working off their husband's debts.

If you drop a lira and accidentally step on it to keep it from blowing away, you have just committed a capital crime.

If you are lucky in said incident there will be someone to rescue you and spirit you out of the country - the preferred method is in a coffin. Which, if you are unlucky, is what you will be returning to the US in after being skinned alive by the locals.

Do not under any circumstances look at or flirt with any unveiled women, nor make any remarks. You will be beaten if you are lucky, and, if afterward you are unlucky and go sailing in a rental boat on the Black Sea, you will be killed by the local fisherman.

Do not under any circumstances go wandering across the local countryside alone, without an armed guard, else the local shepards will throw boulders at you and try to force you off a cliff to your death.

In rural Turkey, there are no McDonalds, only minarets.

20 posted on 02/22/2012 6:21:13 AM PST by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
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To: Cronos
You are as usual correct. Anatolia, the bulk of what is now modern day Turkey, has been occupied over many millenia by so many different peoples and languages (and religions) that to call all the current descendants "Turks" is just a modern convenience and a product of the Turkish government's need to enforce national unity at all costs. The "real" Turks are more to be found in places like Turkmenistan and the other ex-Soviet Turkic republics. The Ugyur in Xinjiang Province in China are another example.

One thing that struck me during my first visit to Turkey (via Italy and Greece) was that the variation from the expected "Mediterranean" type (black hair and dark olive complexion) seemed to increase as I traveled east. I saw more blondes in Greece and then in Istanbul than in Rome. Of course part of that is the intermixing the Ottomans forced on the Balkan peoples during the centuries of Dhimmitude and Devshirme selection of the best and brightest into slavery.

21 posted on 02/22/2012 7:37:17 AM PST by katana (Just my opinions)
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To: PIF

I had a professor who used to visit sites in Turkey but she always went with organized tour groups.


22 posted on 02/22/2012 7:58:35 AM PST by dog breath
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To: katana
As the Ottoman Empire contracted, a lot of Muslims emigrated to the areas still under Ottoman control. A sizable number of Bosnian Muslims ended up in what is still Turkey today--and they were of Slavic descent, no different from their Christian neighbors except for their religion (very few ethnic Turks had settled in Bosnia). Of course the devshirme also added non-Turkish blood to the Muslim part of the population.

The same is true in other European countries--the dominant language doesn't mean that all the people are descended from the group that first brought that language there. Probably a lot of Celtic blood in France and England, probably a lot of Celtic and pre-Celtic blood in Spain and Portugal, probably a lot of Illyrian, Thracian, Celtic, and even pre-Indo-European blood in the Balkans (along with some Roman and German).

23 posted on 02/22/2012 8:43:43 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: PIF

Where do you get that information? I go in and out of there all the time, in the cities and the countryside and I’ve never had any issues....they’re very friendly to all religions there from my experience and bend over backwards trying to be good hosts. I’ve even been in people’s homes that were complete strangers and had meals cooked out of hospitality. Sounds like a serious bias there.....armed guard for the countryside??? Seriously?? Wow....

Lots of nice history there and most isn’t taken care of due to costs. And there is just so much historical ruins that most countries would go broke trying to take care of that much. I sat on ruins of one of Alexander the Great’s castles and we cooked kebabs...amazing...and the hidden fresco’s in people’s backyards...coins everywhere when plowing fields, just don’t try to take them out of the country...lol. Nice place, but hopefully they don’t go too far over to radicalism.


24 posted on 02/22/2012 9:26:27 AM PST by sandboxshooter (Iraq, Afghanistan, War)
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To: PIF

Where do you get that information? I go in and out of there all the time, in the cities and the countryside and I’ve never had any issues....they’re very friendly to all religions there from my experience and bend over backwards trying to be good hosts. I’ve even been in people’s homes that were complete strangers and had meals cooked out of hospitality. Sounds like a serious bias there.....armed guard for the countryside??? Seriously?? Wow....

Lots of nice history there and most isn’t taken care of due to costs. And there is just so much historical ruins that most countries would go broke trying to take care of that much. I sat on ruins of one of Alexander the Great’s castles and we cooked kebabs...amazing...and the hidden fresco’s in people’s backyards...coins everywhere when plowing fields, just don’t try to take them out of the country...lol. Nice place, but hopefully they don’t go too far over to radicalism.


25 posted on 02/22/2012 9:27:06 AM PST by sandboxshooter (Iraq, Afghanistan, War)
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26 posted on 02/22/2012 10:31:46 AM PST by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: sandboxshooter

Where do you get that information?

Lucky you. I lived there for 18 months, several friends were killed by the locals for reasons stated. Other things I witnessed or narrowly escaped.

They are good hosts because custom requires it. All our personnel were armed. Going in and out is not the same as living there.

Watched Turk military beat another Turk mil guy until his brains spread over the pavement ...

Street riot in Ankara was put down in 1967 with jets using napalm.

Yes I am bias, having lived it.

Unless the Military unseats the present government, they will go all the way. This is not too likely since Erdogan purged the Attaturk supporters and is working with Iran.


27 posted on 02/22/2012 11:17:17 AM PST by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
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To: PIF

So you were there before martial law. Those were definitely bad times, but nothing like that now. Very different situation on the ground. I did a tour in 83 during martial law and again 96-98 during the “soft” coup. And have lived there on and off since 2004 due to family living there. It’s a lot different now and was better and more cosmopolitan, but with Erdogan stirring up populism, I think it may get worse before better. The majority are NOT what you described...a vocal minority yes. It may be different for me somewhat since I also speak the language, but times are different than those days. They certainly are not the people you make them out to be. Those were different days.


28 posted on 02/22/2012 2:29:53 PM PST by sandboxshooter (Iraq, Afghanistan, War)
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To: katana
"as usual"? please tell my wife that! :-P

It's just that as i've travelled around, I notice that the "Turks" don't look like the Kirghiz etc. at all -- in fact they resemble Greeks or Armenians more with a touch of Semitics

The inter-mixing is also very correct

29 posted on 02/23/2012 7:11:54 AM PST by Cronos (Party like it's 12 20, 2012)
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