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Who is buried in the Hoover Dam?
IO9 ^ | March 16, 2012 | Keith Veronese

Posted on 03/31/2012 10:24:17 AM PDT by DogByte6RER

Who is buried in the Hoover Dam?

Hoover Dam at night.. Pictures, Images and Photos

The Hoover Dam is one of the most phenomenal structures in modern history. This 1244 feet long, 660 feet thick, and 726 feet high concrete behemoth holds back so much water that it deformed the earth's crust and caused 600 small earthquakes in the decade after its construction.

Over 100 workers died constructing the Hoover Dam — and legend has it, some of them are buried within its concrete facade. Is there anything to these rumors?

An enormous number of deaths -

Over 100 people died in the construction of the Hoover Dam. Of those, 96 are identified as official "industrial fatalities", allowing the deceased's family to obtain compensation. Not included in the 96 are individuals who died from from pneumonia, a diagnosis now believed to be a cover for exposure to high levels of carbon monoxide.

Those who died of pneumonia often worked with gasoline powered equipment in a 140 °F, poorly ventilated area. Claiming pneumonia as the cause of death allowed Six Companies, the body governing this massive construction undertaking, to pursue a loophole preventing the payment of death benefits to families. Interestingly, no locals died of pneumonia during this time.

Forming the Massive Concrete Blocks that made up the Hoover Dam -

To build the dam, enormous seven foot deep and seven foot wide buckets poured concrete into square and rectangular forms ranging from 25 by 25 feet to 25 by 60 feet.

Depending on the square-footage of the block needed, the concrete level would rise two to six inches after each pour, making it rather difficult to lose a worker in a small increase in depth. Falling into the concrete might become an issue, but the workers could easily be extracted before the concrete hardened.

Decaying bodies are an architectural issue -

If a body did make its way into the Hoover Dam, the point of burial would quickly become a weakness in the structural integrity of that particular concrete block.

A human body is less structurally sound than the same volume of concrete. And if the body experienced any sort of decay, an air pocket could form around the body, further decreasing the stability of the weak point. Both situations would lead to a considerable six foot long, two foot wide weak spot in the dam, and a major problem when trying to hold back millions of gallons of water.

In 1933, W.A. Jameson found himself on the wrong end of a tumult of recently poured concrete. When a concrete form gave way, the wet concrete slid down the side of the Hoover Dam, covering Anderson and at least one other worker. Anderson did not survive. Sixteen hours after the fatal accident, workers removed his body from the site.

Workers continue to speak of buried bodies -

Those constructing the Hoover Dam not only failed to squash rumors of individuals buried inside during construction, but often exacerbated the tales.

In the mid-1980s, Todd King, a University of Nevada Professor, conducted interviews with several individuals who worked on the Hoover Dam to learn the truth behind their accounts. Though some of the stories of burial told by the elderly gentlemen sounded plausible to King, not one of the workers interviewed witnessed a person purposefully buried amidst the construction of the Hoover Dam.

Six bodies buried in Montana's Fort Peck Dam -

While it seems like no one is buried in the Hoover Dam, a 1938 structural failure caused thirty-four workers to be buried in the debris of Montana's Fort Peck Dam. Eight of the thirty-four trapped workers died in the collapse. Recovery workers later located two of the eight bodies, with six bodies still entombed inside the dam today.

Structural integrity of the dam aside, it is eerily romantic to imagine that some of the deceased found their final resting place inside of the structure they worked so hard to create. Though no one is permanently buried inside the Hoover Dam, rumors of this fate is not unusual due to its enormous size and the sheer number of deaths associated with the dam's construction.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Conspiracy; History; Miscellaneous; Society; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: boulderdam; bureauofreclamation; civilengineering; coloradoriver; concrete; dam; graveyard; hooverdam; nevada; tomb; urbamlegend; urbanlegend; urbanmyth
Memorial for dead workers at Hoover Dam Pictures, Images and Photos

Memorial for dead workers at Hoover Dam

1 posted on 03/31/2012 10:24:28 AM PDT by DogByte6RER
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To: DogByte6RER

No one is buried in the concrete. Some of the concrete is still curing.


2 posted on 03/31/2012 10:27:58 AM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: DogByte6RER

That’s a huge mass of concrete. I wonder how many buried bodies there would have to be to make that structure 1% weaker than if it were 100% concrete.

I used to live in Las Vegas and have driven over that dam many times and taken the tour once or twice.

It is a truly impressive piece of engineering and construction.


3 posted on 03/31/2012 10:28:38 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: DogByte6RER
While it seems like no one is buried in the Hoover Dam, a 1938 structural failure caused thirty-four workers to be buried in the debris of Montana's Fort Peck Dam.

But that would make a lousy headline, so we went with "Who is buried in the Hoover Dam?" instead.

4 posted on 03/31/2012 10:28:47 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (Like Emmett Till, Trayvon Martin has become simply a stick with which to beat Whites.)
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To: DogByte6RER

Highwayman
I was a dam builder. Across the river deep and wide.
Where steel and water did collide
A place called Boulder on the wild Colorado
I slipped and fell into the wet concrete below
They buried me in that great tomb that knows no sound
But I am still around..I’ll always be around..and around and around and
around and around


5 posted on 03/31/2012 10:31:25 AM PDT by Deaf Smith
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To: DogByte6RER
"I was a dam builder across the river deep and wide
Where steel and water did collide
A place called Boulder on the wild Colorado
I slipped and fell into the wet concrete below
They buried me in that great tomb that knows no sound
But I am still around..I'll always be around..and around
and around and around and around"

Versethree from The Highwayman Johnny Cash, et. al.

6 posted on 03/31/2012 10:33:52 AM PDT by FairWitness (Everything is easy, once you've done it once)
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To: samtheman

First time I saw it years ago wondered why it wasn’t designated as one of the wonders of the world. Everytime I have seen it since I thank God for the people that existed during that time. If this were a project that needed to be built under today’s standards, it would never happen.


7 posted on 03/31/2012 10:33:52 AM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: DogByte6RER
Who is buried in the Hoover Dam?

Some guy named Hoover but I can't remember his first name....

8 posted on 03/31/2012 10:34:26 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (No matter what you post here, someone's going to get pissed off......)
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To: DogByte6RER
A human body is less structurally sound than the same volume of concrete.

What? I want a refund.

9 posted on 03/31/2012 10:35:08 AM PDT by bigheadfred (MY PET TAPEWORM (OBIWAN) IS AN INSANE MILITARY HATING LEFTIST)
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To: Deaf Smith

You beat me by 2 seconds.


10 posted on 03/31/2012 10:36:27 AM PDT by FairWitness (Everything is easy, once you've done it once)
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To: DogByte6RER
A human body is less structurally sound than the same volume of concrete. And if the body experienced any sort of decay, an air pocket could form around the body, further decreasing the stability of the weak point. Both situations would lead to a considerable six foot long, two foot wide weak spot in the dam, and a major problem when trying to hold back millions of gallons of water.

Based on this, Obama will condemn the dam and have it blown up, like he's done twice already.

11 posted on 03/31/2012 10:37:21 AM PDT by Peter W. Kessler (Dirt is for racing... asphalt is for getting there.)
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To: DogByte6RER

I remember seeing footage of those giant buckets pouring concrete into the forms at Hoover Dam on the History Channel.

IIRC, there was some discussion about ice being put into the concrete to hold down the temperature.


12 posted on 03/31/2012 10:37:39 AM PDT by sauropod (You can elect your very own tyranny - Mark Levin)
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To: DogByte6RER

Notice the crack in the cement.


13 posted on 03/31/2012 10:38:02 AM PDT by taterjay
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To: Deaf Smith
Great song. I imagine quite a few just fell to their deaths and some may have been swept away in the river before anyone could get to them.

classic

14 posted on 03/31/2012 10:38:32 AM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: DogByte6RER
behemoth holds back so much water that it deformed the earth's crust and caused 600 small earthquakes in the decade after its construction

Good thing they built it in the 30's -- it never would've gotten past EPA regs today.

Not to mention the exothermal curing still taking place, contributing to Global Warming...

15 posted on 03/31/2012 10:38:49 AM PDT by mikrofon (Jimmy Hoffa's Grandpa?)
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To: DogByte6RER

“The “official” number of fatalities involved in building Hoover Dam is 96. These were men who died at the dam site (classified as “industrial fatalities”) from such causes as drowning, blasting, falling rocks or slides, falls from the canyon walls, being struck by heavy equipment, truck accidents, etc. Industrial fatalities do not include deaths from heat, pneumonia, heart trouble, etc. “


16 posted on 03/31/2012 10:42:21 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: DogByte6RER
What did the fish say when it hit concrete?

Dam !!!

17 posted on 03/31/2012 11:00:16 AM PDT by al baby (Hi Mom)
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To: DogByte6RER

My Wife’s grandfather worked on the Lake Travis Mansfield dam in just outside Austin, TX.

He was very sick one day and his Wife demanded he stay home.

As it turns out, the guy who replaced him that day fell into the wet concrete as they poured it and that became his grave.


18 posted on 03/31/2012 11:03:47 AM PDT by wolfcreek (‘closed eye’ mentality is the reason for our current reality)
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To: taterjay

No but i did notice the crack in the concrete. You should know there is a difference. Pet peeve of mine. Sorry


19 posted on 03/31/2012 11:05:32 AM PDT by al baby (Hi Mom)
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To: sauropod

IIRC, there was some discussion about ice being put into the concrete to hold down the temperature.

Nope. Each cell of poured concrete had hundreds of feet of
cooling pipe that pumped chilled water to cool the exothermic
heat given off from the curing concrete. Each cell was interconnected until the concrete was exothermically stable.
I forget the actual number, but I think around several hundred
miles of cooling pipe are still embedded in the dam.


20 posted on 03/31/2012 11:08:25 AM PDT by OregonRancher (Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints)
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To: Deaf Smith; FairWitness

Love that song. I can listen to it again and again and again and again....


21 posted on 03/31/2012 11:16:41 AM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: DogByte6RER

Jimmy Hoffa?


22 posted on 03/31/2012 11:19:00 AM PDT by Former War Criminal (Who am I? Why am I here?)
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To: unkus

I went to school with a kid who said his grandfather was buried in the dam. But maybe it wasn’t the hoover dam.


23 posted on 03/31/2012 11:25:36 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: wolfcreek

While I don’t doubt the sincerity of all involved in your story, I can assure you that no one is buried in that dam. A rotting body makes for a weak spot in the structure. Anyone who fell into it was fished out, dead or alive.


24 posted on 03/31/2012 11:28:49 AM PDT by crghill (Silly Mormons, God is triune.)
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To: DogByte6RER
Megatron?


25 posted on 03/31/2012 11:54:22 AM PDT by Timber Rattler (Just say NO! to RINOS and the GOP-E)
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To: DogByte6RER

The chemical reaction of cement in a concrete mix ends after about 116 years. From then on the the concrete mix becomes inert and degrades.

It was figured the dam would become a huge sand pit after silting in after a hundred years and before the concrete could fail.


26 posted on 03/31/2012 12:21:21 PM PDT by Razzz42
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To: Razzz42
The chemical reaction of cement in a concrete mix ends after about 116 years. From then on the the concrete mix becomes inert and degrades.

So from 2050 on, people should be wary of being below the Dam, just damn man!

On another note, there are still die-hards that insist upon "Boulder Dam" as the name - something to do with a depression and FDR not getting the naming rights.

27 posted on 03/31/2012 12:31:21 PM PDT by SES1066 (Government is NOT the reason for my existance!)
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To: Hot Tabasco
Who is buried in the Hoover Dam?

Some guy named Hoover but I can't remember his first name....

That would be Robert Hoover, President of Delta Tau Chi.

28 posted on 03/31/2012 12:31:24 PM PDT by GreenHornet
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To: DogByte6RER

Fascinating!! Thanks for posting.


29 posted on 03/31/2012 12:48:09 PM PDT by Bon of Babble (The Road to Ruin is Always Kept in Good Repair)
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To: OregonRancher

From what I’ve read the cooling pipes were eventually pumped full of grout when it was determined they were no longer needed.


30 posted on 03/31/2012 12:49:12 PM PDT by dogcaller
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To: jocon307

I might be wrong.


31 posted on 03/31/2012 1:32:18 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: jocon307
I went to school with a kid who said his grandfather was buried in the dam.

You misunderstood him, I knew him too. What he said at that party was (and I was the only sober guy there) "My damn grandfather Hoover died and he was just buried....."

32 posted on 03/31/2012 2:16:10 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (No matter what you post here, someone's going to get pissed off......)
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To: GreenHornet

They confiscated everything, even the stuff we didn't steal!

33 posted on 03/31/2012 2:27:20 PM PDT by GreenLanternCorps ("Barack Obama" is Swahili for "Jimmy Carter".)
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To: unkus

Who knows? It was in Jr. High School and the kid was a bit of joker.

Supposably I had a great uncle who died in a beer vat. When first I heard the story I thought he had drowned, but later my mom told me that was wrong. It was worse than that. His job was to varnish the vats (these were huge vats, not for home brew) and while he was doing that it caught fire.

So, I don’t know, at this point I couldn’t be sure either of these stories are true.

One thing for sure, some poor bridge painter fell to his presumed death off the Throgs Neck Bridge yesterday.

RIP hard working men, we do appreciate what you do.


34 posted on 03/31/2012 2:34:46 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: DogByte6RER

Jimmy Hoffa?


35 posted on 03/31/2012 2:38:30 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: wolfcreek

The man killed that day by the cement was named Asa Grumbles. His family has confirmed a number of times throughout the years that although Grumbles was crushed by the cement, he was quickly fished out. His body was accurately identified by his two brothers, and he was buried at Fitzhugh Cemetery.

Grumbles was killed while filling in for a co-worker who had temporarily left to take a bathroom break.

http://www.peelinc-newsletters.com/www.peelinc.com/newsletters/0802SR.pdf


36 posted on 03/31/2012 2:53:35 PM PDT by demas415
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To: jocon307

Yes, the tales we hear and can weave. When I was about 12, I told all my friends my grandparents owned B F Goodrich tire company. My maternal grandparents were named Goodrich.

Yes, RIP to the hard working and special thoughts for your Uncle.


37 posted on 03/31/2012 5:15:45 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: SES1066

Not only Boulder/Hoover Dam but all concrete structures 100 years old or more will be in need of replacement. That why there is talk of dam and bridge replacement to keep our infrastructure from failing.

Wiki has many facts and is an interesting read in general reference, also touches on the naming controversy...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoover_Dam


38 posted on 03/31/2012 7:50:11 PM PDT by Razzz42
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To: unkus

Thanks!


39 posted on 03/31/2012 8:20:53 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: Razzz42

If your 100 year mark is accurate, why is the Pantheon still standing? It’s approaching 1,900 years.


40 posted on 03/31/2012 8:29:35 PM PDT by Professional Engineer (Never Again! Except for the next time.)
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To: Professional Engineer

You are an engineer and you are asking me?

Does the dome hold back 16 million acre feet of water? Does the dome take a constant traffic load including vibrations? Is the dome exposed to hot and cold extremes?

The dome material actually consists of lite weight aggregate which is supported by granite (stone) columns but of course you already knew that. Many (older) Roman roads and aqueducts still standing and some still in use.

Go back your trains.


41 posted on 03/31/2012 8:57:06 PM PDT by Razzz42
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To: DogByte6RER

Beautiful dam and art work.


42 posted on 04/02/2012 3:49:08 AM PDT by happygrl
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