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Archaeological finds reveal prehistoric civilization along Silk Road
Global Times ^ | July 25, 2013 | Xinhua

Posted on 07/27/2013 6:14:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Archaeologists have unearthed relics that suggest prehistoric humans lived along the Silk Road long before it was created about 2,000 years ago as a pivotal Eurasian trade network.

An excavation project that started in 2010 on ruins in northwest China's Gansu Province has yielded evidence that people who lived on the west bank of the Heihe River 4,100 to 3,600 years ago were able to grow crops and smelt copper, the researchers said.

The site is believed to date back to the Han Dynasty (202 BC - AD 220).

Over the past three years, archaeologists have discovered a variety of copper items, as well as equipment used to smelt metal, said Chen Guoke, a researcher with the Gansu Provincial Institute of Archaeology...

Chen added that a rare copper-smelting mill was also found in the ruins...

The researchers also discovered carbonized barley and wheat seeds, as well as stone hoes and knives used for farming, said Zhang, adding that some adobe houses were also found this year.

The finds indicate that east-west exchanges started prior to the Han Dynasty, as adobe architecture, barley and wheat originated in central and west Asia, according to Zhang...

From 2003 to 2005, archaeologists excavated the Xihetan ruins in Gansu's city of Jiuquan...

Footprints of the livestock and their skeletons were also found at the site.

In 2005, researchers from China and Japan completed a three-year excavation project at the Mozuizi ruins in Gansu's city of Wuwei, finding traces of a primitive tribe that lived about 4,500 years ago.

(Excerpt) Read more at globaltimes.cn ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: centralasia; china; gansu; godsgravesglyphs; handynasty; heiheriver; jiuquan; mozuizi; silkroad; victorsariyiannidis; viktorsarianidi; viktorsarigiannidis; wuwei; xihetan
(file from David Derrick files)

Archaeological finds reveal prehistoric civilization along Silk Road

1 posted on 07/27/2013 6:14:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

Seems like a good weekly Digest ping.

2 posted on 07/27/2013 6:17:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Ghengis Khan, in spite of his reputation, led to the silk road, the postal service and modern banking, not to mention kefir grains.


3 posted on 07/27/2013 6:17:34 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: SunkenCiv

Nice. Love archaeological stories.
However, there is a disconnect in the calculation in the article. It says the site dates from long before the silk road, which, it says, was built about 2000 years ago. Then it says the site dates from the Han Dynasty, which was at about that same time. Hmmmm...


4 posted on 07/27/2013 6:18:40 PM PDT by Migraine (Diversity is great -- until it happens to YOU..)
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To: gorush

It was also political propaganda. Whenever some ambassador or foreign representative cams a callin’, he’d have assistants continually eating raw meat, so,he’d have a blood-thirsty reputation.


5 posted on 07/27/2013 6:20:51 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: SunkenCiv

And I’m surprised because...???


6 posted on 07/27/2013 6:24:57 PM PDT by Monkey Face ( Jonah 2:8 ~~ They that observe lying vanities forsake thier own mercy, KJV)
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To: SunkenCiv

Cool discovery. I’m surprised the discovery of King David’s palace has not made the news more.


7 posted on 07/27/2013 6:28:17 PM PDT by Viennacon
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To: SunkenCiv

I’ll bet they found drawings of Cher.


8 posted on 07/27/2013 6:29:22 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: Migraine
Right. Somebody confused.

people who lived on the west bank of the Heihe River 4,100 to 3,600 years ago ...

(202 BC - AD 220).

Which would be 2,200 years ago.

9 posted on 07/27/2013 6:33:40 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: gorush

Genghis Khan hadn’t committed his first murder (his half-brother) or mass-murdered his first rival tribe until the Silk Road was more than 1200 years old.


10 posted on 07/27/2013 6:43:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Migraine; Sherman Logan

There are two different finds — one of them dates to the Han Dynasty, during which time maritime trade between the Roman Empire and the Chinese Empire became pretty regular, and the second find is from 2500 BC. The source here is Xinhua, so it’s an ESL success story.


11 posted on 07/27/2013 6:45:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Viennacon

Archaeologists say they uncovered King David’s Palace
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3045203/posts

3,000-year-old palace in Israel linked to biblical King David
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3045351/posts


12 posted on 07/27/2013 6:47:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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Kushan Empire (ca. 2nd century B.C.–3rd century A.D.)
Metropolitan Museum of Art | circa 2013 | MMA
Posted on 07/21/2013 10:08:33 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3045606/posts


13 posted on 07/27/2013 6:49:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Oh sure, there’s that. But if not for Ghengis and his progeny, the black death would never have decimated Europe. :{)


14 posted on 07/27/2013 6:49:33 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush

:’D


15 posted on 07/27/2013 6:59:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Sherman Logan; SunkenCiv

Yes, which dates are right?


16 posted on 07/27/2013 7:02:11 PM PDT by Berosus (I wish I had as much faith in God as liberals have in government.)
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To: SunkenCiv

There has been speculation, unfortunately probably untrue, that Roman troops captured in Crassus’ disastrous defeat by the Parthians fought against Han troops around 35 BC.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Zhizhi

How cool would that be?!


17 posted on 07/27/2013 7:12:32 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: SunkenCiv

The Silk Road repeatedly opened and closed over the centuries depending on the vagaries of conquest along the route.

Given the enormous transport costs and risks, only the very highest value and lowest weight/bulk goods could be traded this way.


18 posted on 07/27/2013 7:14:40 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks.


19 posted on 07/27/2013 7:24:25 PM PDT by Migraine (Diversity is great -- until it happens to YOU..)
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To: SunkenCiv

bump


20 posted on 07/27/2013 7:25:26 PM PDT by GeronL
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To: gorush

It’s a good thing Marco Polo wrote all about this. /s


21 posted on 07/27/2013 7:49:49 PM PDT by CaliforniaNative
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To: Sherman Logan

The route was lucrative, and fought over, wound up ruled by a succession of different conquerors who came and went, and all the time it was open, but the costs varied based on how many payoffs and to whom they had to be paid.

As a trade route, it was open for lapis lazuli, Indus Valley beadwork, obsidian, and a variety of other items going on back into prehistoric times. Chinese Silk wasn’t available until about 500 BC.


22 posted on 07/27/2013 8:24:47 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Berosus

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3048123/posts?page=11#11


23 posted on 07/27/2013 8:26:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Sherman Logan

we’ve got some topics about that. :’)

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/romansinchina/index


24 posted on 07/27/2013 8:28:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Frequently it was closed because the costs exceeded the value of the items transported.

Nomadic tribes are not always renowned for understanding the long-term financial benefits of imposing “taxes” instead of just killing the traders and taking ALL their stuff.


25 posted on 07/27/2013 8:32:20 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanx!


26 posted on 07/27/2013 8:34:07 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Migraine

My pleasure.


27 posted on 07/27/2013 8:51:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Interesting!


28 posted on 07/27/2013 8:58:50 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: SunkenCiv

You have posted many articles about the Urumchi mummies and related discoveries that emphasize that the Silk Route grew up along an East - West melding of cultures. The Aryians moved into India from northern Persia as well. A lot more to learn about the lands along the Route.


29 posted on 07/27/2013 11:36:39 PM PDT by JimSEA
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To: SunkenCiv

I can also recall some speculation that China’s remarkable bronze culture came from along the Silk Road which would make the copper smelting at this site more important. Finally, the introduction of the horse and chariot warriors from Central Asia comes to mind from the time periods represented in these ruins.


30 posted on 07/27/2013 11:43:41 PM PDT by JimSEA
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To: JimSEA; blam

Thanks JS, I think blam posted the Urumchi mummy topics, or at least most of ‘em. :’)


31 posted on 07/28/2013 2:25:35 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: gorush

I’ve read where some of the more isolated places places along the silk road today are littered with trash from 1000-2000 years ago.


32 posted on 07/28/2013 5:17:28 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post):)
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To: gorush

“But if not for Ghengis and his progeny, the black death would never have decimated Europe.”

I’d like to hear more about that.


33 posted on 07/28/2013 5:20:49 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post):)
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To: SunkenCiv

Isn’t this article belaboring the obvious? Of course there were sites where communities grew up and flourished and were later connected by what is called the ‘Silk Road.’

After all, that’s what roads are for. They are pathways and short cuts between towns and cities for people who want to travel from one civilized area to another.

You simply don’t have archeological ‘finds’ of roads that lead nowhere or are between two meaningless geological points.

What’s next? An grant-holding archeologist finding amazing evidence that prehistoric towns and cities occurred at sites where water is found or where shallow water made fording a stream feasible?.

Sometimes the intellectual quality of the logic of scholars is absolutely breathtaking.


34 posted on 07/28/2013 6:59:35 AM PDT by wildbill
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To: Rebelbase

There is a good book on the subject, “Ghengis Khan and the Making of the Modern World” by Jack Weatherford. The monguls swept all the way to Europe which made the way safe for trade, resulting in postal delivery and modern banking. Unfortunately it also resulted in the transport of fleas from China that carried the black plague. I guess you’ve gotta take the bad with the good.


35 posted on 07/28/2013 7:28:07 AM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush

So the plague swept from east to west. I guess the first Euro cities hit would be those on the Mediterranean and possibly Moscow?


36 posted on 07/28/2013 7:32:03 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post):)
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To: wildbill

We're lucky to hear anything of a scientific nature coming from Central Asia; even the stuff from China is barely disguised public relations pieces. :')
37 posted on 07/28/2013 8:46:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Rebelbase

The Plague arrived by ship, stowed away on rats who spread it in Constantinople; it came from India — where it persists today — with which there was indirect trade via the monsoon winds and muzzie ships. There’s evidence that the infamous outbreaks during the Middle Ages were by no means the first ones in Europe, and they probably arrived the same way — during the so-called Dark Ages the already-ancient trade with India continued, and the Byzantine merchants traded all over the former Roman Empire, including Britain and into the Baltic.


38 posted on 07/28/2013 8:51:19 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: gorush; All

Spent the last hour and half watching his video of two guys from Queens who retraced Marco Polo’s route in the early 90’s.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmAuJ4Y7Aa0

This thread has been a great way to spend a Saturday morning.


39 posted on 07/28/2013 9:05:44 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post):)
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To: gorush

Oops, meant to say Sunday morning.


40 posted on 07/28/2013 9:06:09 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post):)
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To: SunkenCiv; JimSEA
"Thanks JS, I think blam posted the Urumchi mummy topics, or at least most of ‘em. :’)"

Yup.

The Asian skeletial remains (Han Chinese) only began to show up in the Urumchi area around 200BC. There were still Caucasian only grave yards in that area into the 1300's.

41 posted on 07/28/2013 10:35:51 AM PDT by blam
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