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How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese
npr ^ | November 7, 2012 | Allison Aubrey

Posted on 11/09/2013 4:31:29 AM PST by NYer


Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene.

The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.

Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.

In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?

Well, not really. Centuries ago in England, lots of cheeses had a natural yellowish-orange pigment. The cheese came from the milk of certain breeds of cows, such as Jersey and Guernsey. Their milk tends to be richer in color from beta-carotene in the grass they eat.

So, when the orange pigment transferred to the cow's milk, and then to the cheese, it was considered a mark of quality.
"Cows on the grassy hillsides of Shelburne Farms in Vermont."

But here's where the story gets interesting.

Cheese expert Paul Kindstedt of the University of Vermont explains that back in the 17th century, many English cheesemakers realized that they could make more money if they skimmed off the cream — to sell it separately or make butter from it.

But in doing so, most of the color was lost, since the natural orange pigment is carried in the fatty cream.

So, to pass off what was left over — basically low-fat cheese made from white milk — as a high-quality product, the cheesemakers faked it.

"The cheesemakers were initially trying to trick people to mask the white color [of their cheese]," explains Kindstedt.

They began adding coloring from saffron, marigold, carrot juice and later, annatto, which comes from the seeds of a tropical plant. (It's also what Kraft will use to color its new varieties of macaroni and cheese.)

The devious cheesemakers of the 17th century used these colorings to pass their products off as the full-fat, naturally yellowish-orange cheese that Londoners had come to expect.

The tradition of coloring cheese then carried over in the U.S. Lots of cheesemakers in Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin and New York have a long history of coloring cheddar.

The motivation was part tradition, part marketing to make their cheeses stand out. There was another reason, too: It helped cheesemakers achieve a uniform color in their cheeses.

But Kindstedt says it's not a tradition that ever caught on in New England dairy farms.

"Here in New England there was a disdain for brightly colored cheese," Kindstedt says.

And that's why to this day, we still see lots of naturally white cheddar cheese from places such as Vermont.

With the boom in the artisanal food movement, we're starting to see more cheese produced from grass-fed cows.

And as a result, we may notice the butterlike color in summer cheeses — similar to what the 17th century Londoners ate.

"We absolutely see the color changes when the cows transition onto pasture in early May," cheesemaker Nat Bacon of Shelburne Farms in Vermont wrote to us in an email. He says it's especially evident "in the whey after we cut the curd, and also in the finished cheese. Both get quite golden in color, kind of like straw, with the beta-carotenes the cows are eating in the fresh meadow grasses."


TOPICS: Food; History
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; cheddar; cheese; cheesemaking; dietandcuisine; godsgravesglyphs; history; newengland
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1 posted on 11/09/2013 4:31:29 AM PST by NYer
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To: SunkenCiv

Ping!


2 posted on 11/09/2013 4:31:57 AM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: NYer

Now we have a 21st century fraud pushing government cheese.


3 posted on 11/09/2013 4:36:48 AM PST by listenhillary (Courts, law enforcement, roads and national defense should be the extent of government)
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To: NYer

At my local supermarket here in Russia, they started selling Irish cheddar cheese (imported). They had white and orange (Coloured) cheese. I bought a block of each. I preferred the orange cheddar because it was softer and sliced better. The “natural” white tended to crumble when cut...


4 posted on 11/09/2013 4:41:03 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
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To: NYer

The interesting thing is that the beta carotene is found inside the chloroplasts, which means that the greener the plant, the more chloroplasts. And alongside the beta carotene inside the chloroplasts is vitamin K1, which most animals can convert into K2.

The result is that the more beta carotene in the butter or cheese or egg yolks, the more vitamin K2 it contains. Butter and cheese and egg yolks from animals that never eat freshly growing green plants are pale, unless artificially died, and are almost entirely lacking in K2.

Which is why the Standard American Diet is almost entirely lacking in K2, because nearly all of the butter and eggs and cheese are from animals that are fed grains.

And since it’s K2 that activates the hormones responsible for calcium deposition. One is responsible for pulling calcium out of the blood and into bones and teeth, and the other for removing calcium from soft tissues and putting it back into circulation.

In other words, it was the move to feeding animals on grains that was the primary reason for the massive increase in both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis during the 20th century.

Weston Price had figured all of this out, 70 years ago. Consumption of high-quality animal fats - from animals that are grazing on grass, not on grains, is essential to human health.


5 posted on 11/09/2013 4:45:32 AM PST by jdege
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To: jdege

Very interesting post. Are there any foods naturally high in K2?


6 posted on 11/09/2013 4:54:56 AM PST by Thebaddog (Obamacare! We are so screwed.)
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To: Cowboy Bob

The Kerrygold brand?


7 posted on 11/09/2013 4:57:44 AM PST by deadrock (I am someone else.)
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To: jdege

Fascinating! Does this lend credence to the difference in purchasing “free range” chickens?


8 posted on 11/09/2013 4:58:07 AM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: jdege

Quite interesting. Thanks for the info.


9 posted on 11/09/2013 5:00:04 AM PST by deadrock (I am someone else.)
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To: NYer

Ain’t that the cheese!


10 posted on 11/09/2013 5:00:48 AM PST by MarDav
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To: deadrock

I don’t think it was Kerrygold. (I looked at Kerrygold’s lable on google, and didn’t recognize it). Unfortunately, I’ve eaten all the cheese, so I’ve no package to look at.

I’ll probably get more the next time I go shopping and can post the brand if you’re curious.

BTW, cheddar is not really popular in Russia. Not sure why...


11 posted on 11/09/2013 5:10:42 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
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To: NYer

The margarine people must have learned this from the cheese makers. Margarine without coloring looks like white like a slab of lard.


12 posted on 11/09/2013 5:11:57 AM PST by BuffaloJack (Gun Control is the Key to totalitarianism and genocide.)
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To: NYer

Allright, who cut the cheese?


13 posted on 11/09/2013 5:12:23 AM PST by Joe Bfstplk
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To: NYer; mikrofon; Charles Henrickson

Ich bin ein Limburger.


14 posted on 11/09/2013 5:12:28 AM PST by martin_fierro (Whey to go)
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To: FReepers


Click the Pic


Support Free Republic

15 posted on 11/09/2013 5:21:48 AM PST by deoetdoctrinae (Gun-free zones are playgrounds for felons.)
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To: jdege

The War on Fats, in general, has not been good for people.

Though now portrayed as bad, fats are an essential part of our diet, and always have been. Fats are the most concentrated form of energy, and even some vitamins can only dissolve in fat.

Yes, the artificial (hydrogenated) fats are not so good for us, but the natural ones present in plants and animals are - and necessary.


16 posted on 11/09/2013 5:25:26 AM PST by canuck_conservative
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To: jdege
Thanks for the contributing that dialog. Fascinating to me on so many levels. I am on coumadin(blood thinner) because I had pulmonary embolism in the lungs, that can be traced back to a clot in my calf. Anyway, do you know where I can get more info on vitamin k enriched foods? I am supposed to avoid vitamin k because its a anti caligmate. I love cheese, eat eggs and such, I'm wondering if I should avoid that now. I was told by a nutritionist to avoid leafy greens and cranberry. Thanks again for your insightful post.
17 posted on 11/09/2013 5:25:35 AM PST by guyfromjrz (fresh breath, it speaks for itself.)
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To: Cowboy Bob

I was just curious. It is the only K2 cheese I can get at my locale. And the fact that a small dairy cartel can ship to either ends of the earth, even in the age of sonic shipping, gives a sense of wonder.


18 posted on 11/09/2013 5:32:53 AM PST by deadrock (I am someone else.)
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To: Thebaddog
Are there any foods naturally high in K2?

There are two sources. Herbivores can make it out of fresh grass, so you can find it in their fats - in the butter of grass-fed cows, in the spring and early summer, and in the egg yolks of pastured chickens, in goose liver pates, etc. And certain fermenting bacteria can make it, so you find it in certain cheeses (brie and gouda), and in this nasty fermented soybean mess called Natto, that the Japanese eat for breakfast.

The low-fat crowd looks at the French and wonders why they don't get heart disease, despite their high-fat diet. The low-carb crowd looks at the Japanese and wonders why they don't get heart disease, despite their high-carb diet. Maybe it's not how much of one vs. the other you eat, but whether the foods you are eating is rich in K2?

19 posted on 11/09/2013 5:35:59 AM PST by jdege
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To: guyfromjrz
K1 is essential to blood clotting. Up until a few years ago, we thought that K2 was simply an alternate form of K1. That turns out not to have been the case.

On the Trail of the Elusive X-Factor: A Sixty-Two-Year-Old Mystery Finally Solved

Latest Study on Vitamin K and Coronary Heart Disease

What You Need to Know About Vitamin K2, D and Calcium

The Mystery of X-Factor Butter Oil and Vitamin K2: Solved

20 posted on 11/09/2013 5:43:38 AM PST by jdege
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To: NYer
***Fascinating! Does this lend credence to the difference in purchasing “free range” chickens?***

our free range chickens lay eggs with very yellow, almost orange yokes. I've read that professional egg farms feed their chickens a derivative from the marigold, high is saffron, to keep the yokes yellow.

There is a trade off for free range chickens. We loose many to predators.

21 posted on 11/09/2013 7:03:47 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
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To: jdege

My cardiologist does not want me to eat foods high in K. I have an artificial heart valve which requires very thin blood to keep me from having a heart attack or stroke.

I am on a high dosage of warfarin (rat poison). So, when a blood test shows too much thinning, I am allowed to eat some broccoli, or CHEETOS!


22 posted on 11/09/2013 7:08:15 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
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To: jdege

Thank you, fascinating.


23 posted on 11/09/2013 7:29:41 AM PST by txhurl ('The DOG ate my homework. That homework, too. ALL my homework. OK?' - POSHITUS)
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To: martin_fierro; NYer; Charles Henrickson

Fromage to age, cheese production has been a gouda cottage industry ....


24 posted on 11/09/2013 8:25:06 AM PST by mikrofon (Orange you glad clicked here?)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
If you've had a heart-valve replacement, concerns about clotting are very real. OTOH, warfarin increases atherosclerosis. K prevents atherosclerosis, but increases clotting. It's a very delicate balance, that needs close monitoring by someone who really understands the issues.

Vitamin K & Warfarin

25 posted on 11/09/2013 10:03:13 AM PST by jdege
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To: jdege

Warfarin

Is that a Call of Duty game?


26 posted on 11/09/2013 10:04:30 AM PST by GeronL
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To: mikrofon

“The Devious Cheesemakers” is a good name for a band.


27 posted on 11/09/2013 5:01:09 PM PST by SoothingDave
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To: NYer; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ..

Thanks NYer. Marketing has been the common characteristic fromage to age. ;')

28 posted on 11/09/2013 10:24:55 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: NYer

"I want to buy some cheese."

29 posted on 11/09/2013 10:27:37 PM PST by dfwgator (Fire Muschamp.)
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To: jdege

Thanks for this. I try to eat as healthy as possible because well, Obamacare sure ain’t gonna be there to have our backs. Never heard of this before, will check the links.


30 posted on 11/09/2013 10:32:27 PM PST by Free Vulcan (Vote Republican! You can vote Democrat when you're dead...)
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To: dfwgator
"I want to buy some cheese."

And then it began, LOL.

Very funny skit and aggravating at the same time.

31 posted on 11/09/2013 10:35:10 PM PST by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin, Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Louie Gohmert......Nuff said.)
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To: GeronL
Warfarin

Is that a Call of Duty game?

That would be rat poison.

32 posted on 11/09/2013 10:40:32 PM PST by cynwoody
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To: guyfromjrz

Here’s a link to some information from the National Institutes of Health about coumadin and vitamin K (including a list of foods) . . . I think it’s saying that you can eat foods rich in vitamin K, as long as you are consistent from day to day . . . because your dosage of coumadin can be adjusted to be in balance with your diet, including your intake of vitamin K, and levels are validated through regular blood tests.

http://www.cc.nih.gov/ccc/patient_education/drug_nutrient/coumadin1.pdf

What should I remember about warfarin (Coumadin) and vitamin K?

1. Follow your prescription exactly, and keep your follow-up appointments for blood tests such as the INR/PT. Warfarin (Coumadin) is a very important drug for you.

2. Keep vitamin K intake constant from day to day because warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with vitamin K in your body.

3. Avoid herbal products and dietary supplements that may affect vitamin K and warfarin (Coumadin) unless approved by a qualified health care provider.


33 posted on 11/10/2013 1:14:38 AM PST by deks
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Years ago, a former neighbor would put about 100 chickens out in his pasture every spring; they roosted in the barn. By fall he’d only have 20 or 30 left. When he would put them out, I’d rib him about having just refilled his coyote feeder.


34 posted on 11/10/2013 1:28:48 AM PST by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: GeronL

No; Warfarin is a Star Fleet officer.


35 posted on 11/10/2013 1:30:47 AM PST by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: NYer

This is an interesting piece. I am a cheese eater.

My wife somehow bought some Cabot Vermont extra sharp cheddar. Wow!! it is goood. It is white.

The question in my mind was...... how or why do they make it white?

Now I know.


36 posted on 11/10/2013 4:58:05 AM PST by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: deadrock

Was at the supermarket today, and checked out the brand of Cheddar. While it was made in Northern Ireland, the company that produces it is actually Danish! The company is named Uhrenholt, and the brand is Emborg.


37 posted on 11/10/2013 5:27:35 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
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To: NYer

Absolutely. The flesh of true ‘free range’ chickens is reddish=purple from eating worms.

Be leery of fake ‘free range’ chickens with white meat.


38 posted on 11/10/2013 7:29:25 AM PST by wildbill
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To: NYer

Absolutely. The flesh of true ‘free range’ chickens is reddish=purple from eating worms.

Be leery of fake ‘free range’ chickens with white meat.


39 posted on 11/10/2013 7:30:20 AM PST by wildbill
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To: The Cajun

Man in crowd: He said, “Blessed are the cheesemakers.”

woman in crowd: “Cheesemakers? What’s so blessed about them?”


40 posted on 11/10/2013 7:34:47 AM PST by wildbill
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

I call my grandkid’s eggs survivor chicken eggs because of all the chickens they have lost to predators. They even had vultures attack & kill their chickens.

Pumpkins are a good winter feed for laying chickens. Brings back the nice colored yokes & helps keep up the laying.


41 posted on 11/10/2013 8:42:27 AM PST by Cold Heart
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To: Cowboy Bob

How does it compare to Russian cheese?


42 posted on 11/10/2013 10:35:31 AM PST by Eaker (Sweat dries, blood clots and bones heal so suck it up buttercup.)
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To: Eaker
Most of the Russian cheeses I've eaten are rather bland. They are basically copies of other cheeses. For example, they have something called "Gollandski." (The Russians don't have a "H" in their alphabet, so they substitute "G") So, Gollandski = Hollandski. There is also "Russian Cheese." I stay away from these standard cheeses.

A local cheese where I live is Circassian cheese. It is similar to mozzarella. Until recently, most of the local pizza cafes would use this cheese because mozzarella was not available. They have imported a lot of German made cheeses for years - Gouda, Maasdam, Tilsiter and Edam have been popular.

Now, though, cheese is being imported from other countries. We're getting cheeses from all over Europe, and even New Zealand!

43 posted on 11/10/2013 11:04:25 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
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To: Cowboy Bob

On my recent European trip, I got to visit the town of Edam, and got to sample the local cheeses, it was fantastic.


44 posted on 11/10/2013 11:07:51 AM PST by dfwgator (Fire Muschamp.)
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To: dfwgator
In 1984, I was an exchange student living in Delft, Holland. Every Thursday was a Farmers Market. Stalls were set up in the town square, and up and down the surrounding roads/canals. I was buying fresh cheese - Gouda and Edam every week.

The Dutch students we were living with had a standing order of having 8 cases of Heineken delivered to our living quarters (2nd & 3rd floors of a townhouse) every week. (there were 5 of us living there).

Needless to say, I love the Dutch!

45 posted on 11/10/2013 11:31:12 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
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To: jdege

Very interesting. Is it just cows that have this K2 in their milk or is it found in goat milk (for instance) and other ruminants? I don’t have enough land for a cow, but have thought of getting a couple goats.


46 posted on 11/10/2013 11:35:33 AM PST by Betis70
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To: jdege

Wow! Thank you for that info.

Could the grain feeding also be a contributor to the obesity epidemic, I wonder.


47 posted on 11/10/2013 2:23:54 PM PST by Bigg Red (Let me hear what God the LORD will speak. -Ps85)
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To: BuffaloJack

The margarine people must have learned this from the cheese makers. Margarine without coloring looks like white like a slab of lard.

***
Back in the late 1940s or very early 1950s, margarine came with a coloring packet of some sort. I do not remember it, but my older sisters remember getting the job of mixing the coloring in.


48 posted on 11/10/2013 2:28:00 PM PST by Bigg Red (Let me hear what God the LORD will speak. -Ps85)
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To: Bigg Red

bttt


49 posted on 11/10/2013 2:40:21 PM PST by txhurl ('The DOG ate my homework. That homework, too. ALL my homework. OK?' - POSHITUS)
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To: mikrofon

Curd I say that you’re having whey too much fun with the puns? I just swiss you lots more good tommes.


50 posted on 11/10/2013 3:08:38 PM PST by Bigg Red (Let me hear what God the LORD will speak. -Ps85)
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