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Find Of Roman Coins Shows Ancient Britons In A New Light
The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-26-2007

Posted on 02/25/2007 6:07:08 PM PST by blam

Find of Roman coin shows ancient Britons in a new light

By Daily Telegraph Reporter
Last Updated: 1:34am GMT 26/02/2007

Experts are excited about a rare coin unearthed by an amateur treasure hunter which could change the accepted ancient history of Britain.

The silver denarius which dates back to the Roman Republic — before Julius Caesar made Rome an empire — was unearthed near Fowey in Cornwall.

Dating from 146 BC, it shows how ancient Britons were trading with the Romans well before the country was conquered in AD 43.

"It proves that there was a lot more going on between the continent and ourselves," said Anna Tyacke, Finds Liaison Officer at the Royal Cornwall Museum.

Cornwall had trade significance because of the tin and copper it produced, but that economic activity is not well documented before the third century AD.

Coins were relatively rare, of high value and often stayed in circulation for more than 100 years — which makes dating the find harder.

Sam Moorhead, Finds Adviser of Iron Age and Roman coins at the British Museum, said: "It may have been the wages of a Roman legionnaire, who earned about 300 denarii a year in the Roman imperial period — after the conquest.

"You could probably have got about eight loaves of bread for a coin like this, or eight litres of wine.

"Vineyard labourers would have earned between a half and one denarius a day. Whereas to be a senator you had to have at least 250,000 denarii in the bank."

The silver coin was minted in Rome and carries the likeness of Roma wearing a winged helmet, plus the name of a Caius Antestius, its maker.

"Roma is a personification of Rome, rather like Britannia is a personification of Britain," Mr Moorhead explained.

The reverse of the coin carries a picture on horseback of the mythological twins Castor and Pollux, who were believed to have helped the Romans in battle.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ancient; briton; coin; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; roman; romanempire

1 posted on 02/25/2007 6:07:12 PM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

FYI.


2 posted on 02/25/2007 6:07:37 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
"It proves that there was a lot more going on between the continent and ourselves,"

It proves that one coin made it to the island.

3 posted on 02/25/2007 6:09:50 PM PST by TheErnFormerlyKnownAsBig (Life is tough. It's even tougher when you're stupid.)
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To: blam

Could have been from a Roman who was a coin collector.In which case the dating had better come from something other than the coin!


4 posted on 02/25/2007 6:16:09 PM PST by Nateman (Socialism , the real global menace threatening mankind!)
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To: blam

Very cool!

Are there pics?


5 posted on 02/25/2007 6:17:57 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: Nateman

If the coin is stamped 146 B.C., it's probably a fake.


6 posted on 02/25/2007 6:19:50 PM PST by scrabblehack
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To: BenLurkin
"Are there pics?"

Not yet. They'll probably turn up tomorrow on the archaeological sites.

7 posted on 02/25/2007 6:22:54 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

The Pheonicians were trading in Cornwall centuries before the Romans. What's the big deal?


8 posted on 02/25/2007 6:30:01 PM PST by since 1854 (http://grandoldpartisan.typepad.com)
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To: TheErnFormerlyKnownAsBig

Recon.


9 posted on 02/25/2007 6:40:10 PM PST by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: blam
Dating from 146 BC, it shows how ancient Britons were trading with the Romans well before the country was conquered in AD 43.

It shows nothing of the sort. It only shows that Roman coins had made it to Briton. Coins are coins, a medium of exchange. Somebody who traded with Romans, in turn traded with somebody, and the end of the chain winds up in Briton

10 posted on 02/25/2007 6:45:14 PM PST by SauronOfMordor (Never try to teach a pig to sing -- it wastes your time and it annoys the pig)
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To: PzLdr
Probably got swept up by a fish that eventually got caught by a fisherman.

Or recon for Marklar.

11 posted on 02/25/2007 6:51:04 PM PST by TheErnFormerlyKnownAsBig (Life is tough. It's even tougher when you're stupid.)
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To: blam

Not so shocking.

Caesar says the Gauls had ships with no oars that dwarfed their triremes.


12 posted on 02/25/2007 6:59:02 PM PST by <1/1,000,000th%
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To: blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...
Thanks Blam.
Dating from 146 BC, it shows how ancient Britons were trading with the Romans well before the country was conquered in AD 43... Cornwall had trade significance because of the tin and copper it produced, but that economic activity is not well documented before the third century AD. Coins were relatively rare, of high value and often stayed in circulation for more than 100 years — which makes dating the find harder.
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
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13 posted on 02/25/2007 7:04:54 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
Why would this be a surprise? We know the non-Roman world was more sophisticated than the Roman historians were willing to concede. The Brits has something valuable to sell - tin - and Roman world was quite willing to buy it. And there were no Socialists or mercantilists around to try to stop world trade.
14 posted on 02/25/2007 7:11:38 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: scrabblehack
Right--anything using Arabic numerals at that time would have to be a fake.

The date is from the name of the official (monetal or moneyer) C. Antestius. T.R.S. Broughton's Magistrates of the Roman Republic puts him between 137 and 134 B.C., but that work was published in 1952, and perhaps new information has come out since then to show that he was actually in office in 146 B.C.

15 posted on 02/25/2007 7:12:37 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: blam

It further shows that Rome used diplomacy and made deals with foreign leaders whenever possible. Propaganda and diplomacy have been emphasized in Latin culture throughout recorded history. Recent UK columns are a more contemporary example of the same.


16 posted on 02/25/2007 7:28:49 PM PST by familyop
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To: scrabblehack

***If the coin is stamped 146 B.C., it's probably a fake. ***

It's legit if it's BCE.;-)


17 posted on 02/25/2007 7:34:50 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar
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To: colorado tanker
It's not surprising to me, except insofar that valuable items are generally only lost to the one who loses them, and scooped up by whomever happens along. :')

A year or so ago there was an expression of surprise that Roman stuff from before Emperor Claudius, but Caesar had already established connections on the island before his two short forays. Much of Britain was conquered during Claudius' reign. Agricola nearly finished up in Scotland but was recalled for execution by Nero. Nero was overthrown and three others in the same year before Vespasian, Claudius' artillery man in Britain, succeeded to the purple.
 
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18 posted on 02/25/2007 7:34:59 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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The Romans in Ireland
Archaeology Today | 2000? | L.A. Curchin
Posted on 07/18/2004 11:54:58 PM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1173950/posts


19 posted on 02/25/2007 7:35:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam

It may prove that Romans from a later period carried old coins.

Duh!


20 posted on 02/25/2007 7:39:58 PM PST by Poser (Willing to fight for oil)
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To: SunkenCiv
If you're interested in historical fiction, there are the Marcus Didius Falco mysteries set during Vespasian's reign. Falco and Vespasian were both rough-cut get to the heart of it sort of guys, but his relationship with Titus was complicated, since Titus had the hots for his gal.
21 posted on 02/25/2007 7:40:38 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: Verginius Rufus

In Brian Sykes book, "Saxons, Vikings And Celts", he thinks he's found a small DNA group that he believes could relate to the Roman occupation.


22 posted on 02/25/2007 7:42:31 PM PST by blam
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To: since 1854

Well put.


23 posted on 02/25/2007 7:49:06 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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maybe someone lost his change on the way back from the takeaway:

Boadicea May Have Had Her Chips On Site Of McDonald's
The Telegraph (UK) | 5-25-2006 | Nick Britten
Posted on 05/24/2006 11:59:01 PM EDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1637917/posts

Romans went to war on diet of pizza, dig shows.
The Scotsman | Mon 26 Aug 2002 | John Innes
Posted on 08/26/2002 5:20:42 PM EDT by vannrox
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So How Far Did The Phoenicians Really Go In The Region?
Daily Star | 2-23-2004 | Peter Speetjens
Posted on 02/23/2004 8:55:51 AM PST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1083750/posts

and in the east:

Roman relics found near Elephanta
Daily News & Analysis | Friday, September 15, 2006 | Ninad D Sheth
Posted on 09/15/2006 3:58:33 PM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1702259/posts

Tamil Trade
INTAMM | 1997 | Xavier S. Thani Nayagam
Posted on 09/11/2004 8:07:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1213591/posts

Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Maritime Spice Route Between India, Egypt
Popular Science | 2-8-2004
Posted on 02/08/2004 3:57:17 PM EST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1074033/posts

Herodotus' History
The History: Thalia, the Internet Classics Archive | 440 B.C. | Herodotus, tr by George Rawlinson
Posted on 09/09/2004 10:31:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1211770/posts

The Voyage around the Erythraean Sea
Silk Road | 2004 | William H. Schoff
Posted on 09/12/2004 10:55:44 PM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1214273/posts

Eusebius' Onomasticon: Geographical Knowledge in Byzantine Palestine
Palestine Exploration Fund | 17 March, 2004, Last modified 30 April, 2004 | Joan E. Taylor and Rupert L. Chapman
Posted on 01/01/2005 4:36:08 AM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1311964/posts


24 posted on 02/25/2007 8:03:58 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
Agricola's service in Britain was from 77 to 84--under Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. He was recalled after his victory at the Mons Graupius and his circumnavigation of Britain, but lived on until A.D. 93.

The historian Tacitus was his son-in-law which is why we know a lot about him.

25 posted on 02/25/2007 8:16:38 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: blam
Someday, some historian may say the same about us: We traded with China, let them infiltrate our economy and government( the Clintons), and they eventually invaded and conquered us.
26 posted on 02/25/2007 8:17:12 PM PST by zeller the zealot (Are Republicans the Party of Life, or is that too risky?)
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Lucca's Roman past revealed
ANSA | March 30 2006
Posted on 03/30/2006 12:34:39 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1606221/posts

"Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of a Roman presence long before the traditonal date of Roman settlement in 180 BCE - corroborating Roman historian Livy's account of the great Carthaginian general Hannibal passing through Lucca in 217 BCE... The discovery came after other finds last year which highlighted how Lucca thrived because of its strategic position on the main road that led towards Gaul."

sidebar:

Phoenician Tombs Found In Sicily
ANSA | 8-23-2006
Posted on 08/23/2006 9:12:18 PM EDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1688949/posts


27 posted on 02/25/2007 8:17:20 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Verginius Rufus

Ooops.


28 posted on 02/25/2007 8:19:01 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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http://www.allbiographies.com/biography-GnaeusJuliusAgricola-451.html

"Roman statesman and soldier, born in Fréjus (formerly Forum Julii). Having served with distinction in Britain, Asia, and Aquitania, he was elected consul in 77, and returned to Britain (78–84) becoming Rome's longest-serving and most successful governor there. In 80 and 81 he extended Roman occupation N into Scotland, defeated Calcagus at Mons Graupius (84), and actively encouraged the development of Roman-style towns in the S. His fleet circumnavigated the coast, for the first time discovering Britain to be an island. The news of Agricola's successes inflamed the jealousy of the emperor, Domitian, and in 84 he was recalled."


29 posted on 02/25/2007 8:22:19 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: scrabblehack
Roman coins don't carry a date. In the case of Roman emperors they are dated by the inscriptions which were the political propaganda of the time. In the case of Republic coins they are dated by the style and the moneyer's name. Castor and Pollux on the back probably mean that the coins were struck as the pay for the legions. After that they would have circulated.
30 posted on 02/25/2007 8:23:28 PM PST by InABunkerUnderSF (Everything I need to know about Palestinian nationalism I learned on June 5, 1968.)
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To: blam
"Vineyard labourers would have earned between a half and one denarius a day. Whereas to be a senator you had to have at least 250,000 denarii in the bank."

If viewed in terms of today's minimum wage, that would mean senators would have to own several million dollars.

31 posted on 02/25/2007 8:23:48 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck
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To: colorado tanker
:') Thanks.
Google

32 posted on 02/25/2007 8:31:20 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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a similar coin -- probably same mint etc -- from a dealer, Beast Coins:

C Antestius, AR Denarius, 146 BC, Rome
C . ANTESTI (ANTE ligate)
Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet, X below chin
The Dioscuri galloping right, dog running right below horses
ROMA in exergue
18mm x 20mm, 4.05g
Antestia 1; Cr 219/1e; Syd 411


C Antestius, AR Denarius, 146 BC, Rome
(larger image)
33 posted on 02/25/2007 8:41:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Nateman

"Could have been from a Roman who was a coin collector.In which case the dating had better come from something other than the coin!"

You fools. The article states the coin has the date 146BC stamped right on it!


34 posted on 02/26/2007 7:05:32 AM PST by FastCoyote
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To: scrabblehack

Maybe the money was backdated to avoid the Roman IRS... ;-)


35 posted on 02/26/2007 8:17:15 AM PST by SteveH (First they ignore you. Then they laugh at you. Then they fight you. Then you win.)
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To: <1/1,000,000th%; BenLurkin; blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ...

one time bump, additional info:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1791138/posts?page=33#33


36 posted on 02/27/2007 9:43:48 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Very cool.

Would be nice to have in a collection.


37 posted on 02/27/2007 12:08:34 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: TheErnFormerlyKnownAsBig

Does it really?


38 posted on 02/27/2007 12:11:13 PM PST by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: SunkenCiv

Those are gorgeous. That Roma shore looks a whole lot better than that cleopatra coin.


39 posted on 02/27/2007 12:17:39 PM PST by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: TheErnFormerlyKnownAsBig

"Greetings, Marklar! I am Marklar! This is Marklar."


40 posted on 02/27/2007 12:25:20 PM PST by Larry Lucido (Duncan Hunter 2008)
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To: colorado tanker
The Brits has something valuable to sell - tin - and Roman world was quite willing to buy it.

Of course the Brits of then weren't the Brits of now. The Normans had not yet invaded and settled, nor had the Saxons, nor the Angles, the Danes, the Jutes, the Vikings and all the rest that make up the modern Brit. Celts and Picts were the ones the Romans and Phoenicians were dealing with.

41 posted on 02/27/2007 12:30:28 PM PST by Tokra (I think I'll retire to Bedlam.)
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42 posted on 02/21/2011 4:51:19 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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