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Keyword: hadron

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  • Could this particle rewrite modern physics? Discovery of 4-quark hadron...

    04/16/2014 7:00:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | April 16, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    Scientists at CERN have confirmed the existence of a new 'exotic' particle International team used the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) detector The particle was first detected in 2007 but it has only now been confirmed Dubbed Z(4430), the discovery challenges existing models of physics It may also indicate that a new type of neutron star, a quark star, existsIn the early 1930s, scientists were fairly confident they understood subatomic physics. That was until dozens of new elementary particles were discovered in the 1950s, forcing scientists to rewrite their models. Now a new particle, first detected in 2007 but not...
  • Scientists Announce Discovery of ‘God Particle’

    07/04/2012 2:34:59 AM PDT · by Eleutheria5 · 26 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 4/7/12
    A progress report from the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator has declared that the Higgs boson, dubbed the “God particle,” has been found. The discovery of the new particle is a major step toward confirming the Standard Model used in modern physics. Professor John Womersley said, “They have discovered a particle consistent with the Higgs boson… That is confirmed...."
  • Scientists Abuzz Over Controversial Rumor that God Particle Has Been Detected

    04/22/2011 9:57:23 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 54 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | 4/22/11 | Mike Wall
    A rumor is floating around the physics community that the world's largest atom smasher may have detected a long-sought subatomic particle called the Higgs boson, also known as the "God particle." The controversial rumor is based on what appears to be a leaked internal note from physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 17-mile-long particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland. It's not entirely clear at this point if the memo is authentic, or what the data it refers to might mean — but the note already has researchers talking. The buzz started when an anonymous commenter recently posted an abstract...
  • Antimatter atom trapped for first time, say scientists

    11/17/2010 2:08:43 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 47 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11/17/10 | Jason Palmer
    Antimatter atoms have been trapped for the first time, scientists say. Researchers at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider, have held 38 antihydrogen atoms in place, each for a fraction of a second. Antihydrogen has been produced before but it was instantly destroyed when it encountered normal matter. The team, reporting in Nature, says the ability to study such antimatter atoms will allow previously impossible tests of fundamental tenets of physics. The current "standard model" of physics holds that each particle - protons, electrons, neutrons and a zoo of more exotic particles - has its mirror image antiparticle. The...
  • Man arrested at Large Hadron Collider claims he's from the future

    04/05/2010 10:24:30 AM PDT · by Sax · 72 replies · 3,066+ views
    CNET UK ^ | 4/1/2010 | Nick Hide
    A would-be saboteur arrested today at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland made the bizarre claim that he was from the future. Eloi Cole, a strangely dressed young man, said that he had travelled back in time to prevent the LHC from destroying the world. The LHC successfully collided particles at record force earlier this week, a milestone Mr Cole was attempting to disrupt by stopping supplies of Mountain Dew to the experiment's vending machines. He also claimed responsibility for the infamous baguette sabotage in November last year. Mr Cole was seized by Swiss police after CERN security guards spotted...
  • Record-breaking collisions (Large Hadron Collider producing more mesons than expected)

    02/05/2010 4:35:52 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 33 replies · 1,040+ views
    MIT News ^ | 2/5/10 | Anne Trafton
    Initial results from high-energy proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider offer first glimpse of physics at new energy frontier.In December, the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator, shattered the world record for highest energy particle collisions. This week, team led by researchers from MIT, CERN and the KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics in Budapest, Hungary, completed work on the first scientific paper analyzing the results of those collisions. Its findings show that the collisions produced an unexpectedly high number of particles called mesons — a factor that will have to be taken into account...
  • Atom smasher catches 1st high-energy collisions (during Large Haldron Collider test runs)

    12/09/2009 9:07:22 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 21 replies · 975+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 12/9/09 | Alexander G. Higgins - ap
    GENEVA – The world's largest atom smasher has recorded its first high-energy collisions of protons, a spokeswoman said Wednesday. Physicists hope those collisions will help them understand suspected phenomena such as dark matter, antimatter and ultimately the creation of the universe billions of years ago, which many theorize occurred as a massive explosion known as the Big Bang. The collisions occurred Tuesday evening as the Large Haldron Collider underwent test runs in preparation for operations next year, said Christine Sutton of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN. Two beams of circulating particles traveling in opposite directions at 1.18...
  • Big Bang machine achieves first particle collisions

    11/28/2009 2:05:24 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies · 1,095+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 11/28/09 | Jason Rhodes
    ZURICH (Reuters) -- Scientists have smashed together proton beams for the first time in a 27-kilometre tunnel under the French-Swiss border in an initial step toward discovering how the universe came into existence, they said on Monday. Scientists at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) hope experiments will already start giving clues about the origins of the universe in the coming months as the world's biggest particle collider starts moving to full power. "It's a great achievement to have come this far in so short a time," said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer about the collision, achieved by sending...
  • CERN atom-smasher restarts after 14-month hiatus: official

    11/20/2009 1:01:09 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 23 replies · 756+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 11/20/09 | AFP
    GENEVA (AFP) – The world's biggest atom-smasher, shut down after its inauguration in September 2008 amid technical faults, restarted on Friday, a spokesman for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research said. "The first tests of injecting sub-atomic particles began around 1600 (1500 GMT)," CERN spokesman James Gillies told AFP. He said the injections lasted a fraction of a second, enough for "a half or even a complete circuit" of the Large Hadron Collider built in a 27-kilometre (17-mile) long tunnel straddling the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. "If all goes well tonight we will try to circulate a beam of particles...
  • Baguette Dropped From Bird's Beak Shuts Down The Large Hadron Collider (Really)

    11/05/2009 4:31:31 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 40 replies · 1,263+ views
    PopSci ^ | 11/05/09 | Stuart Fox
    The Large Hadron Collider, the world's most powerful particle accelerator, just cannot catch a break. First, a coolant leak destroyed some of the magnets that guide the energy beam. Then LHC officials postponed the restart of the machine to add additional safety features. Now, a bird dropping a piece of bread on a section of the accelerator has, according to the Register, shut down the whole operation. The bird dropped some bread on a section of outdoor machinery, eventually leading to significant over heating in parts of the accelerator. The LHC was not operational at the time of the incident,...
  • The Collider, the Particle and a Theory About Fate

    10/13/2009 1:13:12 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies · 1,337+ views
    NYTimes ^ | 10/12/09 | Dennis Overbye
    More than a year after an explosion of sparks, soot and frigid helium shut it down, the world’s biggest and most expensive physics experiment, known as the Large Hadron Collider, is poised to start up again. In December, if all goes well, protons will start smashing together in an underground racetrack outside Geneva in a search for forces and particles that reigned during the first trillionth of a second of the Big Bang. Then it will be time to test one of the most bizarre and revolutionary theories in science. I’m not talking about extra dimensions of space-time, dark matter...
  • A Test for Exotic Propulsion?

    10/12/2009 1:33:28 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies · 1,025+ views
    Centauri-Dreams ^ | 10/12/09 | Paul Gilster
    Can we calculate the gravitational field of a mass moving close to the speed of light? Franklin Felber (Starmark Inc) believes he can, with implications for propulsion. Back in 2006 we looked briefly at Felber’s work, describing what the physicist believes to be a repulsive gravitational field that emerges from his results. Felber discussed the matter at the Space Technology and Applications International meeting that year, where he presented his calculations of the ‘relativistically exact motion of a payload in the gravitational field of a source moving with constant velocity.’ Above a certain critical velocity, Felber believes, any mass...
  • LHC Might Not Be Back Online Until 2010 or Later (Large Hadron Collider)

    12/01/2008 6:10:28 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 16 replies · 1,282+ views
    Gizmodo ^ | 12/1/08 | Mark Wilson
    When the LHC first went down, it was believed that repairs could get the system up and running by April 2009. Then we saw repairs pushing the timeline back to summer 2009. But now, CERN has arrived at a fork in the road regarding LHC repairs. According to spokesperson James Gillies, the complicated repairs can be simplified into modest Plan A and Plan B approach. Plan A is a quick and dirty fix, getting the particle accelerator online as quickly as possible (late summer 2009) at the cost of operating at lower power. In this scenario, 3 of 8 pressure...
  • Large Hadron Collider hacked

    09/16/2008 3:56:41 AM PDT · by Renfield · 30 replies · 281+ views
    A group of Greek hackers broke into the particle accelerator's systems just as scientists were turning it on in front of the world's media Monday, 15th September 2008 Even as the scientists at CERN, the centre for nuclear research, were switching on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator under Geneva last week, a group of Greek hackers were one step away from controlling a 12,500-ton electromagnet that serves as one of the machine’s four detectors. The intruders posted a lengthy note in Greek on the machine’s network introducing themselves as ‘the Greek Security Team’, mocking the system’s poor security...
  • Hackers infiltrate Large Hadron Collider systems and mock IT security

    09/12/2008 11:14:42 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 26 replies · 176+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 9/12/08 | Roger Highfield
    Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world.As the first particles were circulating in the machine near Geneva where the world wide web was born, a Greek group hacked into the facility, posting a warning about weaknesses in its infrastructure. Calling themselves the Greek Security Team, the interlopers mocked the IT used on the project, describing the technicians responsible for security as "a bunch of schoolkids."
  • Big Bang: Nightmares and Dreams -- Physicist Michio Kaku discusses the Large Hadron Collider [Video]

    09/11/2008 12:24:13 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 3 replies · 198+ views
    Click here to watch video.
  • Scientists start up giant particle-smashing machine (CERN Hadron Collider)

    09/10/2008 12:40:45 AM PDT · by HAL9000 · 45 replies · 2,027+ views
    Reuters (excerpt) ^ | September 10, 2008 | Robert Evans
    Excerpt - GENEVA, Sept 10 (Reuters) - Scientists at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) started up a huge particle-smashing machine on Wednesday, aiming to re-enact the conditions of the "Big Bang" that created the universe. Experiments in the Large Hadron Collider, a 10 billion Swiss franc ($9 billion) accelerator built underneath the Swiss-French border, could unlock the remaining secrets of particle physics and answer questions about the universe and its origins.
  • Scientists get death threats over Large Hadron Collider

    09/05/2008 6:41:01 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 56 replies · 236+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 9/5/08 | Roger Highfield
    Scientists working on the world's biggest machine are being besieged by phone calls and emails from people who fear the world will end next Wednesday, when the gigantic atom smasher starts up. [snip] Such is the angst that the American Nobel prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has even had death threats, said Prof Brian Cox of Manchester University, adding: "Anyone who thinks the LHC will destroy the world is a twat."
  • First particles injected into Large Hadron Collider atom smasher

    08/21/2008 7:43:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 56 replies · 130+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 8/21/08 | Jad Marrouche
    The first particles have been injected into the biggest atom smasher on the planet, marking the start of the countdown to probing the secrets of the universe. Scientists are pushing ahead with powering up the machine, shrugging off speculative fears that it could destroy all life on Earth by sucking it into a black hole. Starting up the biggest scientific experiment ever built is not as simple as flipping a switch.
  • CERN to Morons: Large Hadron Collider Won't Destroy Earth. Morons.

    04/03/2008 12:48:33 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 44 replies · 98+ views
    Gizmodo ^ | 3/31/08
    Contrary to the somewhat feverish claims laid out in an recent lawsuit, when our favorite particle-smashing, Force-finding Large Hadron Collider is switched on soon it will not result in the destruction of life as we know it. Such claims are "complete nonsense" say the scientists at CERN (and everywhere else,) in response to the suit. They should know: it's their machine, they designed it and they've been telling everyone for a while that their research shows it's safe. The lawsuit filed by a group of Hawaii residents is alleging that not enough safety checks have been made by CERN to...
  • Big Bang at the atomic lab after scientists get their maths wrong

    04/08/2007 8:55:49 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 76 replies · 2,252+ views
    Times Online ^ | 4/8/07 | Jonathan Leake
    A £2 billion project to answer some of the biggest mysteries of the universe has been delayed by months after scientists building it made basic errors in their mathematical calculations. The mistakes led to an explosion deep in the tunnel at the Cern particle accelerator complex near Geneva in Switzerland. It lifted a 20-ton magnet off its mountings, filling a tunnel with helium gas and forcing an evacuation. It means that 24 magnets located all around the 17-mile circular accelerator must now be stripped down and repaired or upgraded. The failure is a huge embarrassment for Fermilab, the American national...
  • Why a large hadron collider?

    07/07/2006 11:14:14 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 17 replies · 1,069+ views
    Seed Magazine ^ | 7/6/06 | Edit Staff
    Why a Large Hadron Collider? Seed asks some of the greatest physicists alive what we hope to learn from the LHC. by Edit Staff • Posted July 6, 2006 12:32 AM View of the ATLAS detector in the experiment hall, roughly 100 meters underground. ATLAS is one of the five particle physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Credit: Guido Mocafico The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently under construction at CERN is the greatest basic science endeavor in history. Roughly half of the world's particle physicists, 7,000 individuals, make the Collider their workplace. This single-minded group of men and women...
  • The God Particle and the Grid

    04/03/2004 9:56:45 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies · 300+ views
    Wired ^ | April 2004 | Richard Martin
    <p>The physics lab that brought you the Web is reinventing the Internet. Get ready for the atom-smashing, supercomputing, 5-gigabits-per-second Grid Economy.</p> <p>200 feet underground, a proton does 17-mile laps at nearly the speed of light. Guided by powerful magnets, it zooms through a narrow, circular tunnel that straddles the Switzerland-France border. Then a tiny adjustment in the magnetic field throws the proton into the path of another particle beam traveling just as fast in the opposite direction. Everything goes kerflooey.</p>