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Geology Picture of the Week Extra: GoogleEarth searcher finds pristine impact crater in Egypt
Space.com ^ | July 22, 2010 | Clara Moskowitz

Posted on 07/23/2010 9:11:02 PM PDT by cogitator

The header link goes to the article on space.com. Basic story is that an Italian guy who sounds like a hobbyist (former curator of a science museum) found the feature while tooling around on GoogleEarth. Since it's in the remote desert, it's hardly changed since impact -- even has ejecta rays. There's a problem here; most models indicate that an object the likely size of this object should disintegrate in the atmosphere. This one obviously didn't.

Abstract in Science magazine (you'd have to pay to read the whole thing)

The Kamil Crater in Egypt

Fresh crater in Egypt -- increases impact hazard? (National Geographic)

Now, this last link has a GoogleEarth locator pin. If you zoom out, you can see the ejecta rays. If you zoom out further, you can see how amazing it is that Mr. Vincenzo de Michele (the former museum curator) found it and recognized it.

Kamil Crater - discovered thanks to Google Earth


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; Astronomy; Education; Science
KEYWORDS: africa; catastrophism; crater; drought; egypt; globalwarminghoax; godsgravesglyphs; google; impact; sahara
I just think this is so cool -- both the discovery and the way it was discovered.
1 posted on 07/23/2010 9:11:08 PM PDT by cogitator
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To: 2Trievers; headsonpikes; Pokey78; Lil'freeper; epsjr; sauropod; Miss Marple; CPT Clay; ...

** BAM! ping **


2 posted on 07/23/2010 9:12:25 PM PDT by cogitator
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To: cogitator
Would be nice if there were some earthly coordinates.

yitbos

3 posted on 07/23/2010 9:23:40 PM PDT by bruinbirdman ("Those who control language control minds.")
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To: bruinbirdman

Regarding lat/lons: I looked but couldn’t find any.


4 posted on 07/23/2010 9:28:38 PM PDT by cogitator
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To: cogitator

5 posted on 07/23/2010 9:37:57 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: cogitator

What a great find!


6 posted on 07/23/2010 9:48:10 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: cogitator

Sobering.

But then again, the Siberia impact early in the 20th century created the “impact” and blast damage, but left no crater residue.

We are hit more often than we think - glad this not happen during the Russia-US-China nuclear war period. Now, a nuclear blast (in most areas of the earth) is not the first suspicion,

then again, until Schumaker got his ideas accepted by the lunar landing research, almost all “conventional wisdom”/consensus of the experts) was that meteor impact didn’t happen at all.


7 posted on 07/23/2010 9:51:06 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but socialists' ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: cogitator

By image matching with Google Earth:

lat 22.0183 long 27.0877


8 posted on 07/23/2010 10:29:11 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: Dallas59

Great screen capture! I shoulda thought of that. Did you see lat/lon info for the crater?


9 posted on 07/23/2010 10:30:27 PM PDT by cogitator
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To: bruinbirdman; dr_lew; Dallas59
I also found the coordinates in the Sky and Telescope article about this.

New trove of iron meteorites

This article says something that the others didn't; they've found pieces of the impactor (has pictures)

"For the curious, the exact coordinates are 22° 1′ 6″ north, 26° 5′ 16″ east."

Thanks for the images and location.

10 posted on 07/23/2010 10:36:33 PM PDT by cogitator
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To: cogitator
Doh! That was a typo. s/b lat 22.0183 long 26.0877 which matches close enough with 22° 1′ 6″ north, 26° 5′ 16″ east, both of these being within the confines of the crater itself.
11 posted on 07/23/2010 10:46:58 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: Dallas59

That’s a really cool picture. Must have been quite the impact. Hope nothing too big falls from the skies, just from a self preservation point of view.


12 posted on 07/23/2010 10:51:17 PM PDT by flaglady47 (To bastardize Samuel Johnson, tyranny is the last refuge of scoundrels)
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To: flaglady47

I wished I could find a piece of one..a big piece. $20,000 easy.


13 posted on 07/23/2010 10:59:25 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: cogitator
I use XnView
14 posted on 07/23/2010 11:01:50 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Dallas59

My thoughts too. How about that guy on Discovery Channel or something who does nothing else for money but search the desert for meteors? Wouldn’t it be great to find one?


15 posted on 07/23/2010 11:17:46 PM PDT by JSteff (((It was ALL about SCOTUS. Most forget about that and HAVE DOOMED us for a generation or more.)))
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To: JSteff

I’d actually be caught up on my bills with a find like that!


16 posted on 07/24/2010 12:05:12 AM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE
Speaking of Tanguska-can it be seen with google earth?

cool article on Tesla connection http://mondovista.com/tesla.tunguskax.html

17 posted on 07/24/2010 12:34:09 AM PDT by Mr. K (Physically unable to proofreed (<---oops! see?))
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE
"We know from literature that the human occupation of this region ended about 5,000 years ago, with the onset of hyperarid conditions

Did not know we had SUV's to cause climate change back then,,, who knew??

18 posted on 07/24/2010 1:31:20 AM PDT by MrPiper
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; ..

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impact crater egypt site:freerepublic.com
Google
Thanks cogitator.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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19 posted on 07/24/2010 8:03:18 AM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: 75thOVI; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; BBell; ...
impact crater egypt site:freerepublic.com
Google
Thanks cogitator.
 
Catastrophism
 
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20 posted on 07/24/2010 8:05:40 AM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Dallas59
I wished I could find a piece of one..a big piece. $20,000 easy.

Have you tried ebay?

21 posted on 07/24/2010 8:19:24 AM PDT by 668 - Neighbor of the Beast (668, neighbor of the beast, is tagline enough)
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To: 668 - Neighbor of the Beast

1602 Pennsylvania Ave - Next door Neighbor of the Beast

(just sayin’)...


22 posted on 07/24/2010 8:39:58 AM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 546 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I watched on TV a nature channel show called The History Of The Earth two evenings ago. The program discussed the Sahara desert. According to the program– up until 3 million years ago the Sahara was underwater. For the last 3 million years the Sahara has gone from wet savanna with many lakes bigger than the great lakes — to desert — and back again. This has occurred every 20,000 years. Why? the Earth wobbles on its axis every 20,000 years and shifts its position enough to make the the African monsoons shift north. Scientists found that the shift of the earth axes coincided with shifts in sedimentary cores in the Atlantic. That is, every 20000 years the Atlantic cores would show sand intrusions from the Sahara that would stop abruptly at 20000 year intervals at the time when the earth wobbles on its axis.

The Atlantic cores show that the Sahara was a verdant savanna with many huge lakes–more lakes and bigger than the great lakes– up until 5500 years ago or 3500 BC. Then abruptly–in less than 200 years–the Sahara dried up. This coincided with the last wobble of the earth on its axis.

As well, this coincides with the emergence of the old Kingdom in Egypt and (very roughly) the earliest parts of Stonehenge.(I’ve thought for about a decade that about 5000 years ago for the first time people all over the world looked up. I thought the triggering event might have been a destructive comet but a big change in the night sky caused by earth’s wobble would make better sense.)

The show concluded that the sandstone rocks of the Sahara contain immense aquifers of water that could pumped up to turn the deserts there green. Scientists were uneasy about draining the desert of its archaic water because a wholesale program that did turn North Africa green would deplete its archaic water supplies in 100-200 years. And there’s another 15,000 years before the rains return.

imho considering that well water is cheaper than desalinated water–so cheap that it could be used for agriculture now — the best bet to turn north Africa green is well water. In time desalinated water will be cheap enough to replenish the ancient aquifers.


23 posted on 07/24/2010 8:47:00 AM PDT by ckilmer (Phi)
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To: null and void

LOL!! If I ever want to be the neighbor of the beast again, maybe I’ll go there.
(I use the name because a few years ago I lived next door to a compound of fundamentalist muslims. Mosque, madrassa, the whole shebang. I’d tell you more but don’t want to set off my PTSD.


24 posted on 07/24/2010 9:06:28 AM PDT by 668 - Neighbor of the Beast (668, neighbor of the beast, is tagline enough)
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To: 668 - Neighbor of the Beast
Yikes! Although I've always loved (and somewhat envied) your screen name, it never occurred to me that you actually were the Beast's neighbor!
25 posted on 07/24/2010 9:11:01 AM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 546 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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To: ckilmer; SunkenCiv; All

Is there any info/estimate of the possible age of this crater? It has the potential to be the cause of the 1st, 2nd or 3rd Intermediate Periods in Egypt, or perhaps the strange weather of Cassiodorus in the 500s AD. I saw an old National Geographic from the 1970s were a man traveled deep into the great southern desert of Saudi Arabia and found an iron meteor about 4 ft cubed. There were legends of how a wicked city in this area had been destroyed. Sounded a bit like Sodom and Gamorrah. The name Warab, Wahab, or or Wabar comes to mind for the name of this crater or event. Don’t hold me to it, memeory is getting aged.


26 posted on 07/24/2010 10:34:42 AM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: cogitator

bttt


27 posted on 07/25/2010 4:15:42 AM PDT by rdl6989 (January 20, 2013- The end of an error.)
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To: ckilmer
The remains of Lake Tritonis were still there when Herodotus toured Egypt etc, so, 2500 years ago. I wouldn't put much stock in periodicity or any other uniformitarian model for the desertification of the Sahara. :') additional sidebar:
Evolution in Your Face
by Patrick Huyghe
Omni
Lake Victoria, Africa's largest lake, is home to more than 300 species of cichlids. These fish, which are popular in aquariums, are deep-bodied and have one nostril, rather than the usual two, on each side of the head. Seismic profiles and cores of the lake taken by a team headed by Thomas C. Johnson of the University of Minnesota, reveal that the lake dried up completely about 12,400 years ago. This means that the rate of speciation of cichlid fishes has been extremely rapid: something on average of one new species every 40 years!

28 posted on 07/25/2010 8:13:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: gleeaikin
Good memory, btw:
Wabar Impact
SciAm
Nov 1998
Deep in the legendary Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia-the Rub' al-Khali-lies a strange area, half a square kilometer (over 100 acres) in size, covered with black glass, white rock and iron shards. It was first described to the world in 1932 by Harry St. John "Abdullah" Philby, a British explorer perhaps better known as the father of the infamous Soviet double-agent Kim Philby. The site he depicted had been known to several generations of roving al-Murra Bedouin as al-Hadida, "the iron things." What he found was neither the lost city of Ubar nor the basis for the Qur'anic story. But it was certainly the setting of a cataclysm that came out of the skies: the arrival of a meteorite. Judging from the traces left behind, the crash would have been indistinguishable from a nuclear blast of about 12 kilotons, comparable to the Hiroshima bomb. Wabar-size meteoroids are much more common-and harder for astronomers to spot-than the big monsters. Ironically, until the Wabar expeditions, we knew the least about the most frequent events. The slag and shocked rock in the deserts of Arabia have shown us in remarkable detail what the smaller beasts can do.
There is also tektite glass used for some stuff for King Tut, and the source of that has apparently been identified. :')
29 posted on 07/25/2010 8:16:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

Hey, let's go check out that asteroid that fell last night . . .

30 posted on 07/26/2010 3:53:41 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

:’D


31 posted on 07/26/2010 8:38:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Dallas59
Easy.


32 posted on 08/14/2010 8:31:39 AM PDT by Ready4Freddy (Sure I've heard of grits. I just never actually *seen* a grit before.)
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