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Stones Of Destiny Show Scotland's Ancient Faith
Scotsman ^ | 2-8-2007

Posted on 02/09/2007 10:44:51 AM PST by blam

Stones of destiny show Scotland's ancient faith

PETER YEOMAN

The entrance to the revamped Whithorn Museum is eye-grabbing. Picture: Crown Copyright reproduced Courtesy of Historic Scotland

MORE than 1,000 years ago three brief words were cut into the face of a beautiful carved cross.

Standing at attention: Some of the standing stones on display at the Whithorn Museum. Picture: Crown Copyright reproduced Courtesy of Historic Scotland

It is one of more than 60 early Christian grave markers and crosses, many decorated with elaborately carved patterns, that form the internationally important collection known as the Whithorn stones.

For centuries the meaning of the runic inscription was lost after the Anglo-Saxon kingdom that once controlled much of south-west Scotland was swept away. But conservation work, while the collection was prepared for display by Historic Scotland in their modernised museum at Whithorn Priory, recently revealed a plea from a distant time.

It implores us to "Pray for Hwitu".

Discoveries of this kind are like postcards from the past, compressing a remarkable amount of information in a limited space.

Hwitu was a woman who took her name from the Old English place name for Whithorn itself which was Hwit-erne, meaning white house. She, and the loved ones requesting prayers for her soul, were people of some standing.

Even though the cross was already old when the Anglo-Saxon runes were added, it was only the wealthy who could afford to be commemorated in such style.

There are many fascinating artefacts on review in the museum at Drumfriesshire. Picture: Crown Copyright reproduced Courtesy of Historic Scotland

The inscription probably dates from the 9th century or 10th century when the area was controlled by Anglians who, despite being invaders, built on its Christian traditions and made it the centre of a bishopric (or diocese).

These traditions stretched back to the 5th century when St Ninian was believed to have founded the first Christian mission in what came to be Scotland.

The tale of St Ninian saw a cult develop which brought Christian pilgrims to Whithorn throughout the Middle Ages. As they trudged across the landscape, in hope of a cure or some other saintly favour, they would have gazed on other stone crosses pointing heavenward from the Machars in this quiet area of the Solway coast.

A number of the crosses have survived, mostly as fragments, and since 1908 they have been gathered together in a small museum at Whithorn Priory, where they have continued to be admired by pilgrims and other visitors. Since March (not coincidentally on Easter weekend) they have been easier to appreciate thanks to a revamp of the museum.

This new display, created in consultation with the local community, restores something of the wonder medieval pilgrims would have felt for the crosses. They were spiritual objects created by craftsmen of supreme talent, and bore witness to profound devotion.

Stephen Gordon, head conservator at Historic Scotland, steam cleans one of the ancient Whithorn stones.

The museum now uses innovative techniques to make the stones more accessible and reflect the fact that they were created over many centuries.

As a collection, the stones tell an astonishing tale which stretches from the arrival of Christianity to the Reformation.

The first one which visitors encounter is the Latinus Stone, a grave marker dating to around 450 AD. It is the country's oldest Christian monument, commemorating a man called Latinus and his unnamed three-year-old daughter.

Being so old makes it important, but its greatest value is in drawing back the veil on a little-known era. It was a moment when Christianity was a new and unfamiliar faith just gaining a first foothold in pagan lands.

The name Latinus also suggests continuing and positive associations with Rome, even after its abandonment of Britain and when the empire in the west was collapsing.

Other stones were created in the 10th century during the heyday of the Whithorn School, when local carvers established a distinctive style of stone crosses with intricately decorated shafts.

The reason so many are in pieces can be traced back to the 12th century when the building of a new monastery here made a break with the past. The irony is that the attempted destruction could have been their very salvation as the stones were then used as building material, and rediscovered in later centuries when their value was appreciated once again.

While the museum was closed for refurbishment most of the stones were taken to the Historic Scotland conservation centre in Edinburgh. It was then that David Parsons, of Nottingham University's Centre for English Name Studies, translated the Anglo-Saxon runes. The spell at the conservation centre meant the stones could be cleaned, conserved, studied and recorded.

A complete and accurate record of the collection was also created by Ian Scott, the former chief draftsman for the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. His work had a bearing on the new display as he showed that some fragments quite possibly came from the same stone, even though there were no connecting edges.

As a result we have a more detailed understanding of the stones than before.

And thanks to the new-look museum visitors now have an opportunity to fully enjoy some of the most remarkable pieces of Scottish historic, artistic and religious heritage.

Peter Yeoman is a Senior Inspector of Ancient Monuments with Historic Scotland. He advises on archaeology and conservation with the Major Projects team, currently involved with projects at Stanley Mills and Edinburgh Castle. He has excavated numerous medieval ecclesiastical and defensive sites, as well as publish books on medieval archaeology and pilgrimage.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ancient; archaeoastronomy; epigraphyandlanguage; faith; godsgravesglyphs; megaliths; scotland; scotlandyet; stones

1 posted on 02/09/2007 10:44:54 AM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 02/09/2007 10:45:19 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

What year did the Roman occupation of the British Isles end?


3 posted on 02/09/2007 10:51:09 AM PST by Eva
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To: blam

While I appreciate the artistic quality of the pieces, exactly how old does a headstone have to be before someone can dig it up and put it into their collection? LOL


4 posted on 02/09/2007 10:55:27 AM PST by usurper (Spelling or grammatical errors in this post can be attributed to the LA City School System)
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To: Eva

Honorius withdrew the legions in 410, I believe.


5 posted on 02/09/2007 10:57:51 AM PST by pierrem15 (Charles Martel: past and future of France)
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To: blam

Fascinating.


6 posted on 02/09/2007 11:02:15 AM PST by lilylangtree (Veni, Vidi, Vici)
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To: blam

bookmark


7 posted on 02/09/2007 11:06:03 AM PST by GOP Poet
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To: pierrem15

Thanks, I was wondering if there was an over lap between the Romans and the first missionaries. I guess not.


8 posted on 02/09/2007 11:09:24 AM PST by Eva
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To: blam

Thanks. Some wonderful history.

I just finished a small book, about David Livingstone, called "Trail Blazer for God". It is the story of a young Scotsman that, through his belief in God, overcame a poverty stricken childhood to bring Christianity, love, and medicine to Africa.

Too bad, those that come later, use God's gifts for their own interests.


9 posted on 02/09/2007 11:40:00 AM PST by wizr (Do what you love, your God given talent, and God will provide the rest.)
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To: Eva

Christians arrived with the Romans, but before the Catholic Church in Rome took hold across the continent, the Romans quit the British Isles and Christianity developed independently for nearly two hundred years in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland; becoming strongest in Ireland.

In the late fourth and early 5th centuries, Irish missionaries established monasteries and Churches in the British Isles (Britainia and Scotland, and Wales), while the "pagan" Angles (later "English") and Saxons were invading and becoming ascendant there. It was not until two hundred years later that the Church of Rome became very active in Britain and the now settled Angles and Saxons received a "full court press", for conversions, from the Vatican.

Some religious novelist ought to write a novel in which the independent Christian churches in the British Isles become the dominant faith there before any great attempt from the Vatican is mounted and after which such attempts from the Vatican do not succeed; leaving a fully independent Christian Church not centered in Rome or Constantinople, from the 5th Century on and long before the later reformation.


10 posted on 02/09/2007 12:04:19 PM PST by Wuli
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To: NYer; blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

11 posted on 02/09/2007 9:45:00 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Saturday, February 3, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam

A time when the Scots had stones.


12 posted on 02/09/2007 9:51:27 PM PST by VeniVidiVici (Celebrate Monocacy!)
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To: Wuli

From Amazon

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It was a sanctuary from the world--and a silent witness to it all

The first 1,500 years of Christianity's tumultuous history. The clash of cultures. Armies marching. The rise and fall of kingdoms. One language supplanting another. Yet Glastonbury remained a place of serenity, prayer, and reconciliation.

As the legacy of faith passed from generation to generation, each era of believers found refuge in Glastonbury. In its story you will experience the faith that gave Joseph of Arimathea and his family courage to claim new land for Christ. Relive the persecution of St. George and St. Patrick during their captivity under the Roman Empire. Ride along with King Arthur on his historic adventures and discover the spiritual fortitude that enabled him to become the greatest leader of his time. Witness the rekindling of Christianity with St. Augustine of Canterbury. Be inspired by the faith of the remnant in the midst of the Dark Ages. Watch the upheaval under the rule of Henry VIII that led to the Reformation. And as Christianity triumphs over the darkest moments of its history, you may even find your own spiritual roots.

An epic novel of the history of the faith


13 posted on 02/10/2007 6:24:48 AM PST by kalee (No burka for me....EVER!)
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To: blam

The stones with rounded tops don't look anything like Christian symbols to me.


14 posted on 02/10/2007 7:46:13 AM PST by wildbill
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To: VeniVidiVici

A time when the Scots had stones."

Are you kidding? They are having a problem right now with Scots carrying knives and swords again--and using them in all sorts of altercations and gang fights.

A man who uses cold steel face to face with another guy has a lot of stones in my book.

Of course, if I'm a tourist without my trusty Glock and get in a bar argument and some guy pulls out a sword, he's a chicken---- SOB--but I'm out of there with wings on my feet anyway.


15 posted on 02/10/2007 7:50:54 AM PST by wildbill
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To: wildbill
Are you kidding? They are having a problem right now with Scots carrying knives and swords again--and using them in all sorts of altercations and gang fights.

Just like when Long Shanks banned swords, they trained with sticks & stones. Today they ban guns, so the Scots fight with swords & knives. I guess that's progress?

16 posted on 02/10/2007 9:28:58 AM PST by Tallguy
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To: Tallguy

I read in The Scotsman that the legislature is thinking about banning swords again. The more things change, the more they stay the same (in French it sounds more profound.)


17 posted on 02/10/2007 11:52:08 AM PST by wildbill
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To: Eva
But I think a lot of the Romano-Celts (like St. Patrick-- Patricius-- born 387?) had already converted to Christianity by 410.

The Anglo-Saxon and Irish invaders were pagans.

18 posted on 02/12/2007 8:14:31 AM PST by pierrem15 (Charles Martel: past and future of France)
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Comment #19 Removed by Moderator

The Majestic Standing Stones Of Callanish
The Scotsman | 1-3-2006 | Caroline Wickham-Jones
Posted on 01/03/2006 2:03:14 PM EST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1551195/posts


20 posted on 08/16/2007 8:25:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Tuesday, August 14, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


21 posted on 09/08/2011 12:51:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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