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German Paper Reports World's Oldest Temple Is In Sanliurfa (Turkey- 10,000BC)
Turkish Daily News ^ | 1-21-2006

Posted on 01/21/2006 10:34:38 AM PST by blam

German paper reports world’s oldest temple is in Þanlýurfa

Saturday, January 21, 2006

ANKARA - Turkish Daily News

One of Germany's leading newspapers, Die Welt, reported this week that the world's oldest temple, dating back around 12,000 years, is located on Göbekli Hill in Turkey's province of Þanlýurfa, said the Anatolia news agency.

According to an article titled “Holy Hill of the Hunters,” the temple was discovered by German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, standing around 15 meters in height and located on a hill upon which a single tree stands.

Defining the area as the “cradle of civilization,” the paper said local people considered the lone tree a “will tree” and that this tradition was not so surprising since the temple was one of the most important sacred places of ancient times.

Indicating that previously a 9,000-year-old temple in Jordan was considered to be the world's oldest, the article said, “Some parts of ancient history should be rewritten after this discovery.”

It also made reference to stone figures and columns discovered at the excavation site, suggesting that hundreds of people had worked to transport and erect the columns. The grassy knolls around the site suggest that the locals hunted and farmed in olden times.

The shape and style of the temple also revealed that talented craftsmen had worked on its design and construction, said the article.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 10000; anatolia; archaeology; bc; catalhoyuk; catalhuyuk; german; gobeklitepe; godsgravesglyphs; oldest; paper; prehistory; reports; sanliurfa; temple; turkey; worlds

1 posted on 01/21/2006 10:34:40 AM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 01/21/2006 10:36:16 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
Incredible
3 posted on 01/21/2006 10:51:04 AM PST by boomop1
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To: blam

Fascinating..... but age alone does not make anything the "cradle of civilization" - it all depends upon whether there is transmission of cultural and technical knowledge that led to later, greater civilizations. There may be lots of twigs, branches, and dead ends in human history and pre-history which have no connections to the truly great civilizations which developed in other places......


4 posted on 01/21/2006 11:55:56 AM PST by Enchante (Democrats: "We are ALL broken and worn out, our party & ideas, what else is new?")
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To: Enchante; blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; StayAt HomeMother; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; asp1; ...
Thanks Blam. This is fascinating, not least considering that writing older than Sumerian cuneiform was discovered in Anatolia. :')

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
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5 posted on 01/21/2006 8:37:20 PM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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To: blam

According to an article titled “Holy Hill of the Hunters,” the temple was discovered by German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, standing around 15 meters in height and located on a hill upon which a single tree stands.

So Klaus Schmidt is 15 meters tall?

Wouldn't this be better?

According to an article titled “Holy Hill of the Hunters,” the temple,standing around 15 meters in height and located on a hill upon which a single tree stands, was discovered by German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt .


6 posted on 01/21/2006 8:41:20 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: blam

bump


7 posted on 01/21/2006 9:21:32 PM PST by Dustbunny (As happy as a toad in the Lord's pocket.)
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To: GreyFriar

GGG ping.


8 posted on 01/21/2006 9:24:46 PM PST by zot (GWB -- four more years!)
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To: tet68
"Wouldn't this be better?"

Well. Maybe a little better...I'm not gonna ping anyone to see it, lol.

9 posted on 01/21/2006 10:14:56 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
The grassy knolls around the site suggest that the locals hunted and farmed in olden times.

So what'd they find behind the grassy knolls?--maybe we can finally resolve this JFK thing :-)

10 posted on 01/21/2006 10:39:13 PM PST by Fedora
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To: blam

I just love how some archaeoligist finds some old site, and in the media in instantly becomes the oldest, biggest, most important, most sacred, etc., etc.

Researchers and newspapers will now say anything for money, I guess.

I'd like to hear some real information about this site, though. Sounds interesting, perhaps related to the people in the Black Sea basin?


11 posted on 01/22/2006 7:15:09 AM PST by jimtorr
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To: Fedora; blam
The grassy knolls around the site suggest that the locals hunted and farmed in olden times.
#1, I think Fedora is on to something. ;')

#2, I'd be surprised if those "knolls" don't turn out to be more ruined structures. It's almost entirely unheard of to find some kind of large communal structure (whether it was a temple, or a palace, or a fortress, or a market of some kind, or something else, or some combo) and not find it surrounded by a settlement of some size.
12 posted on 01/22/2006 7:15:58 AM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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some Anatolia topics, most relevant first:

Layers of clustered apartments hide artifacts of ancient urban life
San Francisco Chronicle | Monday, April 18, 2005 | David Perlman
Posted on 04/20/2005 9:26:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1387451/posts

from my links page:

A Talk With Colin Renfrew
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1556499/posts

Franchthi Excavations: 17,000 Years of Greek Prehistory
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1197188/posts

In Search of the Real Troy
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1347422/posts

King Midas' Modern Mourners
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1290040/posts

Kommagene, The Forgotten Kingdom
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1445085/posts

Lycia Where Greek language has left its mark
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1549447/posts

Lycian Influence To The Indian Cave Temples
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1440990/posts

Unlocking the Power of Myth
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1462060/posts

Was There a Trojan War?
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1181498/posts

City in the Clouds -- Sagalassos, ancient city in Turkey
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1183007/posts

Argonaut Epos and Bronze Age Economic History
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1199756/posts

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, Int'l Trade and the Late Bronze Age Aegean
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1201978/posts


13 posted on 01/22/2006 7:26:38 AM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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To: tet68

I'm not sure 15 meters is accurate, but he does wear a size 500 shoe.


14 posted on 01/22/2006 7:28:23 AM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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To: tet68
Yes, but the media is so well-trained to obfuscate rather than clarify, that they have become apparently unable to write clear text.
15 posted on 01/22/2006 7:59:26 AM PST by SuzyQue
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To: blam
"German Paper Reports World's Oldest Temple Is In Sanliurfa (Turkey- 10,000BC)"

What's the chance that it still has a mortgage and a Building Fund Committee?

16 posted on 01/22/2006 8:01:11 AM PST by muir_redwoods (Free Sirhan Sirhan, after all, the bastard who killed Mary Jo Kopechne is walking around free)
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To: SunkenCiv
I'd be surprised if those "knolls" don't turn out to be more ruined structures. It's almost entirely unheard of to find some kind of large communal structure (whether it was a temple, or a palace, or a fortress, or a market of some kind, or something else, or some combo) and not find it surrounded by a settlement of some size.

So they actually found the whole of Dealey Plaza, not just the grassy knoll. . .

Seriesly, that sounds plausible. Undoubtedly this publicity will encourage more excavation at the site, so hopefully if there's more to be found it'll turn up soon enough.

I'm curious about what's involved in the "will tree" tradition mentioned. Of course this tradition probably stems from generations much, much later than the original site, but if the tradition at least reflects an accurate interpretation of the function of the structure, it makes me wonder if that implies a burial site in the area.

17 posted on 01/22/2006 11:25:17 AM PST by Fedora
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To: zot

Thanks. I'm glad to know it survived Noah's flood.


18 posted on 01/22/2006 2:58:18 PM PST by GreyFriar ((3rd Armored Division -- Spearhead))
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To: muir_redwoods
What's the chance that it still has a mortgage and a Building Fund Committee?

[rimshot]

19 posted on 01/22/2006 3:03:30 PM PST by Mojave
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To: blam
It also made reference to stone figures and columns discovered at the excavation site, suggesting that hundreds of people had worked to transport and erect the columns. The grassy knolls around the site suggest that the locals hunted and farmed in olden times.

The shape and style of the temple also revealed that talented craftsmen had worked on its design and construction, said the article.


This would indicate to me that it is not “the world's oldest temple”, just the oldest we have found so far.
20 posted on 01/22/2006 3:08:44 PM PST by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink.)
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To: blam

Cool finding! I always think there is a lost civilization that predates Sumeria, which occurred at least 10,000 years ago. I think this lost civilization likely stretched from India to Indonesia. I think some of them went to the Middle East. I believe the inhabitants are the present day Ainu and Polynesian people.


21 posted on 01/22/2006 4:54:01 PM PST by Ptarmigan (Proud bunny hater and killer)
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Flints give Cyprus oldest seafaring link in Med
Reuters Today | Tue Nov 22, 2005 | Michele Kambas
Posted on 11/22/2005 9:35:31 AM PST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1526810/posts

Ancient Furnace Sparks Archaeological Interest
Cypress Weekly | 1-22-2006
Posted on 01/22/2006 3:32:36 PM PST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1562921/posts


22 posted on 01/22/2006 6:29:13 PM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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To: R. Scott; Ptarmigan
R. Scott: This would indicate to me that it is not "the world's oldest temple", just the oldest we have found so far.
Well put.
Ptarmigan: Cool finding! I always think there is a lost civilization that predates Sumeria, which occurred at least 10,000 years ago. I think this lost civilization likely stretched from India to Indonesia. I think some of them went to the Middle East. I believe the inhabitants are the present day Ainu and Polynesian people.
I agree and disagree. I'd agree that there were civilizations which predate Sumeria, but I very much doubt that there was just one coherent civilization stretching across the Earth.
23 posted on 01/22/2006 6:32:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
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24 posted on 04/05/2006 11:54:56 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
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Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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25 posted on 12/31/2007 7:39:28 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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Did we plough up the Garden of Eden?
First Post | October 17, 2006
Posted on 10/17/2006 9:10:35 AM EDT by NYer
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1720793/posts

Is this the world’s oldest statue? [Anatolia, Gobekli Tepe]
The First Post | November 24, 2006 | Sean Thomas
Posted on 11/26/2007 12:01:06 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1930666/posts


26 posted on 12/31/2007 9:18:20 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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Gobekli (image search)
Google

27 posted on 12/31/2007 9:44:32 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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