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CSIC recovers part of the genome of 2 hunter-gatherer individuals from 7,000 years ago
Eurekalert ^ | Thursday, June 28, 2012 | Spanish National Research Council

Posted on 06/30/2012 5:31:29 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

A team of scientists, led by researcher Carles Lalueza-Fox from CSIC (Spanish National Research Council), has recovered -- for the first time in history -- part of the genome of two individuals living in the Mesolithic Period, 7000 years ago. Remains have been found at La Braña-Arintero site, located at Valdelugueros (León), Spain. The study results, published in the Current Biology magazine, indicate that current Iberian populations don't come from these groups genetically.

The Mesolithic Period, framed between the Paleolithic and Neolithic Periods, is characterized by the advent of agriculture, coming from the Middle East. Therefore, the genome found is the oldest from Prehistory, and exceeds Ötzi, the Iceman, in 1700 years.

Researchers have also recovered the complete mitochondrial DNA of one of these individuals, through which they could determine that European populations from Mesolithic Period were very uniform genetically. Carles Lauleza-Fox, from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF), states: "These hunters-gatherers shared nomadic habits and had a common origin. Despite their geographical distance, individuals from the regions corresponding to the current England, Germany, Lithuania, Poland, and Spain, shared the same mitochondrial lineage".

The DNA data, which represent the 1.34% and the 0.5% of both individuals total genome, show that they are not directly connected to current populations of the Iberian Peninsula. Iberians from the Mesolithic Period were closer to current populations of northern Europe, who could have assimilated part of the genetic legacy of these hunters-gatherers.

(Excerpt) Read more at eurekalert.org ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble
This is a reconstruction of individual Braña-1, whose skeleton was almost complete and in good condition. [ credit: Alberto Tapia ]

CSIC recovers part of the genome of 2 hunter-gatherer individuals from 7,000 years ago

1 posted on 06/30/2012 5:31:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 06/30/2012 5:33:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://unileon.academia.edu/NatiFuertes/Papers/953230/LOS_HOMBRES_MESOLITICOS_DE_LA_BRANA-ARINTERO_VALDELUGUEROS_LEON_UN_HALLAZGO_FUNERARIO_EXCEPCIONAL_EN_LA_VERTIENTE_MERIDIONAL_DE_LA_CORDILLERA_CANTABRICA


3 posted on 06/30/2012 5:36:17 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: All

If Obama had a Hunter-Gatherer as a son, he would have looked like.....


4 posted on 06/30/2012 5:37:27 PM PDT by Klemper
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To: Klemper

If Obama had a father he would look like...


5 posted on 06/30/2012 5:39:06 PM PDT by null and void (Day 1257 of our ObamaVacation from reality - Heroes aren't made Frank, they're cornered...)
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To: Paladin2

Thanks.


6 posted on 06/30/2012 5:43:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: AdmSmith; agrace; AnalogReigns; Cacique; caryatid; Celtjew Libertarian; CobaltBlue; ...
Genetic
Genealogy
>> PING <<
Send FReepmail if you want on/off GGP list
Marty = Paternal Haplogroup O(2?)(M175)
Maternal Haplogroup H
GG LINKS:
African Ancestry
DNAPrint Genomics
FamilyTree DNA
GeneTree
Int'l Society of Genetic Genealogy
mitosearch
Nat'l Geographic Genographic Project
Oxford Ancestors
RelativeGenetics
Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation
Trace Genetics
ybase
ysearch
The List of Ping Lists

7 posted on 06/30/2012 5:44:06 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: SunkenCiv

If longevity of a group is what you’re looking for, check out Basque history and bloodlines. Their language is unique and ancient. They have a blood condition that... read up on them, very interesting!


8 posted on 06/30/2012 5:52:20 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush

Thanks gorush.

"Basques have the world's highest frequency of type O and RH negative blood" it sez here, and from some other page, the table below shows the PreColumbian tribe descendants in the Americas and Basques' RH(D) negative. PreColumbian descendants are 99%+ type O, unless there has been intermarriage with European descendants, lots of A there.
Population Rh(D) Neg Rh(D) Pos Rh(D) Neg alleles
Basque people 21-36%[13] 65% approx 60%
Native Americans approx 1% 99% approx 10%
America B.C.
by Barry Fell
(1976)
find it in a nearby library
A fascinating letter I received from a Shoshone Indian who had been traveling in the Basque country of Spain tells of his recognition of Shoshone words over there, including his own name, whose Shoshone meaning proved to match the meaning attached to a similar word by the modern Basques. Unfortunately I mislaid this interesting letter. If the Shoshone scholar who wrote to me should chance to see these words I hope he will forgive me and contact me again. The modern Basque settlers of Idaho may perhaps bring forth a linguist to investigate matters raised in this chapter. [p 173]
Given the lack of a writing system (the only pre-Roman inscriptions in Iberia are, in order, Greek, and distantly behind that are some Phoenician, so-called Tartessian, and various Celtic oghams) or surviving inscriptions, I've never seen any real evidence (plenty of chimerical stuff on the web though) that the Basques were in Iberia prior to the Romans.


9 posted on 06/30/2012 6:48:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: gorush

Aren’t Basques related to the Finns and Hungarians?


10 posted on 06/30/2012 7:48:09 PM PDT by kenavi (Obama doesn't hate private equity. He wants to be it with our money.)
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To: kenavi

From the limited reading I’ve done I’d answer no to that.


11 posted on 06/30/2012 8:15:33 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: SunkenCiv

The Green Bay Packers need this type on their Defensive Line! Dee-Fence Dee-Fence! Go Pack Go!


12 posted on 06/30/2012 8:32:31 PM PDT by TaMoDee ( Lassez les bons temps rouler dans les 2012! Allez Pack!)
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To: gorush

On their wedding day, what does a Basque give to his wife that is long and hard?

His last name.


13 posted on 06/30/2012 8:35:38 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: SunkenCiv; All

I know that you are not fond of Huff Post, but I think this story is completely apolitical and might have other interesting details.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/28/cavemen-bones-dna-humans_n_1636289.html?utm_hp_ref=science&ncid=webmail2


14 posted on 06/30/2012 11:55:56 PM PDT by gleeaikin
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To: TaMoDee

Looks like they’ve dug up Uncle Gomez...


15 posted on 07/01/2012 5:14:32 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: SunkenCiv

Perhaps they have common ancestry through the Solutrean Culture.


16 posted on 07/04/2012 12:40:02 AM PDT by happygrl
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To: happygrl

:’) Someday we may know.


17 posted on 07/04/2012 4:49:19 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: gleeaikin

Thanks, skipping HuffPo, here’s the original source:

Cavemen Bones Yield Oldest Modern Human DNA
Charles Choi, LiveScience Contributor
Date: 28 June 2012 Time: 12:01 PM ET
http://www.livescience.com/21246-cavemen-bones-oldest-human-dna.html


18 posted on 07/04/2012 4:52:25 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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