Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

'Pillaging' Vikings unmasked as eco warriors
Yorkshire Post ^ | 02 Dec 2009 | Paul Jeeves

Posted on 12/03/2009 7:58:22 AM PST by BGHater

THEIR reputation for raping and pillaging may not have set them out as the ideal role-models for an environmentally-friendly way of life. But it seems that lessons could perhaps be learnt from the Vikings after the intriguing discovery in Yorkshire of what is believed to be a metal recycling centre dating back to the 11th century.

Historians and metal detector enthusiasts have made the find which is being heralded as evidence of how the Norse invaders recycled their fearsome array of weapons.

Hundreds of pieces of metal including arrowheads, shards of swords and axe heads have been unearthed as part of a 10-year research project to establish the exact location of the Battle of Fulford which took place on September 20, 1066.

The battle on the outskirts of York, when the invading Viking army, led by Harald Hardrada, triumphed over the English forces, is seen as crucial in the run-up to the Battle of Hastings and William the Conqueror ultimately being crowned King of England.

Historians have attempted to pinpoint the location of the battlefield as campaigners tried to halt a new development of 720 homes at Fulford.

Now more than 1,000 pieces of metal have been unearthed by members of the York Metal Detectorists Club, who have been helping to gather evidence during the decade-long study.

X-rays of the finds are being taken at York University's archaeology department at King's Manor in an attempt to glean more information about their history and prove the location of the battle.

Historian Chas Jones, who has been leading the research, said: "We found several smithing hearth bottoms – the remains of the molten metal which dribbles down during the reprocessing of weaponry ironwork.

"You could say this was one of the first metal recycling centres."

The plans for the 720-home Germany Beck scheme sparked opposition from academics and historians, who have claimed that the development could actually be built on the site of the Battle of Fulford.

But the developers remain adamant that the land is not where the battle took place, and have carried out their own archaeological studies of the site.

Following a public inquiry, ministers ruled that there was insufficient evidence the Germany Beck site was the location, although they admitted that archaeological finds unearthed there were of "regional importance".

Academics specialising in Viking history from as far away as Sweden and Norway voiced their opposition to the Government after the housing scheme was given outline planning permission two years ago.

The archaeological digs have been co-ordinated by the Fulford Battlefield Society, which was established nine years ago to investigate the site.

A series of finds which have been unearthed include fragments of what could be 11th century swords and arrows. Other pieces of worked metal have also been discovered, suggesting that Norse blacksmiths could have been operating there.

According to Mr Jones, the iron finds support the theory that metal had been gathered and recycled in an area close to where the battle took place once the fighting had ceased.

Archaeological experts believe the metal artefacts discovered at Fulford were being refined and recycled by the Norse victors when the Battle of Stamford took place on the border of North and East Yorkshire just five days later.

The Fulford site was abandoned by the Vikings as they switched their attention to Stamford Bridge, explaining why so much material has been left behind.

A full report on the 10-year research project into the Battle of Fulford is due to be published in February.

BATTLE CHANGED COURSE OF HISTORY

The Battle of Fulford has often been dismissed as no more than a curtain-raiser to the most famous conflict on English soil.

But historians have emphasised the events of Wednesday, September 20, 1066, on the outskirts of York were to have a huge impact on the Battle of Hastings.

The Battle of Fulford placed the English forces under immense pressure and losses suffered in Yorkshire were to have a dramatic impact on resistance at Hastings.

After sailing up the Ouse with about 10,000 men in 300 longships, Harald Hardrada and rebel English earl, Tostig, defeated the earls Edwin and Morcar.

Harold scraped together a scratch force and raced 180 miles north in just four days to rout the Norwegian army outside York at Stamford Bridge on September 25.

Then on October 14, Harold was defeated as he tried to block the Norman advance at Hastings with an army of little more than 5,000 weary troops.


FIGHTING CHANCE: Historian Chas Jones studies an axe head at York University’s archaeology department


REMNANTS OF WAR: Chas Jones with some of the artefacts from the Battle of Fulford. More than 1,000 ferrous finds have been collected.


Tiny anvils that were driven into logs to help with the repair of weapons after the Battle of Fulford in 1066.


A tanged arrowhead.


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: england; godsgravesglyphs; history; iron; metal; science; vikings
Seems obvious that a expeditionary force would reuse broken weapons, etc. Hard to believe this is a first.
1 posted on 12/03/2009 7:58:24 AM PST by BGHater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Green warriors, ping.


2 posted on 12/03/2009 7:58:55 AM PST by BGHater (America is a Kakistocracy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

>Seems obvious that a expeditionary force would reuse broken weapons, etc. Hard to believe this is a first.

That is true; for an expeditionary force you would want to be as self-sufficient as possible so as to maximize the length of time of the expedition.


3 posted on 12/03/2009 8:04:07 AM PST by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

Another example of bias in science.

Any practical observer would note that the remains were damaged weapons being melted down to MAKE NEW WEAPONS.

What kind of moron with a first grade education could consider this to be a recycling plant for concerned environmentalist whackos.

I want proof; i.e. where did they process paper, plastic and asbestos waste.


4 posted on 12/03/2009 8:06:15 AM PST by sodpoodle (Stop wasting our wealth and start telling the truth.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

We have a giant smelter in Holt, Alabama near Tuscaloosa. It can melt down metals for reuse but the Greens like it closed because it seems that those furnaces produce a bit of air pollution.

So I guess these Vikings were polluters too.


5 posted on 12/03/2009 8:06:39 AM PST by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
“Seems obvious that a expeditionary force would reuse broken weapons, etc. Hard to believe this is a first.”

To go one step further, when you consider how difficult it was in pre-industrial days to even get metal mined (every bit being extracted by human muscle power) smelted (ditto) and made into an implement (again, all by individual efforts) you would have to be crazy *not* to recycle as much as you could. Although that recycling would involve charcoal fires (very messy) and not a lot of environmental restoration of the area afterward (because zero-environment-impact anything had do be done by hand in a subsistance-level economy).

6 posted on 12/03/2009 8:06:57 AM PST by No Truce With Kings (The opinions expressed are mine! Mine! MINE! All Mine!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

Say it ain't so, Brett.

7 posted on 12/03/2009 8:08:12 AM PST by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

It is hardly noteworthy that metal weapons were recycled or refashioned into other useful tools. It was common for used or useless metal to be melted into musket-balls during the Revolutionary War. Swordsmiths and gunsmiths reused parts and remelted metal all the time. This is not a particularly unique scenario.

Maybe environmentalists aren’t the people to ask about the realtities of ancient warfare.

SnakeDoc


8 posted on 12/03/2009 8:08:56 AM PST by SnakeDoctor ("Talk low, talk slow, and don't say too much." -- John Wayne)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
This is incredible news!!! I propose we change the name of Columbus Day to Leif Erickson Day to honor the World's First Eco Warriors...
9 posted on 12/03/2009 8:09:36 AM PST by Dixie Yooper (Ephesians 6:11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
On the other hand, today we have Vikings posing as eco-warriors.
10 posted on 12/03/2009 8:09:50 AM PST by caveat emptor
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

Gee... Warriors gathered up expensive loot from the battlefield. Metal at the time was worth a great deal. To make this into some kind of ecological lesson is well... nuts.


11 posted on 12/03/2009 8:15:11 AM PST by marktwain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
"You could say this was one of the first metal recycling centres."

You could also say that this is where they piled their dead enemey's weapons after a battle and just forgot about them.

You could say this is where Bug Bunny and Elmer Fudd left their weapons after filming the "Kill the Wabbit" cartoon.

Mostly BS and conjecture to fit a pre-detirmined conclusion.

12 posted on 12/03/2009 8:18:12 AM PST by GoldenPup
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

The vikings obviously didn’t produce enough CO2 to prevent their villages in Greenland from being overrun with ice.....

A fat lot of good “being green” did for them....


13 posted on 12/03/2009 8:21:53 AM PST by GraceG
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

If we put all these broken axes into a mail truck and drive to Michigan, it just might pencil out...

Somehow, I don’t think they were trying to ‘save the planet’...its just an indication of how precious metals were before mechanized mining.


14 posted on 12/03/2009 8:37:01 AM PST by lacrew (The 274th trimester is a very late procedure)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

I seriously doubt that the 11th century was the first time that scrap metal was melted down and re-used.


15 posted on 12/03/2009 8:43:33 AM PST by eclecticEel (The Most High rules in the kingdom of men ... and sets over it the basest of men.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
The most recent recycling of weapons by a viking


16 posted on 12/03/2009 9:52:32 AM PST by xp38 (Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks BGHater. They also introduced interior decorating, tutoring for slow learners, and glee clubs. [expletives follow]

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


17 posted on 12/03/2009 7:05:02 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
Why wouldn't ancient civilizations recycle their metals. When you consider how hard it is to mine the ores, and how far you had to go to get some of the alloying elements, it only makes sense.
18 posted on 12/03/2009 7:27:10 PM PST by Tallguy ("The sh- t's chess, it ain't checkers!" -- Alonzo (Denzel Washington) in "Training Day")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater; SunkenCiv; All
Historians and metal detector enthusiasts have made the find which is being heralded as evidence of how the Norse invaders recycled their fearsome array of weapons.

Oh! Good Grief! Gimme A Break!

(Please allow me to make a slight "correction")

Historians and metal detector enthusiasts have made the find which is being heralded as evidence of how the Norse invaders recycled REPAIRED their fearsome array of weapons.

There!
Fixed It!

Greenie Idiots! "Recycled"! Yeah! Right! My @ss!

19 posted on 12/03/2009 8:32:24 PM PST by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
Hundreds of pieces of metal including arrowheads, shards of swords and axe heads have been unearthed

These early eco-warriors sure left a lot of trash lying around... /irony

20 posted on 12/04/2009 1:21:26 AM PST by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater
Of course they recycled metal, so did every other army that used metal weapons at the time, they didn't do it to be "eco friendly" but because it was easier and cheaper to recycle broken weapons than to mine new metal, especially with the mining techniques and the cost of transporting ore and finished metal in that time period.

These people are desperate to make our current civilization seem like the greedy plunderers when compared to past times, it just isn't true.

21 posted on 12/04/2009 1:41:36 AM PST by calex59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BGHater

180 miles in 4 days. thats a heck of a forced march.


22 posted on 12/04/2009 3:33:47 AM PST by beebuster2000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

next thing you know they will be telling us that the Vikings we led into this battle by Algor the Red.


23 posted on 12/04/2009 3:45:54 AM PST by Einherjar (PEACE THROUGH SUPERIOR FIREPOWER)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: BGHater; SunkenCiv
Of course they recycled, metal was expensive and relatively scarce compared to today.

Next thing you know they'll claim the Vikings only slaughtered their opponents to fight overpopulation.

24 posted on 12/04/2009 11:12:06 AM PST by colorado tanker (What's it all about, Barrrrry? Is it just for the power, you live?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fiddlstix; colorado tanker

/bingo


25 posted on 12/04/2009 12:34:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson